EpiStressNet: A biosocial systems approach to understanding the epigenetic embedding of social stress responses.

Lead Research Organisation: University of Sheffield
Department Name: Biomedical Science

Abstract

The social environments in which we live provide daily challenges that affect how we think and feel, influencing our behaviour and sense of well-being. However, it is far from clear exactly how these experiences affect us at a physical level. Recent research in biology has discovered molecules that are found in all of our cells, which interpret our experiences by switching genes on or off in particular cell types. These molecules, or "epigenetic" mechanisms, bind to DNA and control gene activity, which in turn change the functions of our cells, tissues and organs, and so affect what we think, feel and do. We are beginning to understand that these epigenetic mechanisms are modified by factors that also affect our health, and recent evidence indicates that social stress is one such factor. Societies in which there is a bigger gap between rich and poor, such as the UK, also have bigger, more stressful social and health inequalities. Good evidence suggests that the social stress caused by social inequality leads to ill-health and that this link may involve epigenetic mechanisms. This project aims to build a network of biological and social scientists to explore how social stress causes epigenetic changes which affect biology and behaviour. To address this problem, we will establish a team with wide-ranging expertise in investigating (a) the physical effects of stress on gene activity in the brain and the body, (b) the impacts of social inequality on health, and (c) how we think about the way our experiences get under our skin to shape behaviour and well-being. This team of social science, public health and biology researchers, will develop and carry out novel shared projects. We will hold discussion meetings to consider new biological and sociological ideas together, and share new discoveries that will help to explain how social stresses exert their effects on the brain and the rest of the body, and the roles of epigenetics in these processes. We will also meet with industrial, government and health service professionals, to consider the potential impacts of our research for their work, and engage with the general public more broadly to discuss the wider implications of this research for society.

Planned Impact

Social and Economic Benefits: the huge costs of inequality to good social relations, health, educational attainment and social mobility are well-known. It is less well-understood how best to develop solutions to these problems that will produce measurable, durable improvements. Understanding the biosocial mechanisms that mediate the effects of inequality will help to develop an evidence-base that will be useful in formulating solutions and monitoring their effectiveness. Better knowledge about how social stressors erode health and well-being through modification of epigenetic processes will offer opportunities to create a knowledge-base and toolkit for preventing, ameliorating and/or potentially reversing risks to health. Biotechnology companies with an interest in developing such technologies would directly benefit from the new knowledge produced by this project. The new knowledge would also then be useful to government agencies and health services to either reduce the prevalence of risk factors in the social environment or introduce new experiences that enrich social and environmental quality and offset existing risks. The activities and outputs of the network will therefore be of benefit to government agencies, health services, as well as news media, charities and civil society groups concerned with the adverse social impacts of economic inequality, and the search for social policies that could ameliorate the disadvantages conferred by deprivation. There is extensive evidence showing that gradients of inequality and their corrosive effects on societal and individual well-being are increasing. Better public understanding of the consequences of policy choices for social and health inequalities, together with an appreciation of the evidence base about how social causes produce social consequences via changes to biological processes, will benefit democratically-empowered citizenries wanting to understand the facts of inequality, debate the policy alternatives and collectively determine their future social directions. Thus, in addition to engaging with the types of organizations described above, it will be imperative to engage with the general public to disseminate new knowledge about the types of social stresses that epigenetically embed risks to ill-health, and debate the policy options for achieving behaviour change at the individual and societal levels that could alter the long-term risks of ill-health over the life-course.

Building new capacity for interdisciplinary biosocial research: the broad aim of the proposal is to understand the biological mechanisms through which the social stressors that are characteristic drivers of social inequality become biologically embedded and contribute to health inequalities. We will create an interdisciplinary network with strengths in the analysis of biological mechanisms using both model organisms and human population studies, together with social science expertise in instrumental, empirical evidence-based analysis, and strengths in conceptualization of social phenomena and consideration of their implications for public policy. The network will build capacity for biosocial systems analysis by integrating this wide range of specialist expertise, and involve ECRs in all activities to develop the next generation of interdisciplinary researchers. The research network will carry out small-scale pilot studies and hold interdisciplinary workshops, to test hypotheses and develop new interdisciplinary strategies for understanding how social stress responses become epigenetically embedded. Through facilitating the convergence of relevant biological and social science disciplines, the network will enhance UK capacity to develop a robust evidence-base for effective policy responses to social and health inequalities. We will promote the impact of the network's wide range of capabilities in these areas through a series of Impact Workshops and a programme of Public Engagement activities.

Publications

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Cunliffe VT (2016) Histone modifications in zebrafish development. in Methods in cell biology

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Cunliffe VT (2015) Experience-sensitive epigenetic mechanisms, developmental plasticity, and the biological embedding of chronic disease risk. in Wiley interdisciplinary reviews. Systems biology and medicine

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Lehane DB (2018) Epigenetics and primary care. in The British journal of general practice : the journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners

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Vineis P (2017) Epigenetic memory in response to environmental stressors. in FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

 
Description 1. Development of the zebrafish as a model system for elucidating the epigenetic responses to neuroendocrine stress.
Dysregulation of the Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) Axis is a characteristic feature of the pathophysiology of depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which result from chronic or extreme exposures to psychosocial stressors. A zebrafish mutant lacking Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR) function exhibits profound behavioural and endocrine abnormalities caused by chronic, persistent HPA axis dysregulation. To identify the glucocorticoid-sensitive methylation signature within the brain methylome, we performed a comparative analysis of wild-type and GR mutant adult brain samples using Whole Genome Bisulfite Sequencing (WGBS). Of the 249 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) identified, one high-ranking DMR was located within fkbp5, a known negative feedback regulator and direct transcriptional target of GR, whose epigenomic dysregulation was previously implicated in human PTSD. We also found that another high-ranking GR-DMR is located within a neuron-specific gene implicated in neuronal signalling, suggesting this DMR is a novel node within a signalling network integrating synaptic and neuroendocrine inputs. Both DMRs are established during development and exhibit dynamic glucocorticoid-sensitive regulation across the lifecourse. A manuscript describing these and related findings is in preparation and will be submitted for publication soon..
We also investigated the long-term social behaviour and endocrine consequences of maintaining a minority of wild-type fish alongside a majority of mutant fish exhibiting genetically determined aggressive behaviour towards shoalmates. The chronic exposure of wild-type fish to these aggressive conspecifics did not appreciably affect their social behaviour or endogenous cortisol levels, and consequently no epigenomic analysis of these fish was performed.

2. Evaluation of candidate human epigenomic targets of social stress in a human cohort with a steep gradient of social inequality.
DNA methylation in the vicinity of the human genes FKBP5 (a known GR target described above) and NR3C1 (encoding GR itself) was analysed in DNA samples taken from members of the West of Scotland Twenty-07 cohort with high or low Socio-Economic Positions (SEP), to assess whether SEP was associated with differential methylation of these known targets of HPA axis dysregulation. No robust associations were identified, but the preliminary findings suggest that further analysis of these genes in this cohort may be fruitful.

3. Establishment of a vibrant and growing interdisciplinary research network. The initial network comprised 16 researchers and over the period of the award three Research Meetings and one Impact Workshop were held, involving a total of over 60 participants.
In addition to reviewing pilot research progress, participants discussed many new project ideas, contributed innovative critical thinking, and communicated both enthusiasm and reservations about epigenetics research and its impacts. Recurring themes included (a) the validity and usefulness of applying knowledge of epigenetics to monitor social stress responses in humans, when basic biological understanding of mechanisms remains so limited and (b) the risks of epigenetics and other biomarker research leading to biomedical interpretations of social problems that could crowd out other forms of research, and also challenge the disciplinary practices and traditions of social work that have broad acceptance and have proven successful.

Non-specialist audience: we have identified regions of the genome whose activity in the zebrafish brain is regulated by the stress hormone cortisol. This activity has a molecular signature that seems to be sensitive to stress hormones throughout the life course. We think that these sequences are a "signature" of stress in the brain and that similar signatures may exist in humans, particularly people exposed to high levels of social and behavioural stress, and that these changes could affect their thoughts, feelings and behaviour.
Exploitation Route The zebrafish research has identified important, novel downstream mediators of glucocorticoid signalling. The PI is senior author of a manuscript describing the key results and will be PI on a grant application to BBSRC in 2019. Our research plans are to identify the epigenetic mechanisms involved in the integration of synaptic and neuroendocrine signalling and elucidate their impacts on brain development and behaviour. FKBP5 is a known drug target and our findings may also have applications in pharmaceutical research.
An enduring concern has been to consider how our zebrafish research might help to understand how chronic psychosocial stress affects human behaviour and engenders susceptibility to chronic illnesses. Further collaborations with EpiStressNet colleagues could investigate human orthologues of identified zebrafish genes. The PI intends to continue collaborating with Paul Martin and Sue White to critically engage with epigenetics. We will prioritise assessing the ethical and social policy implications that flow from distinct conceptual framings of epigenetics discourses. In particular, we will scrutinise the Adverse Childhood Events (ACE) agenda, and the interactions between epigenetics and other biomarker research with prevention science and its policy translations. A social science-led research grant application on this topic involving network members is planned for 2019.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Healthcare,Pharmaceuticals and Medical Biotechnology

URL https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/epistressnet/home
 
Description In June 2018, an Impact Workshop funded by this award was held at De Morgan House. London, to which many non-academic stakeholders were invited to review recent progress in epigenetics and discuss the potential societal implications. Non-academic participants from Age UK, the Nuffield Council on Bioethics, and the Lankelly Chase Foundation accepted the invitation and participated in these discussions. The main recurring themes of the workshop were (a) the validity and usefulness of applying knowledge of epigenetics to monitor social stress responses in humans, when basic biological understanding of mechanisms remains so limited and (b) the risks of epigenetics and other biomarker research leading to biomedical interpretations of social problems that could crowd out other forms of research, and also challenge the disciplinary practices and traditions of social work that have broad acceptance and have proven successful. Since this impact workshop was held, I have been invited to participate in another impact event convened by staff at the Nuffield Council on Bioethics, which will take place in April 2019, in London. The focus of the workshop will be to consider: (a) What is known about the potential of various environmental, behavioural and social factors to affect or cause epigenetic changes in humans? (b) How might these changes affect individuals and future generations? (c) How could epigenetic information be used to understand and prevent human disease, to inform social and health policy, or in other areas of public life such as education and the courts? (d) Is the potential for epigenetic research to be used in policy making and other areas being overhyped? These details of the proposed workshop indicate that epigenetics remains an important research area with potentially wide-ranging impacts on non-academic stakeholders, who are now beginning to engage with the potentially salient issues.
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy
Impact Types Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description Medical Research Council Discovery Medicine North Doctoral Training Partnership
Amount £84,000 (GBP)
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2016 
End 03/2020
 
Description EpiStressNet Final research meeting 22-23 March 2018, Sheffield UK. 
Organisation University of Glasgow
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This was the final research meeting of the network, jointly co-organised with Professor Paul Martin (Sociological Studies, University of Sheffield) and Professor Paul Shiels (University of Glasgow) to review progress of my group's pilot studies funded by the grant against the initial objectives and in addition to review the ongoing research of network members and invited speakers.
Collaborator Contribution Paul Martin and Paul Shiels, along wth many other network members, gave summaries of their current research. Professor Martin gave a talk that argued for reconciling where possible and agreeing to differ where necessary in the use of plastic terms such as "stress". Professor Martin's colleague Dr Bartlett gave an overview of some of the preliminary findings made in the Leverhulme-funded project on Epigenetics (where I am a co-Investigator), where an ethnographic study of the epigenetics research community has been carried out. Professor Shiels gave a short talk on some of the collaborative research he has undertaken with a member of my research group on epigenetic biomarker analysis in the West of Scotland 20-07 cohort.
Impact Meetings such as the ones described above, and research activities as described above.
Start Year 2015
 
Description EpiStressNet Glasgow mid-project Research Meeting 
Organisation University of Glasgow
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I co-organised the mid-term research review and discussion meeting for the EpiStressNet network, held at the University of Glasgow and hosted by Professor Paul Shiels on 1 and 2 December 2016.
Collaborator Contribution A series of structured research discussion and presentations were delivered over the course of 2 days.
Impact Grant applications submitted: 1. Wellcome Trust Seed Award in Science. Principal Applicant:Dr David Lehane, University of Sheffield. Co-Applicant, Dr Vincent Cunliffe, University of Sheffield. Title:Linking the stress of migration to TB reactivation: feasibility of a combined psycho-social and molecular mechanism study within deprived and immigrant communities.
Start Year 2015
 
Description EpiStressNet research network - Kick-Off Meeting 
Organisation Beatson Institute for Cancer Research
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution I am the Principal Investigator on the grant that is funding the EpiStressNet network activities. A PDRA in my lab, Dr Helen Eachus, is carrying out some important pilot studies to validate come of the key concepts underpinning EpiStressNet. The Network Co-ordinator, John Paul Ashton, is also a member of my research team. I organised the inaugural Kick-Off meeting of the EpiStressNet research network, attended by members of my research team, including the Network Co-Ordinator, John Paul Ashton, who helped me to organise the meeting. The meeting was held in Sheffield on 3 March 2016. I will continue in this role for the duration of EpiStressNet's existence.
Collaborator Contribution Network members participated in the meeting by providing talks and contributing to discussions.
Impact The EpiStressNet inaugural research meeting was held on 3 March 2016, in Sheffield. I organised the meeting, which was attended by 20 researchers, most of whom are existing members of EpiStressNet, as well as a small number of invited speakers and other participants with relevant interests, whom I have recruited to the network since it was first established.
Start Year 2015
 
Description EpiStressNet research network - Kick-Off Meeting 
Organisation Imperial College London
Department Faculty of Medicine
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I am the Principal Investigator on the grant that is funding the EpiStressNet network activities. A PDRA in my lab, Dr Helen Eachus, is carrying out some important pilot studies to validate come of the key concepts underpinning EpiStressNet. The Network Co-ordinator, John Paul Ashton, is also a member of my research team. I organised the inaugural Kick-Off meeting of the EpiStressNet research network, attended by members of my research team, including the Network Co-Ordinator, John Paul Ashton, who helped me to organise the meeting. The meeting was held in Sheffield on 3 March 2016. I will continue in this role for the duration of EpiStressNet's existence.
Collaborator Contribution Network members participated in the meeting by providing talks and contributing to discussions.
Impact The EpiStressNet inaugural research meeting was held on 3 March 2016, in Sheffield. I organised the meeting, which was attended by 20 researchers, most of whom are existing members of EpiStressNet, as well as a small number of invited speakers and other participants with relevant interests, whom I have recruited to the network since it was first established.
Start Year 2015
 
Description EpiStressNet research network - Kick-Off Meeting 
Organisation Imperial College London
Department School of Public Health
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I am the Principal Investigator on the grant that is funding the EpiStressNet network activities. A PDRA in my lab, Dr Helen Eachus, is carrying out some important pilot studies to validate come of the key concepts underpinning EpiStressNet. The Network Co-ordinator, John Paul Ashton, is also a member of my research team. I organised the inaugural Kick-Off meeting of the EpiStressNet research network, attended by members of my research team, including the Network Co-Ordinator, John Paul Ashton, who helped me to organise the meeting. The meeting was held in Sheffield on 3 March 2016. I will continue in this role for the duration of EpiStressNet's existence.
Collaborator Contribution Network members participated in the meeting by providing talks and contributing to discussions.
Impact The EpiStressNet inaugural research meeting was held on 3 March 2016, in Sheffield. I organised the meeting, which was attended by 20 researchers, most of whom are existing members of EpiStressNet, as well as a small number of invited speakers and other participants with relevant interests, whom I have recruited to the network since it was first established.
Start Year 2015
 
Description EpiStressNet research network - Kick-Off Meeting 
Organisation Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz
Country Germany 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I am the Principal Investigator on the grant that is funding the EpiStressNet network activities. A PDRA in my lab, Dr Helen Eachus, is carrying out some important pilot studies to validate come of the key concepts underpinning EpiStressNet. The Network Co-ordinator, John Paul Ashton, is also a member of my research team. I organised the inaugural Kick-Off meeting of the EpiStressNet research network, attended by members of my research team, including the Network Co-Ordinator, John Paul Ashton, who helped me to organise the meeting. The meeting was held in Sheffield on 3 March 2016. I will continue in this role for the duration of EpiStressNet's existence.
Collaborator Contribution Network members participated in the meeting by providing talks and contributing to discussions.
Impact The EpiStressNet inaugural research meeting was held on 3 March 2016, in Sheffield. I organised the meeting, which was attended by 20 researchers, most of whom are existing members of EpiStressNet, as well as a small number of invited speakers and other participants with relevant interests, whom I have recruited to the network since it was first established.
Start Year 2015
 
Description EpiStressNet research network - Kick-Off Meeting 
Organisation Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV)
Department Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine
Country Switzerland 
Sector Hospitals 
PI Contribution I am the Principal Investigator on the grant that is funding the EpiStressNet network activities. A PDRA in my lab, Dr Helen Eachus, is carrying out some important pilot studies to validate come of the key concepts underpinning EpiStressNet. The Network Co-ordinator, John Paul Ashton, is also a member of my research team. I organised the inaugural Kick-Off meeting of the EpiStressNet research network, attended by members of my research team, including the Network Co-Ordinator, John Paul Ashton, who helped me to organise the meeting. The meeting was held in Sheffield on 3 March 2016. I will continue in this role for the duration of EpiStressNet's existence.
Collaborator Contribution Network members participated in the meeting by providing talks and contributing to discussions.
Impact The EpiStressNet inaugural research meeting was held on 3 March 2016, in Sheffield. I organised the meeting, which was attended by 20 researchers, most of whom are existing members of EpiStressNet, as well as a small number of invited speakers and other participants with relevant interests, whom I have recruited to the network since it was first established.
Start Year 2015
 
Description EpiStressNet research network - Kick-Off Meeting 
Organisation Sheffield Children's Hospital
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Hospitals 
PI Contribution I am the Principal Investigator on the grant that is funding the EpiStressNet network activities. A PDRA in my lab, Dr Helen Eachus, is carrying out some important pilot studies to validate come of the key concepts underpinning EpiStressNet. The Network Co-ordinator, John Paul Ashton, is also a member of my research team. I organised the inaugural Kick-Off meeting of the EpiStressNet research network, attended by members of my research team, including the Network Co-Ordinator, John Paul Ashton, who helped me to organise the meeting. The meeting was held in Sheffield on 3 March 2016. I will continue in this role for the duration of EpiStressNet's existence.
Collaborator Contribution Network members participated in the meeting by providing talks and contributing to discussions.
Impact The EpiStressNet inaugural research meeting was held on 3 March 2016, in Sheffield. I organised the meeting, which was attended by 20 researchers, most of whom are existing members of EpiStressNet, as well as a small number of invited speakers and other participants with relevant interests, whom I have recruited to the network since it was first established.
Start Year 2015
 
Description EpiStressNet research network - Kick-Off Meeting 
Organisation University of Glasgow
Department College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I am the Principal Investigator on the grant that is funding the EpiStressNet network activities. A PDRA in my lab, Dr Helen Eachus, is carrying out some important pilot studies to validate come of the key concepts underpinning EpiStressNet. The Network Co-ordinator, John Paul Ashton, is also a member of my research team. I organised the inaugural Kick-Off meeting of the EpiStressNet research network, attended by members of my research team, including the Network Co-Ordinator, John Paul Ashton, who helped me to organise the meeting. The meeting was held in Sheffield on 3 March 2016. I will continue in this role for the duration of EpiStressNet's existence.
Collaborator Contribution Network members participated in the meeting by providing talks and contributing to discussions.
Impact The EpiStressNet inaugural research meeting was held on 3 March 2016, in Sheffield. I organised the meeting, which was attended by 20 researchers, most of whom are existing members of EpiStressNet, as well as a small number of invited speakers and other participants with relevant interests, whom I have recruited to the network since it was first established.
Start Year 2015
 
Description EpiStressNet research network - Kick-Off Meeting 
Organisation University of Leicester
Department School of Biology
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I am the Principal Investigator on the grant that is funding the EpiStressNet network activities. A PDRA in my lab, Dr Helen Eachus, is carrying out some important pilot studies to validate come of the key concepts underpinning EpiStressNet. The Network Co-ordinator, John Paul Ashton, is also a member of my research team. I organised the inaugural Kick-Off meeting of the EpiStressNet research network, attended by members of my research team, including the Network Co-Ordinator, John Paul Ashton, who helped me to organise the meeting. The meeting was held in Sheffield on 3 March 2016. I will continue in this role for the duration of EpiStressNet's existence.
Collaborator Contribution Network members participated in the meeting by providing talks and contributing to discussions.
Impact The EpiStressNet inaugural research meeting was held on 3 March 2016, in Sheffield. I organised the meeting, which was attended by 20 researchers, most of whom are existing members of EpiStressNet, as well as a small number of invited speakers and other participants with relevant interests, whom I have recruited to the network since it was first established.
Start Year 2015
 
Description EpiStressNet research network - Kick-Off Meeting 
Organisation University of Sheffield
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I am the Principal Investigator on the grant that is funding the EpiStressNet network activities. A PDRA in my lab, Dr Helen Eachus, is carrying out some important pilot studies to validate come of the key concepts underpinning EpiStressNet. The Network Co-ordinator, John Paul Ashton, is also a member of my research team. I organised the inaugural Kick-Off meeting of the EpiStressNet research network, attended by members of my research team, including the Network Co-Ordinator, John Paul Ashton, who helped me to organise the meeting. The meeting was held in Sheffield on 3 March 2016. I will continue in this role for the duration of EpiStressNet's existence.
Collaborator Contribution Network members participated in the meeting by providing talks and contributing to discussions.
Impact The EpiStressNet inaugural research meeting was held on 3 March 2016, in Sheffield. I organised the meeting, which was attended by 20 researchers, most of whom are existing members of EpiStressNet, as well as a small number of invited speakers and other participants with relevant interests, whom I have recruited to the network since it was first established.
Start Year 2015
 
Description EpiStressNet research network - Kick-Off Meeting 
Organisation University of Sheffield
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I am the Principal Investigator on the grant that is funding the EpiStressNet network activities. A PDRA in my lab, Dr Helen Eachus, is carrying out some important pilot studies to validate come of the key concepts underpinning EpiStressNet. The Network Co-ordinator, John Paul Ashton, is also a member of my research team. I organised the inaugural Kick-Off meeting of the EpiStressNet research network, attended by members of my research team, including the Network Co-Ordinator, John Paul Ashton, who helped me to organise the meeting. The meeting was held in Sheffield on 3 March 2016. I will continue in this role for the duration of EpiStressNet's existence.
Collaborator Contribution Network members participated in the meeting by providing talks and contributing to discussions.
Impact The EpiStressNet inaugural research meeting was held on 3 March 2016, in Sheffield. I organised the meeting, which was attended by 20 researchers, most of whom are existing members of EpiStressNet, as well as a small number of invited speakers and other participants with relevant interests, whom I have recruited to the network since it was first established.
Start Year 2015
 
Description EpiStressNet research network - Kick-Off Meeting 
Organisation University of Sheffield
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I am the Principal Investigator on the grant that is funding the EpiStressNet network activities. A PDRA in my lab, Dr Helen Eachus, is carrying out some important pilot studies to validate come of the key concepts underpinning EpiStressNet. The Network Co-ordinator, John Paul Ashton, is also a member of my research team. I organised the inaugural Kick-Off meeting of the EpiStressNet research network, attended by members of my research team, including the Network Co-Ordinator, John Paul Ashton, who helped me to organise the meeting. The meeting was held in Sheffield on 3 March 2016. I will continue in this role for the duration of EpiStressNet's existence.
Collaborator Contribution Network members participated in the meeting by providing talks and contributing to discussions.
Impact The EpiStressNet inaugural research meeting was held on 3 March 2016, in Sheffield. I organised the meeting, which was attended by 20 researchers, most of whom are existing members of EpiStressNet, as well as a small number of invited speakers and other participants with relevant interests, whom I have recruited to the network since it was first established.
Start Year 2015
 
Description EpiStressNet research network - Kick-Off Meeting 
Organisation University of Sheffield
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I am the Principal Investigator on the grant that is funding the EpiStressNet network activities. A PDRA in my lab, Dr Helen Eachus, is carrying out some important pilot studies to validate come of the key concepts underpinning EpiStressNet. The Network Co-ordinator, John Paul Ashton, is also a member of my research team. I organised the inaugural Kick-Off meeting of the EpiStressNet research network, attended by members of my research team, including the Network Co-Ordinator, John Paul Ashton, who helped me to organise the meeting. The meeting was held in Sheffield on 3 March 2016. I will continue in this role for the duration of EpiStressNet's existence.
Collaborator Contribution Network members participated in the meeting by providing talks and contributing to discussions.
Impact The EpiStressNet inaugural research meeting was held on 3 March 2016, in Sheffield. I organised the meeting, which was attended by 20 researchers, most of whom are existing members of EpiStressNet, as well as a small number of invited speakers and other participants with relevant interests, whom I have recruited to the network since it was first established.
Start Year 2015
 
Description EpiStressNet research network - Kick-Off Meeting 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I am the Principal Investigator on the grant that is funding the EpiStressNet network activities. A PDRA in my lab, Dr Helen Eachus, is carrying out some important pilot studies to validate come of the key concepts underpinning EpiStressNet. The Network Co-ordinator, John Paul Ashton, is also a member of my research team. I organised the inaugural Kick-Off meeting of the EpiStressNet research network, attended by members of my research team, including the Network Co-Ordinator, John Paul Ashton, who helped me to organise the meeting. The meeting was held in Sheffield on 3 March 2016. I will continue in this role for the duration of EpiStressNet's existence.
Collaborator Contribution Network members participated in the meeting by providing talks and contributing to discussions.
Impact The EpiStressNet inaugural research meeting was held on 3 March 2016, in Sheffield. I organised the meeting, which was attended by 20 researchers, most of whom are existing members of EpiStressNet, as well as a small number of invited speakers and other participants with relevant interests, whom I have recruited to the network since it was first established.
Start Year 2015