Urban Ageing and Social Exclusion

Lead Research Organisation: University of Manchester
Department Name: Social Sciences

Abstract

Social exclusion, defined as the inability to participate in society's mainstream institutions, has been identified as a major issue facing older people (Scharf and Keating, 2012). This project aims to overcome gaps in conceptual and empirical knowledge about this topic, with particular emphasis on the problems facing older people living in urban settings. This goal should be seen in the context of pressures arising from population ageing and urbanisation. By 2030, two-thirds of the world's population will reside in cities, with - for urban areas in high income countries - at least one-quarter of their populations aged 60 and over. The World Health Organization's 'Age-Friendly Cities' project (2007) emphasises the theme of developing supportive urban environments for older citizens. Policies directed at this goal are seen to require interventions targeted at both the social and physical environment. Following this, the WHO (2010) established the Global Network of Age-friendly Cities and Communities (AFCC) to encourage implementation of policy recommendations arising from the project. By January 2015, this Network spanned 26 countries worldwide with 210 cities and communities enrolled in the programme. The AFCC model has been influential in raising awareness about the need to adapt urban environments to the demands of an ageing population. However, research is needed that examines whether and how this model contributes to tackling social exclusion among older people across different urban settings.

This research project examines this last issue by using an original research design drawing on both quantitative and qualitative methods. It takes a cross-national approach that will identify new policies and practices for challenging social exclusion in European cities. The research is divided into three strands. Strand 1 involves an analysis of the current literature and existing data sets in Ireland, the UK and Belgium. This will provide new insights into how social exclusion varies for diverse groups of older Europeans (e.g. different cohorts, migrants, oldest-old) living in urban settings in contrasting EU nations. The findings from Strand 1 provide the background for Strand 2, which focuses on three cities: Dublin, Manchester and Brussels. These were among the first to be admitted into the WHO Network of AFCC. The question of how these 'Age-Friendly' cities have responded to the issues faced by those experiencing social exclusion (as identified in Strand 1) will be explored through a review of relevant social policy documents in the respective cities, and qualitative research through expert interviews with citywide stakeholders. Strand 3 examines projects designed to challenge social exclusion, with a particular focus on those that illustrate 'good practice'. The methodology for this strand will be based on a model of participatory research, involving the training of older people to become co-researchers in the selected projects.

In exploring these strands, the research will break new ground, both in the development of a conceptual framework for understanding social exclusion in old age in urban settings, and in providing the knowledge necessary for addressing a priority area in social policy. The project will engage with a range of academic audiences and research user groups (e.g. policy-makers, civil society organizations, older people) in order to maximise impact, and will engage with internationally renowned experts and institutions to ensure wide dissemination of the research. Consequently, this project will produce and disseminate a rich evidence base which will enhance knowledge about how to tackle social exclusion across different audiences. Alongside academic papers and presentations in international journals and conferences, dissemination channels will include stakeholder meetings, a policy roadmap for future action and development, and a good practice toolkit providing guidance on reducing social exclusion.

Planned Impact

The project has significance for a wide range of research users. An Impact Working Group (IWG) will be formed comprised of expert stakeholders who will support the project's dissemination strategy and enhance channels of communication with decision makers. Representatives of the following organisations have agreed to be part of the IWG: the WHO Department of Ageing and Life Course; the three cities' Age-Friendly programmes; AGE Platform Europe and Age UK. The IWG's involvement from the start of the project is to ensure that key research user interests are built into the research design.

The detailed plan for impact can be found in the Pathways to Impact document. It involves a strong beneficiary involvement throughout the project and a concrete dissemination plan, including 'open seminars' and a final dissemination event, supported by organisations (the Manchester Institute for Collaborative Research on Ageing [MICRA], Age UK, Manchester City Council) linked with the research; a project website and blog; a policy report; and a good practice toolkit. Should this project be funded, MICRA, an ageing research network of over 1,500 academics, practitioners, policy makers and older people, has offered substantial support (£10K) to the implementation of the impact activities (see letter of support).

The project will be of particular benefit to:
a) Political actors, policy stakeholders and think tanks who are keen to improve their understanding of the ways in which policies can be strengthened to improve older people's quality of life. These include: the WHO Dept. of Ageing and Life Course; the European Commission's DG for Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion; the International Longevity Centre-UK; and Government Departments such as Work and Pensions and Communities and Local Government. These beneficiaries will be actively involved in supporting and identifying impact pathways from the project towards key long-term policy change, and will benefit from the roadmapfor future action and development.
b) Local authorities within the three case study cities: The research directly feeds into their Age-Friendly Programmes and will provide an evidence-base for the strategic commissioning of services that have an impact on older people's quality of life. Leaders of the Age-Friendly Programmes will also participate in the project's IWG.
c) Third-sector stakeholders with a specific remit to create inclusive communities where older people feel secure, valued and able to contribute to society. These include: AGE Platform Europe, Age UK, Age Action Alliance and Beth Johnson Foundation. These beneficiaries will be actively involved in the implementation and dissemination of the project outputs, with the research directly feeding into their policy work, campaigns, expert briefings and media activities.
d) Practitioner-oriented networks, such as the network on Innovation for Age-Friendly Environments and the UK Urban Ageing Consortium, who will especially benefit from the good practice toolkit on tackling social exclusion.
e) Networks bringing together academics, policy-makers and third-sector stakeholders with a focus on ageing issues and urbanisation: Collaborative dissemination activities will be undertaken with the International Network on Population Ageing and Urbanisation, MICRA and Cities@Manchester who have formally agreed to support this project.
f) Older people themselves who may be especially keen to understand the risk factors associated with exclusion in old age (Strand 1); how these can be prevented and addressed (Strand 2), as well as how to voice their concerns or play a role in (research) projects focusing on exclusion (Strand 3). Older people will be actively involved in all stages of the project, through 'open seminars' aimed at bridging the gap between academic research and the general public, alongside opportunities to participate in training sessions and become involved as co-researchers in the project.
 
Description • Research on age-friendly cities should be integrated with research on changes affecting urban environments

• Economic austerity has restricted the development of age-friendly programmes

• Urban regeneration and gentrification create problems for older people 'ageing in place'

• The challenge is creating an urban environment that supports the autonomy and equal rights of older people with others to a 'share' of urban space

• Longitudinal analysis of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing shows that: Social and wellbeing outcomes were continuously better among people living in less deprived and rural areas compared with those in more deprived and urban areas.

• Social and mental wellbeing outcomes often decline at a greater rate among more deprived and more urban areas than less deprived and rural areas.

• Social engagement declines at a greater rate over time among older people living in both more deprived and urban areas, compared to those living in less deprived and rural areas

• Moving into more deprived areas in later life is damaging to mental wellbeing, compared with moving into less deprived areas.
Exploitation Route There is a strong case for incorporating issues about ageing in urban environments with debates concerning spatial justice

Understanding optimum environments for ageing must be seen as an inter-disciplinary enterprise requiring understanding of the impact of developments such as the changing dynamics of urban poverty on older people, the consequences of urban renewal and regeneration, and the impact of transnational migration

There remains a need for experimentation to test and learn from participatory and collaborative approaches involving older people in the co-production of urban space

There is a need for a global perspective (including cross-national comparative perspectives) on developing Age-friendly cities and communities, with a particular focus on issues around social exclusion
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Environment,Healthcare,Government, Democracy and Justice

 
Description The research project has attracted interest from the World Health Organisation - pioneers of the age-friendly cities agenda - and a number of key UK (e.g. Age UK) and European policy actors (e.g. Age Platform Europe). Through a range of invited key-note talks in different cities of Australia (Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Hobart - Tasmania, Canberra), the PI of this project has also been able to influence the debate about WHO policy on Age-friendly Cities and Communities in Australia, and to work with state-government and local policy-makers, NGOs (e.g. International Federation of Ageing) and academic researchers to discuss different approaches to the planning for ageing societies, with awareness for issues around social exclusion. The approach of this research was referred to in the World Report on Ageing and Health as an 'innovative way forward'; and the project's partnership that led to the development of the study received the 'Engage' prize for best partnership initiative from the National Coordinating Centre for Public Engagement, UK. This research has had significant impact through (1) collaboration with older people in local communities to understand experiences and affect change to improve their quality of life in urban environments, thereby creating new models for engagement, (2) building innovative partnerships at the local and regional government level to influence policy to improve the quality of life of older people in urban environments and (3) developing supranational relationships to shape the policy debate on age-friendly cities around the world. Policy and practice influence at regional level Key beneficiary: Greater Manchester Ageing Hub. This organisation brings together the key public and third sector organisations across Greater Manchester working to develop policies on ageing in the context of devolution. Details and evidence: The research has been highly influential on Manchester's Age-Friendly program through the Greater Manchester Ageing Hub since its launch in 2016. The GM Ageing Hub draws on this body of research as an evidence-base for the strategic commission of services relevant to older people, as discussed in a chapter by Paul McGarry (2018), who said "'The work has influenced Manchester's Age-Friendly program, providing the Council with an evidence-base for the strategic commissioning of services relevant to older people". There are 907,000 people aged over 50 in Greater Manchester who are directly affected by these services. The Hub's latest 2018 strategy explicitly mentions MICRA as a partner. It provides a case study based on the research undertaken by the team, and references the co-production methods which are specifically from Buffel's work. The research also produced important reports specifically for the Hub. In 2017, the research contributed to a strategy document for the Hub drawing on key research findings supported by an Impact Accelerator Award. This strategy document was launched at the Greater Manchester Ageing Conference in February 2017, attended by over 150 delegates representing public, third sector and private organisations across GM, and received attention from other organisation such as Ambition for Ageing. In 2017, the team produced a report on social isolation among older people in urban areas for the Hub which has since been cited in policy reports by other organisations, for example, de Noronha (2019). The researchers have built a collaborative relationship with the GM Ageing team which allows them to participate in policy debates on the topic of ageing. This group meets 3 times a year and is chaired by Pam Smith, Chief Executive Lead for Age-Friendly Greater Manchester and Equalities. The PI also provides direct informal briefings for the Chair on the topic of age-friendly initiatives. Shaping policy and practice on age-friendly cities at the international and supranational level Key beneficiaries: International and supranational policy organisations such as the World Health Organisation, Age Platform Europe, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the United Nations, the Matia Gerontological Institute, the Basque Country Government and the Nordic Welfare Centre. The research has served to influence and inform policy and practice at these levels. Details and evidence: The researchers have built relationships with key organisations at the international and supranational level to support the dissemination of findings. The PI have been invited to give 12 invited keynote talks and presentations, for example, 'Age-friendly cities and communities: developing a research agenda' (Buffel, Feb 2018) at Age Platform Europe in Brussels, ', and 'Developing age-friendly communities: A critical perspective on current research, policy and practice' at a policy conference organised by the Matia Gerontological Institute and the Basque Country Government (Buffel, November 2017). These presentations have impacted the way in which attendees address ageing in policy solutions, for example, Xenki Berho Mujika, President of Social Association EMANHAR Gizarte Elkartea who organised the conference, said "Tine's presentation has greatly influenced our thinking. We are already starting to implement some of the suggestions and examples mentioned about how to make our cities more age-friendly." The research has influenced the debate on age friendly cities at this level in terms of the practice of working with older people. The co-production methodology developed has been used and promoted by a range of international organisations such as Age UK and Age Platform Europe. The research has also had significant influence over the direction of policy at this level. The team has recently contributed to a major report from the World Health Organization (2019) which examines the priorities for age-friendly cities and communities using case studies developed in partnership with Buffel and Phillipson. The report will have a long-lasting impact on WHO policy. Alana Officer, Senior Health Adviser at the World Health Organization, said: "The report and case studies will provide key inputs into the development of the Decade of Healthy Ageing from 2020-2030."
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Healthcare,Government, Democracy and Justice
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description Advisory role and academic support to Manchester City Council, Age-Friendly Manchester team
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Contributed to a major report for the World Health Organisation (WHO) that will be used to shape direction of future WHO policy
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Tine's research has also had significant influence over the direction of policy at this level. Tine has recently contributed to a major report from the World Health Organization (2019) which examines the priorities for age-friendly cities and communities using case studies developed in partnership with Buffel (Tine) and Phillipson (Chris). The report will have a long-lasting impact on WHO policy. Alana Officer, Senior Health Adviser at the World Health Organization, said: "The report and case studies will provide key inputs into the development of the Decade of Healthy Ageing from 2020-2030."
URL https://www.who.int/ageing/publications/en/
 
Description Created a brochure titled: 'Translating research into action. Involving older people in co-producing knowledge about age-friendly neighbourhood interventions'.
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
 
Description Influence on Greater Manchester Ageing Hub policies and Manchester Age-Friendly Programme
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
Impact The research produced by Tine Buffel and Chris Phillipson has been highly influential on Manchester's Age-Friendly program through the Greater Manchester Ageing Hub since its launch in 2016. The GM Ageing Hub draws on this body of research as an evidence-base for the strategic commission of services relevant to older people, as discussed in a chapter by Paul McGarry (2018), who said "'The work has influenced Manchester's Age-Friendly program, providing the Council with an evidence-base for the strategic commissioning of services relevant to older people". There are 907,000 people aged over 50 in Greater Manchester who are directly affected by these services.
 
Description Member of Ageing Strategy Working Group, Age-Friendly Manchester, a working group to support and refresh the city-wide ageing policy strategy
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
 
Description Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Secondary Data Analysis award
Amount £145,844 (GBP)
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2018 
End 02/2020
 
Description Faculty HSIF The University of Manchester
Amount £58,494 (GBP)
Organisation University of Manchester 
Department School of Social Sciences
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2017 
End 08/2020
 
Description Funded PhD CASE studentship, Humanities Strategic Investment Fund (H-SIF)
Amount £45,909 (GBP)
Organisation University of Manchester 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2017 
End 09/2019
 
Description Hallsworth Visiting Professor Award
Amount £4,400 (GBP)
Organisation University of Manchester 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2016 
End 03/2017
 
Description School of Social Sciences, the University of Manchester
Amount £750 (GBP)
Organisation University of Manchester 
Department School of Social Sciences
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2016 
End 08/2016
 
Description Seedcorn Award Manchester Institute for Collaborative Research on Ageing
Amount £5,500 (GBP)
Organisation University of Manchester 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2016 
End 12/2016
 
Description World Health Organisation : The Global Network for Age-Friendly Cities and Communities (commissioned report)
Amount £7,000 (GBP)
Organisation World Health Organization (WHO) 
Sector Public
Country Global
Start 07/2018 
End 02/2019
 
Title Co-research with older people: an innovative methodology in ageing research 
Description Background and objectives: A growing body of work suggests that co- or peer research may contribute to understanding the complex health and social problems experienced in later life. Yet, only a limited number of studies have involved older persons as partners in the research process. Moreover, in conflict with the philosophy of participatory research, the views of those acting as co-researchers tend to be ignored. This paper gives an 'insider' account of the process of co-research, drawing upon the experiences of older people trained to undertake a community-based research project. Research design and methods: Eighteen older adults were recruited and trained as co-researchers to take a leading role in a study aimed at developing 'age-friendly' communities in Manchester, UK. The co-researchers completed 68 interviews with residents aged 60 and over who were experiencing isolation within their neighborhood. The findings are based upon four reflection meetings held with the co-researchers, all of which were transcribed with thematic analysis conducted using Atlas.ti. Results: Co-researcher identified a range of advantages associated with the co-research approach, these linked to the recruitment of participants, quality of data, potential for social change as well as personal benefits. They also identified ethical, methodological and practical issues encountered during the research. Discussion and implications: The study demonstrates the contribution of co-research for expanding methodological diversity, accessing seldom heard populations, and utilizing the skills and resources of older people. The research also highlights the opportunities for partnerships between older people and local stakeholders to facilitate community change and social action. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact This method is currently being used in a range of other research projects and is being tested in a variety of contexts and neighbourhoods 
 
Description Age UK 
Organisation Age UK
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution 1) A Manchester Institute for Collaborative Research on Ageing (MICRA)/ Age UK public seminar on urban ageing and age-friendly issues 2) Increasing Age UK's research capacity, feeding into Age UK's policy work, campaigns and media activity 3) Equipping and empowering older people as co-producers of research, and strengthening the voice of older people in the research evidence base
Collaborator Contribution 1) Membership of the Impact Working Group and being able to draw on the Age UK Research Department's knowledge, resources, expertise and networking around the current policy context 2) Support from Media and Communications teams to maximise opportunities to generate impact and public debate on urban ageing and social exclusion 3) Dissemination of research findings and outcomes
Impact 1) A Manchester Institute for Collaborative Research on Ageing (MICRA)/ Age UK public seminar on urban ageing and age-friendly issues 2) A joint report focusing on Translating Research into Action on the issues of age-friendly cities 3) Increased visibility and dissemination of research
Start Year 2016
 
Description Collaboration with Belgian Ageing Studies Research (BAS) Group, Vrije Universiteit Brussel 
Organisation Free University of Brussels
Department Cosmopolis Centre for Urban Research
Country Belgium 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution 1) I am the Co-I of a Hallsworth Visiting Professor Award for professor Liesbeth De Donder, Vrije Universiteit Brussel Belgium 2) A joint seminar with members of BAS with Manchester Urban Ageing Research `Group (MUARG) 3) I lead on a comparative paper looking at age-friendly approaches in Manchester and Brussels 4) I am the lead editor of the book "Developing age-friendly cities and communities: A global Perspective" (Policy Press) which includes a chapter by the BAS 5) Joint symposium at GSA - Gerontological Society of America and IAGG - International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics
Collaborator Contribution 1) Members of BAS were invited to Manchester as key note speakers for a) MUARG seminar group; b) Age-friendly Manchester policy conference and c) Greater Manchester conference on creating an age-friendly region 2) The Belgian Ageing Studies research group supports the project through: Membership of the project's Research Advisory Board and mentoring during my stay in Brussels; Supporting the analyses and interpretation of BAS data and findings; Supporting the selection of a 'good practice' aimed at tackling social exclusion among older people in Brussels; Promoting the opportunity for older people to participate in training sessions to become co-researchers by advertising the project through our networks and contacts with relevant organisations; Providing phone, desk and library access during my stay at the Free University of Brussels; Supporting the dissemination of research outputs through the BAS' networks and website; and Participation in the final dissemination event.
Impact Hallsworth Visiting Professor Award for Prof. Liesbeth De Donder (VUB, Belgium) The University of Manchester £4,400 Buffel, T., McGarry, P., Phillipson, C., De Donder, L., Dury, S., De Witte, N., Smetcoren, A. and Verte, D. (2016) Developing age-friendly cities: Case Studies from Brussels and Manchester. In Fitzgerald, K.G. and Caro, F.G. (eds) International perspectives on age-friendly cities. New York: Routledge. Chapter from BAS group focusing on age-friendly issues in Brussels - to be published in Buffel T, Handler, S and Phillipson (2017) Developing age-friendly cities and communities. Bristol: Policy Press
Start Year 2016
 
Description Greater Manchester (GM) Ageing Hub 
Organisation Greater Manchester Combined Authority
Department Greater Manchester Ageing Hub
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution o The research has provided an evidence-base for the strategic commission of services relevant to older people, as discussed in a chapter by Paul McGarry (2018), who said "'The research has influenced Manchester's Age-Friendly program, providing the Council with an evidence-base for the strategic commissioning of services relevant to older people". There are 907,000 people aged over 50 in Greater Manchester who are directly affected by these services. o The research has also contributed to the development of the Greater Manchester Ageing Strategy (2018)
Collaborator Contribution o The GM ageing Hub Partnership has been important in developing networks and collaborations between policy, practice and research. o The Hub has also contributed to the Impact Strategy of the research project
Impact - The GM Ageing Hub draws on this body of research as an evidence-base for the strategic commission of services relevant to older people, as discussed in a chapter by Paul McGarry (2018), who said "'The work has influenced Manchester's Age-Friendly program, providing the Council with an evidence-base for the strategic commissioning of services relevant to older people". There are 907,000 people aged over 50 in Greater Manchester who are directly affected by these services. The Hub's latest 2018 strategy explicitly mentions MICRA as a partner. It provides a case study based on the research undertaken by the team, and references the co-production methods which are specifically from Buffel's work. - The team have also produced important reports specifically for the Hub. In 2017, Phillipson led the preparation of a strategy document for the Hub drawing on key research findings supported by an Impact Accelerator Award. This strategy document was launched at the Greater Manchester Ageing Conference in February 2017, attended by over 150 delegates representing public, third sector and private organisations across GM, and received attention from other organisation such as Ambition for Ageing. In 2017, the team produced a report on social isolation among older people in urban areas for the Hub which has since been cited in policy reports by other organisations, for example, de Noronha (2019). - Phillipson (2017) Developing a Strategy for Age-Friendly Greater Manchester
Start Year 2017
 
Description International Scientific Research Community 'Solidarity in Diversity: Community, Place-making and Citizenship' 
Organisation University of Leuven
Department Faculty of Kinesiology and Rehabilitation Sciences
Country Belgium 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution 1) I was a co-I in applying for funding for this international network. We received 62.500 EUR from the Fund for Scientific Research Belgium to support network meetings and workshops 2) My contribution focuses on bringing an 'ageing' dimension to the discussion
Collaborator Contribution The University of Leuven manages the research community and organises regular meetings in Belgium, bringing together researchers from a wide range of disciplines to advance the debate around issues around diversity and community in cities.
Impact 2 workshops and a network meeting bringing together a range of disciplines and perspectives including those from sociology, social geography, social gerontology, and urban design
Start Year 2016
 
Description Manchester City Council, Age-Friendly Manchester 
Organisation Manchester City Council
Department Age-Friendly Manchester
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution 1) Continuing the ongoing strategic relationship with the Manchester Institute for Collaborative Research on Ageing, and expert input from leading researchers in the Age-Friendly programme. 2) ? Evidence-based support to strategic commissioning of services that have an impact on the quality of life of older people. 3) Empowering and equipping local older people as co-researchers. 4) Succesful application to attract more Impact funding to translate research on age-friendly issues into action 5) Providing access to seminars by the Manchester Institute for Collaborative Research on Ageing
Collaborator Contribution 1) Enabling access to networks in Manchester but also in Dublin through collaborative relationships already established. 2) ? Membership of Impact Working Group 3) ? Access to strategic networks through our involvement in international organisations including WHO Europe, Age-Platform Europe, WHO Global Network of Age-friendly Cities, and other organisations reflecting Manchester's leading role in the work around age-friendliness. 4) ? In-kind support, e.g. invitation to meetings with key players and strategic public bodies; help with media promotion through the Council's media services; access to town hall for dissemination activities 5) ? A "knowledge exchange" partnership between city council and university staff groups.
Impact - 'Engage' prize for best partnership initiative from the National Coordinating Centre for Public Engagement. - Greater Manchester Ageing Conference 2017 (16th of February 2017, at the Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester) - Placement of PhD student Samuele Remillard-Boilard with the City Council's Age-friendly Manchester team - Report "Translating Research into Action. Involving older people in co-producing knowledge about age-friendly neighbourhood interventions" (Doran and Buffel, 2017) - Chapter 12 Developing age-friendly policies for cities: strategies, challenges and reflections (McGarry, 2017) in Edited book "Developing age-friendly cities and communities: A global perspective (Buffel, Handler, Phillipson, 2017 - in press)
Start Year 2016
 
Description World Health Organisation, Global Network of Age-friendly Cities and Communities 
Organisation World Health Organization (WHO)
Country Global 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution - Research-policy partnership; support in terms of developing the co-production dimension of age-friendly policies; input in WHO ageing documents and WHO Global Network of Age-Friendly Cities and Communities conferences, websites and resources
Collaborator Contribution Access to a worldwide network of "age-friendly" cities and communities - access to policy resources and documents - research-policy and knowledge transfer networks
Impact New research grant proposal is being prepared (to be submitted to the European Research Council in October 2018)
Start Year 2016
 
Description World Health Organisation, Global Network of Age-friendly Cities and Communities 
Organisation World Health Organization (WHO)
Country Global 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution - Research-policy partnership; support in terms of developing the co-production dimension of age-friendly policies; input in WHO ageing documents and WHO Global Network of Age-Friendly Cities and Communities conferences, websites and resources
Collaborator Contribution Access to a worldwide network of "age-friendly" cities and communities - access to policy resources and documents - research-policy and knowledge transfer networks
Impact New research grant proposal is being prepared (to be submitted to the European Research Council in October 2018)
Start Year 2016
 
Description "The Age-Friendly City Can't Just Be for the Wealthy", interview for Citylab 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The Age-Friendly City Can't Just Be for the Wealthy
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.citylab.com/equity/2018/02/the-age-friendly-city-cant-just-be-for-the-wealthy/553007/
 
Description Age-friendly cities presentation at Gerontological Society of America 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Tine Buffel and Chris Phillipson presented their findings on some of the issues facing cities in responding to the challenge of population ageing.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Article in the Guardian newspaper: What would an age-friendly city look like? 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Cited in an article in The Guardian Newspaper: https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2018/oct/10/what-would-an-age-friendly-city-look-like?CMP=share_btn_tw
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2018/oct/10/what-would-an-age-friendly-city-look-like?CMP=share_b...
 
Description Blog: Building age-friendly cities: A manifesto for change 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact https://www.urbantransformations.ox.ac.uk/blog/2018/building-age-friendly-cities-a-manifesto-for-change/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Buffel, T. (2017) Developing age-friendly communities: A critical perspective on current research, policy and practice. Keynote at Conference organised by the Matia Gerontological Institute and the Basque Country Government, Bilbao, Spain. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Buffel, T. (2017) Developing age-friendly communities: A critical perspective on current research, policy and practice. Keynote at Conference organised by the Matia Gerontological Institute and the Basque Country Government, Bilbao, Spain.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Developing age-friendly cities: a global perspective presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presented a talk titled 'Developing age-friendly cities: a global perspective at the Doing Ageing Differently conference, Greater Manchester Age-Friendly Conference friday 8th of Feb, 2019, Manchester Library
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Dissemination workshop bringing together older people, community organisations, government departments, voluntary organisations, health and care services, urban planners and local businesses 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Dissemination workshop bringing together older people, community organisations, government departments, voluntary organisations, health and care services, urban planners and local businesses
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Dissimination of research findings of the project 'Developing Age-Friendly Communities' at the Community Celebrate Festival at Manley Park, Whalley Range, 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dissimination of research findings of the project 'Developing Age-Friendly Communities' at the Community Celebrate Festival at Manley Park, Whalley Range, 2016, including:

§ An Age-Friendly Marquee including display of noticeboards and banners presenting key findings from the research

§ An 'Opinion Tree' to stimulate discussion around age-friendly initiatives and priorities

§ Promotion of intergenerational and age-friendly projects and initiatives

§ Feedback from visitors included:

"The display boards were vibrant, easy to read and in Plain English - and the atmosphere in the marquee meant that people who had any questions were relaxed enough to discuss the work with the researchers and other residents".

"I feel the Age-friendly Marquee demonstrated to people that the opinions of residents around ageing and priorities are taken seriously and used to influence change".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Invited key-note at the Age-friendly Manchester, Ageing Strategy Refresh launch, Manchester City Council, June 2017. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Invited key-note at the Age-friendly Manchester, Ageing Strategy Refresh launch, Manchester City Council, June 2017.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Member of conference planning committee for British Society of Gerontology Conference in Manchester 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Member of conference planning committee, arranged several symposia
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Online article for CITYLAB: The Age-Friendly City Can't Just Be for the Wealthy 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact University of Manchester researchers argue that the movement to make cities more livable for older residents must expand its work on inequality.

https://www.citylab.com/equity/2018/02/the-age-friendly-city-cant-just-be-for-the-wealthy/553007/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.citylab.com/equity/2018/02/the-age-friendly-city-cant-just-be-for-the-wealthy/553007/
 
Description Online blog: Building age-friendly cities and communities: to enable generations to live together? 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Building age-friendly cities and communities: to enable generations to live together?

http://ageing-equal.org/building-age-friendly-cities-and-communities/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://ageing-equal.org/building-age-friendly-cities-and-communities/
 
Description Online coverage: pen portrait of Dr Tine Buffel for winning the Public Engagement Prize National Centre 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact https://www.publicengagement.ac.uk/do-engagement/inspire-me/pen-portraits/dr-tine-buffel
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.publicengagement.ac.uk/do-engagement/inspire-me/pen-portraits/dr-tine-buffel
 
Description Organisation of the Averil Osborn Symposium at the British Society of Gerontology Conference (Liverpool 2019) to promote a dialogue between older people, co-researchers and ageing scholars. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Organisation of the Averil Osborn Symposium at the British Society of Gerontology Conference (Liverpool July 2019) to promote a dialogue between older people, co-researchers and ageing scholars.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Organised symposium on Age-Friendly Communities: New Directions for Research and Policy at Gerontological Society of America conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Organised symposium on Age-Friendly Communities: New Directions for Research and Policy, with participants from Ireland, Belgium and the UK.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Organised the Averil Osborn Symposium at the British Society of Gerontology Conference (Manchester 2018) to promote a dialogue between older people, co-researchers and ageing scholars. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Organised the Averil Osborn Symposium at the British Society of Gerontology Conference (Manchester 2018) to promote a dialogue between older people, co-researchers and ageing scholars.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Policy conference contribution: International Conference on Ageing (IFA) 13th Global Conference on Ageing, Brisbane, Australia (Symposium convener and presentation) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Symposium: Critical perspectives on age-friendly communities: An emerging evidence base
Presentation: Co-creating age-friendly neighbourhoods with older residents
Discussant: John Beard, Director, Ageing and Life Course, WHO
Co-organisers: International Conference on Ageing (IFA) ; Council on the Ageing (COTA) Queensland
Attenders: over 1000 people attended the conference
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2006
 
Description Press release: Manchester contributes to major WHO report into age-friendly cities 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Press release: https://www.manchester.ac.uk/discover/news/major-who-report/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.manchester.ac.uk/discover/news/major-who-report/
 
Description Social Exclusion amongst Older People in Low-Income Neighbourhoods at the Gerontological Society of America 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Presented in the symposium 'Building Inclusive Communities: Learning from Around the World', highlighting the work in Manchester around challenging social exclusion amongst older people in low income neighbourhoods.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description The Global Network for Age-friendly Cities and Communities: Looking back over the last decade, looking forward to the next report mentioned in Centre for Ageing Better newsletter 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact The report written by the WHO in partnership with MICRA was mentioned in the newsletter.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description The impact of gentrification on older adults at the Gerontological Society of America 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Tine Buffel and Chris Phillipson gave an invited paper to the Environmental Gerontology Interest Group discussing their research on the impact of gentrification on older adults.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Translating Research into Practice: A public engagement activity with the local community at the annual Celebrate Festival, a neighbourhood event in Manley Park, Whalley Range, Manchester on July the 16th. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The Translating Research into Action project aimed to work with an existing group of older co-researchers to examine the age-friendliness of their
neighbourhood, and to translate research fi?ndings into practice and policy recommendations that can help improve the quality of life of older people in urban neighbourhoods. At the annual Celebrate Festival, a neighbourhood event in Manley Park, Whalley Range in Manchester on July the 16th, co-researchers and team members presented research findings and engaged with the community. A local artist was engaged to create an 'Opinion Tree'. Community members were invited to 'leaf their opinion' on the tree with their suggestions for change. Also in the Age-Friendly Marquee were
refreshments, information from local groups, and a craft table.
The aims of disseminating the fi?ndings at the Celebrate Festival were to: 1. Raise awareness of the age-friendly research .2. Engage community members in the research by seeking feedback on the identified social and environmental issues for older people living in the area. .3. Encourage community members to make their own suggestions for change.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016