HomeSense: digital sensors for social research

Lead Research Organisation: University of Surrey
Department Name: Sociology

Abstract

What actually happens within households? We know that men are increasingly sharing in domestic duties and parenting; but does this mean that these activities are being done with their partners or are they taking turns? Do families eat together and talk to each other, or do they have separate meals in different rooms while talking on social media to their friends? It is hard to observe households, and research on these issues is done through self-reporting, with people answering questions and filling in diaries, or with highly invasive methods such as video recording. There is another way.

Digital devices are becoming more sophisticated. A modern mobile phone can measure position and movement, as well as what the phone is being used for. Many people wear sensors for heart rate, sleeping patterns, and physical activity. And fixed sensors in houses can be simply plugged in to measure sound and energy use. Using such sensors effectively would reduce the need for questionnaires and interviews, reducing the amount of work for respondents and providing potentially more accurate reporting.

However, there are technical problems to be solved. What can be measured by these devices? How can the data be converted into meaningful descriptions of activities? How reliable are these descriptions? There are also ethical concerns. How can the datasets be securely stored and for how long? How does consent work if people forget the devices are there? When should consent be obtained from people who are monitored but not intentionally included in the research, such as visitors?

This project will examine these technical and ethical issues. We will develop guidelines for social researchers who want to use digital sensing devices in their research. These will be based on expert advice and discussion with members of the general public, as well as the experience of household members and researchers in a trial study.
The data collected in the trial study will be used to compare, contrast and integrate the use of sensor devices with existing research methods. The trial data and comparison of methods will be the foundation to develop analysis tools that help researchers to interpret and understand the rich data that can be collected with these methods, to answer questions about what happens within households.

Planned Impact

The project relates directly to methodology development for digital sensing devices but addresses much wider ESRC and NCRM commitments.

First, digital sensing devices can be used to support cohort and longitudinal studies by easing or augmenting data collection. Longitudinal data collections focus on the interplay of structure (such as demography, geography or social position) and social outcomes (such as health or employment), and these can be supplemented by detailed data about micro processes to provide an understanding how and why these correlations come about.

Secondly, digital sensor data is able to contribute to the ESRC's priority area of Influencing Behaviour and Informing Interventions. Through unprecedented access to a variety of aspects of home life, digital data will provide a unique insight into the routines, practices and habits which are basic building blocks of everyday life. The understanding of the habitual linking of activities, the coping strategies employed and the interaction patterns of people in households obtained through the methodological integration of digital device data can provide a foundation for interventions in particular with regards to energy consumption, health and childcare, and also less obvious issues such as barriers to employment and wellbeing.

The project will develop algorithms and software tools to visualise and understand data generated by digital sensing devices, particularly as it relates to activity sequences, location and interaction. These algorithms may have direct economic and social impact, particularly for the Quantified Self movement and for companies marketing home automation systems. The sale of personal monitoring devices and data analysis subscription services are small, but significant and growing, industries. Richer analysis strengthens these industries and also increases the potential health benefit of such monitoring, as better monitoring and diagnostic tools are developed that use the data. As sensors are introduced into homes as part of the spread of the 'internet of things', companies selling such devices may benefit from the work we will do on issues of privacy, security, consent and ethics.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description 1: The team has found that meaningful visualisations of large amounts of sensor-generated data (time-framed overviews of multiple spaces and activities) are crucial future developments in using sensors and sensor-generated data, i.e., in engaging researchers without computational/engineering expertise and broadening the scope of use (project objective). Team members have so far relied on aggregates of open-source solutions to provide examples of complex data views and discussions about them and they have worked on and investigated the feasibility of open-access Application Programming Interface (API) for social researchers. However, research in this area risks remaining the exclusive reserve of either a 'blind' computational approach or very limited scope of cross-disciplinary collaboration, while there is clear potential - albeit a challenge - to make these technologies more accessible across the social sciences and humanities. We consider here in comparison, for example, progress and use of network analyses and visualisations.
2: Automated activity recognition continues to be of great interest, especially the application potential for response systems for home, work, public spaces, in care, policing, etc. (e.g. to warn about anomalies and/or directly intervene). In contributing to this field, the HomeSense team trialled a method for analysing sensor-generated data which does not rely on so-called 'ground truth' (e.g. using video cameras, time-use diaries, predefined tasks, manual tagging) against which sensor-generated data are analysed and evaluated. Rather, the team proposed an agreement evaluation (based on Levenshtein distance) between computer- and human-generated data, neither of which represent 'truth' in absolute terms. This is a unique method which can be expanded upon to achieve more consistency in sensor-based activity recognition away from laboratory settings.
3: It was disappointing to discover that digital sensors have limited scope in observing social interaction, group dynamics and similar aspects of social life. In using sensors, researchers need into account that social interaction and dynamic can be quiet or taking place (co-located) over communications devices, also that co-location/proximity is not a reliable indicator of interaction and togetherness. However, team members have found significant application potential applying environmental sensors and location tagging to support self-reported data, also that mobile and body-worn sensors can generate valuable data (orientation, location, body motion and conditions) to support large-scale surveys or other observational methods.
4: There is a barrier to 'genuinely informed consent' when researchers propose to prospective participants to install digital sensors in their homes and on their person for general observational purposes of the environment and activities within it. The HomeSense and similar field trials (e.g. SPHERE) have focused on methods (including ethics), device engineering and adaptation, rather than specified problem domains of immediate concern to certain groups or publics at large. Team members found that participants may struggle to comprehend what can be inferred from the data streams, especially when aggregating different types of data from multiple sources (sound, light, temperature, humidity, motion in range, location of persons, particulates and electrical device use). Attempting to overcome this barrier, the team devised elaborate demonstrations in public (for recruitment) and in the homes of participants as part of obtaining their consent. The team found that playing around with live sensors and live data visualisations supported both participants and researchers in conversing about research objectives and making choices about various aspects of the participation. The team is hoping that this methodological approach --demystifying the technology-- will be taken up by others doing similar research.
Exploitation Route Our research on digital sensors and methods to collect, visualise and analyse the data has already sparked interest in areas such as using mobile/body-worn sensors to support population-wide surveys and to further investigate - comparatively - the value of digital sensing in laboratory versus real-life settings, the latter of which pose significant technical, methodological and ethical complications. Open access to information about our research data, illustrations of meaningful data views and reporting on field trial statistics and key findings, are combined measures to make the research data and research findings available to future research projects and potential collaborations (project objective), including also communications with those who continue to exchange with us knowledge and experience in this area, some of whom are private individuals who monitor their activities, their homes, energy consumption and more. Although planned training courses have not proceeded as planned, guidelines based on this project (project objective) are still aimed at social researchers and others interested in using sensors to address their research questions, whereby many of our technological, methodological and ethics findings can be taken forward. Contributions specifically to the field of activity recognition could have wide application in the private sector, e.g., in designing intervention and assistive services for homes, the workplace and other sites of activity. Contributions to documented trials with human subjects have also application potential in assessing acceptability, evaluating consent and building trust. Finally, ongoing work on ethics, privacy issues and data security surrounding the use of sensors and associated observational technologies is eventually aimed at regulators, considering the potential impact of our insights on these issues.
Sectors Construction,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Electronics,Energy,Healthcare,Other

URL http://sensors-in-social-research.net
 
Description Epistemic responsiveness in innovation practice 
Organisation University of Bergen
Country Norway 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution There has been considerable overlap of research on the HomeSense project with research conducted by a multi-national consortium focussed on innovation politics and policy-related issues in areas including IoT, smart homes/cities/healthcare/energy. From Jan 2017 to end of Jan 2018, HomeSense collaborated with a H2020-funded project, CANDID, but a larger informal group of researchers (incl. University of Bergen, University of Edinburgh, IT University Copenhagen, UOC Barcelona, UAB Barcelona, VUB Brussels, University of Pisa, JRC Ispra) continues to be involved in networking activities and further development of a shared research agenda. Key areas of innovation practice this group is researching, include advanced ICTs for studying and intervening in social life, new means of innovation, production, market modelling, infrastructural governance and the governing of science and technology. Direct contributions of HomeSense so far have been to share findings in symposiums and expert consultations on subject participation in our fieldwork trial, especially implications for privacy and data protection, the right to mine data on persons and social practice, and the construction of truth. Our contributions also provided insight into methodological aspects of using advanced ICTs in social research.
Collaborator Contribution The University of Bergen (member of the SVT being the coordinator for this group), contributed funds to attend events that were not funded as part of the CANDID project, and paid for all associated costs of preparing materials and work on site. In return, these activities have contributed to the HomeSense project a much broader understanding of the social, policy and political issues associated with development and use of the new-emerging technologies. The partners in this group each have their focus areas (cities, infrastructures, healthcare, energy, communications with ICT experts, post-truth, policy engagement).
Impact The Candid Primer and The Candid Template (http://candid.no/progress). A communications initiative in bringing together researchers in Social Science, Humanities and ICTs. Multiple disciplines: philosophy, communication/discourse ethics, sociology/anthropology, STS, social psychology, ICT and legal scholarship.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Ethics of using sensors in social research 
Organisation University of Otago
Country New Zealand 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This partnership is between the HomeSense research team and Dr Martin Tolich, Associate Professor of Sociology of Research Ethics at the University of Otago, NZ. The aim of the collaboration is to identify pathways to ethical research conduct when using sensors for passively collecting data on human/social activities, e.g., to develop demonstration methods to adequately inform and engage publics and prospective study participants. Also, the collaboration is preparing a co-authored volume on using sensors in social research. The HomeSense research team contributes the technical and research methodological expertise required to build and adapt the research instruments and study protocols in question.
Collaborator Contribution Dr Martin Tolich has served for over 20 years on ethics committees, apart from being an ethicist himself and having published extensively on the sociology of ethics in research. His contribution to this partnership to-date has been to be the 'critical friend' and to apply his expertise and experience to unravel the very unique particulars of using sensors in social research, e.g., how to establish the 'boundaries of acceptability', on bridging knowledge gaps and genuinely informing publics who may or may not wish to participate as research subjects. His expertise will also contribute to chapter/sections on ethical issues in a co-authored volume on using sensors in social research.
Impact Study protocol, including a demonstration method, for engaging research participants and for using sensors to passively observe their activities. The study protocol is an output of a multi-disciplinary collaboration between sociology, ethics and computer science, and has received a favourable review from the University of Surrey Ethics Committee.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Knowledge exchange on adapting and developing sensors for use in household trials 
Organisation University of Bristol
Department Queen's School of Engineering
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution HomeSense contributions to this partnership are focussed on ongoing knowledge exchange and communication between the two projects (HomeSense and SPHERE), dedicated to the various technical, methodological, ethical and sociological/anthropological issues arising as part of this work. Specific actions so far include visits and giving seminars to wider institutional audiences.
Collaborator Contribution SPHERE (Sensor Platform for HEalthcare in a Residential Environment) is funded by the EPSRC (EP/KO31910/1). Their contributions to this partnerships mirror the ones by the HomeSense team, dedicated to the various technical, methodological, ethical and sociological/anthropological issues arising as part of this work and worth the formal knowledge exchange. Specific actions so far include visits and giving seminars to wider institutional audiences. SPHERE research will be presented in a session, organised by HomeSense: 'Sensors in social research', at the ESRC Research Methods Festival 2018
Impact Multi-disciplinary (at both sites) : computer and software engineering, sociology/anthropology, STS
Start Year 2016
 
Description 2016 Korea-EU Coordinated Calls RD Conference, 10 October 2016. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Professor Klaus Moessner presented HomeSense as part of a presentation, titled: 'One view on future cloud research' at the 2016 Korea-EU Coordinated Calls R&D Conference in Seoul, Korea.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description 2017 Computer Privacy and Data Protection (CPDP) Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Kristrún Gunnarsdóttir was invited to speak to a round table discussion on the right to mine personal data, at the 2017 CPDP Conference in Brussels, 25-27 January.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description 6th Japan-EU Symposium on ICT Research and Innovation, 7 October 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Professor Klaus Moessner presented HomeSense as part of a presentation on 'Situational security, controlled privacy' at the 6th Japan-EU Symposium on ICT Research and Innovation in Tokyo, Japan.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description 8th ESRC Research Methods Festival, 3-5 July 2018, Bath. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Kristrún Gunnarsdóttir and Nigel Gilbert convened a session, titled "Sensors in social research" at the 8th ESRC RMF2018 (3rd July). The session's objective was to report findings from sensor-based studies of social life and potentially sensitive settings, including from HomeSense. The contributing authors addressed the technical, observational, ethical and communicational aspects of applying this method. They reported on explaining the technology to participants, navigating installations and managing the research instruments in the field, on working across the social and computer science disciplines, how to make sense of sensor-generated data and how these data can be evaluated against well established data-gathering methods in social research.
The session was chaired and introduced by Nigel Gilbert, followed by four presentations: "Sensors as an observational method: confidence and trust between researchers and study participants" (Kristrún Gunnarsdóttir, University of Surrey); "From learning about sensors to living with sensors: Lessons from Public Involvement in a smart home for healthcare project" (Alison Burrows, University of Bristol); "Sensor-generated data: visualisations and analytic options" (Jie Jiang, University of Surrey); and "Mitigating practical and ethical issues in sensor-based real world studies" (Benjamin Bedwell, University of Nottingham).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.ncrm.ac.uk/RMF2018/programme/session.php?id=A3
 
Description Data and the Digital in Platform Societies - Lauching the Digital Societies research group in the Dept. of Sociology at the University of Surrey, 14 Dec. 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Kristrún Gunnarsdóttir gave a presentation, titled "Resourcing the data ecosystem in observational research: what are the assumptions and what to expect?" in contribution to a panel on "Life in Platform Societies". The presentation focused on researchers' assumptions and expectations in explaining to study participants complex sensor-based observational technologies by analogy with ordinary practices of mobile and networked computing, presumed to be of reasonable familiarity to most people as contemporary consumers. It spoke of building relationships, obtaining informed consent and committing participants to a form of technical labouring by delegating to them the responsibility of informing relevant others and obtaining their consent to ongoing passive observations. This talk was intended to open discussion about the extent to which advanced ICTs have propagated everyday private, occupational and public lives, to which publics are largely resigned while there is clear disconnect between resignation (presumed inevitability of these developments) and genuine acceptance. It was intended to open discussion about the role of the 'ethical researcher' who seeks to employ technologies and techniques originating in the emerging networks of practice (the data economy) and styles of reasoning that already have locked in publics by necessity rather than meaningful choice. As with other presentations at this event, there was lively discussion that has extended to further communications and information exchange between colleagues from a range of disciplines.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.surrey.ac.uk/department-sociology/research/digital-societies
 
Description ESRC Seminar event at the University of Southampton, 10 October 2016. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Kristrún Gunnarsdóttir and Dr Jie Jiang were Invited to give a presentation, titled: 'The HomeSense project: Novel instruments for household research and observational research' at an ESRC Seminar event at the University of Southampton: 'Microenterprise, technology and big data: new forms of digital enterprise and work and ways to research them', session on exploring new data and methods.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.southampton.ac.uk/geography/news/events/2016/10/esrcseminar.page
 
Description INSIGHTS: bringing together sensor technology and social research, 20-21 June 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact HomeSense organised a two-day workshop in London 20-21 June 2016, with participants from various fields, including ethics and legal scholarship, IoT and home automation, using sensors with Time Use studies, psychology research, computer-human interaction studies and citizen initiatives (Quantified Self).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://cress.soc.surrey.ac.uk/web/events/insights
 
Description Making sense of the 21st century household 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact At the 'Festival of Wonder', celebrating the 50th anniversary of the University of Surrey, the research team orchestrated a full-day demonstration of HomeSense technology in a simulated home setting with live sensors and data visualisation on large monitors. There was much interest in the project from visitors who could intercept the sensors to see the results and who enjoyed discussing the technology with the researchers. Several members of the general pubic left their contact details as potential study participants.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.surrey.ac.uk/festivalofwonder/pdf/festival-of-wonder-full-programme.pdf
 
Description NCRM Annual Centre Meetings: 2016, 2017, 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Professor Nigel Gilbert and Jie Jiang have presented updates on HomeSense activities and findings at the NCRM Annual Centre Meetings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016,2017,2018
 
Description NCRM Research Methods Festival, 5-7 July 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Professor Nigel Gilbert presented HomeSense and convened a session, titled: 'The Ethics of Sensors', at the NCRM Research Methods Festival, 5-7 July, University of Bath.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bM7BKjdW-dY&feature=youtu.be
 
Description Presenting HomeSense at the CVSSP, Surrey 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Jie Jiang presented HomeSense research at the Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing (CVSSP), 14 December 2017 at Surrey University.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Recognising Activities at Home: Digital and Human Sensors 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Jie Jiang presented (with Riccardo Pozza) a paper titled, "Recognising Activities at Home: Digital and Human Sensors", at the International Conference on Future Networks and Distributed Systems (ICFND'17), 19-20 July 2017 in Cambridge, UK.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://sensors-in-social-research.net/2017/12/11/recognising-activities-at-home-using-sensors-a-home...
 
Description Research Exchange at the University of Surrey, 1 June 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Kristrún Gunnarsdóttir presented HomeSense to the Sociology Department at the University of Surrey, with focus on key considerations in bringing sensors into social research methodologies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description SPHERE - Sensor Platform for HEalthcare in a Residential Environment 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Kristrún Gunnarsdóttir organised a seminar at the 5G Innovation Centre in Surrey, 9 May 2017, inviting Pete Woznowski and Alison Burrows to speak on social-anthropological and engineering research for the SPHERE project (Sensor Platform for HEalthcare in a Residential Environment) at the University of Bristol. Pete presented the architecture of the
SPHERE system and discussed the main challenges of deploying the system in up to 100 homes. Alison presented various completed and ongoing user studies, which are contributing to a better understanding of how to design smart home technologies for health and wellbeing.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description SPHERE - Sensor Platform for HEalthcare in a Residential Environment 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Klaus Moessner organised a seminar at the 5G Innovation Centre in Surrey, 5 March 2019, inviting George Oikonomou to talk about developments of the SPHERE project (Sensor Platform for HEalthcare in a Residential Environment) at the University of Bristol. George illustrated and explained the technical and organisational features of their field trial in participants' households in the Bristol area, and the trials they organised at the SPHERE House (living lab). He explained the rationale for many of the practical arrangements and choices made to adequately address the more sensitive aspects of participating in the field trial. He presented key findings and elaborated the potential for future developments in using sensors to improve upon the technology and approach to implementation in research and application scenarios.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Seminar: Using digital sensors to understand activity in the home 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Nigel Gilbert from University of Surrey explained how digital sensors collecting data like motion, temperature, humidity and noise can contribute to social science to a seminar at NatCen, London. There was great interest in the potential for using sensors in conjunction with social surveys.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.natcen.ac.uk/events/upcoming-events/2017/may/using-digital-sensors-to-understand-activity...
 
Description Sensor-generated data: visualisations and analytic options 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Jie Jiang presented at the 8th ESRC RMF2018 in Bath, explaining and demonstrating some of the options available to researchers to visualize and analyse sensor-generated data. She took examples from her work on HomeSense, of what can and cannot be inferred from such data and what the options are to evaluate the data by comparison with other kinds of data sources. This talk was intended as a taster of what can be achieved using visualizations and various analytic options, however, her talk foregrounded how these efforts require effective collaboration between expertise in computing and expertise in social science.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.ncrm.ac.uk/RMF2018/programme/session.php?id=A3
 
Description Sensors as an observational method: confidence and trust between researchers and study participants 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Kristrún Gunnarsdóttir presented at the 8th ESRC RMF2018 in Bath, reporting on the trialling of the use of sensors in people's homes, as part of the HomeSense project. She reported on explaining the technology to participants and discussing with them the purpose of the trial and future direction of this kind of data gathering and observation. She also reflected on the decision to interview participants at the end of the trial, asking them to explain the study after the fact, especially how they would explain ongoing observations to visitors and house guests. Key considerations in this talk centred on the problematics of: 1. communicating complex and mysterious technologies and the implications of consenting to their use in private settings; and 2. delegating responsibility to research participants, to adequately inform all relevant others and obtaining their consent.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.ncrm.ac.uk/RMF2018/programme/session.php?id=A3
 
Description Sensors in Research 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Kristrún Gunnarsdóttir (w/HomeSense team) hosted an open inter-departmental event at the University of Surrey 4 April 2017, aimed at knowledge exchange and dialogue among researchers who use sensors/actuators in their research, and to gain insights into different priorities and stakes in 'smart' solutions for IoT, security, healthcare and behaviour intervention (physical/psychological), veterinary research and more.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Sequence Analysis and STATA seminar, 19 January 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Jie Jiang attended a seminar on Sequence Analysis and STATA, organised by Morten Wahrendorf at the University of Manchester.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Speaking event at SPHERE, University of Bristol, 1 December 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Kristrún Gunnarsdóttir and Dr Jie Jiang were Invited to give a presentation, titled: 'Making sense of the household' at SPHERE, an EPSRC Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration (IRC), University of Bristol.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.irc-sphere.ac.uk/archived-news-and-events
 
Description The real post other 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Kristrún Gunnarsdóttir spoke on managing "ground truth" in HomeSense data analysis at a symposium, on "post-truth" at the TIK Centre for Technology, Innovation and Culture, 6-7 December 2017 at the University of Oslo, Norway. This event was part of a research collaboration in building an EU-wide network on social-cultural and legal issues in 'smart' technology developments.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Using IoT to study life at home 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Jie Jiang shared lessons learned from the research strategy of the HomeSense project at UK/Japan Workshop on 'Acceptability and Value of IoT in the home', 7-8 September 2017 at the British Embassy in Tokyo. Her contribution was titled, "Using IoT to study life at home".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://sensors-in-social-research.net/2017/08/22/dr-jie-jiang-to-share-lessons-learned-from-research...
 
Description Workshop on specifying and characterising rich data, 27 September 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Kristrún Gunnarsdóttir was invited to join an expert consultation workshop on specifying and characterising rich data at the Exchange Avenue, Schiphol, Amsterdam. This research event was organised by the H2020-funded project RICHFIELDS (GA: 654280)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.richfields.eu/stakeholders-workshop-food-and-health-big-data/