Latin American Antiracism in a 'Post-Racial' Age

Lead Research Organisation: University of Cambridge
Department Name: Sociology

Abstract

Latin America has often been held up as a region where racism is less of a problem than in regions such as the United States or Europe. Because most people are "mestizos" (mixed race) and mixture is often seen as the essence of national identity, clear racial boundaries are blurred, resulting in comparatively low levels of racial segregation and a traditionally low public profile for issues of race. In Europe and the United States, the racial mixture and interaction across racial boundaries, which are typical of Latin America and are becoming more visible elsewhere, are heralded by some observers as leading towards a 'post-racial' reality, where anti-racism and multiculturalism - seen in this view as divisive policies that accentuate social differences - become unnecessary. Critics point out that mixture is not an antidote to racial inequality and racism in Latin America: they all coexist. This severely qualifies claims that mixture can lead to a 'post-racial' era.

This project will investigate anti-racist practices and ideologies in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia and Mexico. The project will contribute to conceptualising and addressing problems of racism, racial inequality and anti-racism in the region. We also propose that Latin America presents new opportunities for thinking about racism and anti-racism in a 'post-racial' world. Understanding how racism and anti-racism are conceived and practised in Latin America - in contexts in which mixture is pervasive - can help us to understand how to think about racism and anti-racism in other regions of the world, where notions of race have been changing in some respects towards Latin American patterns. It is also crucial to show the variety of ways in which mixture operates and co-exists with racism in Latin America - a region that is far from homogeneous.

Research teams in each country, working with a range of organisations concerned with racism and discrimination, will explore how the organisations conceptualise and address key problems, which are becoming more salient in other regions, which confront similar scenarios. First, how to practice anti-racism when most people are mixed and when they may deny the importance of race and racism and themselves be both victims and the perpetrators of racism. Second, how to conceptualise and practice anti-racism when "culture" seems to be the dominant discourse for talking about difference, but when physical difference (skin colour, hair type, etc.) remain powerful but often unacknowledged signs that move people to discriminate. Third, how to understand racism and combat it when race and class coincide to a great extent and make it easy to deny that race and racism are important factors. Fourth, how to make sure anti-racism addresses gender difference effectively, in a context in which mixture between white men and non-white women has been seen as the founding act of the nation. Fifth, how to pursue anti-racism when it is often claimed that there is little overt racist violence and that this is evidence of racial tolerance. We will explore how these elements structure - and may constrain - ideas about (anti-)racism within institutions, organisations and everyday practice.

Our project will work with organisations in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia and Mexico - countries that capture a good range of the region's diversity - to explore how racism and anti-racism are conceptualised and addressed in state and non-state circles, in legislation and the media, and in a variety of campaigns and projects. We aim to strengthen anti-racist practice in Latin America by feeding back our findings and by helping build networks; and to provide useful insights for understanding racism and anti-racism within and outside the region.

Planned Impact

The non-academic beneficiaries of this research will include social activists, human rights organisations, media professionals, educators, civil servants and policy-makers interested in engaging with anti-racist practice, mainly in Latin America but also beyond. In Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia and Mexico, these audiences will include:

- Activists in indigenous and black social movements
- Civil servants and policy-makers in government departments charged with addressing anti-racism and anti-discrimination agendas and attending to the rights of ethnic minorities; these may include officials involved in the juridical branch of government, who deal with the legal dimensions of racism.
- National and international NGOs and networks addressing themes of anti-racism and anti-discrimination and campaigning for the rights of ethnic minorities.
- Journalists interested in issues of racial inequality.
- Educators interested in issues of anti-racism (likely to he be phrased as a matter of "diversity and equality"), who may be charged with delivering curricula attuned to these issues
- Members of the general public interested in these themes.

These audiences will be engaged by means of the project workshops, which will have a component to open to the public; the project website, which will include short videos and on-line versions of pamphlets directed an non-academic audiences; and the national launch event. The Advisory Groups are an important means of creating impact, directly by including activist members, working in NGOs and civic society associations and indirectly by tapping into their own wide networks; the non-academic members of the AGs are Emigdio Cuesta (Conferencia Nacional de Organizaciones Afrocolombianas, Colombia), Israel Reyes Larrea (Colectivo Africa A.C., Mexico), Arian Laguna (Observatorio del Racismo, Bolivia), and Sueli Carneiro (Geledés Instituto da Mulher Negra, Brazil).

Outside Latin America, we aim to engage with a similar range of beneficiaries, but in a less intensive way, by inviting selected people to the final symposium, sending out relevant publications and by means of advertising the project website.

The research will benefit these sets of people in Latin America and beyond by providing detailed information on anti-racist activities in a wide range of contexts in different countries; by highlighting the different strategies the various organisations use to address the obstacles facing effective anti-racist action; and by stimulating debate on what anti-racism is as a concept and practice. We anticipate that the project's reach across four Latin American countries with very different histories, demographics and politics will prove very interesting for these beneficiaries, plus allowing some of them, directly involved in the project, the opportunity to enhance their transnational networks and their engagement with academics.

We think that the Latin American material will prove of interest to people interested in promoting anti-racism in other regions of the world. For example, recent cases of alleged racism on the football pitch involving Latin American players, raised issues about cultural differences in the understanding of race and racism and whether it was appropriate to judge all behaviour by a single standard. The UK's Football Association sought the expert opinion of the UK-COI on a matter of this kind, indicating the interest of this organisation - not to mention the press and many fans writing in football blogs - in understanding anti-racism in a global perspective.
 
Title Racismo en Colombia (with English subtitles) 
Description A 5-minute video was produced and edited by the LAPORA-Colombian research team. This material was shared via email and social media with 20 participants. The video illustrates how different activists and organizations understand the concept of racism and how it has been denied and misrecognized in Colombia. This visual piece shows how some ethno-educators and activists seek to challenge racism through pedagogical strategies and state educational policies. It also highlights the role of bodily anti-racism, as black women seek to deconstruct racist stereotypes. The video has been shared with different activists in Colombia and in Latin America in order to show how racism is challenged by different organizations in the region. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact The video has had 240 views on YouTube, since being uploaded in July 2019. Many organizations are pleased to know that their efforts and actions have been disseminated and can serve as examples for other organizations, as expressed by Emilia Eneyda Valencia, a black woman leader of the Asociacion de Mujeres Afrocolombianas (AMAFROCOL). Another the participant of the LAPORA Project, Jon Jak Becerra (who recently won a case against racial discrimination in Colombia) indicated after watching the video: "Muchas gracias por el apoyo, esto me motiva a seguir luchando y la idea es prepararme y seguir contribuyendo en la lucha del pueblo negro por la reivindicación de nuestros derechos. (Thank you very much for the support, this motivates me to continue struggling, and the idea is to prepare myself and continue contributing to the black people's struggles for the recognition of our rights)" (July 11, 2019). 
URL https://youtu.be/AiNLYSAvOHM
 
Title Video "'Nunca habrá un negro en mi ejército'. Delito de odio en Ecuador" ("'There will be no black man in my army'. Hate crime in Ecuador") 
Description Video that narrates the legal case of Michael Arce vs. lieutenant Fernando Encalada, the first ruling for racial hate crime in Ecuador. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact After the first launch of this video on the internet, we received a request by the Office of the Ombudsman in Ecuador to allow the use of this material in training activities of the Office. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VyXHsA5MmVA
 
Title Video: La Vocera 
Description As one of the impact outputs of the project in Mexico we produced a video called La Vocera, which collects the reflections of indigenous women on the impact of the candidacy of Maria de Jesus Patricio, an indigenous woman, for the Mexican presidency in the 2018 elections. Maria de Jesus Patricio was elected the representative and spokeperson (vocera) for the Concejo Indigena de Gobierno (CIG) of the Consejo Nacional Indigena (CNI). The CNI was one of the cases selected for study in this project and this action, of movilizing one inidgenous woman as a presidential candidate and the participation in the debate, is considered one of the most radical antirracist actions in Mexico. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact We have shown the video in a variety of settings. First in the presentation of results event in Mexico City but also in OAxaca. We have also presented it to the women who participated in the video itself who haven't seen it as whole. That presentation led to one of the participants to invite us to present the video to the teacher's union of the state so they can distribute it in all of the schools of the state. we have also used the film in workshops about racism led by an organizaction called COPERA. People who have seen it have responded very well to the video. Felt compelled and moved by the message. We are planning its distribution and release throughout 2019. 
URL https://www.dropbox.com/sh/43xyz66o4b85c66/AABiUvd0YS9iLnkrGivZTdW8a?dl=0
 
Description Our key findings are these:
1. In countries characterised by a history of extensive race mixture and a national self-image as mestizo (mixed) societies, it is often difficult to publicly name racism, especially when talking about Indigenous peoples.
2. This notwithstanding, the contrast between Mexico and Brazil - both countries in which the image of being mestizo has been turned into a national mythology - is striking, insofar as the former is only just beginning to recognise racism as an issue whereas the latter has officially recognised it as a problem for some time. This may be linked to the first point insofar as blackness in Brazil is a much greater presence, demographically, politically and symbolically, and it seems that race and racism are usually more readily associated with Black people than with Indigenous people. Colombia and Ecuador sit between Mexico and Brazil in terms of the perceived legitimacy and degree of public discourse about racism as a social problem.
3. When Indigenous and Black people suffer direct violence, it is more likely they will talk of their problems and struggles in terms of racism. We saw this reaction particularly in relation to the challenges of high-level political participation and in the criminalization of social protest.
4. In some anti-racist activity, the (Black and Indigenous) body very often becomes a central point of reference in terms of making public interventions through bodily presence (road blockages, civic strikes, demonstrations, marches) or devoting time and energy to aesthetic re-evaluation of colour, hair-type, facial features, dress, cultural symbols, etc. The body and its affective charge are powerful sites of anti-racist struggle.
5. Less effective in many ways are legal instruments that penalise racist acts. It is often very difficult to prove in court, for example, a racial hate crime. Such legislation narrows the gaze and limits action. However, when a court case is occasionally successful it can have very powerful effects and create public debate. Legal instruments also open a space for concrete action, albeit targeted quite narrowly. These instruments are necessary but by no means sufficient.
6. Upward mobility by Black and Indigenous people can have useful anti-racist effects, in terms of breaking with rooted stereotypes of these people as poor and uneducated, and creating a middle class intermediaries who can use their position to strengthen Black and Indigenous communities. But social ascent can also induce conformity to middle-class norms (including unwillingness to talk about racism) and can also reinforce class inequalities.
7. The struggles to defend land rights that are a common feature in Latin American Indigenous and Black communities can also have powerful anti-racist dimensions insofar as they aim to ensure a material base for autonomy and identity. On the other hand, because they challenge the dispossession that has been at the heart of colonial and post-colonial racial hierarchies, these struggles also tend to elicit a backlash involving harassment and violence. Revealing the racialised history behind dispossession can assist Black and Indigenous communities to build alliances with others who are also being dispossessed, without losing sight of the specificity of the racialised dimensions of the that history.
8. Anti-racist activity can reproduce gender hierarchies and racial-gender stereotypes (e.g. of Black women or Indigenous men) and therefore anti-racism needs to be constantly gender aware.
9. Racism is often dealt with, especially by the state, in terms of discrimination and may well be elided with other discriminations (gender, disability, sexual orientation, etc.). This evades the specificity of racism and, above all, makes it hard to grasp processes of structural racism.
10. Linked to the above, a key question is how to define racism (and thus anti-racism). Our project argues that a broad definition is needed in order to capture the diverse and deeply embedded processes that enact and consolidate disadvantage and privilege and their racialised dimensions.
11. Overall, we found that anti-racism is helpfully seen as a very diverse set of activities, which do not necessarily talk explicitly about racism as a key issue, but instead employ "alternative grammars" of anti-racism that talk about struggles around land, justice, well-being, security, etc., but that acquire a racialised dimension insofar as they are being used by Black and Indigenous peoples (and in principle by mestizos as well). All these activities have their own strengths and weaknesses and we found that organisations that have a clear appreciation of the structural character of inequality are well placed to assess their own strengths and weaknesses, while those that have a clear appreciation of the way racism shapes such structures of inequality can use such knowledge to direct their activities accordingly.

We met many of our project objectives insofar as we investigated anti-racist practices and ideologies in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador and Mexico, exploring how these work in a "mestizo" (mixed-race) context, and focusing on how diverse anti-racist organisations tackle in various ways the relationship between biology and culture, race and class, race and violence and race and gender. Our objectives of contributing to addressing problems of racism and racial inequality, and of strengthening anti-racist activity by building links, have been partially met (in terms of raising awareness about racism among some organisations with which we worked, and bringing together different organisations): the achievement of these objectives is still in progress, as these processes take a long time to show results. Our objective of providing lessons for anti-racist activities more widely has been partially met (through dissemination in the UK) and is also a long-term goal still in process.
Exploitation Route Our findings indicate an array of issues that could be taken forward by different actors particularly in relation to the broad and pluralistic definitions of racism and anti-racism that emerge from the research. This would allow people working in sectors such as legislation, culture, policy, education and environment to consider issues and struggles that Black, Indigenous and people of colour go through, in their racialised dimension. For example in terms of legislation, the limits and possibilities of legal instruments open a space for concrete action, albeit narrow. In terms of governance and culture and education, the ways in which the term 'discrimination' is used makes it harder to move to an understanding of structural racism. The link between violence and racism can help actors concerned with access to justice, environmental struggles, social, culture and education policy development, democratic processes and community building understand the racialised dimension of Black and Indigenous people's experiences and struggles. The ways in which the body is being understood and resignified by Black and Indigenous peoples can be taken forward by actors in the education and cultural sectors to consider how to strengthen processes and interventions. Overall, our research suggests that a multiplicity of anti-racist actions can be welcomed (including ones that use an "alternative grammar" of anti-racism), but that a clear appreciation of the deeply-embedded structural dimensions of racialised inequality and oppression is needed in order to guide and strengthen such actions.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Environment,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

URL https://www.lapora.sociology.cam.ac.uk/
 
Description The project was planned to have a length of two years (Jan 2017-Dec 2018). We have asked for a no-cost extension to continue developing the impact, presentations and publications of the project until July 2019. To disseminate our results to actors in a variety of sectors, we have developed a variety of activities throughout the fieldwork, analysis and writing-up period, which will continue during the current phase of the project's extension. During fieldwork, we held events open to the general public, in which we presented the project and its ongoing findings, especially in relation the country in which the event was being held. The first of these was in Brazil (May 2017), followed by Colombia (September 2017), Mexico (January 2018) and Ecuador (July 2018). These public events were mainly attended by students and other academics, but also by third sector workers, journalists and activists. We held our final academic project symposium in Manchester in November 2018 and separately organised a half-day impact session in a Manchester city centre venue to present and discuss the project's findings with UK-based antiracist organisations and other relevant stakeholders, who we thought would be interested what might be learned from the Latin American material. Starting in August 2018 we began to put into practice our pathways to impact strategy. In each of the four countries, we held a public launch event to present the project's findings, its website and two key documents we had developed: a short accessible key fact sheet for each country and a longer briefing report on the project as a whole for a wide public and interested stakeholders. We produced these documents in the three main languages of the project (English, Spanish and Portuguese). In each country smaller meetings were also held with one or two groups of interested stakeholders led by organisations that had participated in our research. We were successful in securing funding of £20,000 from the ESRC IAA fund in Cambridge which allowed us to fund these and additional impact activities. Overall, we worked with over 40 organisations, 25 of them more intensively. In November-December 2018, we held 17 engagement activities in the four countries with over 400 individuals, including justice operators and human rights advocates, Church-based NGOs, government operatives, members of grass-roots organisations promoting indigenous and Afro-descendant identities and rights, and members of Afro-descendant and indigenous communities facing violence, land encroachments and environmental degradation. One Colombian indigenous leader said "The project has helped us think about the problem [of racism], a problem that we had but did not see". An Afro-Colombian activist said it was valuable to learn about "how anti-racist practices are implemented, [what are] the mechanisms", and a Mexican indigenous leader concurred: "It was useful for me to locate anti-racist strategies, which are not always named as such by the [social] movements". In collaboration with grass-roots groups, we made films about relevant cases, which have helped to publicise abuses. One concerned Michael Arce, an Ecuadorian soldier who suffered racial abuse from an army instructor who was later prosecuted for racial hate crime. This has over 1200 views on YouTube and has been widely shown in Ecuador. We used this and other legal cases from our project in workshops with Ecuadorian justice operators and human rights advocates designed to improve their ability to handle cases of racism. The Ombudsman's Office said they would use our findings for their education programs. The legal clinic of the Catholic University of Quito said the workshop helped in handling the 2-3 cases of racial discrimination they process monthly. Another video was about an indigenous Mexican woman who ran for presidential candidate nomination and was subjected to racist abuse on social media called La Vocera. The video used many indigenous languages and one indigenous activist said that this "will strengthen the identity of our peoples". Other activities include producing photo-calendars, legal workshops, workshops with children and teachers, with the direct collaboration and participation of people involved in the organisations with whom we have worked in each country.
First Year Of Impact 2017
Sector Education,Environment,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description Cultures of Anti-Racism in Latin America
Amount £828,549 (GBP)
Funding ID AH/S004823/1 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2019 
End 09/2022
 
Description ESRC IAA
Amount £20,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of Cambridge 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2018 
End 03/2019
 
Description Roundtable of Psycosocial Dialogues "Psychology, Law and Diversity" and presentation of the video "There will never be a black man in my army" 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact This was an event that resulted from the collaboration with Gino Grondona, expert witness in the legal case on hate crime affecting Michael Arce. We co-organized a first roundtable discussing topics at the intersection of law and forms of social diversity (gender, sexualities and race) with a researcher on gender issues in Ecuador and a legal activists working on issues of sexuality and reproductive rights. Here we presented the video based on our research on the legal case of hate crime and reflections on when the law has been effective in addressing racial discrimination.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description A talk at CEBRAP - São Paulo 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The event was intended to be the first public presentation of Lapora. Held in CEBRAP, a research institution in São Paulo, the event was attended for more than 50 people. Peter Wade and Monica Moreno Figueroa presented the projects objectives and general context, then I presented how I would carry on the project in Brazil. The talk was helpful to have initial feedbacks and to explore possible ways to pursue the research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description A talk at Quilombo Africa in Pará 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Presentation of LAPORA project at the Quilombo Africa, Pará - Brazil. Around 30 people attended the event, which helped the attendees to link the their local experiences of racism with the national and international spheres.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description A talk or Presentation of the project and first findings of Mexico´s fieldwork in CIESAS Pacífico Sur 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The presentation at the CIESAS Pacífico Sur helped some of the assistants, mostly from the master or PhD programmes and working from another academic disciplines, to consider the issue of racism as a central axis in their researches. The presentation also helped to spark the discussion about the importance of generating public policies in this regard.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description A talk or Presentation of the project and first findings of Mexico´s fieldwork in Centro Cultural San Pablo, Oaxaca 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The public event of Lapora held at the San Pablo Cultural Center, in the city of Oaxaca was attended not only by people from the academic sector, but also for teachers of basic education and people from the indigenous communities of Oaxaca. The event helped to position the issue of racism in the debate of the public sphere and through a non-academic language, so that both attending members of the academy and people from indigenous communities sparked a discussion in the event, questioning what are the measures that should be taken both those concerning public policies, and those that have an impact in the everyday life.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Article published online in MONITOR, Global Intelligence on Racism 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Monica Moreno Figueroa and Peter Wade published an article titled "Is race mixture an antidote to racism?" for the website MONITOR, Global Intelligence on Racism.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://monitoracism.eu/is-race-mixture-an-antidote-to-racism/
 
Description Day of Afro-Ecuadorian Cultural Awareness and Identity, The British School, Quito - Ecuador 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact This was a workshop about racism and antiracism in Ecuador with students, ages 11-18, at the British School in Quito, Ecuador. In this event, LAPORA presented notions of racism and antiracism, structural and every-day racism and a case study of hate crime in Ecuador. After the event, students presented knowledge they gained at the workshop. Students highlighted the discrimination that Afro-Ecuadorian people experience in Ecuador, as well as discrimination based on skin-color and the way it is related to what students called their lifestyle (access to differentiated opportunities and forms of daily discrimination). According to teacher Danielle Parker, students gained a greater understanding of systemic discrimination.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Debate and focus group with Nasa, Quichua and Yanacona indigenous leaders of the Cabildos of Cali, Colombia 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Debate and focus group discussion with Nasa, Quichua and Yanacona indigenous authorities from the Cabildos of Cali. The LAPORA team presented the project and some of its findings. During the meeting indigenous leaders discussed their approaches in order to prevent and ameliorate discrimination within their communities. The topic of racial discrimination sparked new questions for the authorities, who tend to avoid using the term racism. We discussed about the implications of recognizing racism among urban indigenous communities in order to promote relevant anti-racist policies and actions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Encounter with Afro-Ecuadorian Women to reflect on issues of racial discrimination and racism in Ecuador. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact This was an event of sharing experience between Project Lapora, representatives of Fundación Azúcar (one of the case studies in the project) and the leaders of CONAMUNE. We also presented the videos produced by Lapora on the cases of hate crime, environmental racism in Esmeraldas, and the work with Afro-Ecuadorian women carried out by Fundación Azúcar.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Event of presentation of results of project LAPORA and roundtable on racism and antiracism in Quito, Ecuador 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Around 60 people attended the event of presentation of results of project LAPORA with an overview of the 5 case-studies in Ecuador. The event included a roundtable for the discussion of racism and antiracism in Ecuador with an emphasis on hate crime (Michael Arce), discrimination in public places in Otavalo (Kuntur Muenala), discrimination in the assignment of a facility for Fundación Azúcar (Sonia Viveros), and the perspective from the plurinational perspective of indigenous organizations (Floresmilo Simbaña).
Participants requested access to more information. A teacher from a high school in Quito enquired about the possibility of training on the topic directed to primary and secondary students at her institution.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Event with members of communities from Saraguro, Loja province, Ecuador on antiracist struggles and the criminalization of social protest. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Twenty people attender the event of the presentation of results of project LAPORA. The event had an emphasis on the criminalization of social protest (Fernando García and María Moreno) and the participation of speakers on the impact of criminalization and judicialization of 29 Saraguro people (José Sarango, Luisa Lozano, Fausto Lozano) and the legal struggle of the criminalized (Vicente Vivanco, Polibio Guamán). Presentation of video produced by LAPORA on the case.
Teachers of the bilingual education manifested their interest in that the presentations of results be taken to the communities, for a wider dissemination of results beyond the urban centre of Saraguro.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Event with members of rural communities from the north of Esmeraldas province, Ecuador on antiracist struggles and the defense of Afro-Ecuadorian territories. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact 35 people attended the event where the findings of the project on the situation of antiracist struggles, the struggle of territory and environmental suffering were presented. Additionally, there was an updated presentation on the situation of contamination of the river Wimbí and the expert report on ancestrally of the community of Wimbí, and a broader presentation on the effects of extractive industries (timber, oil palm, and gold mining) in the region. In the discussion, there were questions on how to use the information presented to address the lack of response of State institutions. Additionally, after the event, the country research team had a meeting with professors of the local university, Universidad Luis Vargas Torres, who were interested in collaborating with us in training related to race, racism and gender. We were invited for a presentation of project results at the Universidad on January 2019.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Fieldwork visit of Lapora Research Team 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact On this visit, the Lapora Research members Monica Moreno Figueroa, Peter Wade, Emiko Saldivar and Judith Perez accompanied me in the research site Rede Contra a Violência. The experience allowed them to have first-hand narratives about anti-racist strategies in Rio de Janeiro and to hear about different ways in which racism operates.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Fieldwork visit of Lapora Research Team 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact On this visit, the Lapora research members Monica Moreno Figueroa, Peter Wade, Emiko Saldivar and Judith Perez accompanied Luciane in the research site Ilê Omolu e Oxum. Luciane presented the research objectives to the organization, followed by discussion among participants. The experience allowed the Lapora team to hear first-hand narratives about anti-racist strategies in Rio de Janeiro and to hear about different ways in which racism operates. The Ile Omolu e Oxum members were able to reflect on their experiences of practitioners of afro-Brazilian religion and their anti-racist struggle.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Focus group discussion and presentation with Nasa indigenous teachers. Visit of Dr Monica Moreno-Figueroa to the school. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Presentation of the project and focus group discussion with Nasa indigenous teachers in Cali. Teachers discussed their perceptions on discrimination and racism, and how this affects indigenous displaced children in the city of Cali.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Impact event with UK stakeholders 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact The event aimed to create a productive dialogue between members of the team carrying out a research project on anti-racism in Latin America and invited UK-based stakeholders with an interest in anti-racism. One of the premises of the project was that the Latin American experience might be interesting for people and organisations outside Latin America, who are also challenging racism; and that it might be useful for people on both sides of the Atlantic to build networks. We had representatives from these organisations: UK Race and Europe Network (UKREN), Manchester Museum, Ahmed Iqbal Ullah Education Trust, People in Harmony, LASNET (part of Migrant Support, and Coalition of Latin Americans in the UK), Manchester City Council, and Liverpool International Slavery Museum. Feedback from participants indicated that they valued learning about the Latin American cases and having the opportunity to reflect comparatively and make links with other UK organisations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.lapora.sociology.cam.ac.uk/events/impact-event-uk-stakeholders
 
Description Indigenous Intercultural Fest 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact The project aroused more interest to the participants of the table,
which was a bit foreign to the young assistants. About these ones, they asked if we did not find
youth projects to combat racism. On this point, the Nahua and Wixárika lawyers mention
that legal tools already exist to address cases of racial discrimination, but are not known
between the migrant indigenous population but that diverts attention to solve the cases of
racial discrimination.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://www.udg.mx/es/noticia/preparan-cuarto-festival-intercultural-indigena-tlaquepaque
 
Description Interview on public TV news programme 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Monica Moreno Figueroa and Peter Wade were interviewed on a prime-time morning news programme broadcast by the state TV station.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YYHG6D5sZ3I&index=6&list=PLg5nPlQkaUssLhKaFmlEBK_fhKyhF3EEJ&t=0s&fbc...
 
Description Invited talk at Loughborough University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Invited talk at Human Geography Seminar, Loughborough University, UK. Title "Bodily anti-racism: what bodies 'do' to contest racism in public spaces".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Meeting with Huella Negra Collective in Mexico City 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Lapora carried out a meeting with Huella Negra Collective. Here, Huella Negra not only shared its perspective about the uses of the terms afro, afromexican or afrodescendent, but also explained the process by which its calendar tried to create a diverse narrative about afro population in Mexico.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Meeting with ethno-education consultants at Colombia's Ministry of Education 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact July, 25 2019. Meeting with consultants who are developing recommendations on ethno-education policies at the Ministry of Education in Bogotá. We shared our findings on how educational anti-racist practices are still limited by multicultural and mestizaje ideologies. We discussed how ethno-educators found it difficult to critically address the reproduction of racism and racialized hierarchies with students. Despite these limitations, many ethno-educators make significant efforts to question the silencing of the contributions of the Afro-Colombian population and the reproduction of racist stereotypes within primary schools. Some of our findings suggest: 1) Teachers embracing anti-racists strategies tend to be isolated in their schools, as these practices are not transversal, but depend on the individual will or interests of each teacher. For example, the responsibility of implementing the contents of the Afro-Colombian Studies Chair (Cátedra de Estudios Afrocoombianos) rests on the commitment of individual ethno-educators, and they are not mainstreamed into the educational plans of each institution, nor are they internalized or valued by all teachers and managers of the schools. 2) Even when teachers are aware of the gendered effects of racism within schools their anti-racist pedagogical strategies are not considering these dimensions. The only activities aiming to account for gender differences are workshops promoted by the Eleggúa Network that focus on the cultural value of hair and braids among black girls. 3) Indigenous intercultural educators do not address racism as an explicit form of oppression. Instead they recognize the existence of ethnic discrimination, while their strategies focus on achieving cultural dignity and visibility.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Paper given at Graduate Institute of Geneva 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Peter Wade and Mónica Moreno Figueroa gave a presentation entitled "Inflections of Antiracism" at the Graduate Institute of Geneva on 30 April. The audience included postgraduates and undergraduates, as well as other academics. The presentation sparked debate.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Paper presentation at the American Anthropological Association Meeting 2018, San Jose, California 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Around 25 people attended the panel "Negotiating Racial Identity in Latinamerica", where I presented the paper "Legal Antiracist Struggles in Latin America in a Post-Recognition Age".
Members of the audience were interested to know where the publications of this research will be available.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.americananthro.org/AttendEvents/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1702
 
Description Participation on Roundtable on Racism and Territorial Struggles with the Ombudsman's Office of Ecuador 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Description: Roundtable discussion in relation to the case of Wimbí, in the northern Pacific of Ecuador, Esmeraldas province. The roundtable was moderated by a representative of the Ombudsman's office, and the discussants were María Moreno from project LAPORA, Rolan Merlin, local authority of Wimbí, and Jeaneth Yépez, anthropologist who has worked on inter-ethnic relations in Esmeraldas.

Participants: around 30 participants including project participants, public officials postgraduate students, scholars, and members of the community.

Impact evidence: Participants inquired about the possibility of presenting the case of Wimbí in the province of Imbabura, in the northern highlands of Ecuador. In this province, mining activities in ancestral lands of Afro-Ecuadorian populations have increased. The representative of the Vicariate of Esmeraldas, Isabel Padilla, who has supported the struggle of communities of the north of Esmeraldas, found that it would be productive to present the social and environmental impacts of mining, as shown in the case of Wimbí, to the Afrodescendant populations of Imbabura. We discussed about the possibility of co-organizing and event in Ibarra, the capital of the province of Imbabura.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Presentation Investigating Antiracist Actions in Ecuador, at Catholic University, Quito 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Presentation of some preliminary results of the project and of a draft version of the video Nunca habra un negro en mi ejercito: Caso Arce y delito de odio en Ecuador, attended by students of the Department of Anthropology and other schools in the Social Sciences. The presentation sparked interest on the legal case of hate crime. Students also further reflected on the subject on a class short paper for professor Pia Vera from the Department of Anthropology.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation and debate with Kellog Foundation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Supporters
Results and Impact This talk helped to trace a possible routein the struggle against racism in Mexico in terms of research and political alliances.The reflexions carried out in this meeting were focus on how to mesure racism in mixed race population in a context of colorbliness.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation at Ecuador public event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact As part of the project workshop in Quito, Ecuador 3 July 2018 we held an evening session open to the public, which was attended by post-graduate students and some ethnic movement activists. Monica Moreno and Peter Wade gave an introductory talk outlining the project, and Maria Moreno then gave a longer presentation about anti-racism in Ecuador.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Presentation of LAPORA at FLACSO, Quito 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Presentation of the project in the Latin American Faculty of Social Sciences in FLACSO, Ecuador, on October 26, 2017. The presentation sparked questions from postgraduate and undergraduate students who are conducting or are interested in doing research on racism in Ecuador. After this event, a professor from the Catholic University of Ecuador invited us to present the project in their program, for undergraduate students.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation of findings at Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colmbia 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Presentation of final results at the Universidad del Valle in Cali, Colombia. The presentation was followed by a debates and questions on the reaches and limits of anti-racism, on the role of positionality within anti-racist research, and the impact of social media.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Presentation of initial analysis Centro Cultural San Pablo, Oaxaca 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact More than 100 people attended this event in Oaxaca, which helped local organizations and Mexican scholars to push forward the discussion of racism in the country.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation of initial results in Bogotá - Colombia 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact In the event held at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá, Colômbia we were able to share ideas and to receive important questions to help us develop the research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation of project results in the annual meeting of AMAFROCOL 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Lapora presented the results of the project in a panel organised by the social movement "Asociacion de Mujeres Afrocolombianas" (AMAFROCOL). We were invited to present our findings regarding how AMAFROCOL has contributed to anti-racist practices in Colombia. We discussed about the impact of strategies focusing on aesthetics, beauty, subjective transformation and sense of empowerment. The presentation was followed by debates with black women activists from Amafrocol and other allied organisations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012,2018
 
Description Presentation of the Lapora project at the School of Advanced Studies, at the Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colombia 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Public presentation of the Lapora project at the School of Advanced Studies, at the Universidad del Valle. 2017. This Summer School provided a comparative space for academic debate around race and ethnic inequalities in various contexts in Latin America, Europe and Africa. The event was organised by Universidad del Valle in cooperation with the University of Bayreuth (Germany), University of Salvador Bahia (Brazil), University of Maputo (Mozambique).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation of the first finding Mexicos fieldwork in CEPIADET organization 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact The presentation sparkled collective reflections between CEPIADET organization members about the importance of pointing out racism in the public sphere.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation of the first finding Mexicos fieldwork in CONAPRED (National Council to Prevent Discrimination) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The presentation of the first findings of Mexico´s fieldwork helped to give theoretical tools to CONAPRED in order to have a clear understanding of what racism is, and about the importance of connect these ideas with policy makers and publick works from different institutions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentetions of Lapora findings 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact The event was attended by three groups of the sixth semester Communication degree. The students were a little oblivious to the results presented. They asked why Lapora had not taken a means of communication as a case, as the brewing campaigns.
Given this, the consequences of miscegenation and its reactivation through various forms in advertising were explained. Teachers from these groups asked about the way in which the category of "race" was used in other contexts and what was the disposition of Mexican institutions such as educational institutions to use that category in order to highlight and combat inequality among white students. mestizos and indigenous people.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Project FInal Symposium 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact This was an academic symposium, with the attendance of academics, mainly from the USA, Latin American and mainland Europe, plus some postgraduate students.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Project FInal Symposium 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact This was an academic symposium, with the attendance of academics, mainly from the USA, Latin American and mainland Europe, plus some postgraduate students.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.lapora.sociology.cam.ac.uk/events/final-symposium
 
Description Public Presentation of the project at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia and team workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The public presentation of the LAPORA project was held at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia with the support of the Gender Studies School (EEG). Social movements leaders and afrodescendant activists attended the presentation and provided comments on the project's approach and impact. The workshop involved the participation of the Brazilian, Ecuadorian, Mexican and Colombian teams. Activists and academic advisers from Colombian regional departments participated and provided feedback on the project's impact.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Public presentation at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Public presentation of project findings at the Univerisidad Nacional de Colombia with the support of the Escuela de Estudios de Genero. The talk was followed by debates and regional comparisons on the role of territories, NGOs, media, and law for anti-racist action. Members from the Ministry of Education expressed interests and new opinion on the intersections between anti-racism and anti-sexism within the educational system. A legal activists and an artist also expressed interest in the concept of "alternative anti-racist grammars".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Public session at Brazil project workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact As part of the project workshop in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on 20 July 2017 we held a half-day session open to the public, which was attended by post-graduate students and some ethnic movement activists. Monica Moreno and Peter Wade gave an introductory talk outlining the project, and Luciane Rocha then gave a longer presentation about anti-racism in Brazil.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Radio interview at Flacso-Radio 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact This was an interview on Territorial Struggles on Ancestral Territories of Afro-Ecuadorian communities. It was related to one of the case studies in Ecuador, the case of the community Wimbí in Esmeraldas province. It was an invitation of Flacso-Radio, a radio related to the postgraduate university of social sciences, FLACSO.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=1199739653534448&id=124296081016937
 
Description Radio interview at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Radio Interview conducted by the Media Center of the Universidad Nacional de Colombia. The interview focused on the findings of the Lapora project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Round table and launch of the video Nunca Habra un Negro en mi Ejercito: Delito de Odio en Ecuador 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The objective of this round table was to launch the video "Nunca habra un negro ejercito. Caso Arce y delito de odio en Ecuador" (There will never be a black man in my army. Case Arce and Hate Crime in Ecuador). The purpose of the video is to be used to disseminate knowledge this landmark case, the first case of hate crime that has been won in Ecuador (2016), and spark conversations on anti-black racism in Ecuador, and more specifically, in the military. After the presentation of the video, main actors of the case and the public engaged in a discussion about what would reparation look like in such a case. More importantly, the national Ombudsman's Office contacted us to request permission to use the video in the training of staff at their office and for the dissemination of the case.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://youtu.be/qTR5XueQua0
 
Description Roundtable on Racism in Ecuador and the case of the 29 of Saraguro and presentation of video "Saraguro. State racism in Ecuador and criminalization of the social protest". 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This event resulted from the interest manifested by Fernando Yanez, director of the School of Bilingual Education of the University of Azuay to CO-I Fernando García. In the roundtable, we discuss issues affecting black and indigenous people in Ecuador, as well as the specific case of the 29 of Saraguro. Indigenous students of the School were present and requested more information on the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Seminar and debate: challenges and possibilities about researching antiracism in Mexico 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Discussion with professional researchers about the results of the project and about the methodological challenges when we try to investigate anti-racism in Mexico.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Talk or presentation of Huella Negra Organization and its new photo calendar 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The presentation of the new photographic calendar of the Huella Negra collective was carried out. There, the fundamental interests of carrying out the project were discussed, as well as the struggle that the collective has against racism.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Talk or presentation: Paper presentation at the American Anthropological Association Meeting 2018, San Jose, California 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The presentation was attended by professionals and scholars of the subject, with whom I shared new perspectives on anti-racism in Latin America.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.americananthro.org/AttendEvents/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=22345
 
Description Talk or presentation: results of Lapora project for graduate students 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact A debate with graduate students about the relevance of generating statistics and data about the racial innequality en Mexico.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Talk or presentation: results of Lapora project for undergraduate students 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Presentation of the results of the project before a group of university students, of the subject of Public Policies, in the ITESO university, city of Guadalajara
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description The struggle of black people in Mexico in ITESO 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact The project was presented in a general way, specifically the case of Huella Negra. It was explained how the ideology of miscegenation is still commonplace in the cases we address in Mexico. Arellanes explained the context in which activism in favor of blackness in the Costa Chica arises, the steps that have followed to promote in the legislative field the national recognition process, as well as the work that Huella Negra does.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description The struggle of black people in Mexico, in Guadalajara University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact At first, the LAPORA project and the Huella Negra case were briefly presented. Subsequently, Dr. Nicolás Rey gave a historical context on Afro struggles in Latin America, specifically, those of the Antillean Caribbean. In a third moment, Hugo Arellanes presented the Huella Negra project, the political context in which it arises and how the idea of the 2018 calendar was born, based on the results of the Intergenerational Social Mobility Module. This aroused the discussion on the part of the Ha
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Towards a Consolidation of Racial Justice Agenda 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact We held a workshop on racial justice in the city of Oaxaca de Juarez, Mexico on December 3. There we discuss the emotional dimension of racism as well as the limits and scopes of Latin American laws to be able to demand racial justice through the legal system.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Workshop about Team strengthening with CEPIADET NGO 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The indigenous NGO CEPIADET attemded the workshop about the emotional dimensions of racism. This made them question the importance of addressing the issue of emotions in judicial racism.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Workshop on "Anti-Racism in Brazil", with academic and organisation beneficiaries 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Luciane Rocha led a workshop on Anti-Racism in Brazil on 27 November at the Universidade Federal Fluminense in Niteroi. Participants included academics (Joao Pacheco, Flavia Rios) and activist organisations who had participated in the project (Manifesto Crespo, Omolu e Oxum, and Rede Contra a Violencia), and Suelaine Carneiro from the organisation Geledes. The event included an exhibition of photos by Luciane Rocha about her research in Brazil.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Workshop on Black Bodies, Black Aesthetics and Racism 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Luciane Rocha led a workshop disseminating practical examples of anti-racism used by organisations. It was held in the premises of Ilê Omulu e Oxum on 28 November 2018. In attendance were also Rede Contra a Violência, Manifesto Crespo and Atelier Obirin Odara.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Workshop on Race and Racism in Rio de Janeiro 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact This workshop was intended to discuss race, gender racism and territorialization against favela residents in Rio de Janeiro. The event allowed the participants to identify and to analyse their experiences with racism and gender discrimination, which helped then to enhance collective strategies of resistance.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Workshop on the process of Convention 169 and Prior Consultation 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Luciane Rocha led a workshop on ILO Convention 169 and the right to prior, free and informed consultation. It was held on 5 December 2018 in the quilombo community of Mamuna (Alcantara, Maranhão). The workshop was co-led by Johny Fernandes Giffoni, Public Defender for the State of Pará. Other organisations involved were Women of MABE and Aty Guasu.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Workshop organized with the School of Prosecutorson the legal case studies of project Lapora and on the investigation of hate crimes. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was an event organized in collaboration with the School of Prosecutors of Ecuador. In previous events of Lapora, representatives of the Office of the Prosecutor (Fiscalía General) manifested their interest in the results of the project. The event included the analysis of legal cases of project Lapora regarding the possibilities and shortcomings of using the law in antiracist struggles along with an analysis by Gina Gómez de la Torre (prosecutor in the case of hate crime affecting Michael Arce) of how to investigate and litigate cases of hate crime and actions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Workshop with Afrocolombian activists in Bogota 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Workshop with leaders of Afrocolombian organisations. The Lapora team presented the findings of the project and conducted focus group discussions with activists. Participants discussed about the meaning and interpretations regarding the concepts of: racism, racial discrimination, anti-racism, stigmatisation, and structural racism. They also were exposed to the strategies developed by both indigenous and black organisations and they developed comparisons, as well as, general assessments of the reaches, limitations and opportunities for anti-racism in Colombian and the Latin American region.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Workshop with Afrocolombian women leaders at the headquarters of Amafrocol, Cali, Colombia 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Workshop organized by the LAPORA team at the headquarters of Amafrocol in the city of Cali, Colombia. The activity involved focus-groups discussions on hair-care practices, anti-racism, discrimination, aesthetics and mestizaje (racial mixing). The workshop was facilitated by leaders of Amafrocol, who invited other activists, charity managers, and state functionaries. During the activity participants conducted hair-care practices involving braiding and turban creations, while addressing discussions and questions on the links between beauty and racial discrimination. Dr Monica Moreno-Figueroa and Dr Mara Viveros participated as co-facilitators.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Workshop with indigenous peoples of the Cabildos Indigenas in Cali 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Lapora organised a workshop and focus group discussions with 25 indigenous members of the Cabildos Indigenas of Cali. Most participants were members of Nasa and Yacanacona Indigenous peoples. There were also present some members of Asociacion de Mujeres Afrocolombianas Amafrocol. There were also present state functionaries of the Major of Cali and of the Ministry of Culture. We presented the results of the project and we conducted specific discussions with local indigenous authorities, intercultural indigenous teachers, artists, and artisans on the following topics: territory, economy, education, and law.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Workshop with indigenous, afrodescendant and mestizo children at Santa Librada Intercultural School, Cali, Department El Valle, Colombia 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Workshop organized by the LAPORA team with support of a facilitator of the Conferencia Nacional de Organizaciones Afrocolombianas (CNOA and an indigenous state functionary of the Mayor of Cali. The activity involved the participation of 51 children, between 8 and 13 years old. Children produced drawings on their body images and engaged in debates about their ethnic and racial identifications. Three teachers (one indigenous and two afrodescendant) participated in this activity and provided support in facilitating discussions among the students.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Workshop with stakeholders 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Workshop with 15 participants in the City of Cali, Colombia. Most were young black women who are university students and are connected to the black student organization Cadhuve of the Universidad del Valle. Project findings were shared with participants focusing on the role of anti-racism within the field of haircare and aesthetics practices. The Lapora project video on Colombia was also shared among participants, who were very interested in knowing about other organizations that struggle against racism in Colombia. Participants also learned about other anti-racist organizations in Brazil (Manifesto Crespo) and Ecuador (Azúcar) who have been contesting racism though aesthetic practices.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019