The UK Communication Industries: the impact of a proposed UK Brexit from the EU.

Lead Research Organisation: University of Exeter
Department Name: Politics

Abstract

In written evidence to the House of Lords, the Department for Culture, Media and Sport wrote in 2013, "Industry figures indicate that the UK is Europe's leading exporter of TV programmes and second only to US globally. We are the world's No.1 in sales of TV format shows. Domestically the multichannel sector contributes £4.2 billion in Gross Value Added (GVA) to the UK economy through expenditure in employment, advertising and marketing, distribution and support services, as well as content investment" (House of Lords, 2013). The United Kingdom has become an internationally-leading base for companies broadcasting and providing communications services abroad. This was made possible through European legislation which liberalised cross-border broadcasting and other services e.g. the on-demand downloading of films and other programming via satellite, broadband and the internet. With the end to roaming charges by 2017, these services will be increasingly downloaded via mobile phones. Hundreds of companies have located in the UK to take advantage of a liberal and stable regulatory environment for operation.

The well-known company, Sky, relocated to the UK from Luxembourg in 1990. Sky now broadcasts to the UK, Ireland, Germany, Italy and Austria with over 20 million customers and £11 billion in tax revenue. Another large company, the Modern Times Group (MTG), broadcasts 60 channels in 36 countries from the UK. A third company, MTG, is the largest commercial operator broadcasting in Scandinavia and the Baltics, and has broadcasting operations in Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Russia and the Ukraine. The UK-based group, Central European Media Enterprises Ltd (CME), broadcasts 34 commercial, subscription and on-demand channels to approximately 50 million viewers throughout Central and Eastern Europe including Slovenia, Romania, Bulgaria and Hungary.

Today, the UK regulatory body, OFCOM, licenses 1577 television for channels broadcasting across Europe. Companies owning these channels include: Box, Discovery, CBN, Al Jazeera, CBS, AXN, Black Entertainment, Mushroom TV, CSC, ABS, Penny Street, Viacom, Paramount, Coral racing, AETN, Disney, Sparrowhawk, DM Digital, Filmbox, 4 Ventures, E Enterntainment, ESPAN, Eternal World, Playboy, Zonemedia, Millenium, Lightdragon, Baltic Media, CSC, RHF, Fox, Freesat, Coloured Rocks, GEO Tv, AETN, HITV, Zonemedia, JimJam, Sparrowhawk, MTV, Dolphin, NGC, Nikelodeon, STV, Polsat, Sky, Turner, Viasat. Further on-demand services are licensed by the UK regulatory body, ATVOD.

If the UK were to withdraw from the EU but become a member of the EFTA these companies could still broadcast to Europe from the UK under the EEA's Single Market agreement. However, the UK would no longer be participant to Brussels' decision-making. This raises the questions: what effect would a UK exit have on EU decision-making? What subsequent effect would this have on the UK market? The project research is interested in whether changes to communications policy at the European level which might affect UK interests and how UK-based stakeholders might change their preferences accordingly.

The key question of the project is: What effect could withdrawal of the UK from the European Union (EU) have on the UK's communications sector? Over a period of one year, the PI will consult stakeholders and provide forums for scenarios building exercises on the effect of a UK exit on the communications sector. This will be done through an online questionnaire of key stakeholders, 2 symposiums, and 10 policy briefing papers as well as communication with the media and other public platforms. The project will concentrate on current proposals for revisions to the proposed Audiovisual Media Services Directive and the General Data Protection Regulation which deal with cross-border broadcasting and privacy/data protection respectively. In this way, evidence-based scenarios are aimed at improving public discourse.

Planned Impact

This study is relevant to industry stakeholders and policy makers at UK and EU levels who work within the field of communications policy as well as third sector actors and wider citizen audiences. The project will assist users in learning how policy options came into being at the European Union level and what effect this has on their domestic operations. In particular, it will explore UK-based preferences within current initiatives at the EU level in the context of EU decision-making processes.

The outcomes of the research will be of particular interest to the stakeholders under investigation. It will enable them to gain a richer understanding of their role and significance as proposers of policy options in the EU communications environment. The project will provide them with comprehensible, relevant policy analyses to understand the way in which they can form preferences on whether they wish the UK to exit or remain in the EU. A particularly significant impact of the project will be the facility it will assist these stakeholders in learning about how European Union single-market policy-making is conducted and implemented in EU as opposed to EEA states.

The project outcomes are also likely to widen the knowledge set of stakeholders with an interest in cross-border broadcasting and data protection policies respectively. The findings will also inform UK policy officials about stakeholder preferences through engagement with the regulatory bodies responsible for EU and UK communications policies. This knowledge will impact on other regulatory bodies in the broad communications and media environment which employ or are interested in UK exit in some form.

In a similar way to the stakeholders which are the focus of the project's investigation, these regulatory authorities can learn about stakeholder preferences in relation to UK exit and/or renegotiation, allowing them in the process to reflect on their own ways of working. The project will also be relevant to regulatory bodies outside the communications sector considering UK exit, which will have access to the briefing papers produced for the project engagement events and published on the project's website, which would be unearthed through a standard web search by parties who are unfamiliar with developments in communications regulation but are interested in the effect of a possible exit on UK markets as a whole.

The project's findings will have an impact on a range of corporate business, private and public sector, regulators, and civil society interests and their representative bodies, in the specific areas of communications policy under investigation in the project. The website, in a 'user friendly' way, will allow users to gain a greater appreciation of the nature, work and broader significance of the regulatory and decision-making bodies in which they participate or to whom they are subject.

The project's findings will provide stakeholders and policy-makers the opportunity to consider alternatives in decision-making through policy modelling. The findings will be revised into 2 final policy briefings will discuss the implications of these scenarios for the UK/EU relationship in this policy area for dissemination on the Knowledge Forum and other outlets.
 
Description Post-Brexit there is a risk that service providers, such as broadcasters, platforms providing on-demand content, internet sales, on-line financial services and gaming, may lose their passports to EU markets. This is because companies need an EU base (i.e. to be headquartered in the EU) to access service markets under Directives and Regulations which contain the country of origin (COO) principle. This affects e.g. 1523 UK-based television channels which target other EU countries (65% of the EU market) and 515 on-demand services such as video and catch-up services over DTT, cable, satellite, IPTV channels, online and mobile phones (20% share of the EU market). British-based companies would need to re-locate headquarters to an EU Member State. If the UK does not join the Digital Single Market (DSM), companies could broadcast to Europe from the UK under a bilateral agreement. However, the UK would lose voting rights for DSM legislation within the Council of Ministers and European Parliament. This loss of decision-making could affect the UK in key areas: rules governing right of reply, the definition of an economic service, editorial responsibility and effective control; a change in definition of the COO; incitement to hatred and the protection of minors; public health, public security, and consumer protection; the loss of subsidiarity for media markets under EU law. UK produced content could be excluded from national quotas in favour of EU-produced content in catalogues and channels.
Post Brexit, the UK also loses EU negotiated exceptions for cultural goods under GATT; MFN exemptions for audio-visual services under GATS; and is released from EU bargaining over TTIP and bilateral treaty agreements the EU has with third countries. Exemptions include: screen quotas, subsidies, duties, deposits and taxes for film, the transmission of radio and television and video on-demand packages (linear and non-linear). The funding of public service broadcasting is protected by EU MFN exemptions to the WTO's 1995 Agreement on Subsidies and Countervailing Measures which determines whether or not a subsidy can be used by a WTO member. Related to this, the UK-led Public Value test for in a 2009 EU Communication which exempts psbs from EU state aid rules.
The UK will move to 'association status' in EU coordinated self-regulatory fora such as the Body of European Regulators of Electronic Communications (BEREC) and the European Regulators Group for Audio-visual Media Services (ERGA). The UK needs to negotiate independently in spectrum policy agreements at international levels (ITU, WRC) and CEPT) coordination bodies and in standards agreements post-Brexit which incurs greatly cost.
The Investigatory Powers Bill (and existing DRIPA) may not be adequate with the 2016 General Data Protection Regulation, e-commerce and e-privacy Directives which permit the free flow of data within the EU based upon the COO. These problems can be avoided by the use of standard contractual clauses but there are current legal challenges to the validity of these.
Divergence is expected between the UK and EU on 'deep packet capture'; analyses of metadata, and the harvesting of location data.
Exploitation Route My findings and reports have been utilised by civil servants in preparing for Brexit, particularly those working in OFCOM and the DCMS who have provided feedback that my reports and workshops were highly useful and informative. Industry representatives reported changes in internal policy due to discussions in stakeholder workshops I ran in 2016. I also distributed all conference findings to members from the House of Commons' All Party Group on Internet, Communications and Technology, House of Commons Brexit Committee, House of Commons Science and Technology Committee, All Party Group on Cyber Security, All Party Group on Data Analytics, All Party Group on Financial technology, All Party Group on UK and Europe, and All Party Group on the European Union and also the House of Lords EU Internal Market Sub-Committee, Intellectual Property committee and Group on Broadband and Digital Communication. I presented on the government's proposals for the exchange of protection and personal data post-Brexit to members of the South West Data Protection & Privacy Networking Group, Tobacco Factory, Bristol in November 2017 who reported that my interpretation of events was greatly useful to them.
Sectors Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

URL http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/ukcommsexit/projectoutputs/
 
Description My findings assisted civil servants in preparing documents on Brexit and the Digital Single Market. As a result of stakeholder workshops, policy briefings and impact events organised for my project, civil servants from OFCOM and the DCMS, third sector, industry representatives and researchers working in MPs offices have reported that they have used my findings in their own work. I have statements from industry, OFCOM and third sector representatives.
First Year Of Impact 2017
Sector Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software)
Impact Types Economic,Policy & public services

 
Description Documents considered by the European Scrutiny Committee on 1 March 2017
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
Impact I believe that I influenced this publication https://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201617/cmselect/cmeuleg/71-xxxi/7103.htm concerning the parts on the Convention, cultural exception, WTO commitments and routes to the EU market being limited. This is because researchers from MPs' offices stated to me at my November 2016 workshop I ran at Portcullis House that my work was very important particularly as they were unaware that the UK could not trade in audiovisual services under the Council of Europe's European Convention on Transfrontier Television due to the supremacy of European law, the fact that the Convention was outdated (as evidenced by a letter sent to the Council of Europe by Vivian Reding) and that a number of EU Member States had not signed to it. Similar sentences from my workshop proceedings which were not published online but sent out to politicians and civil servants and my evidence submitted to the European Scrutiny Committee can be seen in the Parliament report. I have requested support letters from MPs and have already received support letters from OFCOM.
URL https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201617/cmselect/cmeuleg/71-xxxi/7103.htm
 
Description 11 November 2016 - Conference: 'The relationship of the EU and the UK in the future of the Digital Single Market', House of Commons (London) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact This was the first of two conferences covering the Digital Single Market. One-fourth of the European Commission's 2015 Communication 'Upgrading the Single Market: more opportunities for people and business' dealt with digital single market (DSM) initiatives. The conference addresses cross-border broadcasting, online services, copyright law and content provision.
The speakers represented a wide range of stakeholders from industry, academia and regulatory bodies who addressed challenges and opportunities raised by Brexit. Two key challenges were identified: the loss of a UK voice within the EU policy-making and the Country of Origin (COO) principle which is embedded in many DSM Directives and Regulations. If the UK does not join the Single Market, broadcasters based in the UK may have to move their headquarters to an EU Member State and away from the UK to access EU markets post-Brexit. This is because cross-border broadcasting in Europe operates on the one-stop-shop Country of Origin (COO) principle which allows services to be provided in another EU Member State without restrictions. The COO is coupled with extensive requirements in relation to companies' operations which are embedded into Directives such as SatCab and the AVMSD. It was noted that the COO principle was to be extended to the EU's current copyright and geo-blocking proposals. The Council of Europe's potential role in addressing cross-border broadcasting was discussed and the point was raised that, in 2009, the EU claimed exclusive competence in many of the areas covered by the CoE Convention on Transfrontier Television (CTT). The CTT has subsequently not been updated and 7 EU members, in any case, never signed due to Member States' concern about overlapping competences. Speakers discussed the importance of: tariff free for goods for film and other content exports; freedom of movement for temporary and long term workers in the sector in order to maintain the talent pipeline with definition of creative industry roles as 'highly skilled workers'; continued UK/EU cooperation on intellectual property protection. Currently, the definition of 'European works' under AVMSD refers to works originating in European third States party to the European Convention on Transfrontier Television of the Council of Europe which include the UK. However, the reference to the CTT may disappear during the AVMS Directive's current revision. If the UK does not join the Single Market, UK-produced content will be excluded from national quotas in favour of EU-produced content in catalogues and channels. This means that programming produced by UK based companies will no longer be considered of 'European origin' for services such as Netflix which is based in the Netherlands and other traditional and online broadcasters based in EU Member States. Speakers discussed the shape of alternative trade models with the EU post-Brexit and whether the UK needed to either continue to participate in EU funding schemes for content or national level measures needed to be put in place too. Views were exchanged on emerging markets such as extension of EU directives to new platforms such as mobile phones and VR headsets. Lastly, EU negotiated exceptions for cultural goods under GATT (General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade) and Most Favoured Nation exemptions for audio-visual services under GATS (General Agreement on Trade in Services) were discussed. The key challenge the UK could face is vulnerability to challenges to national content quotas, subsidies for film and television, duties on imports, deposits and tax credits for films and the subsidisation of public service broadcasting as has happened to other states without WTO exemptions. A more detailed summary of each talk is provided below. The below does not represent transcripts of speakers' talks but summaries of presentations provided on the day. I provided a14 page report to participants post-conference which is not public but available on request.
The audience included representatives from the business community (broadcasters, marketing companies, distributors), associations (MPAA, UK Coalition for Cultural Diversity, Children's Media Foundation, Premier League, Communications Association for UK Interactive Entertainment, Royal Television Society, thePublishers Association), public service broadcasters, regulatory authorities (OFCOM, DCMS, BEIS), civil society representatives and MPs. I circulated policy briefings I authored to the conference participants namely: Analysis of the EU's Copyright Package under Brexit, http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/ukcommsexit/projectoutputs/ How the Digital Economy Bill relates to EU regulation http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/ukcommsexit/projectoutputs/ The UK as a hub for cross-border television. http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/ukcommsexit/projectoutputs/ The UK role in EU policy-making. http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/ukcommsexit/projectoutputs/ ?How Brexit might affect EU audio-visual media services policy-making. http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/ukcommsexit/projectoutputs/. Interviews with speakers are here: http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/ukcommsexit/projectactivities/11november2016conference/videos/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/ukcommsexit/projectactivities/11november2016conference/
 
Description 13 May 2016- Stakeholder Workshop, Friends House (London) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Summary: Stakeholder Workshop on Cross-Border broadcasting services. May 13,
2016. Friend's House, London.
This workshop was run as part of the research project 'The UK Communication Industries:
the impact of a proposed UK Brexit from the EU' led by the University of Exeter, which is
funded by the 'UK in a Changing Europe' Initiative based at King's College London. It was
the first of two workshops analysing stakeholder views in the communications sector. The
objective of the workshop was to assess practitioner and stakeholder views on what works
well and what needs to be addressed in the sector of cross-border broadcasting. This was in
the context of current changes in the market and regulation and a possible Brexit.
Stakeholders were able to share their understandings of the sector's environment and
establish mutual interpretations of what possible future scenarios meant to them. This enabled
them to take better control of their own reactions to changes in the future and reduce the
surprise element of future events with mutual understandings of different options.
A key finding was that looser controls affecting company behaviour (including product
markets, globalisation and technological innovation) had a sizeable effect on company
behaviour in addition to regulation. However, EU regulation would have a significant effect
on companies' ability to function within the UK. It is clear that a possible Brexit would
impact directly or indirectly on all of the above factors. The effect is sufficient enough that
companies are considering contingency plans to switch substantial activity to another EU
Member State.
The greatest current strengths identified for the UK focused on regulation, EU policy
management and market borders. Strengths highlighted for various political, economic,
socio-cultural, technological, legal, and environmental factors ('PESTLE') included: UK
talents and skills, and a sound intellectual property environment. The most significant current
UK weakness was uncertainty over Brexit. This was attributed to legal uncertainty, declines
in investment and loss of UK influence on EU policy-making. Online licensing in the case of
a Brexit was also regarded as a grave threat to company operation. Scenario building for a
Brexit scenario saw some opportunity in loosening UK regulatory mechanisms on a 'right to
be forgotten' as applied to new media services. It was noted that Brexit might trigger change
in EU-alliances with other discontented Member States. It also could bring about a return to
the Council of Europe rules (Conventions) for broadcasting policy making, shifting the forum
for Europe-wide agreement. However, the majority view was that Brexit would have an
unfavourable effect on the UK with negative effects on investment, capital flight with
departure of some broadcasters to other EU Member States. Most stakeholders at the
workshop pointed to potential job losses due to a number of factors affecting a post-Brexit
market. The EU was seen as a significant regulatory forum which would affect the UK,
whether the UK remained or left.
The workshop was prefaced by the provision of three policy briefings authored by Alison
Harcourt on current changes in the market, EU regulation and a possible Brexit which were
sent out to stakeholders prior to the workshop. There was an introduction on different Brexit
scenarios by Catherine Barnard, University of Cambridge, followed by a PESTLE / SWOT
Analysis. The SWOT analysis was led by John Howell from the consultancy JH&Co with a
prioritisation exercise conducted through the day. Six aspects of cross-border broadcasting
were assessed: political forces; economic factors; socio-cultural factors; technological
factors; legal factors; and environmental impacts (PESTLE), under which industry
stakeholders prioritised variables. Stakeholders identified Strengths, Weaknesses,
Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) matrices for each aspect, which are outlined below.
Strengths and weaknesses focussed on current conditions in the UK market. Opportunities
and threats centred on future scenarios considering both internal and external variables.
Participants spent time at each table building up the SWOT analysis for each of the 6 aspects
of cross-border broadcasting services. Each indicated factors they considered most important
for each category. A representative for each category then discussed these priority factors in
more detail. The list below summarises strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats
across different categories as indicated. Each table was managed by academic / consultant
participants, namely: Alison Harcourt (University of Exeter) for the Politics table, Richard
Collins (City University London) for the economics table, John Howell (JH&Co) for the
social table, Maria Michalis (University of Westminster) for the technology table, Judith
Townend (Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, IALS) for the legal table and
Christina Angelopoulos (IALS) for the environmental table. Full findings here: http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/media/universityofexeter/collegeofsocialsciencesandinternationalstudies/politics/projects/ukcommsexit/workshopfindings13May.pdf
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/media/universityofexeter/collegeofsocialsciencesandinternationals...
 
Description 14 December 2016 - Conference 'Brexit Divisions III: Business and Trade after Brexit', UCL, London 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The UCL European Institute hosted an afternoon of debate and discussion on the place of business and commercial interests in the negotiations to determine Britain's future relationship with Europe and the nature of Britain's trade and economic relations with the continent after Brexit. It took place at the JZ Young Lecture Theatre Anatomy Building, UCL. The event was filmed and is available here (bottom of the page) https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLe8vyktlR0b2m36psVgd-Fz7VWFAr9Wlq and linked to the UCL website: I presented at the event which placed experts from the academic, policymaking and business communities in conversation with one another and with the audience. DESCRIPTION: The British decision to leave the European Union in the 23 June referendum will have profound consequences for the country's economic policy and the future of its trade relations. To inform this debate, the UCL European Institute hosted an afternoon of debate and discussion on the place of business and commercial interests in the negotiations to determine Britain's future relationship with Europe and the nature of Britain's trade and economic relations with the continent after Brexit. The event placed experts from the academic, policymaking and business communities in conversation with one another and with the audience. Among the questions addressed by the two panels were: What are the various options for Britain's future relationship with Europe? What will be the effect on the regulatory landscape of British withdrawal? What institutional form will the post-Brexit trading regime take? What will economic policy look like in post-Brexit Britain?

Panel Session 1: Brexit and Trade
13.30-15.15
Oliver Ilott, Senior Researcher, Institute for Government
Stephen Adams, Partner and Lead Consultant on European and Multilateral Issues, Global Counsel
Martins Paparinskis (Chair), Reader in Public International Law, UCL Faculty of Laws

Panel Session 2: Business and Brexit
15.45-17.30
Michael Jacobs, Director, IPPR Commission on Economic Justice
Richard Davies, Chief of Staff of the LSE Growth Commission
Alison Harcourt, Professor in Politics, Exeter University, and ESRC Senior Fellow, UK in a Changing Europe Programme
David Coen (Chair), Professor of Public Policy and Head of Department, UCL School of Public Policy, and Director, UCL Global Governance Institute

The event was followed by a reception.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://events.ucl.ac.uk/event/event:t1q-iw27dvzi-8189mi
 
Description 19 January 2016 - Conference 'British media, EU Membership and Referendum', The Shard, London. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The event was mainly aimed at fellow academics with some media, third sector and think tank participants. It focused on the role of the media in shaping attitudes towards the EU. My role was to explain how the media were regulated by the Electoral Commission and OFCOM and how this might change if media organisations move their regulatory base to an EU Member State away from the UK. The event looked more generally at the relationship between British media and different strands of Euroscepticism, and the potential impact of social media and new technologies on political engagement and I was able to comment on this. Programme 9:00 - 9:30am - registration 9:30 - 11:00am - Opening remarks and Panel 1: UK-EU relations six months after the referendum This comprehensive panel stock of Brexit negotiations and discusses the economics, political and social implications of triggering Art.50 to the UK and the EU. Panel Speakers: Prof David Bailey, Aston University Prof Simon Hix, LSE Prof Anand Menon, KCL Prof Paul Taggart, University of Sussex Prof Vera Troeger, University of Warwick Chair: Dr Tatiana Coutto, University of Warwick 11.00 - 11.15am - Coffee break This panel will discuss methodological and empirical trends concerning the influence of the media on political behaviour. Special attention will be paid to the framing of EU affairs in Europe, and to the relationship between media and Euroscepticism. The panel will also discuss future perspectives. 11: 15 -12:40pm - Panel 2: Communicating politics and the EU to the British public: an interdisciplinary view Speakers: Mark English, European Commission Prof Oliver Daddow, University of Nottingham Prof Alison Harcourt, University of Exeter Prof Abhinay Muthoo, University of Warwick Prof Claes de Vreese, University of Amsterdam Chair: Dr Elena Lazarou, European Parliament 12:40 - 1:40pm - Buffet lunch Panel 3: Communicating politics and the EU to the British public: "old" and "new" media This panel discussed specific features of online and social media, and to what extent existing models of content and discourse analysis may be adapted in order to better tackle the relationship between political communication and public attitudes. The panel will also discuss media neutrality, and possible policy strategies to fight misreporting and the diffusion of fake news on the internet. Speakers: Dr Clare Llewellyn, University of Edinburugh Amy Longland, My Life My Say Emran Mian, Social Market Foundation Will Moy, Full Fact Prof Steve Shifferes, London City University Chair: Prof Nathaniel Copsey, Aston University / Foreign & Commonwealth Office 3:00 - 3:15pm - Coffee break 3:15 - 4:30pm Panel 4: Media, technology and youth engagement. Concluding remarks This panel tackles issues such as turnout among young voters in the UK and elsewhere, how they obtain information about politics and policy processes, and their perceptions vis-a-vis the relationship between the UK and the EU. Panels: Mete Coban, My Life My Say Dr Robin Hill, University of Edinburgh Kenny Imafidon, Bite the Ballot Paul MacIntyre, Myton School, Warwickshire Prof Carolyn Rowe, Aston University Chair: Siobhan Benita, University of Warwick The event is supported by The UK in a Changing Europe, and organised by the Department of Economics and Warwick Policy Lab. For further information, please contact Tatiana Coutto - t.coutto@warwick.ac.uk. To register click here. Venue: The Shard, 32 London Bridge St, London SE1 9SG, United Kingdom
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://ukandeu.ac.uk/event/british-media-eu-membership-and-the-referendum/
 
Description 2 December 2016 - Conference 'The relationship of the EU and UK in the Future of Data Protection and Privacy Policy', Portcullis House, London 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact This is the second of two conferences I organised covering the Digital Single Market. This conference addressed GDPR implementation, revision of the e-privacy Directive and issues of cross-border data handling under Brexit. Circa 150 people attended including representatives from the business community (broadcasters, marketing companies, distributors, data companies), associations (the DMA, Creative Industries Association, Civil Court Users Association, Electronic Money Association, Law Association), public service broadcasters, regulatory authorities, civil society representatives (Big Brother Watch, Open Rights Group, Privacy International) and MPs offices.
The conference was run as part of the research project 'The UK Communication Industries: the impact of a proposed UK Brexit from the EU' led by Professor Alison Harcourt at the University of Exeter, which is funded by the 'UK in a Changing Europe' programme based at King's College London. It is the second of a series of conferences on the future of the Digital Single Market following stakeholder workshops earlier in the year. Drawing on key issues highlighted by the stakeholder workshops, this conference dealt with implementation of the GDPR, revision of the ePrivacy Directive and issues around the future of Fintech and virtual currencies.
The speakers represented a wide range of stakeholders from industry, academia and regulatory bodies who addressed challenges and opportunities raised by Brexit. EU Member States are currently implementing the GDPR, the European Commission has released a proposal to revise the ePrivacy Directive in January 2017 and the Payment Services Directive II is to come into force (including in the UK) in January 2018 under which certain powers have been delegated to the European Banking Authority. Speakers raised a number of key issues: it was confirmed that the GDPR must be implemented by May 2018 in the UK despite the Brexit vote. The future relationship with the European Data Protection Board (EDPB) is yet unsure. Much of the discussion surrounded adequacy post-Brexit. There was concern that the UK's new Investigatory Powers Act will not pass the adequacy test particularly post the Court of Justice's Judgment in Joined Cases C - 203/15 and C - 698/15 decided on December 21st 2016 which states that "General and indiscriminate retention" of emails and electronic communications is not legal. At the same time, the EU's manner of granting adequacy to third countries is seen as vulnerable under WTO trade laws. Company representatives pointed to inconsistencies between different jurisdictions and difficulties in implementation. I provided a 22 page report to participants post-conference which is not public but available on request.
I also distributed my evidence submitted to the Culture, Media and Sport committee's inquiry into the Digital Single Market at the conference. http://data.parliament.uk/writtenevidence/committeeevidence.svc/evidencedocument/culture-media-and-sport-committee/impact-of-brexit/written/42276.pdf and a report authored by myself and Professor Lilian Edwards: http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/ukcommsexit/projectoutputs/. Videos from the conference are here: http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/ukcommsexit/projectactivities/2december2016conference/videos/ Schedule: 9:00 Registration and refreshments 9:30 Introduction: Alison Harcourt, University of Exeter. View video. 9:50 Panel 1. The General Data Protection Regulation. Lilian Edwards, University of Strathclyde "Data protection and privacy law after Brexit" Christopher Docksey, EDPS Director Nina Barakzai, Group Head of Data Protection, Sky 11:00 Tea and coffee break 11:30 Talk: Steve Wood, ICO Deputy Commissioner, ICO "The future of data protection in UK'. View video. 12:00 Panel 2. revision of the e-privacy Directive. Chair: Elizabeth Lomas, UCL Joasia Luzak, University of Exeter. View video. Ellis Parry, BP Simon Rogers, IBM. View video. 13:00 Lunch 14.00 Panel 3. cross-border data handling. Chair: Christina Angelopoulos, University of Cambridge Timothy Hill, Law Society Chris Combemale, DMA Group CEO, Direct Marketing Association. View video. Anna Fielder, Privacy International. View video. 15:10 Panel 4. cross-border financial transactions Chair: Judith Townsend, University of Sussex Eleni Koulourioti, Regional Coordinator AFC EMEA, Deutsche Bank. View video. Thaer Sabri, Chief Executive, Electronic Money Association Andreas Klug, Privacy & Data Protection Counsel, Worldpay. View video. 16:20 Closing remarks 16:30 Event ends.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/ukcommsexit/projectactivities/2december2016conference/
 
Description 21 June 2016 Stakeholder Workshop, Friends House (London) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Summary: Stakeholder Workshop on Cross-Border data handling. June 21, 2016.
Friend's House, London.
This workshop was run as part of the research project 'The UK Communication Industries:
the impact of a proposed UK Brexit from the EU' led by the University of Exeter, which is
funded by the 'UK in a Changing Europe' Initiative based at King's College London. It was
the second of two workshops analysing stakeholder views in the communications sector. The
objective of the workshop was to assess practitioner and stakeholder views on what works
well and what needs to be addressed in the sector of cross-border data handling. This was in
the context of current changes in the market, EU regulation and a possible Brexit.
Stakeholders were able to share their understandings of the sector's environment and
establish mutual interpretations of what possible future scenarios meant to them. This enabled
them to take better control of their own reactions to changes in the future and reduce the
surprise element of future events with mutual understandings of different options.
A key finding was that Brexit would have a significant effect on companies' ability to
function within the UK. This effect outweighed looser controls affecting company behaviour
such as technological innovation and globalisation. This is because legislation on data
protection and e-commerce came into effect at the European level before or at the same time
as at the national level i.e. the EU has taken a lead in this regulatory sphere and EU regulation
has acted as a sizeable control on company behaviour. The effect of a possible Brexit is
sufficient enough that companies are considering contingency plans to switch activity to other
EU Member States.
The workshop was prefaced by the provision of a 4,000 word policy briefing authored by
Alison Harcourt and Lilian Edwards on current changes to EU regulation and summarised
views of UK-based stakeholders which was sent out to stakeholders prior to the workshop.
The workshop began with an introduction on different Brexit scenarios by Damian Chalmers,
London School of Economics, followed by a PESTLE / SWOT Analysis by 31 stakeholders
from the sector to identify key issues. The SWOT analysis was led by John Howell from the
consultancy JH&Co with a prioritisation exercise conducted throughout the morning. Six
aspects of cross-border data handling were assessed: political forces; economic factors; sociocultural
factors; technological factors; legal factors; and environmental impacts (PESTLE),
under which industry stakeholders prioritised variables. Stakeholders identified Strengths,
Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) matrices for each aspect, which are outlined
below. Strengths and weaknesses focussed on current conditions imposed by EU regulation
and the UK market. Opportunities and threats centred on future scenarios with Brexit as the
key variable.
Stakeholders spent time at each table building up the SWOT analysis for each of the 6 aspects
of cross-border data handling. Each indicated factors they considered most important for each
category. A representative for each category then discussed these priority factors in more
detail. The list below summarises strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats across
different categories as indicated. Each table was managed by academic / consultant
participants, namely: Alison Harcourt (University of Exeter) for the politics table, Richard
Collins (City University London) for the economics table, Judith Townend (Institute of
Advanced Legal Studies, IALS) for the social table, Elizabeth Lomas (UCL) for the
technology table, Lilian Edwards for the legal table (University of Strathclyde) and John
Howell and David Artingstall (JH&Co) for the environmental table.
The greatest current strength identified by stakeholders was the market access EU
membership provides to the UK which allows for economies of scale. The most significant
weaknesses identified were low levels of public understanding of data use and of national and
EU regulation covering its use. Scenario building for a Brexit scenario saw some
opportunities in the UK's possible role as a springboard for European companies operating in
India and China. Economic instability was seen as the gravest threat to company operation in
the case of a Brexit. Other threats prioritised were: negative effects Brexit could have on
investment and capital flight, the loss of influence on EU policy development and a drying up
of the UK recruitment pool in the IT and creative skills sector. Most stakeholders at the
workshop pointed to potential job losses in subsectors due to a number of factors affecting a
post-Brexit market. Another key concern was a possible fragmentation of data jurisdictions
and future restraints on data transfer out of the EU which would be detrimental to a data
economy.
Full summary here: http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/media/universityofexeter/collegeofsocialsciencesandinternationalstudies/politics/projects/ukcommsexit/workshopfindingsJune21final.pdf
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/media/universityofexeter/collegeofsocialsciencesandinternationals...
 
Description 24 May 2016- Conference: 'The EU and the UK: the wrong kind of regulation?', British Academy (London) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact The EU and the UK: the wrong kind of regulation? A conference on 24 May 2016, convened by myself and the University of East Anglia's (UEA) Prof Hussein Kassim. Figures from the campaign groups, as well as leading experts from law, the media, and academia, sought to investigate the impact of EU regulation not only on business, but more broadly on agriculture, employment, the environment and social policy. Among the key questions addressed were:

What are the costs of EU rules? Do the benefits outweigh the costs for business, consumers and other groups?
Would Brexit free the UK from EU regulation?
What would be the impact of Brexit for EU businesses?
The first panel, chaired by Allie Renison, head of EU and Trade Policy at the Institute of Directors, saw the CBI's Andy Bagnall highlight what he considered the overwhelming benefits of the EU to business, and pointed to the 95 per cent of the CBI member that supported remaining in the EU.

Richard Patient, the London chairman of Business for Britain, took a contrary view. He focused on what he considered to the damaging impact of EU regulation on small businesses, and spoke against what he sees as the EU's one-size-fits-all approach.

Piet Eeckhout, professor of EU Law at University College London (UCL), commented on the UK's influence on EU regulation and discussed how EU rules have become global standards in some areas. He also raised the issue of 'gold-plating' by the UK. To watch the panel, click here.

The single market was the focus of the second panel, chaired by John Fingleton of Fingleton Associates, and a former chief executive OFT and chair of the Irish Competition Authority.

Prof Kai-Uwe Kuhn, professor of economics at UEA's Centre for Competition Policy (CCP) and a former chief economist at the European Commission, underlined the benefits of EU competition policy to business, notably in providing a single set of rules. UEA Prof Catherine Waddams, professor of regulation and also a member of the CCP, discussed EU regulation in the utilities, arguing that consumers probably faced lower prices as a result.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.uea.ac.uk/about/media-room/eu-referendum/the-eu-and-the-uk-the-wrong-kind-of-regulation-
 
Description 25 April 2016- 'Ask the Experts' Evening, the Forum (University of Exeter) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We held an 'Ask the Experts' evening at the University of Exeter which was attended by over 450 members of the public in Exeter, Penryn and online, facilitated by the streaming service Periscope. The town hall event offered the chance to discuss the EU Referendum and provided the people of Exeter, Devon and the surrounding area the opportunity to put their questions to leading specialists. The event was live tweeted using the hashtag #EUAsk and the Q&A session was recorded in full and is available to rewatch on Youtube here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UsJ_YN4lfuU which received over 1,000 views post event.

Members of the panel:

Alison Harcourt (Professor of Politics at the University of Exeter),
James Devenney (Professor of Commercial Law and Head of the Law School at the University of Exeter),
Susan Banducci (Professor of Politics and Director of the Q-Step Centre at the University of Exeter),
Claudio Radelli (Professor of Politics and Director of the European Centre for Governance at the University of Exeter),
Sam Robbins, (Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Exeter),
Catherine Barnard (Professor of European Law at the Cambridge University),
Iain Begg (Research Fellow of the European Institution at the LSE).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UsJ_YN4lfuU
 
Description 29 September 2015 Course: 'Analysing the possible impact of Brexit on Government Policies and Processes', Centre for Parliamentary Studies (London) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I was invited to speak about the single market and Brexit at a learning event organised by the Government Exchange at the Centre for Parliamentary Studies. The full programme and speakers including other senior fellows from the UK in a Changing Europe initiative can be viewed here: http://www.governmentexchange.co.uk/courses/eu-brexit/AIOB.php.
Programme: Analysing the Possible Impact of Brexit on Government Policies and Processes

29th-30th September 2016

'To assess the range of potential impacts of Brexit on Government policies, processes, and legislation, and to examine the possible process for the UK leaving the EU and the role of the Civil Service.'

Learning Outcomes

To create awareness and prepare the Civil Service for alternative policy landscapes and processes
Assess the key policy foundations of the EU, including the Lisbon Treaty and the European Single Market
Impact of Brexit on Local Government
Analyse the possible processes involved in leaving the EU
Explore the role of the Civil Service in negotiating the UK leaving the EU
Gain an insight into the key EU institutions, and how the UK's relationship with the EU will look prior to Brexit
Assess the possible impacts on the UK legislative process, including reviewing, repealing or amending existing legislation, regulations and directives
Gain an insight into alternative models of relating to the EU and the Single Market, i.e. Norwegian model
Analyse the potential impact of Brexit on devolved administrations
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.governmentexchange.co.uk/courses/eu-brexit/AIOB.php
 
Description Alison Harcourt speaks at the CIGR Inaugural Conference in collaboration with ILPC 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Alison Harcourt speaks on May 3rd 2019 at the CIGR Inaugural Conference in collaboration with ILPC : With great power comes great responsibility - Internet policy in an age of disaster capitalism conference 10:30 - 16:30 Institute of Advanced Legal Studies 17 Russell Square Charles Clore House London WC1B 5DR on the copyright panel.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/cigr-inaugural-conference-in-collaboration-with-ilpc-tickets-57381889...
 
Description Alison Harcourt spoke about the roadmap for the EU's Digital Single Market (DSM) at Europe House 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Alison Harcourt spoke about the roadmap for the EU's Digital Single Market (DSM) outlining different scenarios for the UK's trade in digital services post-Brexit including discussion of the EU's recent copyright package, the GDPR, e-privacy revision and audio-visual media services. 35 people were present at the event including from OFCOM, the DCMS, PACT, the Creative Industries Federation, academics, AETN and industry representatives.

The seminar was part of a 15 part series run by the Centre for European Governance into the changing politics and policies of Europe including Brexit and the UK's changing relationship with the EU. http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/politics/research/centres/ceg/news/articles/2019cegseminarseriestheuka.php
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/politics/research/centres/ceg/news/articles/2019cegseminarseriest...
 
Description Alison speaks at the Regulatory landscape of post-Brexit Britain conference. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Alison will be speaking at the March 21st 2019 Regulatory landscape of post-Brexit Britain all day workshop at QMUL Mile End campus sponsored by the City of London Corporation on speaking on the digital markets regulation panel in the afternoon with a representative from Google Europe and a member of the Creative Industries Council.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/regulatory-landscape-of-post-brexit-britain-tickets-57989959530?platf...
 
Description Alison speaks on March 28th 2019 13:30 - 15:00 at a round table event on Brexit Amory Parker Moot Room University of Exeter 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Alison speaks on March 28th 2019 13:30 - 15:00 at a round table event on Brexit Amory Parker Moot Room University of Exeter
o Professor Helen Drake, Chair of French and European Studies and Director of the Institute for Diplomacy and International Governance at Loughborough University London.
o Tim Durrant, Senior Researcher at the Institute for Government
o Alex Prichard, Senior Lecturer at the University of Exeter
o Alison Harcourt, Professor at the University of Exeter
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://www.exeter.ac.uk
 
Description Alison spoke on Panel 601: REF 2021: Insights from 2014 and Key Challenges for the Future at the 2018 UACES annual conference. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Session
Panel 601: REF 2021: Insights from 2014 and Key Challenges for the Future at the UACES annual conference.
Time: Tuesday, 04/Sep/2018: 3:10pm - 4:40pm
Location: 3.1

Show help for 'Increase or decrease the abstract text size'Presentations
REF 2021: Insights from 2014 and Key Challenges for the Future

Chair(s): Simon Usherwood (University of Surrey)

Presenter(s): Alison Harcourt (University of Exeter), Charlie Jeffery (University of Edinburgh), Jonathan Tonge (University of Liverpool), Susan Hodgett (Ulster University)

Alison presented on the REF roundtable at the UACES conference which examined both the insights from the previous REF cycle and the key challenges for the coming assessment. It featured insights from a range of disciplinary perspectives and from those who have previously served on REF assessments as well as those who are expected to do so in 2021. The roundtable was an opportunity for UACES members to become better acquainted with the REF process and in particular, with changes that have occurred between REF 2014 and today. It will pay particular attention to the ways in which interdisciplinary research will be foregrounded this time around.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.uaces.org/events/conferences/bath/panels/
 
Description CIGR2021 with PSU PILOT 'Infodemic regulation' May 7 2021 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact CIGR2021 with PSU PILOT 'Infodemic regulation' May 7 2021

12noon "Digital Services Acts and Omissions", Chair @ChrisTMarsden

Speakers: Alison Harcourt @alieliale @1Br0wn @cyberleagle Tim Cowen (Preiskel)

130pm Trusted Autonomous Systems, chaired by Chris Marsden

Speakers : Professor Burkhard Schafer; Dr Phoebe Li; Dr Lachlan D. Urquhart

230-300pm break

300pm "infodemic: Big Tech's Weakest Arguments" chaired by Dr Andres Guadamuz

Speakers: Maria Farrell, Chris Marsden, Elettra Bietta, Andrea Matwyshyn

430pm

"The short 21st century" Internet fragmentation because....Chaired by Professor Andrea Matwyshyn

Professors Jon Crowcroft, Derek MacAuley, Lilian Edwards + special guests
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/cigr2021-tickets-148204300051
 
Description Communicating politics and the EU to the British public: an interdisciplinary view. Conference on British Media, EU Membership and the Referendum organised by the University of Warwick. Shard, London. January 17, 2017. https://www2.warwick.ac.uk/about/london/events/calendar/british_media_eu/ 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact I participated in a panel on Communicating politics and the EU to the British public: an interdisciplinary view at the British Media, EU Membership and the Referendum conference organised by the University of Warwick at the Shard, London on January 17, 2017 with Mark English, European Commission Prof Oliver Daddow, University of Nottingham Prof Alison Harcourt, University of Exeter Prof Abhinay Muthoo, University of Warwick Prof Claes de Vreese, University of Amsterdam. My main premise was to point out hat a move of news production services and broadcasters producing news channels out of the UK due to Brexit might have affect on the regulation of political broadcasting in the UK and this should be something considered by the Electoral Commission.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/economics/events/2017/1/british_media_eu_membership_and_the_referendum...
 
Description Harcourt, Alison (2017) "Brexit and digital markets" presentation at Exeter alumni event Thursday 15th June 2017 Dechert LLP, 160 Queen Victoria Street, London EC4V 4QQ. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact I presented to Exeter's alumni assocation with circa 50 attendees on "Brexit and digital markets" on Thursday 15th June 2017 at Dechert LLP, 160 Queen Victoria Street, London EC4V 4QQ together with Andrew Hood, Senior Director, Dechert LLP, Pete Jackson, Freelance Strategy Director and Edward Boyd, Managing Director at Centre for Social Justice. I was able to communicate project findings to recent graduates many of them working in the media sector and in the City.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.exeter.ac.uk/news/events/details/index.php?event=6992
 
Description I presented at the LSE Symposium Troubled Democracy: Media, Power and Control 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I presented at the LSE Symposium Troubled Democracy: Media, Power and Control on May 19th, 2017. The audience was mainly academic. My main point was to point out how transparency requirements could change for UK industry post-Brexit with discussion also of the 4th and 5th EU Anti-Money Laundering Directives and establishment of the European electronic access point by the European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://pomp.com.pl/en/symposium-troubled-democracy-media-power-and-control/
 
Description I presented on Brexit and the EU's Digital Single Market on April 23, 2018 at the Coaver Club, Exeter for the European Movement. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact I presented on Brexit and the EU's Digital Single Market on April 23, 2018 at the Coaver Club, Exeter for the European Movement. It was an opportunity to explain current developments to a general public audience.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.europeanmovement.co.uk/events
 
Description March 22nd 2019 Alison speaks at the The Inspiring Women Seminar Series on digital services at the Council Chamber in Northcote House 14:00 - 15:00 p.m. (women only) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact March 22nd 2019 Alison speaks at the The Inspiring Women Seminar Series is a lunchtime event open to all women in Higher Education, Council Chamber in Northcote House 14:00 - 15:00 p.m. Council Chamber in Northcote House 14:00 - 15:00 p.m. to a female only audience.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/inspiring-women-seminar-series-professor-alison-harcourt-tickets-5077...
 
Description Participation in "The Implications of Brexit on the UK: The Case of the EU Digital Single Market" Panel: European in a post-Brexit world. 113th APSA Annual Meeting. August 31st, 2017. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I presented a paper on "The Implications of Brexit on the UK: The Case of the EU Digital Single Market" on the ECPR panel: European in a post-Brexit world at the 113th APSA Annual Meeting on August 31st, 2017 to an academic audience. As a result Erik Jones Professor of European Studies and International Political Economy Director of European and Eurasian Studies at Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies introduced me to Bo Lidegaard, head of Europe for Macro Advisory Partners who is working on the future of digital Europe.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://ecpr.eu/news/news/details/463
 
Description Presentation to South West Data Protection & Privacy Networking Group December 11, 2017 at the Tobacco Factory, Bristol 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact I presented to the South West Data Protection & Privacy Networking Group workshop held on Wednesday 1st November from 9.30am to 12pm at The Tobacco Factory in Bristol.t The event was hosted by Chris O'Connell from AppDynamics who arranged the venue and subsidised the cost. Georgina Graham from Osborne Clarke presented on the main 'takeaways' of the new UK Data Protection DP Bill. Alison Harcourt presented on the Government's recent paper 'The Exchange and Protection of Personal Data: a future partnership paper' (link below) re the post-Brexit legal landscape for the legitimation of data flows within the UK and the EU. Chris O'Connell presented on GDPR controller/processor contracts with special emphasis on risks and liabilities. Presentations were followed by interactive and practical discussion with attendance from Atlata Giles, Fieldfisher.com; Adam Tuckett, the NHS, Alison Deighton, TLTsolicitors, Alison Gane, NHS, Andrew Cox, Dyson, Angela Bridges, Marketingsource, Annabelle Gold Caution, Burges Salmon, Bernadette Keen, Bristol City Council, Bjorn Almgren, Intel, Caroline Dominey, NHS, Catherine Barford, Nationwide, Chris O'Connell, Appdynamics, C Coughlan, Ashfords.co.uk, C Westbrook, Expedia.com, Daryl Lant, IOP, David Tancock, David Varney, Burges Salmon, Donna Hobbs, Dyson, Eleanor Locke, Osborne Clarke, Emily Jones, Osborne Clarke, Emma Davies, TLTsolicitors, Emma Fox. Tltsolicitors, Emma Meacham, Teleperformance, Emma Young, Environment Agency, Felicia Hislop, Admiralgroup, Helena Ashton, NHS, Hilary Coote, Baesystems, Jade Ince, Nationwide, James Gay, Bristol City Council, James.Mullock, Twobirds, James Rellie, Teleperformance, Jannine Aston, Verizon, J Clarke, Mitsubishi, John Phantis, Verizon, Jon Round, Osborneclarke, Kate Tregale, NHS, Laura Amlot, Admiralgroup.co.uk, Leanne Bridges, Dyson.com, Lianne Moulder, Admiralgroup, Martin Bowen, Dyson, Massimo Felici, HP, Michael Lewis, Admiralgroup, Michela Derrico, HP, Natalie Jones, IOIP, Nick Holland, Fieldfisher, Nuria Pastor, Fieldfisher, Richard Craven, Orbotech.com, RG Talbot, Qinetiq, Rob Evered, Intel, Rory Trust, Burges Salmon, Ruth Fisher, Tltsolicitors, Sandra Cavill, Environment Agency, Sarah Fricker, IOP, Sarah.Nell, Nationwide.co.uk, Sharon Cutler, Euro-recycling, Siani Pearson, HP, Sonia Bellamy, EE, Teresa Gudge, English Heritage, Thomas Dear, Nationwide, Trish Bartlett, Bartlett Ukconsultancy, Victoria Carr, NHS.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation to South West Data Protection & Privacy Networking Group. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact I presented on the government's proposals for the exchange of protection and personal data post-Brexit to members of the South West Data Protection & Privacy Networking Group, Tobacco Factory, Bristol in November 2017 who reported that translation of the government's proposals, current GDPR implementation and explanation of EU regulatory fora particularly decision-making within the Article 19 WG was greatly useful to them. Attendees including data protection officers and legal representatives from AppDynamics, the UK Blood and Transplant, Dyson, Marketing Source, Bristol City Council, Intel, Ashfords, Burges Salmon, TLT, Teleperformance, the Environment Agency, Admiral Group, Osborne Clarke, Bristol City Council, Verizon Enterprise Solutions, NHS South, Central and West Commissioning Support Unit, Fieldfisher, Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, Qinetiq, the NHS, Nationwide Building Society.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Privacy, Encryption and Surveillance: do we need a new Common Law for Cyber. Policy Round Table January 26th 2017. Cyber Policy Institute. Organised by James Morris MP for cyber security skills gap and Lord Arbuthnot of Edrom House of Lords with attendance by industry representatives. The Cyber Policy Centre, 4th Floor, Rex House, 4-12 Regent Street, London SW1Y 4PE. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I was invited expert to the annual Policy Round Table Privacy, Encryption and Surveillance: do we need a new Common Law for Cyber which took place on January 26th 2017 at the Cyber Policy Institute organised by James Morris MP for cyber security skills gap and Lord Arbuthnot of Edrom House of Lords at the Cyber Policy Centre, 4th Floor, Rex House, 4-12 Regent Street, London SW1Y 4PE. This resulted in an Encryption and Society report which was released to the press in November 2017. In attendance were Dr Annegret Bendiek Senior Associate Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik Anna Caddick Olswang Partner Professor George Christou University of Warwick Professor of European Politics and Security David Cook PwC Cyber Security & Data Protection Team Lasantha De Alwis Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation Director, ITC & Corporate Secretary Katharine Derschewsky Associate Partner Instinctif Partners The Right Honourable Lord Arbuthnot of Edrom House of Lords Officer, All Party Parliamentary Group of Cyber Security Professor Alison Harcourt Exeter University Professor of Politics Andrew Henderson Wychwood Consulting Ltd Secretariat All-Party Parliamentary Group on Cyber Security Dr Martin Koyabe Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation Manager of Technical Support and Consultancy Sheetal Kumar Global Partners Digital Lead on Global Internet Freedom Prog Owen Larter Microsoft UK Government Affairs Manager Iona Millership Olswang Associate James Morris MP House of Commons Member of Parliament Katie Morris Article 19 Head of Europe and Central Asia Bob Pickles Canon Head of Corporate & Government Affairs Jean-Jacques Sahel ICANN Vice President, Europe Paul Taylor KPMG Partner & Head of UK Cyber Security Dan Tench Olswang Partner Professor Tim Watson University of Warwick WMG Director Cyber Security Centre Professor Colin Williams University of Warwick Softbox Ltd.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Privacy, Encryption and Surveillance: do we need a new common law for cyber? 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I was invited to contribute to a Cyber Policy Centre round table event on January 16, 2017 entitled Privacy, Encryption and Surveillance: do we need a new common law for cyber? The Cyber Policy Centre, 4th Floor, Rex House, 4-12 Regent Street, London SW1Y 4PE. The purpose of this round table was to move the conversation around the themes of identity, privacy and surveillance beyond the tactical concerns generated by the GDPR and the IPA, and even beyond the underlying exercise of the attempt to relocate the prior analogue manifestations of these themes in Cyber. The round table focused on the novel policy, legal and regulatory challenges posed in these areas by Cyber and it will explore ways in which a positive contribution can be made to the formation of new and innovative expressions of the formal mechanics of the social contract in the information age. Participants: the Right Honourable The Lord Arbuthnot of Edrom House of Lords Officer, All Party Parliamentary Group Cyber Security Dr Annegret Bendiek Senior Associate Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik Anna Caddick Olswang Partner David Cook PwC Cyber Security & Data Protection Team Professor George Christou Warwick University Professor of European Politics and Security Lasantha De Alwis Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation Director, ITC & Corporate Secretary Flick Drummond MP MP for Portsmouth South Chair, All Party Parliamentary Group on Cyber Security Professor Alison Harcourt Exeter University Professor of Politics Dr Martin Koyabe Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation Manager of Technical Support and Consultancy Sheetal Kumar Global Partners Digital Lead on Global Internet Freedom Prog Owen Larter Microsoft UK Government Affairs Manager Sarah Lennard Brown Global Prosecutors E-crime Network Co-Ordinator Iona Millership Olswang Associate Katie Morris Article 19 Head of Europe and Central Asia Jan Neutze Microsoft Director of Cybersecurity Policy, EMEA Bob Pickles Canon Head of Corporate & Government Affairs Jean-Jacques Sahel ICANN Vice-President, Europe Paul Taylor KPMG Partner & Head of UK Cyber Security Quentyn Taylor Canon Director of Information Security, EMEA Dan Tench Olswang Partner
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.cyberpolicycentre.org.uk/
 
Description SCL webinar "The Digital Services Act and the Future of the Internet" Tuesday 16 February 2021 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact SCL webinar: "The Digital Services Act and the Future of the Internet" - Tuesday 16 February 2021 @ 6 pm

Date: Tuesday 16 February 2021

Chair:
Professor Chris Marsden, Professor of Internet Law at the University of Sussex, Founder-Director of the Centre for Information Governance Research

Speakers:
Graham Smith, Of Counsel, Bird & Bird LLP
Dr Ian Brown, Visiting Professor FGV, Expert Advisor to OSF on interoperability remedies for DSA/DMA
Professor Alison Harcourt, Professor of Politics, Exeter, Project Director ESRC UK in a Changing Europe programme with the project "The impact of a proposed UK Brexit from the EU: the UK communications industries"
Tim Cowen, Chair of the Antitrust Practice at Preiskel & Co, CMA, Expert on competition law in communications markets

The long awaited redrawing of Internet intermediary liability law ('platform law' as some call it) was announced by the European Commission in 2019, and the legal texts are expected to be published in December.

The Digital Services Act package will have two main parts: to increase and harmonise the responsibilities of online platforms and Information Society service providers, and regulate platforms' content policies; to set ex-ante rules in markets characterised by large platforms acting as anticompetitive gatekeepers.

This seminar brings together four experts on the various elements of the new rules, to deal with the issues it presents for:

Online platforms generally;
larger gatekeepers including the GAFAM companies;
technical interoperability remedies for both inline platforms and the GAFAM players;
the implications for newly Brexit Britain in revising its own rules, including the long-running 'Online Harms' legislative agenda.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.scl.org/events/649-scl-webinar-the-digital-services-act-and-the-future-of-the-internet-t...
 
Description South West Data Protection & Privacy Networking Group 16th March 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I organised a meeting of the South West Data Protection & Privacy Networking Group together with Kathryn Whelan (Intel) and Georgina Graham (Associate for Osborne Clarke LLP) on Wednesday 12th October 10:00-12:00 in Bristol. The topic was "Brexit - Going It Alone?!". There were 2 presentations: by myself and Georgina Graham with Q&A. It was a closed invitation only event with circa 40 professional practitioners in audience including data protection officers and lawyers from the NHS, Dyson, Bristol City Council, Marketing Source, Ashfords, Expedia, the Environment Agency, Admiral Group, Burges-Salmon, BP, Verizon, Dyson, HP, Qinetiq, Nationawide and Field Fisher.
October 2016 Session Feedback
• Overall: 89% "very useful"; 11% "useful"; 0% "of little use". No Comments
• Session length & timing: 0% "too long"; 89% "just right"; 11% "too short". No Comments
• Attend again: 100% "yes".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description presentation to Transparency: where art thou in consumer protection? conference University of Exeter 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact I presented at the conference Transparency: where art thou in consumer protection? organised by Joasia Luzak at the University of Exeter on June 27th, 2017. This was mainly an academic audience but included legal practitioners and a Director of the European Data Protection Supervisor's Office. I discussed how transparency requirements for UK companies . Many of the participants were unaware of how transparency measures could change in the UK post-Brexit particularly those relating to the media industry.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.exeter.ac.uk/news/events/details/index.php?event=6983