GCRF: Economic empowerment and intimate partner violence in Sub-Saharan Africa

Lead Research Organisation: London Sch of Hygiene and Trop Medicine
Department Name: Public Health and Policy

Abstract

Intimate partner violence is a crucial human rights, development and public health issue, with one in three women worldwide reporting physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence. The prevalence of intimate partner violence is particularly high in the Southern and Eastern Africa, where 39 to 46% of women report intimate partner violence during their lifetime. Despite increasing evidence for the worsened health as a result of partner violence, little is known about how to prevent it. Economic empowerment may be a solution, but research has shown mixed evidence for how (if at all) it improves women's experience of intimate partner violence or reduces men's perpetration. It is particularly important to understand the dynamics of economic empowerment and partner violence in sub-Saharan Africa in order to design effective interventions and improve health across the continent.
We will explore the extent to which economic empowerment is associated with intimate partner violence, what forms of economic empowerment are crucial to reduce intimate partner violence, how men's access to resources influences male perpetration of partner violence and how economic and empowerment changes affect the occurrence of intimate partner violence. We propose to empirically examine these enduring questions using our team's existing data from trials we are conducting in Tanzania and South Africa. Data from a rural (Tanzania) and an urban (South Africa) studies will investigate how different forms of economic empowerment affect women's experience and men's perpetration of intimate partner violence. Additional qualitative data from Tanzania and South Africa will explore what "power" in economic empowerment interventions and programme actually means to women and how economic empowerment affects their relationship and their experiences of intimate partner violence. These two case study countries will inform a deeper analysis using data from the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) of 21 countries in sub-Saharan Africa, namely Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Congo Democratic Republic, Cote d'Ivore, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The DHS analysis will be able to investigate the association between economic empowerment factors and intimate partner violence beyond the individual levels to also explore community level factors that might contribute to intimate partner violence and map these associations graphically. Lastly, longitudinal analysis of the Tanzanian and South African trials will provide evidence for how changes in economic status and empowerment influence women's experience and men's use of partner violence.

Lessons from this proposal will guide the field towards interventions that are tailored to reduce intimate partner violence through economic empowerment, but also considering other factors in the ecological framework. The research team will work closely with the World Health Organisation and existing DFID consortia to reduce violence against women as a method to ensure insights are translated into global policy. We will also work with local governments and non-governmental organisations to share the knowledge generated by this proposed research to ensure that women and men are offered tailored economic empowerment interventions that will help them to live a life free of violence. Our team of emerging researchers from the United Kingdom, Tanzania, and South Africa will deepen existing expertise through tailored training opportunities and ongoing interdisciplinary collaboration. With support from the ESRC Secondary Analysis Call, our team will be in a position to apply our secondary evidence towards a novel intervention for reducing partner violence in Tanzania and South Africa.

Planned Impact

This research aims to provide a better understanding of the effect of economic empowerment on intimate partner violence. The proposed project will be beneficial for a wide range of stakeholders, first of all for women in sub-Saharan Africa who experience intimate partner violence or participate in economic empowerment programmes, such as micro finance. Beyond that, we believe that the findings of the proposed research will be of high interest to policy makers and programmers at non-governmental organisations, national governments and international agencies working to reduce intimate partner violence or providing economic empowerment, especially economic empowerment type interventions, such as micro-finance services. Given the strong leadership in the academic field to prevent and address violence against women and to design and evaluate interventions, this study also has the potential to inform future development by influencing future intervention designs and programming.

The research team is very well placed at the Gender Violence and Health Centre (GVHC) at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine to ensure that the findings of the proposed study are translated into practice and reach those who will benefit most from the research findings. GVHC is known for its conceptual advancements in the field of violence against women, its commitment to scientifically rigorous methods and dedication to impact and wide dissemination of research findings to influence policy and practice. The proposed research will be able to draw on the long term relationships GVHC has established with key stakeholders worldwide, especially in developing countries through its lead participation in research consortia addressing violence against women. In addition, the research team will work closely with Dr Garcia Moreno from its non-academic partner the World Health Organisation (WHO), a global leader in violence against women research with a wide network reaching policy makers, academics and local, national and international stakeholders. This proposed research links well with the major ongoing work of GVHC and the institutions it works with and can also draw on networks of institutions the international co-investigators are based in, such as the Mwanza Intervention Trial Unit and the University of Dodoma in Tanzania and the University of Witwatersrand and Sisters for Life in South Africa.

In the short to medium term, the project will be able to impact policy and practice through traditional academic outputs such as peer-reviewed journal papers and conference presentations. This will take place in panel or single presentations at selected key conferences, such as the Sexual Violence Research Initiative (SVRI) Forum (http://www.svri.org) that reaches academic audiences as well as practitioners, policy makers and major donors in the violence against women field. Further impact will also be achieved by stakeholder meetings in South Africa and Tanzania as well as capacity building at the institutions that will raise the awareness of intimate partner violence research in general and inform ongoing intervention studies aimed at reducing intimate partner violence through economic empowerment. Towards the end of the project, we will email policy briefs and geographical maps visually displaying the findings to key stakeholders and further distribute them via existing mailing lists (SVRI, STRIVE and What Works) and other social media outlets, e.g. Twitter and publish them on the GVHC webpage. An information sheet will also be developed for dissemination via the WHO webpage.

In the long term, the project aims to inform future intervention design, development and programming as it will provide micro-finance providers with the necessary evidence to tailor their project to women's and their family's needs. By distributing the findings to policy makers and donors, the project also aims to influence policies with the resulting in-depth knowledge

Publications

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Title Food Apartheid documentary 
Description Health-e's Food Apartheid documentary looks at the long-term effects of malnutrition in further entrenching violence, education, health and employment divides that exist in South Africa today. This story interviews academics, activists, mothers and students to understand how hunger impacts millions of South African lives. The secondary analysis from the GCRF award is featured as a way to understand how men who are living with food insecurity use higher rates of intimate partner violence. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact Broadcast on public television in South Africa (Cutting Edge on SABC1 at 21:30, 6 Mar 2018 and DSTV Channel 404 at 17:30, 11 Mar 2018). Viewership of SABC1 Cutting Edge is 1,218,000. 
URL http://youtu.be/rQlbV8O1DlU
 
Description Achievement 1: Theoretical framework for how economic insecurity is associated with intimate partner violence (IPV) in sub-Saharan Africa. Mixed findings in the field of poverty and IPV make it challenging for policy and programmes to be effective. One reason for mixed findings may be the under-theorisation of economic insecurity and IPV. We developed a theory-based conceptual framework through the emerging knowledge of the different types of analysis under this project, insights from stakeholders, writing workshops and numerous dedicated group calls. Our proposed conceptual framework combines existing theories with new emerging knowledge to understand the pathways that lead from economic insecurity at the individual, relationship and community level to IPV in sub-Saharan Africa. The final draft of the framework was presented at the Sexual Violence Research Initiative (SVRI) Conference 2019 and will be submitted to Social Science & Medicine.

Achievement 2: Wide dissemination of research results. Key findings from this grant have primarily been disseminated through academic publications (8 accepted) and conference presentations (6 at 2019 SVRI, 3 at 2017 SVRI and DHS analysis at International Population Conference). Research findings were also disseminated through three stakeholder events in Johannesburg, Mwanza and Dar es Salaam and through the Prevention Task Team during the Gender-Based Violence Summit held by the South African presidency. Findings around men's perpetration of IPV and poverty were included in a documentary film called "Food Apartheid," which was viewed by roughly 1 million viewers and won multiple awards.
Our findings challenge the assumption that economic strengthening interventions such as microfinance are sufficient to truly empower women economically and or reduce IPV perpetration or victimisation and highlight differences according to urban-rural settings and age.

Achievement 3: Network of sub-Saharan African researchers on gender-based violence. Through the stakeholder meetings in Johannesburg and Dar es Salaam, we have started the process of generating a network of economic empowerment and IPV researchers in sub-Saharan Africa. As detailed in the narrative section, the meeting in Johannesburg was deliberately arranged for early and mid-career researchers to inform future collaborations. In Dar es Salaam, based on the government interest in IPV research, a formal Tanzanian network of IPV researchers was initiated.

Achievement 4: Capacity building and training. The project was deliberately set up to allow wider participation of researchers than those named on the grant, especially early career researchers. The project directly paid for training on longitudinal data analysis skills of Dr Mahenge and Dr Ranganathan, facilitated the participation of LSHTM PhD student Anushe Hassan, added skills for an intern at WHO Dr Ruiz, and paid for training and symposium attendance of Dr Hatcher in London. Throughout the project, we added LSHTM research fellows Mr Kayombo (Mwanza based) and Dr Stern into ongoing discussion of the findings and knowledge exchange. During the 2018 Johannesburg meeting, all researchers received additional training on using data visualization as a method for communicating research findings around economic empowerment and IPV. This training was also provided to 38 global GBV researchers during the 2019 SVRI.
Exploitation Route Academic impact
Results of the analyses from the project have received significant attention through publications and conferences attended by academics, donors, practitioners and policy makers from sub-Saharan Africa and around the world. The conceptual framework in particular generated significant interest and we have been in touch with a number of experts keen to participate in its development. Ultimately, this framework may have cross-disciplinary influence in the development of programmes tackling IPV through economic empowerment of women and men.

Non-academic impact
IPV is high on the political agenda, with a recent DfID announcement of 66 million for IPV programming and research. We anticipate an uptake of this grants findings by this DfiD investment due to the gap in theory-informed interventions on IPV and economic empowerment. The GCRF funding has positioned our team to be responsive to emerging policy windows. For example, we contributed to the implementation of the Tanzanian National Action Plan, were requested to work with WHO on the RESPECT Framework and guided the prevention task force within the South African national GBV Summit. Our ability to launch new policy and programming initiatives will be bolstered by the new networks of GBV researchers in sub-Saharan Africa initiated by this grant.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Government, Democracy and Justice,Other

URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rQlbV8O1DlU
 
Description The findings of the grant have been disseminated in both academic and non-academic symposiums and workshops. The first presentations of the study by Ms Hussain and Drs Hatcher, Ranganathan, Stern, and Stöckl were held at a symposium at LSHTM on the 15th May 2018. We presented the work to upcoming academic researchers at LSHTM, which has an international student and staff body, many of whom returning to their home countries in their capacity as researchers, health professionals, governmental or non-governmental workers, or other relevant positions for society. The symposium was attended by 30 students and staff members and the presentations and comments by the audience fed into the development of the conceptual framework. On November 8-9, 2018, we held our first stakeholder meeting in Johannesburg, attended by 11 participants, including representatives from UNICEF, IMAGE, Social Surveys Africa, MRC South Africa, as well as early career researchers from sub-Saharan Africa involved in similar projects. The event was explicitly targeted at early and mid-career researchers as well as practitioners to allow the building of a network of young researchers and practitioners that will facilitate collaboration for future work and their applicability to the programming and policy context in sub-Saharan Africa. The workshop also included a section on principles of infographic creation to allow participants to translate their research findings into memorable messages for their engagement with policy makers. Immediate outputs of the workshop included key message slides for all participants based on their studies, an updated conceptual framework on economic scarcity and IPV and a new network of early and mid-career researchers and practitioners working on IPV in Sub-Saharan Africa. On November 26, 2018, we organized a local stakeholder workshop in Mwanza, Tanzania with a focus on micro-finance organizations and local government officials in Mwanza, Tanzania. The workshop was attended by representatives from Platinum Credit, EBLI, Mikono Yetu, Asa-Microfinance, FINCA Microfinance Bank, as well as local governmental representatives from Mwanza City Council, Ilemela Municipal Council and a regional trade officers and local non-governmental institutions such as WADADA and Amani girls. At the meeting, we disseminated the findings of the ESRC grant, with an overview of the existing data from sub-Saharan Africa derived from the DHS analysis and an in-depth explanation of the MAISHA Trial results that have been conducted in Mwanza and therefore had the greatest relevance for this particular audience. The meeting led to lively discussions among the stakeholders, including the need to expand the gender training component to rural areas beyond Mwanza city and the possibility to shorten the curriculum. Overall, the workshop contributed to raising the awareness of IPV among micro-finance participants and provided different institutions with potential programmes to prevent it. The last stakeholder workshop was conducted on the November 30, 2018 in Muhimbili University, institute of Psychiatry, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania where we presented the findings of the study to a group of 50 students and 20 staff members. Participating students are all upcoming clinical psychologists and mental health professionals, for whom a basic knowledge of IPV and its relationship to economic stress can be beneficial in their future daily practice when seeing patients. The lecture was followed by a two hour smaller meeting between Dr Mbwambo, Dr Likindikoki, Dr Faini, Dr Mahenge, Dr Kayombo, Dr Stevens and Dr Stöckl about building a network on Tanzanian GBV researchers that can advice the government of Tanzania in the implementation of the Tanzanian Action Plan on Preventing and Reducing Violence against Women and Children. This meeting was instrumental to gain the support of the two patrons of the future network, Dr Mwambo and Dr Kapiga and to discuss primary objectives of the network. The network will now hold its first meeting on March 14, 2019 with approximately 20 Tanzanian researchers attending. It will be promoted to various government stakeholders attending the STRIVE meeting on the 15th of March 2019. Findings from this research were presented at six different presentations at the 2019 SVRI in Cape Town, South Africa, which is the flagship conference for IPV research in low and middle income countries. The conference was attended by more than 800 experts, researchers, funders, programmers, journalists, activists and policy-makers. We presented on the quantitative findings of IMAGE, the qualitative and quantitative findings of MAISHA, the quantitative findings of the Sonke CHANGE trial, a systematic review of IPV interventions and the conceptual framework. Feedback from these presentations led to several connections and follow-ups by academics and practitioners that led to a refinement of the conceptual framework that is in submission to Social Science and Medicine. We have further published eight papers as a result of this grant, including papers in the American Journal of Public Health, American Journal of Preventive Medicine, AIDS, BMC Public Health, Prevention Science and the Journal of Interpersonal Violence. Three articles are currently under review in Culture, Health and Sexuality, American Journal of Preventive Medicine and BMC Public Health with two in the process of being submitted to Social Science and Medicine. In South Africa, Dr Hatcher served as a Task Team Member for the National Summit on Gender-based Violence. As a lead facilitator for the Prevention Task Team, Dr Hatcher spoke with national policy-makers on poverty reduction and violence. The outcome of this policy engagement was the inclusion of economic empowerment into the GBV Summit Declaration, a national policy document that will guide South Africa's new development of a National Strategic Plan for GBV. Dr Hatcher's findings contributed to development of a documentary on South African Broadcast Channel, entitled "Food Apartheid", which won the 2018 Food Sustainability Media Award. This reached an audience of more than 1 million viewers with data from the GCRF findings around food insecurity and men's perpetration of IPV.
First Year Of Impact 2018
Sector Creative Economy,Government, Democracy and Justice,Other
Impact Types Societal,Economic,Policy & public services

 
Description Task force to the South African Presidency
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
Impact Research findings have been disseminated through a policy network (Prevention Task Team) during the Gender Based Violence Summit held by the South African presidency.
 
Description Cash Transfer and Intimate Partner Violence Research Collaborative - Meghna Ranganathan
Amount $250,000 (USD)
Organisation Wellspring Advisors 
Sector Private
Country United States
Start 06/2019 
End 06/2021
 
Description Commonwealth Rutherford Fellowship for Bathsheba Mahenge
Amount £51,002 (GBP)
Funding ID TZRF-2017-487 
Organisation Commonwealth Secretariat 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2018 
End 02/2020
 
Description ERC Starting Grant
Amount € 1,500,000 (EUR)
Funding ID 716458 IPV_Tanzania 
Organisation European Research Council (ERC) 
Sector Public
Country Belgium
Start 09/2017 
End 08/2022
 
Description GCRF Accelerating Achievement for Africa's Adolescents Hub
Amount £18,531,197 (GBP)
Funding ID ES/S008101/1 
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2019 
End 05/2024
 
Description Global Impact Accelerator Account (GIAAs)
Amount £13,000 (GBP)
Organisation London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2018 
End 03/2019
 
Description Intimate Partner Violence Prevention Research
Amount $1,500,000 (USD)
Organisation Wellspring Advisors 
Sector Private
Country United States
Start 09/2018 
End 08/2021
 
Description Multilevel Mechanisms of HIV Acquisition in Young South African Women
Amount $669,253 (USD)
Funding ID 5R01MH110186-02 
Organisation National Institutes of Health (NIH) 
Sector Public
Country United States
Start 04/2016 
End 01/2021
 
Description Personal fellowship to Abigail Hatcher, KO1 Award
Amount $1,500,000 (USD)
Funding ID 1 K01 MH12118501 
Organisation National Institutes of Health (NIH) 
Department National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Sector Public
Country United States
Start  
 
Description Proof of concept study to prevent violence against women
Amount $305,000 (USD)
Organisation Wellspring Advisors 
Sector Private
Country United States
Start 10/2019 
End 09/2020
 
Description Sustainable Development Programme 2018
Amount £300,000 (GBP)
Organisation The British Academy 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2018 
End 07/2020
 
Description Muhimbili, Tanzania collaboration 
Organisation Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences
Department Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health
Country Tanzania, United Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution GCRF ESRC grant: We have hold a stakeholder meeting at Muhimbili University attended by health care professionals, students and academics. After the stakeholder meetings we started plans to build up a network of Tanzanian GBV researchers, with the first meeting conducted in Mwanza in March 2019. Prior engagement: During my first field visit in Tanzania I have conducted an analysis of the prevalence, maternal health outcomes and risk and protective factors of intimate partner violence during pregnancy of the WHO multi-country study data on Tanzania together with the Tanzanian principle investigator of the WHO study from Muhimbiliy University and my mentor from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Furthermore, I started to introduce myself and built up a network with local experts (researchers, NGO staff and other activists) interested in intimate partner violence in Tanzania during this stay.
Collaborator Contribution GCRF ESRC grant: Dr Likindokoki will head the proposed network, together with Dr Mahenge from the University of Dodoma, Dr Mshana from the National Institute of Medical Research in Tanzania and me. Dr Likindikoki hosted our stakeholder engagement event at Muhimbili University. Prior engagement: The partner not only gave me access to the dataset but also discussed the analysis plan and findings with me during my stay, whcih resulted in a joint publication.
Impact GCRF ESRC Grant: a network meeting with junior researchers on GBV in Tanzania. Prior Grant: An article was published in Reproductive Health Matters. The team consisted of a trained psychiatrist, an epidemiologist and mathematical modeler and me, a social scientists. Another article resulting from this collaboration is currently under review in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth.
Start Year 2010
 
Description Mwanza International Trial Unit (MITU) 
Organisation National Institute for Medical Research, Tanzania
Department Mwanza Intervention Trials Unit (MITU)
Country Tanzania, United Republic of 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Although not officially a partner in this grant, we co-authored a paper with MITU on economic empowerment and intimate partner violence. This benefits both the GCRF grant as well as the MAISHA analysis undertaken in MITU as it led to direct collaboration between Dr Meghna Ranganathan, Co-Investigator in this grant and Ms Tanya Abramsky who is leading the analysis for MITU on conceptual frameworks trying to capture the complex issues related to this topic.
Collaborator Contribution The partnership is mainly focused on an exchange of knowledge and ideas about analysis and is beneficial in both ways. MITU also offered room and refreshments for the stakeholder event with microfinance stakeholders in Mwanza for free.
Impact The paper under this collaboration is close to submission to BMC Public Health, Stakeholder Workshop in Mwanza. Participation in future synthesis group on engaging men in IPV research funded by a different donor.
Start Year 2017
 
Description University of Dodoma 
Organisation University of Dodoma
Country Tanzania, United Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution At the University of Dodoma, we are working with Dr Bathsheba Mahenge, an early career researcher. The grant provides Dr Mahenge with the possibility to actively participating in the discussion around economic empowerment and intimate partner violence that are held regularly under this grant. She is actively involved in the DHS analysis under this grant. We are providing Dr Mahenge with training opportunities, e.g. she has taken a methods course in Tanzania, funded under this grant to improve her analytical skills. I, Dr. Heidi Stöckl have also actively supported Dr Mahenge in applying successfully for a Commonwealth Postdoctoral Fellowship to allow her to visit LSHTM for two years starting in the end of March. This means that she is able to enjoy further training opportunities under this grant and will be welcomed into an existing group of researchers, working on a joint topic.
Collaborator Contribution The early career researcher, Dr Mahenge, is providing her time for free to participate in the discussions of the project and the analysis of papers. She is providing important insights into the local customs and interpretation of the findings, highlighting important policies that might have an influence and explain the findings. As a lecturer at the Universty of Dodoma, the capital city of Tanzania, Dr. Mahenge is also continuing to provide us with suggestions on how to best disseminate our findings among local governments, policy makers and local stakeholders.
Impact Conference paper on economic empowerment and intimate partner violence presented in Cape Town in 2017 and one paper submitted to SVRI 2019. Stakeholder workshop in Dar es Salaam, 2 draft papers close to submission, training attendance
Start Year 2017
 
Description University of Witwatersrand 
Organisation University of the Witwatersrand
Department Reproductive Health and HIV Research Unit (RHRU) Witwatersrand
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The collaboration between the University of Witwatersrand and me is longstanding, as I have been technical advisor for the Safe& Sound trial and supervised the local partner, Dr. Abigail Hatcher's PhD. I am also an honory senior lecturer at the University of Witwatersrand. For this partnership, we have provided Dr Hatcher, a early career researcher with the opportunity to participate in frequent and regular discussions on the topic of economic empowerment, to forge new relationships with researchers based in Tanzania and the UK and to participate in further training courses. Also, by providing her with salary time, we also allowed her to utilize her data on a topic she otherwise would not have explored, the effect of men's economic situation on their perpetration of intimate partner violence.
Collaborator Contribution For the current study, Dr. Hatcher contributed an important component to the discussion- namely the data and therefore analysis on men's economic situation and intimate partner violence. This type of data, investigating men's perpetration, is comparatively rare in the violence against women field. In the long run, we are planning to conduct more studies on understanding what leads men to perpetrate violence and the role of men's and women's economic empowerment in it. Dr. Hatcher will also support us in planning a stakeholder meeting in South Africa.
Impact Multiple shared discussions. 1 paper accepted in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Participation in the South African Presnidency Taskforce on Preventing Violence against women. Particpation in a synthesis group on engaging men funded by another donor.
Start Year 2017
 
Description WHO Reproductive Health and Research Department 
Organisation World Health Organization (WHO)
Department Department of Reproductive Health and Research
Country Global 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have involved Dr Garcia Moreno and a PhD student from Mexico who is currently conducting an internship with her into the discussions of the ongoing analysis. We have conferred with Dr Garcia Moreno about the potential output of an info paper to be posted on the WHO website that highlights the outcomes of this project.
Collaborator Contribution Dr Garcia-Moreno has participated in discussions about the focus of the project. She has freed time of her intern to participate in the discussions and to network with team members and partners. She also suggested to put a draft info paper on the WHO website.
Impact Shared discussions, relevance of the publication for the non-academic field and draft information sheet for the WHO website.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Documentary film 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A documentary film in South Africa, called Food Apartheid, which was seen by roughly 1 million viewers and has won multiple awards.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rQlbV8O1DlU
 
Description Interview for The Telegraph 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact I was interviewed by "The Telegraph" for their feature on International Women's Day. The interview spoke about microfinance interventions and their role and supportive evidence in preventing and addressing intimate partner violence.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/03/08/violence-against-women-epidemic-levels-worldwide-say-exp...
 
Description LSHTM Dissemination event 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The first presentations of the study by Dr Hatcher, Dr Ranganathan, Dr Stern, Ms Hussain and Dr Stöckl were held at a symposium at LSHTM on the 15th May 2018 where we presented the work to upcoming academic researchers at LSHTM that has an international student and staff body, with many of them returning to their home countries in their capacity as researchers, health professionals, governmental or non-governmental workers, or other relevant positions for society. The symposium was attended by 30 students and staff members and the presentations and comments by the audience fed into the development of the conceptual framework.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Microfinance stakeholder workshop Mwanza 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact On November 26, 2018, we organized a local stakeholder workshop in Mwanza, Tanzania with a focus on micro-finance organizations and local government officials in Mwanza, Tanzania. The workshop was attended by representatives from Platinum Credit, EBLI, Mikono Yetu, Asa-Microfinance, FINCA Microfinance Bank, as well as local governmental representatives from Mwanza City Council, Ilemela Municipal Council and a regional trade officers and local non-governmental institutions such as WADADA and Amani girls. At the meeting, we disseminated the findings of the ESRC grant, with an overview of the existing data from sub-Saharan Africa derived from the DHS analysis and an in-depth explanation of the MAISHA Trial results that have been conducted in Mwanza and therefore had the greatest relevance. The meeting led to lively discussions among the stakeholders, including the need to expand the gender training component to rural areas beyond Mwanza city and the possibility to shorten the curriculum. Overall, the workshop contributed to raising the awareness of IPV among micro-finance participants and provided different institutions with potential programmes to prevent it.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Newspaper article 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact News article featuring the analysis from this grant, including link to Food Apartheid, a documentary with over 1 million viewers in South Africa and globally
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2018-04-08-health-e-news-food-apartheid-is-stoking-violence/
 
Description Stakeholder Workshop Dar es Salaam 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The last stakeholder workshop was conducted on the November 30, 2018 in Muhimbili University, institute of Psychiatry, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania where we presented the findings of the study to a group of 50 students and 20 staff members. Participating students are all upcoming clinical psychologists and mental health professionals, for whom a basic knowledge of IPV and its relationship to economic stress can be beneficial in their future daily practice when seeing patients. The lecture was followed by a two hour smaller meeting between Dr Mwambo, Dr Likindokoki, Dr Faini, Dr Mahenge, Dr Kayombo, Dr Stevens and Dr Stöckl about building a network on Tanzanian GBV researchers that can advice the government of Tanzania in the implementation of the Tanzanian Action Plan on Preventing and Reducing Violence against Women and Children. This meeting was instrumental to gain the support of the two patrons of the future network, Dr Mwambo and Dr Kapiga and to discuss primary objectives of the network. The network will now hold its first meeting on March 14, 2019 with approximately 20 Tanzanian researchers attending. It will be promoted to various government stakeholders attending the STRIVE meeting on the 15th of March 2019.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Stakeholder Workshop Johannesburg 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact On November 8-9, 2018, we held our first stakeholder meeting in Johannesburg, attended by 11 participants, including representatives from UNICEF, IMAGE, Social Surveys Africa, MRC South Africa, as well as early career researchers from sub-Saharan Africa involved in similar projects. The event was explicitly targeted at early and mid-career researchers to allow the building of a network of young researchers and practitioners that will facilitate collaboration for future work and their applicability to the programming and policy context in sub-Saharan Africa. The workshop also included a section on principles of infographic creation to allow participants to translate their research findings into memorable messages for their engagement with policy makers. Immediate outputs of the workshop included key message slides for all participants based on their studies, an updated conceptual framework on economic scarcity and IPV and a new network of early and mid-career researchers and practitioners working on IPV in Sub-Saharan Africa.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018