Gender Based Violence and Displacement

Lead Research Organisation: University of Bristol
Department Name: Sch for Policy Studies

Abstract

This research will address the knowledge gap that exists regarding the ways in which displacement processes impact on perceptions and experiences of Gender Based Violence (GBV) and the potential for tackling such violence. Using collaborative techniques between academics and refugee community partners to co-produce research, the research will provide data about how displaced communities themselves experience and perceive GBV, and the potential collisions which exist between different gender norms, expectations and masculinities in this regard.The project seeks to improve the situation for displaced people within Iraqi Kurdistan Region (IKR) in particular, by sharing and translating co-produced knowledge and expertise regarding GBV of formally displaced people from within the Bristol refugee community with those currently displaced in IKR. While the focus will be largely on women (as the group mainly impacted by GBV), we will also engage with men in the refugee communities to explore their experiences and perceptions of GBV and mechanisms for disrupting pathways to perpetration.

This project brings together an inter-disciplinary team with academic and partner non-governmental organisations in the Bristol refugee community and colleagues in IKR at the Gender and Violence Studies Centre, University of Sulaimani. The approach adopted in this proposed research is that knowledge generation about gender-based violence, migration and conflict must arise from the experiences and knowledges of the these communities and that the most appropriate methodologies involve processes of co-production that place equal value on academic and community knowledge and expertise.

The project will involve a number of overlapping phases.

The development phase will bring together the expertise from the research team, academic advisors and the Bristol refugee community groups to develop safe and ethical ways to engage in the co-productive creation of new knowledge which addresses how people incorporate sometimes competing ideas about gender and violence in terms of their place on the displacement journey, and in relation to a wide range of intersecting factors (such as race, gender, religion, nationality, location, sexuality, disability, age etc.). A major focus will be exploring different methods and research tools involving co-production which might be used. We will utilise the skills of the research team, including community facilitators, to explore using art, creative writing/poetry, music, photography, and more therapeutic techniques in order to explore participants' narratives of GBV and displacement. The development process will begin within the UK site and extend to the IKR site once a short-list of method options has been identified. We anticipate three development consultation meetings in each site, two with women and one with men.

Applying lessons from the development phase, we will explore how the Bristol based knowledge production can be applied in the context of the IKR. Initial ideas and findings will be shared throughout the process between the two sites to ensure that translation between them becomes a practical reality. We anticipate at least eight meetings or workshops at each site, six with female participants and two with men.

Communicating the 'findings', co-produced knowledges and potential artefacts which emerge from the research is part of the process as opposed to a means to an end. Of primary importance will be the use of the project knowledges within IKR and those communities currently displaced. Events will take place in IKR in particular, such as workshops with NGOs, to share the produced knowledge from both fieldwork sites and to create additional space for dialogue and communication between displaced people from different points on the journey. Two major co-produced events in Bristol and IKR, will provide showcases for the work to policy makers and practitioners.

Planned Impact

The world is facing the worst refugee and forced displacement crisis since the Second World War (UNFPA, 2016). It is therefore even more important to find innovative, ethical, and safe ways to explore issues relating to GBV in the context of currently and previously displaced peoples and to produce knowledge to contribute to the disruption of GBV pathways, challenging the inequalities that underpin gendered violence across origin, displaced, and diaspora countries and communities.

(1) Refugee and wider communities
International research recognises the significant impact that GBV has on individual health and wellbeing, whether as victims (WHO, 2013) or perpetrators (Hester et al, 2015), or communities as a whole. Through innovative methods we hope to improve the health and well-being of victims and survivors through greater community awareness of the impacts of GBV on displaced communities. Working closely with key third sector, refugee and government agencies/organisations we aim to have a direct impact on the content of interventions for displaced communities re: GBV.

We will address a number of the International Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), including: gender equality and empowerment of all women and girls; eliminating forms of GBV; increasing women's social participation; addressing issues of health and wellbeing; reducing inequality between and within countries through the knowledge transfer process; and promoting peace/justice within communities in different countries.

Being co-produced and based in communities where the research takes place, we will address concerns raised by communities, offering opportunities for members to reflect on their displacement experiences to help others in such crisis. Community groups will be supported to provide their own recommendations to other displaced people, and to work with displaced populations, men and women, within the country of origin to continue those debates and discussions about how perceptions of GBV can change. It is vitally important that spaces to disrupt the consequences of GBV are created not just during the displacement process but long after. Our research seeks to bring together those communities at different points in the displacement journey to co-produce knowledge.

The research will add voice to victim/survivor experiences and feed into development of victim focused responses by exploring the different ways in which they experience and perceive GBV within the process of forced displacement and how their experiences can be heard within communities by using innovative methods. It recognises that there may be difficulties for men in relation to rapidly shifting ideas of appropriate masculinities during and after the displacement journey. We will provide data to inform better interventions for displaced men to offer diverse community-based forms of masculine identities.

(2) NGOs, refugee agencies, governments
In IKR, "1 in 5 women surveyed said they had directly been offered money for sexual services; 1 in 10 women said they had been pressurized by govt officials, organised gangs, police and other security personnel, NGOs, and by members of Syrian and non-Syrian communities to engage in physical relationships" (UN Women, 2014). This demonstrates a need to engage and build capacity at a community level, about GBV during displacement. We will provide recommendations to NGOs/other agencies involved in the displaced journey to adapt processes to increase the safety of victims/survivors, also offering positive messages for potential perpetrators and disrupting negative GBV behaviours.

Recommendations will be made to assist providers, including UNHCR and other international agencies working directly with refugees and displaced populations in camps and displaced sites, contributing to global policy and planning of assistance programs as part of the protection mandate of the UN agencies and international humanitarian organisations.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Title 21 portraits for the 21st Century exhibition 
Description Designed, made, and curated by one of the women from the group in Bristol, this was a week long exhibition at Trinity, an arts space, in Bristol. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact This exhibition was made possible due to the increase in the artists confidence as a result of being part of this project. We financially support her to put the exhibition on in terms of materials, but she put this sole exhibition on alongside the final conference event. The event was also covered on media in Iraqi Kurdistan: https://www.facebook.com/KurdsatMagazine/videos/1164783277017082/?__tn__=kCH-R&eid=ARBhfPYG84XktG7f_s5nz4rv8M4O3qmynu033UzflW7oIQAAqOzlhdMF9ka_H7zRDzVXuNx9LE3X7dmv&hc_ref=ARSRIyU13aZTP3l313yYOJACRdUuC5p29xaDYI1QxVVuWF8V60E4Gps5-QU5pj-vT1g&fref=nf&__xts__[0]=68.ARBPE-agd0wQ6DPo4j-vLEknkOj5vOOrRQIkaGadsJ2SyP-JNLTPHCxcOBn3kw3N9ElOp1ktfKgst2BPR7Wo999L9m1XsvGG7AWUwq4qFnzQa7ZP27OWVfD7yjlq8QzVQ2gJ0fwrgqp9AVFWhjWfxjH_QDh2y03cKtXriFctB8bmb1Iv2C3Xac_ZX6E1B2DbDaG4RB9wcZXMTuOL4do9J894orPSIMjMtTA4glA4-ilNAY4AA8227APM2Q9rWPZwNzML0gTDyY6wbpHBSzPHG5HAN_8KogQLxEeenMwf1BdM1dnmezNZUHLeIDTaukdjfpXf4vSPU-yd_AkItt7FrGwnMMZnqIoO2zeKOk3P6bGHZDtkHui5QOW0kToTEd4sMw 
URL https://www.3ca.org.uk/whats-on/2018/21-portraits-for-the-21st-century
 
Title Film of the men's poem 
Description Artists were commissioned to put a film together to speak and illustrate the poem put together by the men's group. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact This film is now available for people to access the poem which the men's group developed. The impact has been to raise the profile of men's experiences of displacement and ways in which they and their families are impacted by the process. Our partner organisation also uses it with displaced men to facilitate discussion. 
 
Title Here/There: To Be A Woman 
Description The Women's Group in Bristol worked together with the collaborating artists to create a range of artistic outputs. This includes a Sofa and Cushions, in a British and Kurdish style which is made of material containing art, images, and poetry created by the group. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact The sofa/cushions were displayed as part of St.George's art trail and visited by 100+ members of the public. 
URL http://eleanorshipman.com/portfolio/herethere-to-be-a-woman
 
Title Here/There: to be a man. 
Description A magazine was put together highlighting the process of working with the men's displacement group. This highlights the process of developing the poem, the ideas raised by the different men, and their experiences of displacement. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact The magazine has had an impact on the men who took part in the event. Seeing their creations in print was a proud moment for them. 
 
Title Men and displacement poem 
Description During a series of workshops the men's group worked with a local writer/poet who pulled together their ideas into a written poem. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact The poem has been distributed within the displaced community to act as a focus for discussions amongst men about the ways displacement impacts on them and their families. 
 
Title Paintings by Yazidi girls and women 
Description A number of paintings were produced during the project, facilitated by a local artist who taught painting skills to the groups, by Yazidi girls and women as well as a big collective painting internally displaced people. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact These artefacts, some of which are now permanently housed in the offices of an international refugee charity in the region, demonstrate the skills and creativity of displaced people and the creative ways in which these communities can use those skills to address the emotional impacts of displacement as well as learning new skills which may be transfered to economic market. 
 
Title Peace Celebration. A drama by Syrian refugees in Kurdistan Region - Iraq. 
Description A group of refugees used drama in the project to explore their experiences of displacement in terms of gender. This culminated in a public performance of "Peace Celebration'', a drama by Syrian refugees in Kurdistan Region - Iraq. The art tutor Gaziza Omar worked with the group and the performance included drama performed in both Kurdish and English. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact The performance had immediate impacts on the self esteem of the refugees taking part. Using arts based creative skills to explore difficult experiences gave refugees the space to explore their previous experiences as well as refind skills they may have lost during that process. 
 
Title Shattered Hopes: A collection of real stories by displaced women in Kurdistan Region - Iraq (in Arabic and English). 
Description This is a collection of stories from displaced women in Iraqi Kurdistan Region who took part in this project. The stories, produced during the project, discuss the experiences of displacement for women. Written in both Arabic and English. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact We aim to have this professionally published and expect further impacts moving forward. 
 
Description The following are some of the key findings from the project. These issues arose through the process of engaging in art based projects with the different groups in both the UK and IKR.

- GBV exists in the camps, including verbal abuse and sexism. These are rooted in ideas about men and women and their roles, and made worse by conflict, displacement and living life in a refugee camp. The case of the author of the 'lost years'' poem demonstrates that girls are sometimes forced to marriage and their lives are dedicated to housework and child care, including the children of her widowed husband. Our author openly talks about her forced marriage, the oppressive family life, the abusive behaviour of her husband, who beat her, did not provide money for food and abandoned her. Another cause for GBV is that their men are jobless. This has caused of family problems leading to domestic violence (children are also subject to violence). Women don't have opportunities to express their anguish and suffering and keep it to themselves. In the UK gender roles were also a strong theme. Men felt disempowered and undermined when they could not get jobs and when their previous status was ignored. Women felt more constrained in the UK than in their home countries mainly due to a lack of childcare and lack of family help and support to look after their children.

- It is important not to depict men as perpetrators and women only victims. Men also are victims of violence and exclusions and the power dynamics and traditional gender norms lead to male control over women and practice of violence. Men protested against the fact that most of the organisations working on GBV include only women in their programs. However, they believe, if they want to understand violence against women and to prevent it, they need to include both genders. ''The organizations who are working in this field, include only women and they do not take care about the men''. Men often feel isolated, left on their own and overtly ask for male-related programs leading to gender awareness. This topic has emerged in the four focus group meetings with men in IKR; we believe that this is a powerful indicator that displacement affects men and women differently and men should be included in future studies, including in creative writing and artistic activities.

- Lack of mobility and freedom in the camps created a lack of self sufficiency and plunged refugees and IDPs into isolation, depression and various forms of prolonged post-trauma symptoms. Girls and women are kept at home to look after family members and do the housework, or they stay at home to avoid verbal abuse and sexism in the camps.

-Absence of awareness of GBV and their rights in host countries and need for gender-related awareness programs, not only on their rights, but also how to demand them, and how to access social, legal and health care services. Involving women in gender training and empowerment programs is an important step. We noticed that the gender training DHRD proposed to women in Ashti 1 & 2 and Arbat camps helped them to understand their position as women and their rights within KR. However, we cannot tell that such short-term training lead them to gender-awareness

- Lack of social and cultural activities for women, who are often stuck with all household work leaving very little space for them to go out and interact with public spaces. This situation has left women with difficulties in organising their time and commit to activities outside housework and childcare. With resources and the persistence and professional intervention of the team/art facilitators, women managed to overcome this problem- but this was not easy in the beginning.

- Reproductive ill health is an important risk in the camps. Most married women suffer from gynaecological problems; there is a specialist doctor working in the camps, but, there are no maternity unite nor ultrasounds in any of the camps. Women who are in labour are sent to Sulaimaniya hospitals and, because of the time length, it happened they had delivery on their way to hospital in Sulaimaniya. Also, the poor financial state of those women makes it difficult for them to consult doctors during pregnancy. Women don't have access to contraception means and, some of them openly articulated the excessive demands of men for sex, which is not reciprocal. Some cases of disintegration of families and betrayal in the camps have also been reported.

- Our study found that women's displacement journey is shaped by their gender, their age, their status as married or not, their level of literacy and education, as well as by their ethnic and religious backgrounds. For example, in the beginning, Yazidi women did not want to participate in the meetings and art projects; given their religion and the past offensives by neighbouring communities and countries, they auto-excluded themselves. The research team had to address this issue through group as well one-to-one discussions.

- Solidarity between different religious and ethnic groups need to be addressed with the aim to overcome tension between people from different backgrounds and go beyond fear of each other, which is rooted in historic conflicts between communities in the Middle East. Through support programs, art and education we can create a space for co-habitation and peaceful co-existence


- Loss is an important topic almost all the women in the camps referred to in their stories: loss of home, land and possessions, lost of family members, loss of their youth and life. Many of the women who participated in our project lost their family members while fleeing war and armed confrontation. They have not gone through grieving and carry lots of pain and suffering. Our art projects helped the women to express their anguish and pains. Our study found the impact of art in overcoming isolation, trauma and suicidal ideation. Furthermore, specialised services are required to address the need of those who had been subjected to rape, sexual slavery and torture (the case of Yazidis). We also noticed that our art projects created a space for a better interaction between boys and girls leading to a productive gender relations, albeit temporarily.

- Creativity and knowledge lead not only to express their anguish and suffering, but also contribute, in both the UK and IKR, to both men and women increasing their self-esteem.
Exploitation Route We have engaged with policy makers, commissioners, and community groups to disseminate the findings of the project. The creativity of the participants of all of the groups is an inspiration to many. Our findings, through the artefacts will be used to encourage other displaced people to use art and creative methods as a way of exploring their experiences of gender and displacement. This is particularly relevant for men who are often not included in gender programmes. Men found it helpful to think about the ways in which gender impacts on them and their families.
Sectors Creative Economy,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Other

 
Description This project is a community arts based co-production between displaced communities in Bristol and IKR. The 2 groups in the UK have been engaging with issues of Gender and Displacement (one male group, one female) and working with local artists to explore these themes and create art based on them. This has had an impact both in terms of the process of collaboration, as well as the outcome. The Women's Group for example has resulted in the creation of a group which continues to communicate and explore ways to present and access arts spaces in the local area. Update During the past 12 months we have engaged in a number of engagement activities relating to the fieldwork conducted in both the UK and Iraqi Kurdistan Region. This has included public events in both locations where the art produced by the different groups has been presented to the public, practitioners, and policy makers. We have engaged also with politicians and policy makers through direct meetings at the Home Office (UK) and in IKR. There has been broad media coverage of the events and art work in IKR in particular. We have found that the artefacts which were produced have resulted in wider interest in the research themes that emerged in the project linked to both public and private impacts of displacement on gender roles and identity.
First Year Of Impact 2017
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Creative Economy,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description Contribution to newspaper article commenting on visa restrictions hampering academic collaboration
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
URL https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/dec/16/uk-efforts-to-tackle-iraq-war-aftermath-hampered-by-...
 
Description Evidence session on Kurdish aspirations and the interests of the UK
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
URL https://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/foreign-affairs-committe...
 
Description Final conference Event - Bristol
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fd3rGIUghD0&fbclid=IwAR0IzGUspI4UPj52vxOkfc15ZODOQXCxb63RdAAmLzEGIzC...
 
Description Presentation to the Home Office (UK Government) Border Control Unit Policy Team
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Global Impact Award
Amount £20,362 (GBP)
Organisation University of Bristol 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2018 
End 03/2019
 
Description Barton Hill Settlement 
Organisation Barton Hill Settlement
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Working with BHS who have provided the venue and wider support to the co-production groups/meetings.
Collaborator Contribution Provided venue for activities. Supported the group through existing support services.
Impact This partnership enabled the meeting of a group of displaced women to take part in an arts based co-production project.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Partnership with Ashley Community Housing 
Organisation Ashley Community Housing
PI Contribution The Bristol based team, led by Dr Nadia Aghtaie has worked closely with Ashley Community Housing to conduct planning meetings with locally displaced communities in order to outline the structure of the project.
Collaborator Contribution Partners have organised community based planning meetings to assist in the project.
Impact We have held planning meeting with community members to discuss the project. We are currently drafting contract.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Partnership with Democracy and Human Rights Development Centre (DHRD) 
Organisation International Centre for Human Rights and Democratic Development
PI Contribution Dr Nazand Beigkhani, co-applicant, has visited Iraqi Kurdistan Region twice since the project started for partnership discussions with DHRD.
Collaborator Contribution At this point the DHRD have held initial planning meetings for the research team to make contact with relevant local communities where the research will take place.
Impact A contract between the grant holder University of Bristol and the DHRD is now in place.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Partnership with Heartland Alliance 
Organisation Heartland Alliance
PI Contribution Dr Nazand Begikhani has visited the region twice since the project started and met with these partners to discuss the project.
Collaborator Contribution This partner is in addition to those we original planned to work with and comes from a shared interest in the topic.
Impact We are in the process of finalising a memorandum of understanding to clarify roles within the project to be issued by the grant holding University of Bristol and Heartland Alliance.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Arts Trail 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Over 100 members of the public attended the St George Arts Trail in Bristol where our collaborative artist was displaying the Sofa/Cushions created by the project in Bristol as part of the Here/There: To Be A Woman art colaboration.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://eleanorshipman.com/portfolio/herethere-to-be-a-woman
 
Description Bristol based final event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The final event was held in Bristol in November 2018. Unfortunatley a number of our colleagues from Iraqi Kurdistan Region (IKR) were unable to attend as they were denied visas. This was later raised with the Home Secretary, and subsequently written about in an article for the Guardian Newspaper (reported elsewhere).
The event itself consisted of an exhibition of the artwork produced in Bristol, as well as IKR. Study participants attended the day and contributed to the discussion about the impacts of displacement and how gender is a factor within it. Also in attendance were politicians and administrators from IKR. Dr Karwan Jamal Tahir, KRG representative in London, and Dr Muhammad Hussein Ahmad, from KRG Higher Education Ministry, responsible for developing gender curriculum.They stayed and engaged with the project reflecting on the work that had been conducted in their country as well as that happening in Bristol.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fd3rGIUghD0&fbclid=IwAR0IzGUspI4UPj52vxOkfc15ZODOQXCxb63RdAAmLzEGIzC...
 
Description Conference Presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation, by invitation, at The Centre for Narrative Research (CNR) and the Centre for Cultural Studies Research (CCSR) with the Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging (CMRB), at the University of East London. Approx. 50 academics, students, policy makers, and media in attendance to hear about the research and outcomes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://culturalstudiesresearch.org/?p=1762
 
Description Contribution to Bristol Migration Summer School 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Bristol Summer School, 9-12 July 2018, on Migration Data for Policy. Dr Begikhani to address a plenary session on 10 July reflecting upon the preliminary findings of the research. The title of her paper was: What is hidden behind the data? Contextualizing migrant experiences.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://bristol.ac.uk/wun/events/2018/migration-data-for-policy-summer-school-.html.
 
Description Evidence given by Dr Nazand Begikhani to the Foreign Affairs Committee evidence session on Kurdish Aspirations and the Interests of the UK 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Evidence given by Dr Nazand Begikhani to the Foreign Affairs Committee evidence session on Kurdish Aspirations and the Interests of the UK.
The intention was to bring the project to the attention of policy makers and politicians as well as to locate the project within the wider political issues of the region. The invitation to present the findings of the project to the Home Office (2018) came from this information process.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/foreign-affairs-committe...
 
Description Further information sent via AHRC funder to United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) in Geneva 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact We were invited by the AHRC (co-funder) to provide information as they are keen to explore the impact of this research.
Chief Executive, Professor Andrew Thompson, requested information about our project after visiting the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) in Geneva. They have expressed an interest in the GCRF projects and specifically mentioned ours. We sent additional information to them about the project, our partnerships, and our future plans.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Media interview exploring the project in IKR 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact TV interview with Dr Nashmeel Rasool about our research activities and preliminary findings in IKR on Kurdish Satelite TV. This was an opportunity to disseminate information about the projects, and reiterate positive messages about the project and the displaced people who took part, within the wider host community. This is important as wider social debates about these issues don't always include the voices of displaced people themselves and this project did.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Frojekinwe%2Fvideos%...
 
Description Meeting with Susan Allee, Director in the United Nations Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO), head of the Integrated Operational Team for the Middle East and Northern Africa. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact A small meeting with Susan Allee to discuss the project, its aims, objectives and how it can meet the needs of the UN
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Network meetings chaired by the United Nations Populations Fund (UNFPA). 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Ms Talar Kamal (partner in IKR) participated in a gender-related monthly network meetings chaired by the United Nations Populations Fund (UNFPA). On 9th July 2017, Ms Talar Kamal from the DHRD discussed the project and its development with 20 policy makers and practitioners.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Planning meeting in Bristol with men from displaced communities. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Planning meeting to discuss the project. This is particularly important given the collaborative nature of the project and the need to ensure that the project meets the needs of the communities it is seeking to engage.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Planning meeting with women from displaced communities in Bristol 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Planning meeting to discuss the project. This is particularly important given the collaborative nature of the project and the need to ensure that the project meets the needs of the communities it is seeking to engage.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Various activities in IKR March 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact March 8, 2018: The team in IKR hold several activities presenting the outcomes of the art project to public. The idea behind this initiative came from the participants and the art facilitators and was approved by the research leader.

In order to ensure the best outcome, the DHRD recruited a Media facilitator to advertise the event and raise awareness about the project and its findings according to the UoB ethical principles. On 27 February 2018, the team addressed a press conference in the presence of local media channels and talked about the project, its different phases and preliminary findings7.

The activities involved a ten-minute documentary film about the background of the research and the two art projects in Sulaimanya, the exhibition of 35 paintings/drawings by 20 displaced women of different ethnic groups, and theatre performance group titled "Peace Celebration". Twenty refugee girls, women and boys aged between 17-upward acted in the drama, which also involved a short Indian dancing session by three Syrian refugees and a boy who played music. At the end of the program, participants were given certificate of recognition, a photo album that included the training activities since the start along with some gifts as appreciation for their role and creative participation8.

In addition to DHRD members and the art facilitators of both art projects, the event involved KRG officials and the international organizations that run the camps, including the UNHCR. The events were attended by the refugee and IDP community members, camp administrators and international and local organizations, policy makers as well as host society members. In Arbat, three hundred people attended the event; the venue had 200 seats, but the organizers were obliged to hire 100 more chairs to accommodate all the guests.

In Erbil and Duhok, the outcomes of the three projects were presented to public on 21 February 2018 at an event organized by PAO to mark the end of the art projects. The event also hosted a group of displaced women from Domiz and Kawrgosk camps to exhibit their handicraft and decorative domestic pieces. These women were discovered by PAO's project leader during the second phase of the field work. The University of Bristol could not fund the project, but convened with PAO to develop it in parallel with the other two projects. It is worth mentioning that the GBV and Displacement project opened the path for other artistic projects and activities in the camps, including theatre, acting and performance. According the PAO project leader, the play was very moving and left a big impression on the audience some of whom were crying during the show.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://drive.google.com/file/d/1WGNol2DGmA1_Vc-rQ8dVqqCPRH3NsXD1/view