Anti-Microbials In Society (AMIS): a Global Interdisciplinary Research Hub

Lead Research Organisation: London Sch of Hygiene and Trop Medicine
Department Name: Public Health and Policy

Abstract

Our use of antibiotics has escalated. We are often most aware of antibiotic use when we treat infections - for people, and animals. However, their use is more widespread. We use them routinely to reduce risks of infection amongst people with vulnerable immune systems, in farming livestock, to manage infection and to promote growth and even in crop farming. This widespread use is linked to a rise in antibiotic resistance (AMR). The amount of antibiotic chemicals in circulation is held responsible for driving selection pressure amongst bacteria such that some infections become untreatable with previously effective drugs. This can have dramatic consequences for both health and economics. And yet, scientists have emphasised the lack of evidence for using antibiotics in many scenarios. For example, it is estimated that at least 50% of human antibiotic usage has no clinical benefit.

Policy makers are agreed that we must reduce our reliance on these medicines. But how? Efforts to change end user behaviour are often called for but thus far have not had the widespread impacts required to curb the emergence and spread of resistance. In this research, we propose that antibiotics are embedded within our socioeconomic infrastructure in such a deep way that attempts simply to change behaviour of patients, physicians of farmers are peripheral to our underlying dependency on their use. We suggest that by understanding the ways in which antibiotics are intertwined with our lives, institutions and infrastructures today we may identify ways to replace their use while minimising unintended consequences. For example, attempts to reduce use of one antibiotic often increases the use of another. Removing antibiotics all together may require a more systemic intervention such as the promotion of recovery time. In so-doing, however, other consequences could occur for the workforce and for economies tied up with pharmaceutical production and sales. We need to look closely at measures that have already been taken to reduce antibiotic use and understand what their consequences have been, as well as play out potential new interventions in different settings. If we are able to identify effective measures to reduce reliance on antibiotics in different scenarios, this will be more cost effective and timely than one-size-fits-all efforts to change end user behaviour.

The issue of AMR is global, and is expected to have most severe consequences for low and middle income countries (LMICs). The need to reduce use of antibiotics in these settings presents a particular challenge, where markets fill the gaps of fractured health systems. An access-excess balance is described whereby many in need of antimicrobials remain untreated while these medicines are commonly used unnecessarily. This scenario persists despite decades of research and programmes into the rational use of medicines in LMICs. New approaches are needed to uncover the significance of antibiotics in our societies, to understand why the imperative to target their use so difficult to enact.

This project presents a fresh approach beyond the traditionally delineated domains of social, biological or clinical sciences. The project aims to launch the AMIS Hub, an internationally recognised centre of excellence for developing, implementing and disseminating high quality research on antimicrobials in society, and two initial studies in Thailand and Uganda with the following objectives:

1. To understand the roles of antibiotics in every-day life and infrastructure
2. To evaluate the impact on care of imperatives to restrict antibiotics
3. To identify and rehearse counterfactuals to antibiotic use

This project will generate a critical mass of researchers undertaking high quality research into AMR, high quality comparative evidence indicating the nature of our reliance on antibiotics and recommendations for alternatives to antibiotics that will minimise unintended consequences.

Planned Impact

Societal benefit
This project intends to deliver societal level benefits of curbing the spread of AMR. The paradox of our reliance on antimicrobials, the common of which use renders them less reliable, is a concern for all those reliant on these medicines. At present, we remain unaware of many of the ways in which antimicrobials are interwoven with our social, physical, biological and economic structures. This prevents us from being able to effectively reduce use of these medicines. It also means interventions to reduce antimicrobial use can have unintended consequences. By examining the interrelationships between antimicrobials and different forms of life and infrastructures, this project will enable more informed measures to be taken to reduce our reliance on these medicines. By evaluating the impacts of different interventions already undertaken, we will also identify consequences of such efforts that may be unanticipated. These can then be taken into account in (re)designing such interventions. By identifying counterfactuals to antimicrobial use, we will be able to explore alternative ways to arrange our infrastructures and cross-species relations.

Policy impact
To enable this societal benefit, the research will need to impact policy. We will ensure that our results enable policy makers to be equipped with possibilities for reducing our reliance on antibiotics whilst understanding the potential consequences of doing so in different scenarios. Our comparison across study sites - different income level countries, over time after different interventions, and in farming and industrial settings - means the findings will be tailored to different scenarios. Furthermore, through the AMIS Hub's network of other research, we will be able to identify commonalities more broadly in possible options to reduce or replace antimicrobial use, as well as in consequences of doing so. These recommendations and considerations can be taken into account in the development of national action plans on AMR.

Target audience
To achieve this policy impact, our target audience will include: (1) political and public health officials in Thailand and Uganda; (2) policy makers and public health practitioners working within and across other LMICs; (3) local officials and members of the public in the study countries and beyond.

Outputs of the research
The two country studies will provide detailed information and examples on: perceptions about antibiotics and AMR; why and how we rely on antibiotics; what are the consequences when antibiotics are not provided; and what alternatives to antibiotics are possible and already in place. The interdisciplinary approach of the project will provide alternative ways of viewing AMR as societal problem, which could contribute to novel configurations of non-academic collaborations and solutions.

Communication strategy
The AMIS Hub will develop a central communications operation which will support each country's engagements with target audiences as well as reaching out to international audiences. In each country, inception meetings with each target group will be held to refine the project plans to meet specific concerns. This will facilitate buy-in and increase the potential for findings to have lasting and meaningful impact. Subsequent meetings will be held in the course of the research and at the end, to discuss progress and findings, and identify possibilities of translating them into meaningful outputs. Specific meeting plans differ between countries due to different political contexts: eg. in Thailand we will visit specific stakeholders and carry out site visits in other regions of this larger country; in Uganda we will utilise established community advisory board methods and will host centralised meetings. Policy briefs will be prepared and translated for each country and a third for cross-study findings, to be distributed at dissemination events in country, in London and at conferences.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description Empirical findings.
Our research revealed how antibiotics are used in humans and in farming in Uganda and Thailand. Through ethnographic fieldwork - extended periods of immersive observation, interviews, group discussions and surveys with residents and farmers - we established multiple ways in which our societies are intertwined with antibiotics.
In Uganda, we learned: (a) how in an urban informal settlement with frequent flooding, lack of access to toilets and clean water, antibiotics are used very frequently to tackle symptoms such as diarrhoea that have become a part of everyday life; (b) how pig and poultry farmers in peri-urban areas characterised by rapid growth in meat production relied on antibiotics to help to protect their entrepreneurial investments; (c) how in rural eastern Uganda antibiotics are used to tolerate lingering ill-health and to continue to take up passing opportunities by a range of local, national and international actors.
In Thailand, we learned: (a) how antimicrobial resistance amplifies vulnerability in peri-urban contexts and challenges of containment between homes and hospital wards; (b) of the need to refocus onto care, rather than patients' compliance to the anti-TB treatment plans, especially in marginalized migrant populations; (c) of the unintended consequences of AMR policy to reduce antibiotic use by front-line healthcare officers; (d) of the reliance in orange orchards on antibiotics to save crops and the lack of alternatives for achieving undamaged citrus yeilds.

Conceptual developments.
Our research expanded the conceptual toolkits for thinking about antibiotic use. Our use of the concept of 'antibiotics as infrastructure' has been influential both within academic and policy communities. It provides a way of thinking about the way that antibiotics cannot easily be extracted from the settings and systems they are currently put to work in, without unravelling those systems. Our use of the concept 'antibiotics as a quick fix' has also been influential particularly in policy and programmes, locally and internationally, providing a language for drawing attention to the things that antibiotics have been fixing. Our framing of the types of solutions offered by social science to address antibiotic use has also been well received - describing these in terms of addressing practices, structures and networks.

Capacity strengthening.
The AMIS programme successfully promoted fresh perspectives to the study of AMR through social science. The AMIS website, www.antimicrobialsinsociety.org, profiled 70 social researchers in AMR, 130 Essential Readings, and 40 commentaries. The website has on average 1800 views per month from over 110 countries. 30 newsletters were sent to 300 subscribers from academic, policy and programmatic backgrounds. We hosted a symposium in 2018 with over 100 social researchers from over 40 countries; an interdisciplinary workshop in 2019 on 'hallmarks' of effective antibiotic policy; an LSHTM AMR Centre seminar in 2019 on Antimicrobials in Society; four online panel events on social science solutions to antibiotic use in 2020; and an Addressing Antibiotic Use report launch and engagement event in 2021. The AMIS Thailand and Uganda projects attracted academics and policy makers to journal clubs, workshops and conferences and provided MSc and PhD training opportunities.
Exploitation Route The findings from across the AMIS programme contribute to the body of knowledge on the was antibiotics are used and to policy on reducing reliance on antimicrobials as a measure to address AMR. Our findings provide insights to policy, programmes and researchers on ways to reduce reliance on antimicrobials that address practices, structures and networks. This is directly relevant to countries implementation national action plans on AMR. The research materials and outputs will be directly relevant to researchers aiming to expand understanding of the social lives of pharmaceuticals.
Sectors Agriculture, Food and Drink,Healthcare

URL https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/research/centres-projects-groups/amis-hub
 
Description Impact on policy. The findings have contributed to decision making through presentation at governmental AMR Coordinating Committees that are responsible for implementing national action plans (NAPs) in Uganda and Thailand. Members of the AMIS projects in Uganda and Thailand have been asked to join technical working groups for the AMR national action plans, including the design of the second NAP in Thailand and the implementation of the first NAP in Uganda. The findings and conceptual frameworks emerging from the AMIS programme have been fed into policy for a through participation in numerous committees at an international level including with the World Health Organisation and the Inter Agency Coordinating Group on AMR. Impact on programmes. The AMIS research in Uganda and Thailand has been carried out in with collaborative relationships with local authorities. In Uganda, individuals with specific programmatic responsibilities in Kampala, in farming in Wakiso and in Tororo, have participated in two-way dialogues to shape the research and also to allow the research findings to influence programmatic decisions in relation to antibiotic stewardship and health care access. In Thailand, research in the peri-urban Om Yai sub-district, was carried out in conjunction with dialogues with local authorities, health care facility leadership and community leaders. The research increased awareness of the specific problems of the marginalised population affected by AMR in the area including access to health care, burden of diseases and the specific social determinants of health. This has led to programmatic initiatives to tackle these problems locally.
First Year Of Impact 2019
Sector Agriculture, Food and Drink,Healthcare,Government, Democracy and Justice
Impact Types Policy & public services

 
Description Co-organizers and participation in workshop 'Problems & Principles - multidisciplinary hallmarks for addressing global AMR'
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Dr Chandler attended Interagency Coordination Group (IACG) on Antimicrobial Resistance
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
URL https://www.who.int/antimicrobial-resistance/interagency-coordination-group/IACG_Optimize_use_of_ant...
 
Description Dr Chandler attended Second Technical Consultation on AMR and Behaviour Change (WHO) (May 2018)
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Dr Chandler invited as panelist in the Call to Action on Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR)
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
URL https://wellcome.ac.uk/news/second-global-call-action-against-drug-resistant-infections
 
Description Dr Chandler participated in UKRI Cross-Council Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) Initiative at the House of Commons
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
URL https://mrc.ukri.org/news/browse/ukri-one-health-amr-research-priorities-showcased-in-parliament-tod...
 
Description Dr Chandler participation in AMR Roundtable hosted by the Department of Trade
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
 
Description Dr Chandler was asked to contribute to the World Bank's AMR Investment Framework
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
URL http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/430051570735014540/pdf/Pulling-Together-to-Beat-Superbugs-...
 
Description Dr Clare Chandler was invite to join advisory group for terms of reference for Evidence for Action on AMR (UN Interagency Coordination Group on Antimicrobial Resistance)
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Dr Komatra provided input into national strategic plan on knowledge and awareness of people about antibiotic use and AMR, arranged by Thailand FDA.
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
 
Description Dr Luechai Sringernyuang appointed to the National Sub-Committee on Public Awareness Raising on AMR and ATB Rational use.
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
Impact Co PI Luechai Sringernyuang shared social science perspective on AMR and gave suggestions for the sub-committee. This has raised the social science perspective on AMR to policymaker's in Thailand.
 
Description Dr Sittichoke engaged in the design of data collection survey on knowledge and practice of antibiotic use for Surin Provincial Public Health Office
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Dr.Luechai appointed member of the National Sub-Committee on Public Awareness Raising on AMR and ATB Rational use
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
 
Description Dr.Luechai invited to be a member of the FDA's Think-Tank on research mapping in regard to the National Action Plan on AMR
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
 
Description Exhibit at UK Parliament AMR Reception
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
 
Description Mahidol University team developing care model for bedridden patients with local politicians and district hospital
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Dialogues have been initiated with local politician and district hospital staff in developing primary care system that can take into account the AMR control especially among bedridden patients both at home and in the hospital wards. The health care model will deal with AMR in bedridden patients and will be then developed and trialed until the end of 2020.
 
Description PI Clare Chandler invited to provide inputs into Wellcome Trust strategies on behaviour change for AMR on 21 Feb 2018, based on her participation in the WHO Behaviour Change Group
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description PI Clare Chandler member of WHO AMR Secretariat Behaviour Change Consultation on 6 Nov 2017 to define priorities and strategies for Pillar 1 of the Global Action Plan on AMR
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Participation in behavior change experts meeting hosted by OIE
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Susan Nayiga and Christine Nabirye took part in a one day consultation on AMR data/Updates organised by the National One Health Platform
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
 
Description Antibiotic use in cats and dogs: a qualitative study of UK pet owners' experiences
Amount £3,835 (GBP)
Organisation Antibiotic Research UK 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2018 
End 10/2019
 
Description Bloomsbury Colleges PhD Studentships 2017
Amount £77,109 (GBP)
Organisation Bloomsbury Colleges 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2017 
End 08/2020
 
Description Commonwealth Partnerships for Antimicrobial Stewardship scheme
Amount £71,000 (GBP)
Organisation Tropical Health & Education Trust (THET) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2019 
End 04/2020
 
Description Enabling optimal antimicrobial use in East Africa
Amount £147,102 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/T024984/1 
Organisation United Kingdom Research and Innovation 
Department Global Challenges Research Fund
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2020 
End 03/2021
 
Description Fogarty International Centre PhD Studenship
Amount $20,469 (USD)
Funding ID D43TW010526 
Organisation National Institutes of Health (NIH) 
Department Fogarty International Centre
Sector Public
Country United States
Start 09/2017 
End 08/2020
 
Description Invited proposal from the WHO - Antibiotic Prescribing and Resistance: Views from LMIC Prescribing and Dispensing Professionals
Amount £96,600 (GBP)
Organisation World Health Organization (WHO) 
Sector Public
Country Global
Start 06/2017 
End 03/2018
 
Description Medical Research Foundation National Training Programme in AMR
Amount £2,451,007 (GBP)
Funding ID MRF-145-0004-TPG-AVISO 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Department Medical Research Foundation
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2017 
End 12/2022
 
Description Medical Research Foundation National Training Programme in AMR (round 2)
Amount £62,000 (GBP)
Funding ID MRF-145-0004-TPG-AVISO 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Department Medical Research Foundation
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2018 
End 12/2023
 
Description The Fleming Fund Grant
Amount £237,039 (GBP)
Organisation Government of the UK 
Department Department of Health and Social Care
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2018 
End 10/2020
 
Title AMIS MOPH Guideline for Collecting Fieldwork Data 
Description Dr Komatra developed a framework tool for guiding MOPH researchers in collecting fieldwork data. The tool encourages the fellows to focus on five themes: Rationality, Speed, Anthropocentric, Apocalypse and Caring. When MOPH researchers visit their own fieldworks, for instance, a pig farm in Ratchaburi province, they need to elaborate a group of the question involved with these five themes. The main purpose of the tool is to engage critically with what scientists and policymakers think and to provide alternative views on AMR for them to rethink their approach. Additionally, another aim is to help MOPH researchers have a base framework for shaping the focus of their research. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact At this point the method is still being tested, and once we have assessed its utility across settings we will publish it and make the survey tool and protocol available to others. 
URL https://researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/id/eprint/4653503/
 
Title Awareness of AMR Survey for Human and Animal Health Professionals 
Description Our group has developed a tool for capturing levels of awareness amongst human and animal health care professionals. We developed it based on our initial qualitative research and are piloting the tool in 2018. The tool is particularly designed to gauge awareness of AMR amongst trained professionals in low and middle income country settings, and the initial piloting was done with the AMIS Hub's Uganda site. 
Type Of Material Physiological assessment or outcome measure 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact At this point we are still validating the tool and testing relevance across countries. 
 
Title Medicines use pile sorting survey 
Description Our group has developed a method for assessing familiarity with different types of antibiotics, interpretations of efficacy and resistance, and access to antibiotics. The method involves visiting residents of a particular study area and asking them to sort piles of medicines that have been acquired locally. We use the Open Data Kit software to record responses and are able then to assess responses against the World Health Organisation's 'Access, Watch and Reserve' list of antibiotics. We are testing this methodology in multiple countries within and beyond the AMIS Hub. 
Type Of Material Physiological assessment or outcome measure 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact At this point the method is still being tested, and once we have assessed its utility across settings we will publish it and make the survey tool and protocol available to others. 
 
Description Infectious Diseases Research Collaboration Uganda 
Organisation Infectious Diseases Research Collaboration (IDRC)
Country Uganda 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Dr Chandler is the LSHTM Principal Investigator on this project.
Collaborator Contribution The IDRC will oversee the project in country and conduct training and workshops. The effectiveness of the project will also be evaluated by researchers within our partnership with IDRC.
Impact This project proposes to build on an existing partnership between LSHTM and the IDRC in Uganda, to develop and deliver an antimicrobial stewardship programme under the THET programme. The partnership aims to establish the antimicrobial stewardship committee at Jinja regional referral hospital and strengthen its capacity to optimise antimicrobial treatment, and clinical outcomes, and infection prevention and control at patient, health facility and health system levels. The aims of antimicrobial stewardship are to improve patient outcomes and safety, reduce spread of resistance and healthcare costs. The project will involve sharing of expertise by NHS staff from the Hospital of Tropical Diseases with Ugandan counterparts, including in a workshop and on-site visits
Start Year 2019
 
Description International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) 
Organisation International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)
Country Kenya 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution LSHTM research team and ILRI collaborated on organizing workshop on collecting data on antibiotic use in Animals. This is part of a collaboration looking at building survey tools to understand antibiotic use in livestock.
Collaborator Contribution ILRI co-organised the workshop and have shared survey tools for feedback and input from LSHTM.
Impact The workshop shared experiences on several ABU data tools. Outcomes of the discussion included that while the majority of the tools presented were able to provide detailed qualitative information about usage, few were able to provide reliable and meaningful volumetric data at the local user level. Next steps from the workshop and for the partnership will be to provide a comparison of the data collection tools, to establish which aspects of data collection could be harmonised and understand what resources would be needed to scale up site specific research of this kind.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Medical Research Foundation 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC)
Department Medical Research Foundation
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Professor Clare Chandler invited to be on the Leadership Team for the new MRF PhD Student Programme. We are hosting one PhD student for her studies in our AMIS Uganda project.
Collaborator Contribution The MRF-funded National Training Programme on AMR aims to develop a strong and active network of new researchers for the UK with multidisciplinary skills who will be able to develop, undertake and, potentially, lead AMR research which crosses the traditional boundaries between research disciplines and sectors. The Programme currently funds 18 fully-funded PhD studentships (with a second cohort to be recruited for 2019-20 in the new year) and training and cohort-building activities for a wider cohort of 150 PhD students studying AMR across the UK. The first residential training course for 51 PhD students was held in August 2018 at the University of Bristol.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary collaboration. For our specific PhD studentship started in 2018 the two disciplines are History and Anthropology.
Start Year 2018
 
Description SoNAR - Global 
Organisation Amsterdam Institute for Global Health and Development (AIGHD)
Country Netherlands 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution SoNAR-Global is a global consortium led by social scientists specializing in emerging infectious diseases (EID) and antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Funded by the European Commission Horizon 2020 work programme, it aims to build a dynamic, sustainable international social science network to engage the active participation of social sciences and promote complementarity and synergy in the governance of prevention and response to infectious threats.
Collaborator Contribution Clare Chandler and Susan Nayiga were invite to participate as a member of scientific board for the SoNAR network. Dr.Luechai has been appointed as AMR Scientific committee members of the Sonar-Global. The AMIS Thailand team attended the Sonar - Global SEA Regional meeting in Feb 2020, where AMIS findings were shared. Susan has contributed to the development of the teaching materials for social scientists, as part of the capacity strengthening for social science-informed interventions. Sonar-Global Network Bangkok Regional hub meeting: Invitation to contribute to a course on the social dimensions of AMR (meeting 2020) - Sitichoke suggested that the curriculum should set specific objectives for each week, so trainers would know what objectives they have to achieve. Additionally, was suggests that, from AMIS fieldwork in primary health care and orange orchard, power relationships between government officers and researchers and farmers should be considered as case studies for training. Thitima, from our AMIS team, shared that the components of AMR related to plants are left in the curriculum and also the complexity of talking to the growers/the cases, regarding social dimensions, such as regulations, consumer activists, health practitioners.
Impact There have been no outcomes from this collaboration yet.
Start Year 2019
 
Description The International Network for AMR Social Science (INAMRSS) 
Organisation New York University
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Professor Clare Chandler is the INAMRSS's founding Center Directors. The International Network for AMR Social Science (INAMRSS) is an open consortium of international academic center directors focused on social science research and policy on antimicrobial resistance (AMR), newly created to coordinate academic support for the Global AMR R&D Hub.
Collaborator Contribution The INAMRSS will foster international research collaboration by tying together researchers from diverse regional, national, and international AMR research centers. INAMRSS's academic expertise can provide the Global AMR R&D Hub with unique insights and generate hypotheses for additional relevant studies on AMR.
Impact The network has a number of academic partners across different regions. The consortium is currently represented in nine countries and is open to researchers with shared interests, especially those from regions, disciplines and perspectives not yet represented
Start Year 2019
 
Title Anthropology of AMR (twitter account) 
Description Created twitter account run by a group of Anthropologists at LSHTM, which disseminates our and others research on Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) antimicrobials in society, antibiotics as infrastructure, human-microbial relations, slow work 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact This account is followed by various actors relevant to AMR and other aspects of global health, including: [LIST] Tweets, current page. 618 Following 536 Followers 903 Likes 677 
URL https://twitter.com/AnthroAMR
 
Title Antimicrobials in Society Hub (website) 
Description The AMIS Hub is unique online resource, curated by anthropologists at the LSHTM, that brings together research relevant to AMR from across different social science disciplines. Aimed at those designing and implementing AMR policy, as well as funders and researchers from the life sciences, the AMIS Hub introduces readers to a wealth of relevant social research on AMR. The AMIS Hub materials include research summaries, blogs 'from the field', and reviews of existing and ongoing research and theory. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact The AMIS Hub has help connect and promote many of the leading social science and humanities scholars working on AMR. This assisted with raising their profile to policy-makers and non-social science researchers. 
URL https://www.antimicrobialsinsociety.org/
 
Description "Public Engagement on AMR in Thailand" Virtual Stakeholder Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The workshop was organised by the "AMR Dialogues" project, funded by the Wellcome Trust, focuses on addressing the problem of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Thailand and integrating with the Thailand National Strategic Action Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance. Workshop objectives were assembling a map of AMR stakeholders, mapping out what AMR engagement activities have been done in Thailand and to discuss which engagement activities worked well. This meeting recruited researchers and policymakers to share ideas about AMR project, stakeholders and AMR engagement activities in the country.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
 
Description AMIS Hub launch mentioned in the WHO Global Action Plan on AMR Newsletter No. 32 sent on 20 Nov 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Mention of the AMIS Hub in the WHO AMR newsletter helps raise the profile of the Hub, which hopefully will lead to increased participation and engagement from stakeholders in future. "This new online hub and resource from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, U.K., brings together research relevant to AMR from across different social science disciplines. Aimed at those designing and implementing AMR policy, as well as researchers from the life sciences, the AMIS Hub introduces readers to relevant social research on AMR. The AMIS research team will explore four key thematic strands across two countries - Thailand and Uganda."
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description AMIS Thai team first consultative meeting with their advisory board 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact AMIS Thai team held a consultative meeting with their advisory board on 7/11/17 consisting of senior members of the Thai AMR research, public communication and policy communities - engaging with the advisory board helps shape the Thai team's research and engagement activities, as well as keeps these leaders informed of the study's progress and findings. Attendees:
1. Prof. Visanu Thamlikitkul (Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital)
2. Asst. Prof. Niyada Kiatyingangsulee (Center for Drug Development and Monitor)
3. Vanchai Tantivitayapitak (Director of News, PPTV channel)
4. Prof. Pattarachai Kiratisin (Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital)
5. Prof. Leuchai Sringernyuang (Mahidol University)
6. Dr. Komatra Cheungsatiansap (Ministry of Public Health)
7. Dr. Panoopat Poompreuk (Silpakorn University)
8. Dr. Uravadee Chanchamsaeng (Ministry of Public Health)
9. Mr. Sittichoke Chawraingern (Ministry of Public Health)
10. Miss Pakha Whanpuch (Mahidol University)
11. Miss Suchira Rompanatham (Ministry of Public Health)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description AMIS Thailand Website 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact The AMIS Thailand website serves as depository for publications, events and activities, as well as hosting an online forum which point to the ongoing research and findings.The site reached 723 page views during February 2019 to February 2020. There were a further 477 page views during October 2020 to March 2021.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019,2020,2021
URL http://amisthailand.org/
 
Description AMIS Thailand invited to co-host the second National Forum on AMR with the Thai FDA 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact AMIS Thailand were asked to co-host the second national forum on AMR and to be part of the Research partner/network.

'The Second National Forum on AMR aim is to facilitate and strengthen multi-sectoral collaboration and practical actions under the One Health approach to support the implementation of Thailand's National Strategic Plan on AMR 2017-2021. The Forum will generate information sharing and strengthen/widen the multi-sectoral collaboration to accelerate actions and sustain the national momentum in addressing AMR under One Health approach. The First National Forum on AMR was held during the Prince Mahidol Award Conference (PMAC) in January 2018 with the aims to understand AMR situations and engage multi-sectoral partners at the early stage of national strategic plan on antimicrobial resistance (NSP-AMR) implementation. '
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description AMIS Thailand team presented at The 14th Thai Humanities Research Forum "iHumanities: Technology, Health and Life" 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The series of the 14th Thai Humanities Research Forum "iHumanities: Technology, Health and Life" held on September to December, 2020 by faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Mahidol University. The main objective was to provide a forum for exchanges across disciplines in the fields of Humanities and Social Science in the context of interaction with the fields of Science, Technology and Medicine on the one hand, and that of the social impacts of science, technology and healthcare service on the other.
The AMIS Thailand team presented the key messages from the upcoming papers. The participants discussed and shared about the role of pharmacist on AMR issue, experiences of Antibiotic prescribe and solutions of AMR issue.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description AMIS Thailand's preliminary results dissemination workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact This workshop was organised by the AMIS Thailand team to compile the project's policy recommendations based on the empirical research conducted in Thailand. Team members presented the recommendations categorized into three groups based on audiences, policymakers, practitioners, and researchers, then attendees provided their suggestions.
The participants suggested that the policy recommendations should be realistic within given time period, and practical, based on findings of empirical research. Final policy recommendation will be presented at the AMIS Thailand wrap up event, now planned in May 2021. All feedback was noted by AMIS team and all attendees invited to final wrap up event.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description AMIS Uganda Facilitation of feedback dialogues with study participants and other key stakeholders. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact AMIS Uganda team organised and conducted feedback dialogues with study participants and district heath, veterinary and agriculture officials in August 2019. This is an opportunity to share preliminary findings and get additional feedback on research from key stakeholders. This was conducted across all the study sites in Namuwongo, Wakiso and Tororo districts of Uganda.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description AMIS Uganda advisory committee meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The AMIS Uganda team organised an advisory committee meeting in August 2019 to share key findings from the AMIS project, gain inputs on how best to make our findings useful with a focus on the AMR National Action Plan and to hear suggestions for next steps in our research. The AMIS advisory Panel in Uganda is made up of senior academics and policy makers who work on the implementation of the Uganda National Action Plan.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description AMIS Uganda team took part in the Infectious Diseases Research Collaboration (IDRC) Young Investigators Research Symposium in January 2020. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Co-investigators Susan Nayiga, Christine Nabirye and Miriam Kayendeke took part in the Infectious Diseases Research Collaboration (IDRC) Young Investigators Research Symposium in January 2020. This was organised by the Infectious Diseases Research Collaboration as a platform for sharing the various studies on malaria, HIV, TB and AMR currently ongoing in the organisation and to recognise researchers doing outstanding work.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description AMIS co investigator Susan Nayiga made a presentation on 'Use of antibiotics to treat humans and animals in Uganda' at the world antimicrobial awareness week 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact AMIS co investigator Susan Nayiga made a presentation on 'Use of antibiotics to treat humans and animals in Uganda' at the world antimicrobial awareness week virtual seminar series on the 19th of November 2020 to share insights from the AMIS Uganda research on understanding the roles and context of antimicrobials in everyday life in rural, urban and peri urban settings in Uganda. The world antimicrobial awareness week virtual seminar series organised by Makerere University, Pharmacy Department, the Uganda Ministry of Health and the Uganda national one health platform.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description AMIS featured in Winter 2018 issue of ESRC magazine Society Now 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact AMIS is featured on page 10 of the ESRC Society Now article on tackling AMR by focusing on social and behavioral issues.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.esrc.ac.uk/files/news-events-and-publications/publications/magazines/society-now/society-...
 
Description AMIS introduced in Thailand Society and Health Institute's e-newsletter 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Society and Health Institute has launched a e-newsletter intended to promote current projects and research within health and the impact on wider society in Thailand. The current issue of newsletter focused on the AMIS project, in which Sittichoke had a column introducing a background of the project. Additionally, the newsletter promoted the upcoming annual academic conference of the institute, including the presentatiosn by Dr Clare Chandler and AMIS MoPH team.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description AMIS introduction to FDA 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact AMIS researchers were invited to a conference hosted by International Health Policy Program, in which Dr. Nithima Soompradid, Thailand FDA, was involved too. FDA member interested to learn more about project and asked about its purpose, the team, field sites and methodology. There was particular interest in how to place antimicrobial use (a behaviour) within a microbe-human-chemical relationship (a context). Dr. Nithima Soompradid expressed interest in sending her college to interview team members further about the project. w
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description AMIS online panel series - Antibiotics as Care: health facility based 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The AMIS project organised four sessions to bring together key insights from recent social research studies into the questions of (a) why antibiotics are being used in the ways that they are, in different settings and (b) what social researchers propose should be done to address this.

The first panel, chaired by Professor Clare Chandler, focuses on the use of antibiotics in healthcare facilities. Panellists Dr Esmita Charani, Dr Paula Saukko, Dr Justin Dixon and Professor Alex Broom draw on social theory to unpick antibiotic use in their diverse research settings across Sudan, Malawi, Zimbabwe, Australia, India and the UK.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://antimicrobialsinsociety.org/events/antibiotics-as-care-health-facility-based/
 
Description AMIS project presented in high-level meeting 'Universal Health Coverage as a Tool to Combat Infectious Diseases' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Dr Komatra was invited to the High-level Meeting: Universal Health Coverage as a Tool to Combat Infectious Diseases, arranged at Tokyo, Japan, during 30 - 31 May 2018, as a panellist. He talked about how Thailand universal health coverage, locally known "UC", related to health service provided to a patient who has an infectious disease. He also introduced the AMIS project of which he is co-PI. Participants were interested in discussing the project further.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.asef.org/images/docs/ASEF-Tokyo%20Report.pdf
 
Description Activity Title Miriam Kayendeke participated in an Antimicrobial Resistance, Community Engagement, Global Health and The Arts and Humanities Workshop in Kathmandu in Nepal 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Co-investigator Miriam Kayendeke took part in this three day Community Engagement for AMR international workshop. This was organised by the 'Changing the Story', University of Leeds.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Addressing Antibiotic Use Roundtable Event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact On the 24th of February, delegates from around the world joined Professor Clare Chandler online as she launched our collaborative report, "Addressing Antibiotic Use: Insights from Social Science Around the World".

Clare described how understanding antibiotic use through the report's framework of practices, structures and networks will support the development of research and policy responses. She explained that the report's findings of the range of recommendations from across social research outputs suggests that we need to revisit the focus, scale and timeframes of our responses, with efforts integrated into broader health and development initiatives.

For the roundtables, we had the privilege of welcoming a distinguished group of panellists with expertise in research, policy and programmes across a range of global One Health settings.

The first roundtable, considerations for research, was chaired by Dr Heidi Hopkins. Speakers considered how research infrastructure can support the development of locally tailored interventions. Professor Iruka Okeke highlighted the need to develop a community of social scientists in the Global South who understand the local context and with the expertise to contribute to the development of interventions. Professor Sabiha Essack explained how investment in implementation research that is decentred from the Global North and involves local stakeholders from the outset would produce relevant, usable evidence regarding how to address antibiotic use. This in turn raises questions about how to evaluate the success of more complex structural interventions. Dr Tim Jinks described the vacuum between international, top down responses and local action, calling for the inclusion of a diversity of voices in setting a Global South driven research agenda for addressing antibiotic use. Reflecting on the research included in the report, Dr Hung Nguyen highlighted the need for greater social science informed work on antibiotic use in livestock.

The second roundtable, considerations for policy and programmes, reflected on the time horizons and scales through which policy and programmes should address antibiotic use. Dr Haileyesus Getahun reported the mismatch between political timescales with their short-term interests in re-election and those over which AMR must be tackled, in part through addressing structural problems. He also described the tension between the need for large scale efforts to mobilise financial and popular support with the need for locally tailored actions. Professor Sujith Chandy suggested that improved sharing of the successes and challenges of implementing locally tailored interventions would foster their translocation to multiple other suitable locations. Similarly, Dr Watipaso Kasambara proposed a knowledge sharing platform through which research insights are made accessible to policy makers. Along with Dr Franck Berthe, Dr Kasambara also highlighted that by integrating tackling AMR into other programmes, such as sustainable development goals, greater financial and political support can be levered in order to mobilise action. Dr Berthe pointed out that there is no time to wait as we change our approach to tackling AMR, and investment is needed to have the right people in place to understand and reshape the systems that drive antibiotic use around the world. Panellists agreed that galvanising action at political and local levels is needed to mobilise the resources, action and ownership needed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://antimicrobialsinsociety.org/commentary/addressing-antibiotic-use-report-launch-roundtable-ev...
 
Description Antibiotic Use and Human Behaviour (Upsalla PhD workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Invited (and attended) to present/discuss an anthropological approach to antibiotic use. Event was attended by approx 20 postgraduate students doing PhDs on AMR, as well as well as seniors academics and vets who worked on or with antibiotics. Generated debated and changed some peoples thinking around how social science can contribute to current approaches to AMR. Also generated interest for students in AMIS, and continued dialogue via email, as well as a podcast.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Antibiotic science, technology and infrastructures Panel 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This final session in the Antibiotics in Society panel series looks at antibiotics in terms of science, technology and infrastructures. Professor Nik Brown, Dr Catherine Will, Professor Komatra Chuengsatiansup and Dr Charlotte Brives present research concerned with a diverse array of environments, ranging from hospital architectures to Thai citrus orchards, and actors including Mycoplasma genitalium and phages.

As described by the session chair Professor Clare Chandler, together these talks offer stories of contradictions; gaps between 'ideal worlds' - the formalised worlds of science and technology - and implemented 'in practice' worlds of sociotechnical tinkering. They illustrate how different strands of knowledge are produced - in clinical settings, in the community, in research laboratories - and woven and rewoven together to produce ideas of what is 'normal'.

Charlotte Brives' concept of pluribiosis - the practical recognition of the spectrum of relationships between entities that often self-transformed by these relationships - has resonance across the presentations. In drawing attention to the situated character of each entity and relationship, pluribioisis calls for caution for any AMR solutions that are intended to be massive and overlook the situated nature of knowledge.

As infrastructure, when antibiotics are removed from a situation, perhaps due to the threat of antimicrobial resistance, their influence continues to shape the hole they leave behind. By recognising how antibiotics act as onto-epistemological infrastructure, with their characteristics shaping ways of knowing, it can help us understand the challenges faced when seeking to introduce alternatives such as phages.

Background:
The past five years has seen social research on the topic of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) flourish. The field has expanded in multiple directions, with innovative and informative research that has followed medicines, microbes, patients, animals, care providers, policies, and much more. One key area of expansion, in which a variety of fresh perspectives from social theory have been applied across multiple settings around the globe, is the reasons for antibiotic use. There are now many excellent research studies that have explored and explained different aspects of antibiotic use, drawing on a variety of disciplines including anthropology, sociology, geography, history, philosophy, law, economics, political science, psychology and design. Each of these studies presents insights into the reasons that societies - and constituent groupings - have come to be entangled with antibiotic medicines. And each stimulates ideas for response, in policy, programme or pilot form. The momentum for action on AMR at a global and national level has generated strong interest in the drivers of antibiotic use, and moreover 'what to do'. This seems a critical moment to join together the insights from across the multiple social research projects that have generated new evidence and ideas in recent years, in order to provide a steer from social researchers towards a policy, funder and other-discipline audience.

Objective:
These panels will bring together key insights from recent social research studies into the questions of (a) why antibiotics are being used in the ways that they are, in different settings and (b) what social researchers propose should be done to address this.

Approach
Four Thematic Panels through Q3&4 2020, brought together into a report with infographics, will be followed by a half-day event on 'Addressing Antibiotic Use' in Q1 (Feb) 2021.

Thematic panels:
The four Thematic Panels will bring together social researchers to present and discuss their key findings and implications for policy/programmes/pilots. Each of the four panels will group together different lead individuals from recent research projects under four themes. Themes were developed from those set out on the AMIS website, and which were used as an organising structure for the 2018 Social Science and AMR symposium at the British Academy. An advisory group* has guided the themes and composition of the proposed panels and will support the review of the final report, together with others who contribute to the panels and process.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://antimicrobialsinsociety.org/events/panel-4-antibiotic-science-technology-and-infrastructures...
 
Description Antibiotics as Care: health facility based Panel 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The first panel, chaired by Professor Clare Chandler, focuses on the use of antibiotics in healthcare facilities. Panellists Dr Esmita Charani, Dr Paula Saukko, Dr Justin Dixon and Professor Alex Broom draw on social theory to unpick antibiotic use in their diverse research settings across Sudan, Malawi, Zimbabwe, Australia, India and the UK.

Rather than a story of demand or ignorance, together these presentations paint a picture of affect, care and resources. By looking beyond individual behaviour, the panelists render visible the organisational structures, resource distribution, and political arrangements shaping antibiotic use. Addressing this 'problem', therefore, requires going beyond simply providing information, to develop a nuanced local understanding of the realities of accessing and delivering healthcare, often in time and resource limited settings. Strengthening collaboration within healthcare and moving away from equating care with case management are two proposed avenues by which to alter antibiotic use. The presentations also highlight the need to consider political entanglements and regulation making across a plurality of healthcare settings when seeking to sustainably alter antibiotic use.

Background:
The past five years has seen social research on the topic of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) flourish. The field has expanded in multiple directions, with innovative and informative research that has followed medicines, microbes, patients, animals, care providers, policies, and much more. One key area of expansion, in which a variety of fresh perspectives from social theory have been applied across multiple settings around the globe, is the reasons for antibiotic use. There are now many excellent research studies that have explored and explained different aspects of antibiotic use, drawing on a variety of disciplines including anthropology, sociology, geography, history, philosophy, law, economics, political science, psychology and design. Each of these studies presents insights into the reasons that societies - and constituent groupings - have come to be entangled with antibiotic medicines. And each stimulates ideas for response, in policy, programme or pilot form. The momentum for action on AMR at a global and national level has generated strong interest in the drivers of antibiotic use, and moreover 'what to do'. This seems a critical moment to join together the insights from across the multiple social research projects that have generated new evidence and ideas in recent years, in order to provide a steer from social researchers towards a policy, funder and other-discipline audience.

Objective:
These panels will bring together key insights from recent social research studies into the questions of (a) why antibiotics are being used in the ways that they are, in different settings and (b) what social researchers propose should be done to address this.

Approach
Four Thematic Panels through Q3&4 2020, brought together into a report with infographics, will be followed by a half-day event on 'Addressing Antibiotic Use' in Q1 (Feb) 2021.

Thematic panels:
The four Thematic Panels will bring together social researchers to present and discuss their key findings and implications for policy/programmes/pilots. Each of the four panels will group together different lead individuals from recent research projects under four themes. Themes were developed from those set out on the AMIS website, and which were used as an organising structure for the 2018 Social Science and AMR symposium at the British Academy. An advisory group* has guided the themes and composition of the proposed panels and will support the review of the final report, together with others who contribute to the panels and process.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://antimicrobialsinsociety.org/events/antibiotics-as-care-health-facility-based/
 
Description Antibiotics beyond health facilities: care, pharmaceuticals and markets Panel 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The second session of the AMIS panel series, chaired by Professor Helen Lambert, considers antibiotic use outside of formal healthcare facilities. Through their social research in Asia, Uganda and Australia, Dr Papreen Nahar, Dr Marco Haenssgen, Susan Nayiga and Dr Mark Davis illustrate how antibiotics move across public and private sectors with consumers, who have multiple social roles, turning to a range of healthcare providers and information sources.

Together, these talks problematise the typical 'Western' starting point of global antibiotic use initiatives regarding the contribution of the informal sector in providing access to medicines. By not understanding local realities and the role of antibiotics as 'safety nets' and 'quick fixes', such efforts might inadvertently create new forms of marginalisation and health inequality. Developing a critical understanding of informality, providing alternative forms of safety-netting and acknowledging the mixed messages given to consumers regarding 'appropriate' antibiotic use are proposed as means by which to sustainably intervene. The presentations and the subsequent discussion also reflect upon the interface between public and private sectors - for example how information and regulatory efforts flow between the two - and consider how the private sector might be further engaged in antibiotic stewardship efforts.

Background:
The past five years has seen social research on the topic of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) flourish. The field has expanded in multiple directions, with innovative and informative research that has followed medicines, microbes, patients, animals, care providers, policies, and much more. One key area of expansion, in which a variety of fresh perspectives from social theory have been applied across multiple settings around the globe, is the reasons for antibiotic use. There are now many excellent research studies that have explored and explained different aspects of antibiotic use, drawing on a variety of disciplines including anthropology, sociology, geography, history, philosophy, law, economics, political science, psychology and design. Each of these studies presents insights into the reasons that societies - and constituent groupings - have come to be entangled with antibiotic medicines. And each stimulates ideas for response, in policy, programme or pilot form. The momentum for action on AMR at a global and national level has generated strong interest in the drivers of antibiotic use, and moreover 'what to do'. This seems a critical moment to join together the insights from across the multiple social research projects that have generated new evidence and ideas in recent years, in order to provide a steer from social researchers towards a policy, funder and other-discipline audience.

Objective:
These panels will bring together key insights from recent social research studies into the questions of (a) why antibiotics are being used in the ways that they are, in different settings and (b) what social researchers propose should be done to address this.

Approach
Four Thematic Panels through Q3&4 2020, brought together into a report with infographics, will be followed by a half-day event on 'Addressing Antibiotic Use' in Q1 (Feb) 2021.

Thematic panels:
The four Thematic Panels will bring together social researchers to present and discuss their key findings and implications for policy/programmes/pilots. Each of the four panels will group together different lead individuals from recent research projects under four themes. Themes were developed from those set out on the AMIS website, and which were used as an organising structure for the 2018 Social Science and AMR symposium at the British Academy. An advisory group* has guided the themes and composition of the proposed panels and will support the review of the final report, together with others who contribute to the panels and process.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://antimicrobialsinsociety.org/events/antibiotics-beyond-health-facilities-care-pharmaceuticals...
 
Description Antibiotics beyond humans: Ecologies, production, flows Panel 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The third session of the AMIS panel series, chaired by Professor Clare Chandler, looks at how we might consider antibiotics beyond humans. Professor Steve Hinchliffe, Dr Claas Kirchhelle, Dr Salla Sariolla and Rijul Kochhar draw on their research conducted in Bangladesh, India, West Africa, Georgia and the UK to reflect upon food production and attend to the microbiopolitics of therapy, including the potential 'techno scientific salvation' offered by phage.

Their accounts of aquaculture, livestock and poultry farming in different settings describe entanglements of economic margins, time pressures, climate unpredictability, sanitation systems, veterinary advice, supply chains and the regulatory environment. Against this complex backdrop - sometimes comprising of a 'stacking of lacks' - narrowly focussed, short-term stewardship interventions can have limited and/or unintended impacts on antibiotic use.

The panellists reflect upon techniques of food production intensification, and the value and organising work of diagnostics. The expertise of those caring for animals is illustrated, and its dismissal in diagnosing animal ill-health is questioned. Attending to devices and the ways that they arrange the world around them is proposed as a fruitful line of inquiry that decentres not only humans but also the concept of behaviour. Another proposed avenue by which to better understand antibiotics use is for social researchers to attend to supply chains and the roles of multinational corporations in food production.

Background:
The past five years has seen social research on the topic of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) flourish. The field has expanded in multiple directions, with innovative and informative research that has followed medicines, microbes, patients, animals, care providers, policies, and much more. One key area of expansion, in which a variety of fresh perspectives from social theory have been applied across multiple settings around the globe, is the reasons for antibiotic use. There are now many excellent research studies that have explored and explained different aspects of antibiotic use, drawing on a variety of disciplines including anthropology, sociology, geography, history, philosophy, law, economics, political science, psychology and design. Each of these studies presents insights into the reasons that societies - and constituent groupings - have come to be entangled with antibiotic medicines. And each stimulates ideas for response, in policy, programme or pilot form. The momentum for action on AMR at a global and national level has generated strong interest in the drivers of antibiotic use, and moreover 'what to do'. This seems a critical moment to join together the insights from across the multiple social research projects that have generated new evidence and ideas in recent years, in order to provide a steer from social researchers towards a policy, funder and other-discipline audience.

Objective:
These panels will bring together key insights from recent social research studies into the questions of (a) why antibiotics are being used in the ways that they are, in different settings and (b) what social researchers propose should be done to address this.

Approach
Four Thematic Panels through Q3&4 2020, brought together into a report with infographics, will be followed by a half-day event on 'Addressing Antibiotic Use' in Q1 (Feb) 2021.

Thematic panels:
The four Thematic Panels will bring together social researchers to present and discuss their key findings and implications for policy/programmes/pilots. Each of the four panels will group together different lead individuals from recent research projects under four themes. Themes were developed from those set out on the AMIS website, and which were used as an organising structure for the 2018 Social Science and AMR symposium at the British Academy. An advisory group* has guided the themes and composition of the proposed panels and will support the review of the final report, together with others who contribute to the panels and process.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://antimicrobialsinsociety.org/events/antibiotics-beyond-humans-ecologies-production-flows/
 
Description Attended workshop set by International Health Policy Program 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Phakha attended a workshop set by International Health Policy Program for listening and giving them a comment about a survey developed by its fellow to collecting data about knowledge and awareness of people about antibiotic use and AMR which would run by the National Statistical Office in 2019.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Clare Chandler gave expert comment to LSHTM newsletter 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Clare Chandler gave an expert comment on the on 'No Time to Wait' WHO report about the growing perils of drug-resistant infections. Dr Chandler responded to the reports 's findings, commenting on how the report addressed both health and economic impacts of AMR and the importance of considering the interconnectedness of the issue rather than falling back on models of traditional behavior change.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/newsevents/news/2019/united-nations-and-who-call-urgent-action-avert-antimic...
 
Description Coll Hutchison attended the 'Regulating Resistance, Resisting Regulation' workshop at Bristol University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact COLL TO EDIT
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.bristol.ac.uk/media-library/sites/amr/Regulating%20Resistance,%20Resisting%20Regulation%...
 
Description Cross site collaboration - exchange visit to Uganda. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Dr.Luechai and Phakha joined the exchange visit to Uganda. Dr.Luechai introduced the AMIS Thailand project and shared preliminary findings from the AMIS Thailand research. The exchange visit included meetings to advocate and exchange research experiences with academes, policy makers and researchers from Ministry of Health officials, Makerere University and Uganda Health Supply Chain (UHSC).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description De Denyer Willis presented at the Antibio-addicts conference at Paris-Dauphine University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Denyer Willis gave a presentation on AMR and the Postcolonial: Behavioral Targets, Logics, and Temporalities. The conference was attended by a number of academics from Europe ad the USA. The coordinator of the French AMR policy also attended the event. The conference was an opportunity to present AMIS ideas andthinking and network with other researchers in the field.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://ritme.hypotheses.org/7619
 
Description Department for Trade roundtable to look at current and future developments in the Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) sector in relation to Trade and Investment 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The Science and Scenarios Team as part of the Department for Trade (DIT) convened a roundtable to look at current and future developments in the Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) sector in relation to Trade and Investment.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Developing an interdisciplinary approach to Global AMR Policy: A Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Hosted at LSHTM on March 14th and 15th 2019, this two-day international workshop brings together leading experts from the medical humanities and sciences, donors, and policymakers to develop a policy evaluation tool for AMR and antimicrobial stewardship. The tool will provide a much-needed qualitative interdisciplinary 'best practice' matrix for international stewardship policies in high-, medium-, and low-income settings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Dr Chandler attended Fleming Fund Country Meeting in Tanzania 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The Fleming Fund has worked closely with the Tanzania National AMR Coordinating Committee to identify key priorities in the National Acton Plan that can be supported through the Fleming Fund Grant. Dr Chandler attended the country meeting to discuss national AMR strategies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.flemingfund.org/countries/tanzania/
 
Description Dr Chandler gave a talk on anthropology and AMR at the Colfe's School 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Dr Chandler discussed her role as an anthropologist and how it relates to the progression of modern day medicines. The spoke on the role of healthcare services and practitioners in managing the misuse of antibiotics.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.colfes.com/news/dr-clare-chandler-addresses-the-john-glyn-society/
 
Description Dr Chandler gave keynote lecture at Leicester University event on optimizing antibiotic use in hospitals 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Chandler gave keynote presentation on Antimicrobial resistance and the social sciences.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/health-sciences/research/soc-sci/pdf-resources/amire-workshop-2018...
 
Description Dr Chandler invited to speak at Royal Society round table discussion on Scoping round table on antimicroibial resistance 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Chandler invited to speak at Royal Society round table discussion on Scoping round table on antimicroibial resistance.
The meeting seeks to convene key individuals to:
1. Identify a shared view on the current state of AMR - boundaries of knowledge and
perception
2. Identify the gaps to action - the incentives to inaction
3. Understand the key issues going forward
4. Agree on the critical question to pose (and reply to) including in drug discovery,
social messaging, public health and more.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Dr Chandler participated in debate on Drugs, Bugs and Our Precarious Existence at the Hay-on-Wye How The Light Gets In Festival 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Chandler participated in debate on Drugs, Bugs and Our Precarious Existence at the Hay-on-Wye How The Light Gets In Festival. Dr Chandler wrote about the discussion and interest in the topic area in the AMIS blog on the website (see link below).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.antimicrobialsinsociety.org/commentary/drugs-bugs-and-our-precarious-existence/
 
Description Dr Chandler participated in panel discussion at book launch for Superdrugs: An arms rave against bacteria 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Chandler participated in the panel discussion as part of the book launch of Superdrugs: An arms rave against bacteria, hosted at LSHTM.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/newsevents/events/superbugs-arms-race-against-bacteria
 
Description Dr Chandler spoke at Global Health Lab series hosted by LSHTM and the Lancet 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Dr Chandler spoke at the Global Health Lab series on 'Does antimicrobial resistance spell the end for modern medicine?', hosted by LSHTM and the Lancet.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/newsevents/events/does-antimicrobial-resistance-spell-end-modern-medicine
 
Description Dr Chandler spoke at Wellcome Seed Award Experience event 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Chandler spoke about the experience of applying for the seed award funding and the key outputs of the award.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Dr Clare Chandler attended the SEDRIC global meeting at Wellcome Trust 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Dr Chandler attended the Surveillance and Epidemiology of Drug-resistant Infections Consortium (SEDRIC) focused on Mobilising epidemiology and surveillance data to inform patient care pathways.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://wellcome.ac.uk/what-we-do/our-work/surveillance-and-epidemiology-drug-resistant-infections-c...
 
Description Dr Clare Chandler participated as a panel member at The Economist Antimicrobial resistance summit 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Dr Chandler participated in the panel discussion entitled 'out of the shadows'. In the panel Dr Chandler discussed the role of antibiotics in developing countries and discussed with the panel on how surveillance of the supply chain be improved to stop substandard medicines reaching the market.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://events.economist.com/events-conferences/emea/amr2019
 
Description Dr Clare Chandler participated in the scoping round table on antimicroibial resistance hosted by The Royal Society 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The Royal Society used this panel to examine the scope of developing a scenario building process to explore the future of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). The meeting sought to provide strategic input to inform Royal Society's decisions about developing AMR scenarios.

The meeting objectives were:
1. Identify a shared view on the current state of AMR - boundaries of knowledge and perception
2. Identify the gaps to action - the incentives to inaction
3. Understand the key issues going forward
4. Agree on the critical question to pose (and reply to) including in drug discovery, social messaging, public health and more.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://royalsociety.org/
 
Description Dr Clare Chandler spoke at Chemonics/Economist event on AMR 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Clare Chandler spoke at an event organised by Chemonics International, an independent international consulting firm, and The Economist Intelligence Unit, the research and analysis division of The Economist Group and hosted by the Wellcome Collection. Clare highlighted the importance of moving beyond the 'behavioural change' model, to consider the social and structural context in which antibiotics are used. Following the talk there was a number of journalists interested in her work and Devex and SciDev are both in the process of publishing posts on the event.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Dr Clare Chandler spoke on TRT world at a round table discussion on Drug resistance 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Dr Clare Chandler spoke on a panel as part of a documentary shown on Sky on the show TRT world. The show was entitled 'RUG RESISTANCE: How to fight back?' and Clare spoke of the teams work in East Africa and on some of the more structural barriers to fighting AMR. The video is also available on youtube with over 800 views to date.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.trtworld.com/video/roundtable/drug-resistance-how-to-fight-back/5dfb6e02b53db8001717de6b
 
Description Dr Wirun Limsawart presented at Evidence for action 5: Contribution's of social sciences and anthropology on AMR panel at Thailand's The 2nd National Forum on AMR. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Dr Wirun Limsawart presented at Evidence for action 5: Contribution's of social sciences and anthropology on AMR panel at Thailand's The 2nd National Forum on AMR.
As one of the few social scientists at the forum, he presented work from the MOPH team to 150+ attendees, covering his research on AMR, migrants and inequalities Accomplished the aims of: ensuring AMIS's presence at inter/national policy events, dissemination of findings and maintaining connections with Thai policy-makers and scientists to increase possible impacts of final findings/dissemination, sparked some discussion amongst the audience to provide opportunities to start thinking different about AMR/AMU
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL http://dmsic.moph.go.th/index/detail/8027
 
Description Dr de Lima Hutchison presented at Regulating Resistance, Resisting Regulation: Project workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Coll de Lima Hutchinson discussed how AMR had become a priority in LMICs because of its importance in high income countries. Coll drew parallels between this aspect of the global discourse on AMR and the historical rise of importance of smoking reduction in LMICs. Coll also highlighted the lack of critical engagement with pharmaceutical companies and the existence of advertisement carrying messages that promoted antibiotics as a means of "getting back to work quicker".

This was also an opportunity for Coll to disseminate some key findings from our research in Thailand, and to hear other research on AMR from the Asia and globally.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.bristol.ac.uk/media-library/sites/amr/Regulating%20Resistance,%20Resisting%20Regulation%...
 
Description Dr.Komatra Chuengsatiansup presented on the Connecting the dots: Aligning evidence to policy II panel at Thailand's The 2nd National Forum on AMR 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Dr.Komatra Chuengsatiansup presented on the Connecting the dots: Aligning evidence to policy II panel at Thailand's The 2nd National Forum on AMR.
As one of the few social scientists at the forum, he presented work from the MOPH and overal Thai team to 150+ attendees, focusing specifically on AMR and AMU policy and the relevance of anthropology to contributing to more effectice and inclusive policy. Accomplished the aims of: ensuring AMIS's presence at inter/national policy events, dissemination of findings and maintaining connections with Thai policy-makers and scientists to increase possible impacts of final findings/dissemination, sparked some discussion amongst the audience to provide opportunities to start thinking different about AMR/AMU
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL http://dmsic.moph.go.th/index/detail/8027
 
Description Dr.Luechai Sringernyuang presented at Evidence for action 5: Contribution's of social sciences and anthropology on AMR - Thailand's The 2nd National Forum on AMR 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Dr.Luechai Sringernyuang presented at Evidence for action 5: Contribution's of social sciences and anthropology on AMR panel at Thailand's The 2nd National Forum on AMR.
As one of the few social scientists at the forum,, he presented work from the Mahidol Thai team to 150+ attendees, covering their research on marginalisated populations, including bedridden patients. Accomplished the aims of: ensuring AMIS's presence at inter/national policy events, dissemination of findings and maintaining connections with Thai policy-makers and scientists to increase possible impacts of final findings/dissemination, sparked some discussion amongst the audience to provide opportunities to start thinking different about AMR/AMU
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL http://dmsic.moph.go.th/index/detail/8027
 
Description ETHNOGRAPHIES OF GLOBAL HEALTH: WHAT DO "FOLLOWING METHODOLOGIES" ENTAIL? (Conference Panel at American Anthropological Association 2018) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Abstract:
Over the past three decades, anthropologists that follow people, things and ideas - migrants, sugar, policy, mushrooms, medicines and microbes to name just a few - have opened up the so-called singular -or even multi-sited- ethnographic field (Jensen 2012; Kirksey & Helmreich 2010; Marcus 1999; Tsing 2009, 2015). They have helped to reveal the practices that make and define our field sites and objects of study, as well as the conditions for knowing them. 'Following' has emerged from methodological and conceptual experimentation with how we co-produce, document and delimit ethnographic presents.

This panel is concerned with exploring the diverse arts of ethnographic following and the reflexive practices that following entails. In the Anthropology of Global Health, ethnographies that 'follow' often emphasize cartographic and geometric metaphors, along with images of continuity and connection. These metaphors and images can assist us in attending to the spatialisation and flow of tangible objects in global health circuits, but we are interested too in how we might better consider the non-tangibles in global health - the affective, imaginary, atmospheric, and emotional - and the difficulties of placing these in a coherent 'field'. How, then, do cartographic or geometric metaphors potentially constrain the ways we do, think about, and imagine our co-production of ethnographic presents and engagement while 'following' in the field?

The papers in this panel are all interested in how 'what we follow' depends on our fine-tuning and experimenting with various modes of noticing: listening, reading, smelling, seeing, and touching, but also how this is enabled through technologies such as mobile phones, computers, and x-rays, for example. These can direct our attention in different ways and shape how and what we follow; highlighting the importance of temporality and emotional experience, as much as spatiality to our following. The papers here trace following in a multitude of ways, from the ethnographer becoming the followed in the case of research on TB patients in India and the fear encased in this, to the psychological and violent ways that following can be policed and/or prohibited, to challenges of following microbes and medicines and their associated emotional and cognitive disconnect, to how we might follow something like proof, which is at the same time deeply emotional and bureaucratically firm.

The aim of following, then, may not be to know 'an object' as it moves, but to document particularities and similarities as they emerge through connections, tensions and disconnections in specific sites, situations and practices (Yates-Doerr 2015). Thus, in this panel, we aim to conceive of an Anthropology of Global Health that can use a 'following' methodology that does not just demonstrate effortless 'flow', but also how global health, and its objects, affects, imaginaries, and atmospheres, are often patchy, disconnected, and uneven.

Impact: Panel brought various researchers from different contexts and backgrounds together to critically discuss relevant contemporary methodologies to study global health. Lead to reflections on current and past ways of doing ethnography, extended and created new academic networks for potential collaboration.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Examining the Long-term Health and Economic Effects of Antimicrobial Resistance in the United States. National Academies of science, engineering and medicine 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact AMIS PI Clare Chandler presented in the opening section of the meeting on Anthropology of AMR.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.nationalacademies.org/event/01-05-2021/examining-the-long-term-health-and-economic-effec...
 
Description Exploratory Workshop on the History of Policy Responses to Antimicrobial Resistance (LSTM) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Gathering of historians and anthropologist to discuss past and possible directions for future research on AMR policy. Exchange of different perspectives and approaches, as well identification of funding stream and possible focus of proposal.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Film screening and panel discussion for AMIS launch 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Following the screening of the classic 1940's British film "The Third Man" (which has a counterfeit antibiotics subplot), a panel, together with audience participation, discussed (a) how the film depicts the roles of antimicrobials in society after they had so recently been mass-produced; (b) how this has changed today; and (c) how the roles of antimicrobials has spread and gained traction across the world. There was positive feedback from members of the audience (approximately 150 in attendance) both during the event, and via email following the event.

Chair: Ms. Madlen Davies, health and science reporter at the Bureau of Investigative Journalism
1) Dr. Clare Chandler, Medical Anthropologist, co-Director of the Antimicrobial Resistance Centre & Principal Investigator of the AMIS Hub, LSHTM
2) Dr. Laura Shallcross, NIHR Clinician Scientist & Honorary Consultant in Public Health, UCL
3) Mr. Ross Macfarlane, Research Development Lead, Wellcome Collection
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.thebureauinvestigates.com/blog/2017-11-21/the-third-man-and-the-changing-role-of-antibio...
 
Description Following the unseen: The microbial and medicinal unravelling of global health and questions of disconnect (Conference of American Anthropological Association 2018) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Abstract
To focus on the 'following' implies a paradoxical subjectivity, as it redirects our attention from the main actor - the lead - to the secondary, the ethnographer whose actions can only exist in the shadow of the former. This paper discusses implications of 'following' 20 individuals suffering from drug-resistant tuberculosis in India over a period of two years and beyond. In the process, it has become increasingly complex to delineate 'following'; in addition to regularly repeated home-visits within a 30 miles radius, it has involved trace ethnography of treatment-related documents and x-rays, diary writing, photos, videos, audios, clinical visits etc. Yet, to follow entails possibilities of being 'followed back'. Updates from the field on treatment developments and needs for interventions reached me on my cell phone, asking for advice. The field was following the ethnographer, as the intersubjectivity of the field encounters stretched across the globe in an extended existential ethnography. To follow also pointed to the dilemma for the ethnographer of trying to avoid being followed by the bug by hiding behind a mask, while trying to stimulate conducive situations for researcher and interlocutor to follow one another in engaged dialogue. This is just one example of the biosocial inseparability of the bug and the fear it generates in both sufferer and surroundings.

Impact: Attendees asked questions, asked for contact for potential collaborations / future proposals.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.eventscribe.com/2018/AAA-Annual/searchbypresentation.asp?goToLetter=F&h=Browse
 
Description Future AMR Policy: what can we learn from history? 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Participated in the the workshop hosted by the University of Exeter, RAND Europe and the University of East Anglia at the Institute for Historical Research, School of Advanced Study, University of London.

The event, the first of two, used historical analysis of the evolution of AMR, tobacco control and climate change policy to stimulate a discussion and fresh thinking on policy to address the challenge of antimicrobial resistance. In doing so, it explored cross cutting lessons from the history of the different policy areas and identified gaps in understanding to inform future policymaking.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Hosted Social Science and AMR Research Symposium 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The AMIS programme, through a cost extension from the ESRC, funded a research symposium in September 2018. This symposium was an excellent opportunity for humanities and social science scholars to share their latest theories and research into AMR. The symposium received excellent feedback from attendees, and was an excellent platform for showing how the humanities and social sciences can contribute to addressing the issue of AMR.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.antimicrobialsinsociety.org/commentary/amr-symposium-commentary/
 
Description Keynote Talk: One Health Workshop, Future Animals, Nature and Health Research Group, Swedish Agricultural University. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact AMIS Postdoctoral Researcher, Laurie Denyer Willis, was invited to give the Keynote talk at the One Health Workshop, Future Animals, Nature and Health Research Group, Swedish Agricultural University. The opportunity raised the profile of the AMIS research hub, promoting fresh approaches to AMR research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.slu.se/en/ew-news/2018/10/fanh-one-health-workshop/
 
Description Launch of antimicrobialsinsociety.org, the AMIS Hub website 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The AMIS Hub (antimicrobialsinsociety.org) is an online resource that brings together research relevant to AMR from across social science disciplines. Aimed at those designing and implementing AMR policy, as well as researchers from the life sciences, the AMIS Hub introduces readers to a wealth of relevant social research on AMR. The AMIS Hub materials include research summaries, blogs 'from the field', and reviews of existing and ongoing research and theory. We envision the Hub as a mechanism for policy-makers and life scientists to engage with social science research on AMR, to forge future collaborations and to inspire new ways to address AMR. The Hub launched in late November 2017, and was officially announced to current and potential partners in our first e-newsletter which was sent out in December 2017 to 150 stakeholders. Feedback has been positive, site visits are routinely monitored, although impact is yet to be measured given the idea is to build the website over time, engaging with partners to provide and promote content.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.antimicrobialsinsociety.org/
 
Description Laurie Denyer Willis was invited to give a talk entitled "Antimicrobials in Society" to the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Laurie Denyer Willis was invited to give a talk entitled "Antimicrobials in Society" to the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development in September 2018. The talk was attended by a wide range of policy actors, researchers and industry representatives, including Dame Sally Davies, the Cheif Medical Officer of the UK.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.ebrd.com/news/2018/how-to-stop-the-rise-and-rise-of-drugresistant-superbugs.html
 
Description Mahidol University presented AMIS research findings at ministry of health public seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The MU team presented at the "Friday seminar" held by Society and Health Institute, Ministry of Public Health, a public seminar that aims to present the findings from AMIS Thailand project, taking opportunity to discuss with researchers, policy makers and academia engaging in the field of AMR and Social Science in general.
The MU team presented the lessons of Ethnographic field work in Peri-Urban area. The physicians from rural area and slums in the four-regions network were invited to discuss about working in each area. The participants discussed about experiences of bedridden patients in the way of AMR infections and primary care in Urban area. They requested to join another meeting and plan for future discussion.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Nabirye Christine attended the Sociology of Health symposium in Grand-Popo, Benin in October 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Co-investigator Christine Nabirye took part in a two day sociology of health symposium in October 2019. This was organised by the Culture of Cultures microbial sociology, University of Helsinki and Laboatoired'anthropologie Medicale Appliqué, Abomey-Calavi University, Benin to discuss the role of critical Social Science in public health and medicine in West Africa. Christine Nabirye described her work on AMIS and how antibiotics stand in for development in Uganda which is why people should not be defined a 'risk' but instead understand how they are at risk of environmental hazards in their lives that they negotiate every day.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://blogs.helsinki.fi/culturesofcultures/2019/11/14/engaging-in-critical-social-science-of-publi...
 
Description National Audit Office seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Dr Chandler gave a talk on Social research approaches to AMR.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description PI Clare Chandler featured in an LIDC podcast on 4 Dec 2017 on the global threat of AMR 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact This episode of "Development Matters" broadcast on SOAS Radio as part of the LIDC explores what exactly we mean by antibiotic resistance, the use of antibiotics in food production, the potentially devastating effects of not addressing antibiotic resistance and solutions to this frightening problem. The speakers were Dr Clare Chandler (Associate Professor in Medical Anthropology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine) and Dr. Lucy Brunton (Lecturer in Molecular Epidemiology at the Royal Veterinary College).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://soundcloud.com/soasradio/lidc-antibiotics
 
Description PI Clare Chandler profiled in the 13 Nov 2017 RCUK AMR Newsletter, in a feature titled Applying Social Science Theory to the Problem of AMR 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Clare's work on applying social science theory was featured prominently in the RCUK AMR Newsletter, with a link to a detailed interview blog post, that emphasized the fresh perspectives approach the AMIS project brings to the field of AMR research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://blogs.rcuk.ac.uk/2017/11/09/applying-social-science-theory-to-the-problem-of-amr/
 
Description PI Clare Chandler quoted in Science Magazine on 7 March 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Clare is quoted in Science Magazine talking about the unintended consequences of malaria RDT testing - such as increases in antibiotics use, changes in treatment seeking behaviour, in addition to strains on already weak health systems. Although it is hard to measure immediate impact, such engagement with scientific media helps contribute to the public discourse on AMR and ways to prevent it.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/03/malaria-free-still-sick-whats-giving-millions-kids-fevers
 
Description PI Clare Chandler quoted in the Guardian on 7 Nov 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We hope Clare's expert quote in the Guardian on antibiotic use in farming will help shape the public discourse on AMR, although immediate public impact is hard to gauge or measure. One form of impact is that based on this and the Telegraph article, she was invited by the BMJ to provide an opinion piece for them, which was submitted and accepted in Feb 2018, and will be published shortly.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/nov/07/farmers-must-stop-antibiotics-use-in-animals-due...
 
Description PI Clare Chandler quoted in the Telegraph on 13 Nov 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We hope Clare's quote in the Telegraph on three quarters of GPs incorrectly prescribing antibiotics will help shape the public discourse on AMR, although immediate public impact is hard to gauge or measure. One form of impact is that based on this and the Guardian article, she was invited by the BMJ to provide an opinion piece for them, which was submitted and accepted in Feb 2018, and will be published shortly.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/11/13/three-quarters-gps-still-wrongly-prescribing-antibioti...
 
Description PI Clare Chandler responded to several interview requests following contribution to UK Parliament event on Global Superbug Crisis on 31 Jan 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Clare's contributions at the UK parliament event on the Global Superbug Crisis on 31/1/18 was followed up by interviews with journalists from Science magazine, Bureau of Investigative Journalism and the Independent, as well as by film makers preparing the 2019 Superbugs film
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Participation in Uganda National AMR conference (2018) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The AMIS team was invited to make two presentations sharing findings from the farming site in Wakiso and the urban informal settlement in Namuwongo, Kampala.
The presentations were made during the breakout sessions. There was a lot of interest in understanding issues around use of antibiotics in farming. There was interest in what antibiotics were commonly used in informal settlements and why.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Participation in community-based activities 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Patients, carers and/or patient groups
Results and Impact Participation in community-based activities i.e., home visit, vaccination campaign and series of communication with local health workers in the Om Yai Health Center and Sampran District Hospital has been done with the plan to develop outreach and public engagement projects in the next phase of research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Podcast interview - Episode 4. Coll De Lima Hutchison & anthropology of microbes; fecal pollution & AMR; plasmid transfer in Acinetobacter. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Podcast was a feature interview with Coll de Lima Hutchison's research on AMR and the AMIS project more generally, outlining the contributions and relevance of an anthropological approach to AMR.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.uac.uu.se/the-amr-studio/episode4/
 
Description Public Engagement on AMR in Thailand kick-off Meeting (in conjunction with Thailand AWW) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The "AMR Dialogues" project, funded by the Wellcome Trust, focuses on addressing the problem of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Thailand and integrating with the Thailand National Strategic Action Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance's Strategy 5 (public knowledge and awareness of appropriate use of antimicrobials). This meeting recruited researchers and policymakers to share ideas about AMR campaigns in many regions in the country, to form a a working group on AMR dialogues in Thailand . It was discussed that a working group on AMR dialogues in Thailand requires more discussion with local communities and health practitioners. AMIS Thailand team, gave a talk about the AMIS project and the contributions of social sciences and anthropology on AMR.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Public Lecture at Mahidol University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Dr Chandler gave a lecture entitled social sciences and a better understanding of antimicrobial resistance in society. Clare outlined the role of the AMIS hub and other AMIS team members presented on their research in Thailand and Uganda. The lecture was held at the Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities and was mainly engaging staff and PhD students at Mahidol University.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Public lecture - An introduction to study nonhuman actors from the medical anthropology perspective, by Sittichoke Chawraigern 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact In the public seminar on how anthropologists study nonhuman actors through multispecies ethnography, Sittichoke Chawraigern, invited by The Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn Anthropology Center, gave an introduction on studying nonhuman actors, e.g., microbes, industrial livestock, from the medical anthropology perspective.

This lecture, as one of the most interesting research trends in anthropology, has approximately reached 5,700 views in total (5,300 views on Facebook and 450 views on Youtube).

https://www.facebook.com/359813091400/videos/227209462314350
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c9eg7SaHPok&list=PLZtaaX-8WVhKNdgPsPwmvefZ5HrZ0S_lN?dex=2
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c9eg7SaHPok&list=PLZtaaX-8WVhKNdgPsPwmvefZ5HrZ0S_lN&index=2
 
Description Public lecture at Makerere University's Faculty of Public Health. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr.Luechai gave a talk on "fresh perspective on AMR research: the research experiences from Thailand" in a public lecture at Makerere University's Faculty of Public Health and preliminary findings from the AMIS Thailand research. There was a lot of interest in Social Sciences and AMR and the students were interested to discuss this aspect with him.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Public lecture at Ministry of Public Health 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Dr Chandler gave a public lecture entitled 'The Practices of Medical Anthropology in the New Public Health Context'. The audience included MoPH policy analysts, public health workers, researchers and hospital staff. Following the lecture the attendees broke out into smaller working groups to discuss how anthropology and humanities can be applied to various field of public health. Many AMIS researchers were present from the UK, Uganda and Thai teams and they all shared their experiences from the project with the working groups. The staff and students present were very engaged and saw this as an opportunity to learn about the role of anthropology and social sciences in global health.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://shi.or.th/content/45118/1/
 
Description Research mapping and prioritization on antimicrobial resistance in Thailand Workshop, held by International Health Policy Program, Ministry of Public Health. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Research mapping and prioritization on antimicrobial resistance in Thailand Workshop held by International Health Policy Program, Ministry of Public Health.
The main objective is to develop AMR research priorities in the future and share current AMR research in Thailand. Dr Wirun, Sittichoke, Thitima and Phakha who are the AMIS Thailand team gave a talk about the findings of AMIS project and the contributions of social sciences and anthropology on AMR.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Resisting global imperatives because of care: Conscientious practitioners, data alignment prescription targets in a health centre in Thailand 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Sittichoke Chawraingern gave a presentation to medical and public health practitioners in which national AMR and antimicrobial metrics were discussed
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Sittichoke Chawraingern gave lecture a 55th anniversary of the founding of Faculty of Sociology and Anthropology, Thammasat University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact On the 55th anniversary of the founding of Faculty of Sociology and Anthropology, Thammasat University a conference was held titled "Anthropology, Antimicrobial, Resistance". Sittichoke Chawraingern presented how the AMIS project aims to address the issue of AMR and introduced the audience to some key themes or concepts uncluding Antibitoics as a "Quick fix" to care and issues around "Data performativity".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://socanth.tu.ac.th/news/department-news/tusocanth55-talks-03/
 
Description Susan Nayiga presented at the LSHTM AMR Centre Webinar- AMR in a post-pandemic world 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact AMIS co investigator Susan Nayiga made a presentation on 'AMR in a post pandemic world' at the LSHTM AMR Center Webinar to share how research, health and society are changing in light of COVID-19 and the implications this will have for AMR policy and action. The presentation also covered how health systems will change post-pandemic and how this might affect the AMR response.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/newsevents/events/amr-post-pandemic-world
 
Description Susan Nayiga took part in the antimicrobial stewardship, optimal access and use technical working group at the Ugandan National AMR retreat 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Co-investigator Susan Nayiga took part in the antimicrobial stewardship, optimal access and use technical working group. This was organised as part of the AMR Retreat aimed at finalizing the AMR Surveillance Guidelines in June 2018.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Susan presented at the Medical Research Foundation National PhD Training Programme in Antimicrobial Resistance Research Annual Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact AMIS co investigator Susan Nayiga made a presentation on 'Living with persistent ill health: What tinkering with antibiotics renders visible in rural households in Eastern Uganda'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://amrtraining.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/3RD-ANNUAL-CONFERENCE-2020-FINAL-PROGRAMME-1.pd...
 
Description Thailand's 2nd Annual Conference on Anthropology and Sociology, 21st November 2020, Ubon Ratchathani University, Thailand. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The presentation on the paper "Following method: the anthropological methodology in the unsettled world." The goal was to propose the novel and specific methodology used in the AMIS project. Finally, we had a fruitful and fascinating conversation on the existing and limited research methodology.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description The AMIS Hub website 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The AMIS Hub (antimicrobialsinsociety.org) is an online resource that brings together research relevant to AMR from across social science disciplines. Aimed at those designing and implementing AMR policy, as well as researchers from the life sciences, the AMIS Hub introduces readers to a wealth of relevant social research on AMR. The AMIS Hub materials include research summaries, blogs 'from the field', and reviews of existing and ongoing research and theory.

The Hub launched in late November 2017, and has been monitored regularly since. On average, the website receives over 1800 page views per month from over 450 users (measured over a 36 month period). In 2020, we had 16,539 views from 6,111 visitors. These visitors were from over 110 countries including countries in Africa, North and South America, Australasia, Asia, the United Kingdom, Europe and more. Most visitors were directed to the website from search engines, followed by the London School of Tropical Hygiene and Medicine, twitter and from our mailchimp newsletters.

From these website, we have had requests to join the AMIS Hub from multi-disciplinary professionals, direct enquiries about future events and had requests to showcase professional publications via the Essential Readings tab.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018,2019,2020,2021
URL https://antimicrobialsinsociety.org/
 
Description The Second Global Network of Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Prevention Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Network of Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Prevention (NAMRIP) based at the University of Southampton in collaboration with the Makerere University College of Health Sciences are organizing a scientific conference. The conference will bring together a broad cross-section of professionals from the United Kingdom and Africa to share experiences and stimulate research into innovations geared towards breakthroughs in combating antimicrobial resistance. The theme was Innovations towards combating antimicrobial resistance: a whole society engagement. The AMIS Uganda team participated in this event, which sparked lots of interest in the role of social sciences in AMR research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.southampton.ac.uk/namrip/news/2019/02/uganda-conference.page?