Supporting the Industrial Strategy

Lead Research Organisation: London School of Economics & Pol Sci
Department Name: Centre for Economic Performance

Abstract

1) Developing Skills: Strengths and Weaknesses in the System, and What can be Done.
The new Industrial Strategy must consider how the education system can create the general and specific skills needed by businesses today and in the future. CEP will synthesise evidence on strengths and weaknesses in the current education system at all levels (schools, colleges and universities), and highlight where improvements can be made. This might be within the current system, or through the design of new mechanisms to incentivise individuals and firms to invest in training. In conjunction with researchers from the Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER), we can produce a synthesis of findings on technical and vocational education. We will also be able to study in more depth firm-level relationships with higher education institutions, with the aim of better understanding how they impact on local economies.

2) Driving Growth across the Country: Mapping the Data on Firms and Labour Markets.
The starting point for developing appropriate regionally focused growth policies is to understand the status quo, to carefully document how this has changed over time, and to better understand the factors underlying and driving geographic differences. The CEP is developing better data to describe the geographic spread of industry, and associated variation in labour market patterns like problems of real wage stagnation and the rise of new types of work arrangements, including the gig economy. As well as analysis of the digital economy, and the opportunities and threats it poses for the labour market and implications for the future. We will seek to release reports describing the data, map the relevant metrics (including productivity, investment, employment and pay) so that policymakers and stakeholders could benchmark their own regions/sectors.

3) Supporting Businesses to Start and Grow: Drivers of Innovation and Diffusion.
The Industrial Strategy should be focused on addressing market failures which cause barriers to investment in innovation, technologies or organisational practices that drive productivity growth. One strand of work using patents will analyse the innovation spillovers between technologies and places, and the types of policy that stimulate business R&D and innovation. The spillover analysis would also be linked with new measures of regional Total Factor Productivity (TFP) to understand the local economic impact of innovation. This work will help guide policymakers to where the payoffs of R&D investment might be greatest for the UK. In this context, we would consider payoffs both in terms of economic growth but also in terms of achieving non-economic objectives such as lower greenhouse gas emissions and more secure energy supply. We also plan to produce a report together with the LSE's Grantham Institute on clean growth. Another strand of work will consider the role of financial constraints on firm growth, and the extent to which these have contributed to recent poor productivity performance in the UK. And finally, we will explore the relationships between management practices and investment efficiency.

4) Encouraging Trade and Inward Investment: Brexit and Industrial Strategy.
Many UK firms (particularly SMEs) face longstanding barriers to exporting, and Brexit will create new challenges in this area. At the same time, while UK Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) performance has been stronger to date, there are concerns that Brexit will induce multinationals to relocate in order to maintain access to the single market. CEP will seek to understand the likely trade and FDI impacts of Brexit, and the implications for labour markets and consumers. This will include a deeper analysis of the sectoral and regional dimensions, and should be useful to inform the scope and form of industrial policy response.

Planned Impact

Informing and Supporting the Industrial Strategy

The research findings and outputs from each of these four projects will be used to inform and support the Industrial Strategy through active dialogue and dissemination with policymakers, media, businesses and other stakeholders. The new funding will allow us to deliver policy oriented reports (for example under our CEP Special Paper series or as part of the follow-on work of the LSE Growth Commission) which will be academically robust and will subsequently go on to become peer reviewed journal papers.

Deliverable outputs from the four projects will be produced by April and July 2018, and we can share intermediate findings and work in progress where these would be considered useful. CEP researchers have already been working closely with BEIS, HM Treasury and the Downing Street Policy Unit on Industrial Strategy through a series of meetings, roundtables and seminar presentations and this will continue. The funding will allow us to provide both high-level briefings for ministers and senior civil servants, together with more detailed "teach-ins" with more junior policy advisers and researchers. We are keen that such interactions are two-way, and will seek to engage the policy community from the start (as with did with the recent LSE Growth Commission) to ensure that from initiation onwards the new work this funding will support is helpful to those designing and implementing the new Industrial Strategy.

The CEP would also organise events or workshops in order to discuss and share new work, and working with our impact team we would also seek to put together short-term multimedia outputs (blogs, videos) and articles for Centrepiece in order to disseminate our work to wider audiences.
 
Description Key findings are summarised and outlined according to subject area, corresponding to award abstract, as follows below.

1) Developing Skills
Human Capital: CEP work studied UK fiscal incentives for R&D and human capital accumulation. Findings indicate that despite large contributions of each to economic growth, the UK fiscal system does not treat the two equally when it comes to employer incentives to invest. Firms that invest in R&D are able to claim generous tax relief, whereas no aligned incentive to invest in worker training exists. The rationale to provide incentives for both R&D and human capital are comparable, and both hold high importance for economic growth, yet the exiting fiscal incentives are unequal. Further findings show that this unequal treatment of physical and human capital stands in contrast to common practice in many other developed nations.

Apprenticeships: Our evidence review of apprenticeships in England indicates high variability in the value of apprenticeships in terms of earnings increases across age, gender, and type of apprenticeship across sector and level. The value of a given number of apprenticeship starts depends on their composition, and efforts to improve quality can influence quantity. Stricter standards for the quality of apprenticeships can decrease the number of apprenticeship starts, because higher standards imply higher costs. Our findings therefore suggest that a higher weight placed on high-quality apprenticeships may lead to a slower rate of growth in the number of apprenticeship starts. We analysed the short and long term payoff of apprenticeships to the individual, using data that tracked students through schooling and into the labour market. Findings suggest a positive earnings differential, though with large variability between sectors. Importantly, this variability has important implications for the gender earnings gap, as men tend to specialise in vocational areas where having an apprenticeship is more important¬ for earnings (such as Building and Construction and Engineering). This is not the case for women, who are more likely to undertake apprenticeships in areas such as Service, Child Development, and Health and Social Care.
Universities: Research into maximising universities' impact on the UK's industrial strategy indicates that it is important to improve the accessibility of the university system for poorer students and address variability in the quality of teaching. A fairer maintenance system, together with better information and advice for students to enhance course matching, could help close the participation gap. More can be done to improve the commercialisation of research to diffuse new technologies, and to encourage talented international students and university staff to come to the UK.

2) Driving Growth - Mapping Data

Under its 'Informing the Industrial Strategy' project, CEP has produced an interactive online map that for the first time tracks business and labour market data across the UK. The new tool allows users to interpret economic variables and issues across a range of interests and areas, including employment, job density, and firm type. The tool stems from an earlier CEP research paper and initial discussions in the LSE Growth Commission, as a way to visualise its results and conclusions- giving the paper more impact and enhancing its policy value. This will help inform policy and decision-making and enhance the quality of the debate on regional economic development in the UK. Covering data from 2009 to 2015, an early version of the tool was demonstrated to HM Treasury, BEIS and the chair of the new Industrial Strategy Committee in order to ensure it will be helpful to their analysis and ongoing policy discussions. Official launch is expected soon.
CEP has also undertaken a ground breaking survey of 20,000 people to investigate self-employment and the gig economy work in the UK. This was to collect data not readily available in secondary data sources on the labour market, with an intention to carefully document the nature and evolution of non-standard working arrangements. This involves generating a better understanding about the workers engaged in self-employment and alternative work arrangements in terms of their demographics, skills, occupations and industries, and what their contractual conditions are regarding wages, hours worked and social protection. It also considers the variety of working patterns that these contracts involve, the reasons why workers engage in these types of contracts, and the extent to which non-standard work arrangements satisfy the need for flexibility, or if the opposite is true and workers would prefer to work more hours. In a section specifically devoted to workers on zero hours contracts, we found that almost 30% of zero hours contract workers had no other option but to accept working on a zero-hours contract because of a lack of job opportunities and 44% of those on zero-hours contracts said they would like more working hours. We also discuss reforms of social security that could possibly extend work injury, sickness, old age and unemployment insurance to these contracts. A parallel survey in India has now been conducted, which will allow us to make a normative assessment of the potential expansion of the Employment Guarantee Scheme from rural areas to also including urban areas, and offer an evaluation of the willingness to pay for a job guarantee derived from a choice experiment included in the survey.
Through our separate crowdworkers survey of 4,000 respondents, we sought a better understanding of labour supply decisions for different types of work in the both the UK and the US, in particular focusing on the trade-offs between employment and self-employment. As well as analysing the characteristics of employees and the self-employed, we estimated the distribution of preferences over various job attributes typically associated with typical or atypical work arrangements such as flexibility, security, coverage of employment legislation and autonomy. The results of the survey suggest that the majority of the population prefer job characteristics that are associated with traditional employer-employee relationships. Such a finding is suggestive that the changing nature of work is likely to have significant welfare implications for many workers.

3) Supporting Business and Innovation

A long-form report and policy recommendation guide was published in December 2018, encapsulating CEP's finding on sustainable growth's role in the industrial strategy. The most important finding of this report is that the low carbon innovation investment will reduce carbon AND lead to economic growth. The special report shows why it is sensible for environmental sustainability to be at the heart of the UK's growth strategy and how this can be achieved - with 16 actionable recommendations for the Government. The sustainable growth strategy outlined in the report focuses on four priority policy areas: innovation, infrastructure, skills and cities. These are areas where the UK has existing advantages and interests, are important for driving productivity and growth, and are likely to be key determinants of the country's success at managing the transition to a net-zero-carbon economy.
CEP research additionally looked into productivity related to SMEs, which make up the majority of UK businesses. Our findings argue that SMEs could potentially be contributors to economic growth, but face obstacles including access to finance and poor management practices. Access to long-term finance, especially equity finance, remains an obstacle for firms with high growth potential. Poor managerial practices affect all types of SMEs, whether they have the potential to grow or not.

4) Brexit, Trade, and Local Impact

Our key findings on the impact on local and regional growth (studying local authorities and primary urban areas) include:
• Areas most exposed under a hard Brexit are also the most exposed under a soft Brexit.
• All areas at the levels of disaggregation considered are predicted to face some form of economic loss.
• Areas in London and the South East are predicted to see the largest decline in economic activity, measured by gross value added of the area, with three of the top ten worst hit local authorities in Greater London (City of London, Tower Hamlets and Islington) and nine of the top ten located in the South East. Most of these areas have large employment shares in service sector industries such as financial intermediation, which are predicted to experience relatively greater losses
• While the North and the Midlands are estimated to perform less badly after Brexit, the model does not imply that these areas will adjust better in the long run. For example, while London was set to be one of the worst hit areas during the financial crisis, its skill composition and diversified local economy meant it displayed greater resilience and was able to bounce back quicker. Areas that are predicted to face the least bad impacts are those that are poorer to start with, and these areas may have greater relative difficulty bouncing back after being hit by a negative shock.
• Local authorities expected to experience bigger negative effects on their local economy from Brexit have a higher proportion of people who voted remain in the EU referendum. This relationship is most clear under the hard Brexit scenario, and suggests that areas voted in line with their relative economic interest.
Exploitation Route Our work above provides numerous policy recommendations and options for the government's industrial strategy nationally and regionally to improve productivity. We will impact on the policy agenda with the findings via specific action points:
• Richard Davies will feed in IS findings of CEP to the ISC via continued regular discussions with Andy Haldane, the Chair of the Council. Anna Valero will be the lead contact for Sarah Hodgetts, head of ISC staff. Both fed into the ISC workshop on metrics for measuring the success of the industrial strategy. IS findings will similarly be followed up through continuation of the regular policy discussions that have been set up between CEP researchers with BEIS advisers, HMT, and Downing Street Policy Unit over the past 12 months.
• CEP will hold public events on IS inviting decision makers and academics, the first was run by Ralf Martin on May 24th 2019 focusing on how to make industrial policies work century. Dani Rodrik from Harvard was the keynote speaker and said afterwards this was a "watershed event in my scholarly lifetime". A rich and frank discussion was held under Chatham House rules, moderated by Henry Overman, with Andy Haldane, Chair of the Industrial Strategy Council, alongside leading representatives from BEIS, UKRI, CBI and BMWi. A member of the panel later commented that the discussion had changed how they frame industrial strategy policies.
• A series of lunchtime expert roundtables, organised in cooperation with the DfE and BEIS, on the theme of predicting the UK's future skills already established by the LSE will continue.
• CEP will run a "Business Basics" randomised control trial with BEIS to evaluate business support policies that seek to encourage SME adoption of AI technologies in the retail and hospitality sectors.
• Finally, we will continue to update our interactive web atlas of Industrial Strategy for the general public and respond to requests from ISC for updates on variables not already included.
Our research further informs additional work and use through numerous means, including:
• Given the policy drive to increase the number of people undertaking apprenticeships in England and plans to dramatically change the post-16 education system, which would include making apprenticeships a more important part of it, our research informs the national debate by raising the question of how beneficial apprenticeships are to young people currently.
• Universities are a core part of the UK's innovation infrastructure, with important roles across all the foundations set out in the government's industrial strategy: people, place, ideas, business environment and infrastructure. The sector has witnessed a number of reforms in recent years and there is much debate about future policy, in particular with respect to its financing, expansion, globalisation and economic impact. CEP recommendations to policymakers seek to close the student participation gap; as well as addressing issues around innovation and spillovers for business and local economies.
• The litany of problems currently faced by the UK economy includes the chronic shortage of intermediate skills, recent productivity stagnation and falling real wages. We recommend promoting human capital investment by firms (with appropriate measures to protect the investment from problems such as trainees moving on to other firms immediately after their training) which would bypass the liquidity constraints faced by individuals, while enhancing productivity and pay in the medium to long term. While the apprenticeship levy (and associated incentives) only covers large firms and only for a very specific type of human capital investment, a human capital tax credit would cover the full distribution of firms and not be limited to types of training that can be classified as 'apprenticeships'. This could help to redress the current imbalance between investment in physical and human capital.
• Little is known about new alternative working practices, and the path breaking surveys conducted by CEP will help policymakers understand such non-standard working arrangements. The plan is to produce research from the rich and unique survey data to develop a better understanding of the reasons why employees and the self-employed undertake such work (flexibility versus necessity) and how policy should react to this.
• Our overarching strategy for sustainable growth to address the dual challenges of restoring productivity growth and managing a transition to a low-carbon economy - priorities in both the UK and other G20 countries - can be used to create roadmaps and develop strategy in this area.
• UK productivity continues to be disappointing and the question arises whether SMEs can be an engine of growth for the UK as part of the government's Industrial Strategy. It is fast-growing innovative businesses that can drive long-term productivity growth. Therefore, interventions that target firms with higher growth potential are likely to be more efficient than general business support policy for all SMEs - but the challenge for policy-makers resides in identifying high-growth firms. By contrast, policies that address poor managerial practices have the potential to increase aggregate productivity by targeting all types of SMEs, not just high-growth firms.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Energy,Financial Services, and Management Consultancy,Government, Democracy and Justice,Manufacturing, including Industrial Biotechology

URL http://cep.lse.ac.uk/Industrial_Strategy/
 
Description As described in the Key Findings section our work has been used to inform the UK Industrial Strategy among policymakers. IS findings have been regularly used in policy discussions between CEP researchers with BEIS advisers, HMT, and Downing Street Policy Unit, as well as DfE and DCLG. CEP researchers fed into the ISC workshop on metrics for measuring the success of the industrial strategy.
First Year Of Impact 2018
Impact Types Economic

 
Description CEP Research (Management and Productivity) cited in BEIS White Paper "Industrial Strategy: building a Britain fit for the future (November 2017)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
Impact Informing the UK Industrial Strategy
 
Description Establishment of Industrial Strategy Council
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
Impact BEIS announced on 7th October the establishment of a new independent Industrial Strategy Council to be chaired by Bank of England's chief economist Andy Haldane. This sprang directly from the proposals we set out in the LSE Growth Commission of a new framework to govern IS to make it more transparent, data driven and to sit outside the political process - including a new decision making body. The report was followed up with several CEP researcher discussions (Davies, Valero and Siddique) with BEIS advisers, HMT, Downing Street over the past 18 months as to how such a body could be work.
 
Description Industry in Britain - An Atlas (Valero and Davies): Cited in Speech in House of Lords debate on Industrial Strategy, Viscount Chandos (8 January 2018)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
 
Title Crowdworker survey 
Description Through our separate crowdworkers survey of 4,000 respndents we sought a better understanding of labour supply decisions for different types of work in the both the UK and the US, in particular focusing on the trade-offs between employment and self-employment. As well as analysing the characteristics of employees and the self-employed, we estimated the distribution of preferences over various job attributes typically associated with typical or atypical work arrangements such as flexibility, security, coverage of employment legislation and autonomy. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The results of the survey suggest that the majority of the population prefer job characteristics that are associated with traditional employer-employee relationships. These preferences hold even when analysing the sub-sample of those in atypical work arrangements. Such a finding is suggestive that the changing nature of work is likely to have significant welfare implications for many workers. 
 
Title Gig economy survey 
Description CEP has undertaken a ground-breaking survey of 20,000 people to investigate self-employment and the gig economic in the UK. Similar surveys have been conducted in Italy by Tito Boeri and in the US by Alan Krueger. CEP joined up with Tito Boeri and Alan Krueger to compare alternative work arrangements in the UK, US and Italy. We aim to carefully document the nature and evolution of non-standard working arrangements in the last decade. This is undertaken initially as we are interested in understanding who are the workers engaged in self-employment and alternative work arrangements in terms of demographics, skills, occupations and industries, and what their contractual conditions are regarding wages, hours worked and social protection. We will also explore the variety of working patterns that these contracts involve and the reasons why workers engage in these types of contracts. In particular, we will investigate the extent to which non-standard work arrangements satisfy the need for flexibility, or - conversely - workers engaged in these contracts would prefer to work more hours, but are somehow constrained in doing so. We will also discuss reforms of social security that could possibly extend work injury, sickness, old age and unemployment insurance to these contracts. Preliminary results presented at the XX European Conference of the Fondazione Rodolfo DeBenedetti in Pavia (Italy)- titled "The welfare state in the XXI century" - have informed a recent op-ed on Bloomberg Opinion: https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-01-15/plenty-of-uber-drivers-love-their-jobs-too A parallel survey in India has now been conducted, with 16,000 respondents, which will provide a contrast with our UK study and will allow us to estimate the distribution of worker preferences over pay uncertainty aversion and work day security. The latter of these will allow us to make a normative assessment of the potential expansion of the Employment Guarantee Scheme from rural areas to also including urban areas. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The UK survey includes a section specifically devoted to workers on zero hours contracts. We explored the trade-off between flexibility and dead-end jobs in zero hours contract work. We have found that almost 30% of zero hours contract workers had no other option but to accept working on a zero-hours contract because of a lack of job opportunities and 44% of those on zero-hours contracts said they would like more working hours. Results from the survey have been included in the paper "Zero Hours Contracts and Labor Market Policy" by Nikhil Datta, Giulia Giupponi and Stephen Machin, which was presented at 68th Panel Meeting of Economic Policy in Vienna and is currently under revision for its forthcoming publication on Economic Policy. https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/oct/03/regular-secure-work-wanted-by-almost-half-on-zero-hours-contracts-flexible-gig-economy?CMP=share_btn_tw https://apolitical.co/solution_article/do-gig-workers-really-value-flexibility/?fbclid=IwAR3w0-0yy-YCho8ZXvhx2jK1EjirknOp3PQCygM6jXuSG2WMq_-q66pk-O0 
 
Title Online interactive maps on business and labour markets data in the UK. 
Description Under its Informing the Industrial Strategy project, CEP is producing online interactive maps on business and labour markets data in the UK. Previous work by the CEP has shown the importance of mapping economic activity as a way to allow policymakers and academics to get a clear picture of regional economic activity. The CEP published the first "Atlas" of UK industry in 2017, presenting a selection of the maps on the UK economy. The new interactive tool will give the user the ability to select the economic variable or issues that interests them spanning 2009 to 2015 (with the facility to add more data when it becomes available)--this could be employment, job density, different types of firms for example--and generate a map of their own choosing. This will enhance the debate on regional economic development in the UK, and has been developed with input from officials from HM Treasury. The maps will launch in conjunction with the first events of the newly-established Industrial Strategy Council (expected to be late February). 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact National, policymakers have been involved in the development of the tool and find it useful 
URL http://cep.lse.ac.uk/atlas/
 
Description Article: Apprenticeships in England: what do we know? 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Increasing the quantity and quality of apprenticeships is high on the policy agenda in England. Research on this issue is a central focus of the Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER). Sandra McNally summarises some of the most significant findings to date.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/cp537.pdf
 
Description Article: Universities and industrial strategy in the UK 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact The UK's higher education sector is a source of national strength with the potential to contribute to all areas of the government's industrial strategy. Anna Valero and colleagues review the evidence on how the positive economic effects of universities on individuals and the economy can be maximised.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/cp539.pdf
 
Description BBC Radio 4 "PM" live interview on Friday 9th Feb discussing productivity in answer to listener questions (Valero) (9 February 2018) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Valero BBC Radio 4 "PM" live interview on Friday 9th Feb discussing productivity in answer to listener questions
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Capitalising on technological change and the low-carbon transition in the UK 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact An overarching strategy for sustainable growth is required to address the dual challenges of restoring productivity growth and managing a transition to a low-carbon economy ? priorities in both the UK and other G20 countries. Against the backdrop of an uncertain economic climate as the UK recasts its relationship with Europe and the rest of the world, and as countries []
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/businessreview/2018/12/03/capitalising-on-technological-change-and-the-low-ca...
 
Description Media mentions: Research using Gig economy survey (Machin, Datta, Giupponi) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Machin, Datta and Giupponi's research on the gig economy and zero hours contracts is directly quoted in The Guardian (3 October 2018) https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/oct/03/regular-secure-work-wanted-by-almost-half-on-zero-hours-contracts-flexible-gig-economy?CMP=share_btn_tw

19/01/2019
Emirates Business
Plenty of Uber drivers are loving their jobs too
The U.K. data are similar. A survey by Stephen Machin and Giulia Giupponi, two researchers at the London School of Economics, involved more than 20,000 self-employed, gig economy and zero-hours respondents. On average, workers on zero-hour contracts worked about 19 hours per week. Very few did more than 40 hours. Again, there was a near-equal split between those who'd like more hours (44 percent) and those satisfied (40 percent). Gig economy workers were similar.
http://emirates-business.ae/plenty-of-uber-drivers-are-loving-their-jobs-too/

Also in:
19/01/2019
Muchos conductores Uber sí aman su trabajo
https://gestion.pe/economia/empresas/conductores-uber-aman-256130

17/01/2019
mentelocale.it
https://www.mentelocale.it/milano/articoli/77924-salone-cultura-2019-milano-programma-orari-biglietti.htm

16/01/2019
Korea Times Online
Plenty of Uber driver and other 'gig economy' workers love their jobs too
http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/opinion/2019/01/197_262126.html

15/01/2019
PostBulletin.com
https://www.postbulletin.com/opinion/other_views/commentary-plenty-of-uber-drivers-love-their-jobs-too/article_ca67b20c-86b0-5d37-ad25-9d1afd1a241e.html

15/01/2019
Bloomberg
https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-01-15/plenty-of-uber-drivers-love-their-jobs-too

15/01/2019
PostBulletin.com
https://www.postbulletin.com/opinion/other_views/commentary-plenty-of-uber-drivers-love-their-jobs-too/article_ca67b20c-86b0-5d37-ad25-9d1afd1a241e.html
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Meeting at BEIS on scoping their new work and potential partnerships on business pilot programmes to encourage adoption of new technologies or management practices. (Valero) (30 January 2018) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Anna Valero meeting at BEIS on scoping their new work and potential partnerships on business pilot programmes to encourage adoption of new technologies or management practices.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Meeting at BEIS providing update on industrial strategy evidence planned programme (Valero) (6 February 2018) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Valero meeting at BEIS providing update on industrial strategy evidence planned programme
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Meeting at Number 10 on Industrial Strategy. (Richard Davies) (10 January 2018) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Focus on benchmarking comparative advantage and how to deal with the long tail of unproductive companies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Meeting with Gerard Lyons and Patrick Spencer from the Centre for Social Justice to discuss our work on productivity and industrial strategy and give input into their future of work programme (Valero) (5 February 2018) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Meeting with Gerard Lyons and Patrick Spencer from the Centre for Social Justice to discuss our work on productivity and industrial strategy and give input into their future of work programme (Valero) (5 February 2018)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Roundtable discussion on Technological Change to inform the Industrial Strategy - 13 June 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Technology and skills roundtable with policy makers (Industrial Strategy project). Presentations from Andy Dickerson on Automation and Employment, and Guy Michaels on Individual Consequences of Occupational Decline; policymakers attended from Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy; Department for Education; HM Treasury; OECD. And participants from the following foundations and institutions: Corsham Institute; Future Advocacy; Gatsby; Joseph Rowntree Trust; Learning and Work Institute; Resolution Foundation and The Royal Society. Colleagues attended form CEP; CVER; Manchester University and Sheffield University.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Universities and industrial strategy in the UK 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact The UK has a world-leading university sector and this has a key role to play in moving the country onto an inclusive and sustainable growth path. Universities can make important contributions across the five foundations that underpin the government?s industrial strategy: Universities support the productivity and prospects for ?people? through the education of students and the nurturing of researchers. Via []
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Valero BBC Radio 4 interview with Jonty Bloom on "PM" discussing productivity (Valero) (5 February 2018) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Anna Valero in BBC Radio 4 interview with Jonty Bloom on "PM" discussing productivity
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018