Skills acquisition and employability through volunteering by displaced youth in Uganda

Lead Research Organisation: Northumbria University
Department Name: Fac of Arts, Design and Social Sciences

Abstract

This project investigates the capacity of volunteering to reduce inequalities experienced by displaced youths in Uganda and to build their skills and employability. Forced displacement has become one of the most intractable challenges of the 21st century, with 65.6 million people displaced worldwide at the end of 2016 - a number which is predicted to rise further in the coming years.

1.4 million of these refugees are currently seeking refuge in Uganda, fleeing from conflicts in the Central African countries of South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Burundi, and Somalia to the east. The majority of these refugees are children, and so building the skills and employability of the many young people (understood in this research as aged 15 - 25) - caught up in this crisis is critical not only to their own future prospects, but to the long-term stability of their host country and region.

Often, however, economic and other inequalities will exclude young refugees from formal schooling and wider opportunities for skills acquisition; while they will also frequently "fall through the cracks" of humanitarian programming. Many, though, are engaged in volunteering, a practice increasingly identified with building skills and enhancing employability. Thus, the aim of this research is to develop a new conceptual framework and produce a body of data and evidence for critically analysing whether volunteering by displaced youths in Uganda helps their skills acquisition and employability and reduces the inequalities they experience.

The project will take an interdisciplinary (Youth Studies, Volunteering Studies, Refugee Studies, Urban Studies and Development Studies) mixed method approach, and establish and exploit collaborative links with global South refugee NGOs, volunteers and leading global volunteering and development actors. Fieldwork will be conducted in four case study regions - Kampala city, North Western Uganda, South Uganda, where two of the populations are in the same district, and South West Uganda - and proceed through the following three phases.

In Phase 1, the research team will carry out a series of workshops, key informant interviews and field visits in order to build stakeholder engagement, refine and confirm the impact plan, and establish an initial typology of forms and understandings of volunteering to inform the large-scale quantitative survey in phase 2.

In Phase 2, the research team will design, develop, pilot and launch a large quantitative survey of young refugees involved in volunteering. Preliminary analysis of the data arising from this survey will inform the questions and focus of phase 3.

Comprising 6 main activities - participatory mapping, participatory photography, one to one semi-structured interviews, life history interviews, and stakeholder interviews - Phase 3 will deepen our understanding of where and how young refugees volunteer, address the factors shaping volunteering activity, and its impacts on skills acquisition and employability.

The main outputs from the project will include 10 international peer-reviewed journal articles; presentations at major national and international conferences; a project website, containing findings, updates and working notes targeted at different audiences; a compendium of policy briefings; a (touring) photographic exhibition (and accompanying booklet), drawing on images solicited in the context of the participatory photography exercise; and a volunteering for skills acquisition and employability toolkit.

By developing a conceptual framework and body of data and evidence on the impact of volunteering by displaced youths in Uganda on skills acquisition, employability and inequality, the research will contribute directly to knowledge which supports how creative solutions to meeting the Sustainable Development Goal challenges work with programmes to develop education and skills.

Planned Impact

The research aims, objectives, methodology and impact plans have been co-designed with local partners and stakeholders in Uganda, with input from leading global humanitarian and development actors, ensuring our outputs are oriented to need and likely to have high impact.

We anticipate the research will enhance approaches to tackling inequality, skills acquisition and employability for young displaced people in Uganda by:

- Producing accessible knowledge and evidence to inform and shape policy making that affects the livelihoods of young refugees in Uganda, including by government ministries (e.g. Office of the Prime Minister Refugees Department, The Ministry of Local Government) and civil society organisations.

- Providing knowledge and resources for volunteer and refugee engaging organisations to design, develop and improve approaches to volunteering to maximise impacts on skills acquisition, employability and inequality, such as through improved recruitment, training, placement allocation, volunteer management and support to translate experiences into employment opportunities.

- Raising policy maker, civil society, business and public understanding in Uganda and more broadly, about different forms of volunteering and their capacities to enhance skills acquisition and employability and address inequality, in order to increase volunteer opportunities and participation, aid recognition of volunteer experience in employee recruitment and locate volunteering within wider development policy repertoires around young people, skills acquisition and inequality.

- Developing indicators and building stakeholder capacity to evaluate and assess the impact of volunteering on skills acquisition, employability and tackling inequality within Uganda, as well as in other developing countries hosting young displaced people.

- Building the capacity of local stakeholders to listen to the voices of young displaced people using approaches that recognise the inequalities and challenges they face, and develop strategies enabling young people's voices to shape and influence policy and practice.

- Fostering dialogue and co-ordination between volunteer and refugee engaging organisations in Uganda to develop more integrated approaches to volunteering for young refugees.

Developments in each of these regards will be facilitated by the following outputs: a project website (with integrated social media); Stakeholder workshops; Capacity building workshops; a Volunteering for Skills Toolkit; a compendium of Policy briefings; in-country Policy and Practice workshops; a photography exhibition and booklet; Pop Up Labs; Global policy and practice events; and papers at leading Policy and Practice conferences.

An Alignment, Interest and Influence Matrix (AIIM) will be developed during initial stakeholder workshops, mapping degrees of interest in the programme, alignment with objectives and influence in policy making and practice. An Outcome Mapping process will then confirm our final communications and impact approach. Two sets of indicators will be developed to monitor impact, one for individual young refugees and the other for stakeholder organisations, based on the Theory of Change approach. Our overall approach will be guided by an advisory board of leading Ugandan and global actors including The Norwegian Refugee Council, the Lutheran World Federation and Finn Church Aid and 5 citizen advisory boards of young displaced refugee volunteers.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description Key findings
Findings to date are significant for conceptualising volunteering and its roles in social and economic development in DAC list countries in East Africa, and Uganda in particular.

a) Dominant ideas of volunteering in Uganda
There is a lack of consensus on what volunteering means for different actors in Uganda. Used to describe a range of practices, and connected to policy making for youth empowerment, there is disagreement about what volunteering is principally for, who can and should participate in it and if and how it should be remunerated.

Dominant understandings of volunteering in Uganda are strongly influenced by European and North American models. This means it is often associated with 'programmed' activity managed by an organisation engaging volunteers in delivering their work or providing opportunities through volunteering. 'Everyday' and community-led forms volunteering often not seen as 'volunteering', meaning they are missing from debates around what contribution volunteering can make to economic and social development.

b) Volunteering and inequality
Not recognising community-led volunteering means some stakeholders see volunteering as a preserve of the affluent; as one participant commented during one of the stakeholder workshops in Kampala, 'for us we don't believe a poor man can volunteer. A poor man is actually looking for a way of survival'. Furthermore, programmed opportunities may exclude vulnerable community members by requiring particular skills or travel to volunteer. As a result, claims for volunteering's contribution to social and economic development, inclusion and equality in DAC countries need to be treated with caution.

c) Skills and employability
Rather than a route to employability, volunteering in Uganda can be seen as a livelihood strategy in itself for some refugees. Without access to jobs, volunteer remuneration can be a key income source. Rather than contributing to development, there is a risk that volunteering represents a form of precarious labour.

d) Reduction in volunteering opportunities for young refugees due to COVID19
Volunteering opportunities for young refugees in Uganda have reduced as a result of COVID19. Organisations have reduced volunteer engagement, and community-led volunteering has dropped due to reduced trust amongst community members. This finding challenges wider celebrations, particularly in the Global North, of the role of volunteering in addressing wellbeing and community need during the pandemic by deepening understandings of the specific challenges faced by youth refugee volunteers in Uganda.
Exploitation Route We expect outcomes to be taken forward via our planned project updates and papers, capacity building workshops, volunteering for skills toolkit, policy briefings, policy and practice workshops, exhibition, pop-up labs and global policy and practice events. These will engage, provide evidence for and promote debate amongst young refugees in Uganda, civil society, volunteering, and international donor organisations in Uganda, Ugandan government bodies, businesses in Uganda and global humanitarian and development actors (e.g. IFRC). The success of the stakeholder workshops at the start of the project has produced a distribution list of Ugandan stakeholders with whom updates are shared and we expect these to provide a key pathway to impact in the country. We expect that our youth advisory boards, enumerators and consultant NGOs will offer key capacities to engage young refugees and stakeholders with the project findings, and are working with them to identify appropriate modes of communication and engagement. COVID19 has created an even more urgent need for data on volunteering in the global South and anticipate this will open new opportunities for impact via existing and new networks and partnerships. We do not envisage significant changes to the ways our outcomes will be taken forward, but some impact pathways will be adapted to go online where appropriate.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Government, Democracy and Justice

URL http://www.ryvu.org
 
Description Impact: Delays to the fieldwork due to COVID19 mean we are behind on generating the data and associated outputs for our impact strategy. However, the project and its initial findings have contributed to the global Call to Action as part of the UN/IFRC Plan of Action to Integrate Volunteering into the 2030 Agenda and are being fed into a range of other relevant policy and practice fora both through formal events and direct contact and knowledge sharing with key policy professionals and practitioners. Initial findings have also been shared across a network of Uganda stakeholders whose work is concerned with refugee youth, volunteering and skills and employability, and we anticipate strong take up of full project findings through planned workshops and other activities on the basis of interest to date. Further impacts have arisen through the research processes, notably through the training of research enumerators and in bringing young refugees together in advisory boards across the research settings. Gender equality A number of measures have been put in place to ensure gender equality in our approach and in the data we collect. In particular: - In recruiting Youth Advisory Board members, attention has been paid to ensure participation across genders. - The Youth Advisory Boards have been consulted in the development and roll out of survey work to ensure gender sensitivity. - Following feedback and analysis of pilot survey data, questions were adjusted to ensure they captured volunteering participation across genders and nationalities - The survey sampling and methodology were also adapted following the pilot to ensure young female refugees were not excluded through a focus on recruitment via public spaces in Kampala where there may have been reduced presence of young female refugees - Gender has been identified as a critical theme informing the current development of the qualitative tools for data collection Survey data from the project will be able to be disaggregated by age, gender and nationality. Secondary impacts are emerging in the context of the UK's engagement of volunteers during the COVID19 crisis, and what can be learnt from volunteering experiences amongst refugee youth in Uganda. To date, this has involved participation and dialogue with key volunteer engaging stakeholders in the UK to share learning from our research and to highlight existing evidence outside the UK that can be drawn upon.
First Year Of Impact 2020
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Government, Democracy and Justice
Impact Types Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description Invitation for Professor Matt Baillie Smith to Chair Advisory Board of the International Association for Volunteer Effort (IAVE) Research on Volunteering Leadership and COVID-19
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description RYVU project citation in Implementation Report of Red Cross and Red Crescent International Resolution
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
Impact The research has been cited as an example of best practice in responding to the gaps in understanding volunteering experiences in humanitarian and development settings. Although it is not possible to quantify the specific reach of the impact, the policy document highlights its significance in providing for the first time an evidence-based dataset about the forms of volunteering undertaken by young refugees in Uganda and the impact on their skills, employability and livelihoods.
 
Description Exploring Refugee Entrepreneurs in Uganda through South-South Entrepreneurial Development Spaces
Amount £4,950 (GBP)
Organisation Northumbria University 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2020 
End 12/2020
 
Description International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) Volunteering Policy Study
Amount € 21,000 (EUR)
Organisation Spanish Red Cross 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country Spain
Start 11/2020 
End 03/2021
 
Description Local Consultancy Partners 
Organisation Agency for Accelerated Regional Development (AFARD)
Country Uganda 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The research team has actively engaged with Non-Governmental Organisations in Uganda for the design and implementation of the project. These organisations work closely with refugee, youth and volunteer communities across each of the settlements where the research for the project is being conducted and the research team has organised meetings with them to discuss the project's approach, negotiate local access, reinforce local ownership of the project, and strengthen stakeholder active engagement with the research.
Collaborator Contribution Local consultants are leading local authorities working with young refugees in Uganda and have been engaged extensively in the development of the research design and in shaping the project. They have been advising on and facilitating local access, logistics, stakeholder engagement, fieldwork and liaison with the Youth Advisory Boards.
Impact This collaboration has contributed to the successful roll out of the project's survey, ensuring local appropriateness and ownership of the project by Ugandan partners. It has also informed Working Papers 1 and 2, listed in the publications section.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Local Consultancy Partners 
Organisation Agency for Cooperation and Research in Development - Uganda (ACORD-U)
Country Uganda 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The research team has actively engaged with Non-Governmental Organisations in Uganda for the design and implementation of the project. These organisations work closely with refugee, youth and volunteer communities across each of the settlements where the research for the project is being conducted and the research team has organised meetings with them to discuss the project's approach, negotiate local access, reinforce local ownership of the project, and strengthen stakeholder active engagement with the research.
Collaborator Contribution Local consultants are leading local authorities working with young refugees in Uganda and have been engaged extensively in the development of the research design and in shaping the project. They have been advising on and facilitating local access, logistics, stakeholder engagement, fieldwork and liaison with the Youth Advisory Boards.
Impact This collaboration has contributed to the successful roll out of the project's survey, ensuring local appropriateness and ownership of the project by Ugandan partners. It has also informed Working Papers 1 and 2, listed in the publications section.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Local Consultancy Partners 
Organisation COBURWAS International Youth Organization to Transform Africa
Country Uganda 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The research team has actively engaged with Non-Governmental Organisations in Uganda for the design and implementation of the project. These organisations work closely with refugee, youth and volunteer communities across each of the settlements where the research for the project is being conducted and the research team has organised meetings with them to discuss the project's approach, negotiate local access, reinforce local ownership of the project, and strengthen stakeholder active engagement with the research.
Collaborator Contribution Local consultants are leading local authorities working with young refugees in Uganda and have been engaged extensively in the development of the research design and in shaping the project. They have been advising on and facilitating local access, logistics, stakeholder engagement, fieldwork and liaison with the Youth Advisory Boards.
Impact This collaboration has contributed to the successful roll out of the project's survey, ensuring local appropriateness and ownership of the project by Ugandan partners. It has also informed Working Papers 1 and 2, listed in the publications section.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Local Consultancy Partners 
Organisation Finnish Refugee Council (FRC)
Country Finland 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The research team has actively engaged with Non-Governmental Organisations in Uganda for the design and implementation of the project. These organisations work closely with refugee, youth and volunteer communities across each of the settlements where the research for the project is being conducted and the research team has organised meetings with them to discuss the project's approach, negotiate local access, reinforce local ownership of the project, and strengthen stakeholder active engagement with the research.
Collaborator Contribution Local consultants are leading local authorities working with young refugees in Uganda and have been engaged extensively in the development of the research design and in shaping the project. They have been advising on and facilitating local access, logistics, stakeholder engagement, fieldwork and liaison with the Youth Advisory Boards.
Impact This collaboration has contributed to the successful roll out of the project's survey, ensuring local appropriateness and ownership of the project by Ugandan partners. It has also informed Working Papers 1 and 2, listed in the publications section.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Local Consultancy Partners 
Organisation Young African Refugees for Integral Development (YARID)
Country Uganda 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The research team has actively engaged with Non-Governmental Organisations in Uganda for the design and implementation of the project. These organisations work closely with refugee, youth and volunteer communities across each of the settlements where the research for the project is being conducted and the research team has organised meetings with them to discuss the project's approach, negotiate local access, reinforce local ownership of the project, and strengthen stakeholder active engagement with the research.
Collaborator Contribution Local consultants are leading local authorities working with young refugees in Uganda and have been engaged extensively in the development of the research design and in shaping the project. They have been advising on and facilitating local access, logistics, stakeholder engagement, fieldwork and liaison with the Youth Advisory Boards.
Impact This collaboration has contributed to the successful roll out of the project's survey, ensuring local appropriateness and ownership of the project by Ugandan partners. It has also informed Working Papers 1 and 2, listed in the publications section.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Volunteer-involving Partner Organisations 
Organisation African Volunteers Association (AVA)
Country Uganda 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The research team has identified key national and international volunteer-involving organisations as partners for the dissemination of project findings. These partner organisations have a wide outreach and are recognised as key stakeholders in volunteer spaces in Uganda and internationally therefore the research team has remained in constant dialogue with them since the research inception and has been updating them on the research progress.
Collaborator Contribution Currently these partner organisations have been receiving updates on research progress and a more active engagement is expected in later stages of the project for the dissemination of the research findings.
Impact This collaboration is expected to contribute towards dissemination outputs in later stages of the research.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Volunteer-involving Partner Organisations 
Organisation International Federation of Red Cross and Crescents
Country Switzerland 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The research team has identified key national and international volunteer-involving organisations as partners for the dissemination of project findings. These partner organisations have a wide outreach and are recognised as key stakeholders in volunteer spaces in Uganda and internationally therefore the research team has remained in constant dialogue with them since the research inception and has been updating them on the research progress.
Collaborator Contribution Currently these partner organisations have been receiving updates on research progress and a more active engagement is expected in later stages of the project for the dissemination of the research findings.
Impact This collaboration is expected to contribute towards dissemination outputs in later stages of the research.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Volunteer-involving Partner Organisations 
Organisation Jesuit Refugee Service
Department Jesuit Refugee Service, Uganda
Country Uganda 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The research team has identified key national and international volunteer-involving organisations as partners for the dissemination of project findings. These partner organisations have a wide outreach and are recognised as key stakeholders in volunteer spaces in Uganda and internationally therefore the research team has remained in constant dialogue with them since the research inception and has been updating them on the research progress.
Collaborator Contribution Currently these partner organisations have been receiving updates on research progress and a more active engagement is expected in later stages of the project for the dissemination of the research findings.
Impact This collaboration is expected to contribute towards dissemination outputs in later stages of the research.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Volunteer-involving Partner Organisations 
Organisation Uganda Red Cross Society
Country Uganda 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The research team has identified key national and international volunteer-involving organisations as partners for the dissemination of project findings. These partner organisations have a wide outreach and are recognised as key stakeholders in volunteer spaces in Uganda and internationally therefore the research team has remained in constant dialogue with them since the research inception and has been updating them on the research progress.
Collaborator Contribution Currently these partner organisations have been receiving updates on research progress and a more active engagement is expected in later stages of the project for the dissemination of the research findings.
Impact This collaboration is expected to contribute towards dissemination outputs in later stages of the research.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Volunteer-involving Partner Organisations 
Organisation Uganda Youth Development Link (UYDEL)
Country Uganda 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The research team has identified key national and international volunteer-involving organisations as partners for the dissemination of project findings. These partner organisations have a wide outreach and are recognised as key stakeholders in volunteer spaces in Uganda and internationally therefore the research team has remained in constant dialogue with them since the research inception and has been updating them on the research progress.
Collaborator Contribution Currently these partner organisations have been receiving updates on research progress and a more active engagement is expected in later stages of the project for the dissemination of the research findings.
Impact This collaboration is expected to contribute towards dissemination outputs in later stages of the research.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Article in 'The Conversation' on Covid19 and volunteering 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Professor Matt Baillie Smith contributed an article in 'The Conversation' entitled, 'Coronavirus volunteers aren't just a source of free labour - don't take advantage of them'. This drew on insight from the early phases of the RYVU project and argued for greater attention to volunteering experiences in the global South when planning and developing volunteer responses to COVID19.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://theconversation.com/coronavirus-volunteers-arent-just-a-source-of-free-labour-dont-take-adva...
 
Description Blog post for IFRC 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Professor Matt Baillie Smith together with Bianca Fadel and Aisling O'Loghlen authored a blog on volunteering and livelihoods based on research about volunteer remuneration and hierarchies in the Global South. The team were invited by the International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) to do this on the basis of the RYVU project and wider research about volunteering in the Global South.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://future-rcrc.com/2020/10/26/its-time-to-talk-about-paying-volunteers/
 
Description Blog post on The Covid-19 lockdown and the case for praxis research 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Moses Okech, a member of the research team from Uganda Martyrs University, wrote a blog post entitled 'the Covid-19 lockdown and the case for praxis research: The experience of urban refugees in Uganda'. The post appears on the project website and provided some insights into how the lockdown affected refugees in Uganda when restrictions were at their tightest, in March 2020.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://ryvu.org/2020/06/12/the-covid-19-lockdown-and-the-case-for-praxis-research-the-experience-of...
 
Description Blog post on Work and Livelihood Experiences of Young Refugees during the Covid19 pandemic in Uganda 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr. Robert Turyamureeba, a member of the research team, wrote a blog post on work and livelihood experiences of young people during the Covid19 pandemic in Uganda. The blog was posted onto the project website and gave first hand insights into the experiences of young refugees at the time when the pandemic hit in Uganda.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://ryvu.org/2020/06/12/work-and-livelihood-experiences-of-young-refugees-during-the-covid19-pan...
 
Description Contribution to Volunteering and COVID19 Evidence Group 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Invited participation in Volunteering and COVID19 Evidence Group Roundtable, convened by a group of academics and practitioners reporting findings from live research on volunteering during the pandemic to the UK government and key stakeholders.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
 
Description Contribution to global practitioner/policy conference - Forum 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Professor Baillie Smith made an invited contribution to the leading global forum for volunteering in development contexts organised by the INGO Voluntary Service Overseas (VSO) in Kigali, Rwanda. The event was attended by key civil society stakeholders from across the region. This included sharing project approaches and initial findings on volunteering, power and inequality and led to a debate about which kinds of volunteers are missed from current research approaches. Participation in the event also included convening of a pop-up labs on volunteering and the SDGs for participants and led to discussion of the ways refugees are engaged in volunteering in other settings in the region.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Participated in UNV/IFRC Expert Group 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The significance of the RYVU project for volunteering research and policy was a key factor in the invitation of Professor Baillie Smith and Bianca Fadel to participate in the United Nations Volunteers/ International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) Expert Group of the Global Technical Meeting on "Reimagining Volunteering for the 2030 Agenda" (GTM 2020). This consisted of a group of thought-leaders either from or actively working in the Global South in the fields of volunteering, civic engagement and sustainable development that provided expert input to the United Nations Plan of Action to Integrate Volunteering into the 2030 Agenda. The group held regular meetings as a critical challenge function in the content preparation of GTM 2020 including inputting research findings and insight and ensuring the thematic framing of the GTM 2020 aligned with the evidence base.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Participated in the Global Technical Meeting Re-imagining Volunteering for the 2030 Agenda 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Because of his work on the RYVU project, Professor Peter Kanyandago was invited as a key speaker to present at the Global Technical Meeting "Re-imagining Volunteering for the 2030 Agenda" (GTM 2020). The GTM2020 took place virtually on 13-16 July 2020 as a special event during the High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development in 2020, as set out in General Assembly resolution A/RES/73/140 on Volunteering for the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It was co-chaired by the United Nations Volunteers (UNV) programme and the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) and was organised in collaboration with the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs. Professor Kanyandago spoke to the GTM Plenary Session 2 "Global Volunteering Snapshot: What is volunteering doing for the SDGs" on the Live conversation "How can evidence and knowledge help us reimagine volunteering?". More than 4,000 people participated in the virtual session and the recording remains available and was also widely disseminated via UN social media pages (UN Web TV, UNV Twitter and UNV Facebook). In the presentation, Professor Kanyandago highlighted how the experiences of the Global South can help improving the understandings of relationships between volunteering and the Sustainable Development Goals Agenda (SDGs), drawing particularly on the RYVU project's focus on the role of volunteering in developing young refugees' self-reliance, network and skills.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://unitednationsvolunteers.swoogo.com/gtm2020/speakers
 
Description RYVU Stakeholder Workshops 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 4 stakeholder workshops were held across Uganda in the case study settlements of Kampala, Nakivale, Rwamwanja and Bidibidi in October 2019. These workshops were attended by stakeholders from government, civil society and the third sector who engaged with the sectors related to the project: refugees, young people and those involved in building skills and employability. The main objectives of the workshop were as follows:

? Introduce RYVU to key stakeholders
? Provide opportunities to input into the delivery of RYVU
? Identify and make connections with existing activities and initiatives
? Validate the analysis tools with a wider group of stakeholders
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://ryvu.org/2020/02/12/newsletter-february-2020/
 
Description Seminar hosted by the Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience at Durham University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Professor Matt Baillie Smith was invited to discuss preliminary findings from the RYVU project at the seminar 'Convenient saviours: local volunteers in humanitarian crises, conflicts and development' hosted by the Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience at Durham University. The seminar drew on insight from the early phases of the RYVU project to explore assumptions behind the celebration of the 'local' volunteer, the invention of 'informal' volunteering and donor creation of volunteering hierarchies in the global South, asking whether the term volunteering has run its course in both academic and practice terms.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.dur.ac.uk/ihrr/about/events/?eventno=45337
 
Description Video on resuming fieldwork 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Robert Turyamureeba created a video which accompanied a news story on the project website. The new story explained that the Team were able to restart fieldwork after the initial Covid19 lockdown in Uganda. Robert's video offered insight into the affect the lockdown had had on young refugees in Uganda.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://ryvu.org/2020/10/29/fieldwork-resumes/
 
Description Webinar hosted by the Institute for Volunteering Research at the University of East Anglia together with the School of Political Science and Public Administration at the East China University of Political Science and Law 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Professor Matt Baillie Smith and Dr Moses Okech discussed the RYVU project at a webinar hosted by the Institute for Volunteering Research at the University of East Anglia together with the School of Political Science and Public Administration at the East China University of Political Science and Law. The webinar was called 'Youth Volunteering: participation in times of Covid19'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://sway.office.com/pW53sHuBOyJViByp?ref=Link
 
Description Webinar on volunteer responses to Covid19 co-hosted by the UNESCO Chair in Adult Literacy and Learning for Social Transformation and the Institute for Volunteering Research (IVR) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Professor Matt Baillie Smith spoke about the RYVU project at a webinar entitled 'Volunteer responses to Covid 19: what can we learn moving forward?'. The event was co-hosted by the Institute for Volunteering Research at the University of East Anglia and the UNESCO Chair in Adult Literacy and Learning for Social Transformation. The aim of the discussion was to provide a space for volunteers, volunteer organisations, policy-makers, academics and practitioners to share critical insights and learning on volunteering during COVID19, with the aim of shaping ongoing debate and policy and practice formation.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.bigmarker.com/UEAUK/Volunteer-responses-to-COVID-19-what-can-we-learn-to-move-forward