GCRF Accelerating Achievement for Africa's Adolescents Hub

Lead Research Organisation: University of Oxford
Department Name: Social Policy and Intervention

Abstract

In thirty years' time there will be half a billion adolescents in Africa. Like youth everywhere, they possess huge potential to thrive. But more than half are trapped in cycles of poor nutrition, poverty, low education, violence and unemployment. They also have the world's highest rates of early fertility, with adverse long-term outcomes for adolescent parents and their children. Such inter-generational disadvantage creates risks not only in the region but also to global stability.

The SDGs and African Union's Agenda 2063 challenge us to take a radical new approach. The UK's Global Challenges Research Fund provides a unique opportunity to do this. The Accelerating Advantage Hub will find the combinations of services with the greatest positive impacts for Africa's adolescents and their children. We need to move beyond services focused on single outcomes, towards 'super-accelerator' impacts across multiple SDGs of health, education, violence prevention, gender equality and economic stability. With our government partners we will test combination services - for example of cash transfers, malaria prophylaxis, parenting programs, business skills and violence prevention - to identify the leanest and most effective policy packages.

The Hub has been planned with African governments and international agencies including the UN Development Program, African Union, UNICEF and the World Health Organisation. They have told us that 'evidence as usual' is not enough. When we make a personal investment, like buying a computer, we want to know not only whether it is the most efficient, but also whether it is good value for money and whether we will like to use it. Governments need the same information about services: their effectiveness, their cost-effectiveness, whether they can be delivered through existing health, education and welfare systems, and whether they will be accepted by service providers and by adolescents. The Hub will conduct large-scale studies and use existing data in Angola, Cote D'Ivoire, DRC, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Somalia, South Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia & Zimbabwe. All projects will include cost-effectiveness to assist budget decisions. In short, we will provide African policy-makers with the evidence they need and want to do the best for adolescents.

The Hub will also train and support frontline workers to improve services for adolescents across Africa. We will turn evidence into training modules, freely accessible manuals and support materials. We will deliver practitioner training in 34 African countries by working with NGO partners selected for wide regional coverage, for example Paediatric Adolescent Treatment for Africa, the International Rescue Committee, Clowns without Borders and the International AIDS Alliance. Skills-building for young researchers in Africa and the UK is built into the Hub's work. We will support 45 promising young academics and dedicated African policymakers to focus their careers on improving the lives of adolescents and their children.

The Hub's work is planned with adolescents themselves. Too many services have failed because they do not appeal to teenagers' aspirations and immediate goals. The Hub will work directly with adolescent advisory groups in Eastern, Western and Southern Africa to co-develop approaches that are not only effective, but also meaningful and fun for those who will use them.

We aim to reach 20 million adolescents and their children with effective combinations of services to meet their needs. Between our direct countries of research and our NGO partners, the Hub will actively engage with policymakers, practitioners and adolescents across East, West, Southern and Central Africa and including fragile and war-torn states. We have a common goal: to transform the potential of Africa's adolescents into a thriving future for the continent.

Planned Impact

WHO WILL BENEFIT FROM THIS HUB, AND HOW?

20 MILLION ADOLESCENTS AND THEIR CHILDREN IN AFRICA, TO REACH THEIR POTENTIAL THROUGH EFFECTIVE, SCALED-UP SERVICES. The Hub will feed evidence of effective combination services directly into national and regional policies, capitalising on political will to invest in Africa's emerging workforce and constituency. Impact strategies include two researchers in UNDP and the African Union, policy briefs and high-level meetings building on existing strong networks and advisory roles. In countries with major projects (Lesotho, Sierra Leone, South Africa, South Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia) advisors will include senior government, multilateral agencies and donors (e.g. Dr Ntuli Kapologwe, Ministry of Health Tanzania, Dr Alhaji Kamara, Ministry of Education, Science & Technology Sierra Leone, Thabani Buthelezi, National Dept Social Development South Africa). Through evidence co-creation with African governments, we will maximise uptake of findings into national policies with population-level impact.

AFRICAN POLICYMAKERS, THROUGH PROVIDING THE EVIDENCE THEY ARE ASKING FOR. The Hub responds to clear requests from African policy-makers. As they start to operationalise the Sustainable Development Goals at country-level, with globally-shrinking aid resources, governments want to know two things. First, what combinations of services will impact the greatest number of their priority SDGs? Second, what are their most cost-effective options? We will provide such evidence from Angola, Cote D'Ivoire, DRC, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia & Zimbabwe. Governments and adolescents will be directly involved in selecting the combinations of services to test. Finance civil servants will be invited to join our training program and co-author cost-effectiveness analyses, thus sharing capacity and building research engagement. The Hub will partner with UNICEF, WHO, the Global Fund and the NEPAD Agency of the African Union to deliver capacity-sharing webinars and workshops for national governments on super-accelerator evidence.

PRACTITIONERS, NGOS AND GOVERNMENT AGENCIES DELIVERING SERVICES TO ADOLESCENTS AND THEIR CHILDREN IN 34 COUNTRIES, THROUGH FREE, ACCESSIBLE TOOLS AND TRAINING. We will turn research findings directly into manuals and training toolkits for effective combination services. We will work directly with our NGO partners Paediatric Adolescent Treatment for Africa, International AIDS Alliance, Clowns Without Borders and International Rescue Committee and UN partners to deliver training modules within their existing networks in 34 African countries, adding Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, CAR, Chad, Libya, Morocco, Namibia, Niger, Rwanda and Sudan. With partners we will build capacity for practitioners in health, education and community services, to reach over a million adolescents and their children through direct service provision. The Hub team have a strong record of turning evidence into service delivery in this way: for example one of our parenting programs available on the WHO website is being delivered to 300,000 families across 10 African countries in 2018.

ACADEMICS IN AFRICA AND THE UK, THROUGH GROUNDBREAKING SCIENCE, CAPACITY-SHARING, SHARED DATASETS, TOOLS AND MEASURES. The Hub will provide innovative evidence for researchers in the fields of adolescence and early childhood, intersecting across health, education, violence prevention, economic empowerment, nutrition and employment. Academics may access freely available resources and datasets, freely available for non-profit use. Early career investigators in Africa and the UK will benefit from training, mentorship and will be supported to take leadership roles - and subsequently to lead the Hub's legacy of future research and impact.

Organisations

Publications

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Accelerate Hub Authors (2020) World Food Programme Policy Brief

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Based On Work By Cluver L (STACKing The Odds For Adolescent Survival: Health Service Factors Associated With Full Retention In Care And Adherence Amongst Adolescents Living With HIV In South Africa) (2019) STACKing the odds for survival: Boosting retention in care for adolescents living with HIV

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Based On Work By Cluver L (Sustainable Survival For Adolescents Living With HIV: Do SDG-Aligned Provisions Reduce Potential Mortality Risk?) (2020) SDG-aligned provisions reduce potential mortality risk among adolescents living with HIV

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Based On Work By Cluver, L (Multiple Violence Exposures And Adolescent Antiretroviral Non-Adherence In South Africa) (2020) Violence is stopping adolescents from taking lifesaving antiretrovirals

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Based On Work By Toska, Elona (Consistent Provisions Mitigate Exposure To Sexual Risk And HIV Among Young Adolescents In South Africa. AIDS And Behavior) (2020) Preventing exposure to sexual risk and HIV in South Africa through SDG-aligned provisions

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Based On Work By, Haghighat, R. (Transition Pathways Out Of Pediatric Care And Associated HIV Outcomes For Adolescents Living With HIV In South Africa) (2020) Pathways of adolescent HIV care transition in South Africa

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Based On Work By: Toska, Elona (Screening And Supporting Through Schools: Educational Experiences And Needs Of Adolescents Living With HIV In South Africa) (2020) School-based support for adolescents living with HIV

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Mona Ibrahim (based On Work By Numerous Authors) (2020) Adolescent Girls and Young Women - An evidence update from the UKRI GCRF Accelerate Hub

 
Title Accelerate Hub Website Update 
Description The Accelerate Hub website has recently undergone major updates with new content and images showcasing our work. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact *Need to access statistics of website activity- maybe can ask Ruth? 
URL https://www.acceleratehub.org/
 
Title Accelerate Hub logo redesign 
Description The Accelerate Hub logo was redesigned to include less text and colour and be simple and to the point. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact The logo redesign has informed Accelerate Hub's style and brand guideline and is included in all marketing materials. 
URL https://www.acceleratehub.org/files/acceleratehubbrandguidepdf
 
Title Breakthrough on HIV adolescence: Prof. Mark Orkin 
Description SABC Digital News, Johannesburg, SA 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact National reach, general public, estimated 38,000, SABC Digital News, Johannesburg, SA 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BeXfH7MFs30&feature=youtu.be
 
Title Song Written By Teenage Advisory Group Participant 
Description After our first engagement activity in the Eastern Cape, one of the participants shared a song he had written with a facilitator. In the song, he reflects on a conversation he had with other participants in the group who are young fathers. The song describes some of the challenges that young parents may face and how these challenges may affect their child. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact The song was written after our first engagement activity with our Eastern Cape TAG. In an accompanying explanatory voice note, the participants explains "This track guys, I wanted to say, the group of you guys, you brought me together with young mothers and young fathers. So I collected the story there, so I could have something to write. So that means it has something to do with me and the group, you know?" This echoes the reflections of other TAG members, who have expressed that their involvement in the adolescent advisory groups gives them the opportunity to share their stories, reflect on other participant's stories, which they can learn from. 
 
Title Understanding Adolescence in African Contexts Podcasts 
Description This series of podcasts explore the question of adolescence in African contexts. They are part of the ongoing work of the 5-year, UK Research and Innovation Global Challenges Research Fund Hub, Accelerating Achievement for Africa's Adolescents, hosted by the University of Oxford and the University of Cape Town. The podcasts were recorded during a three-day workshop on the theme of Understanding Adolescence in African Contexts, hosted at Rhodes House in Oxford. These podcasts are part of the innovation strand of the Hub's work, which will co-ordinate further workshops over the coming years, seeking to challenge and extend the ideas that underpin research on adolescence in Africa. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact *Awaiting to receive stats of how many times the podcasts have been listened to 
URL https://podcasts.ox.ac.uk/series/understanding-adolescence-african-contexts
 
Title WP2 Posters 
Description Designed posters summarising the research studies in Work Package Two. These posters were displayed at the Accelerate Hub Year one meeting 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact Approximately 27 Hub members engaged with these posters which assisted in stimulating dialogue and showcasing study highlights. 
 
Title Western Cape TAG Play and Mural Painting 
Description Our Western Cape TAG chose a play and a mural painting as some of the ways in which they wanted to participate in TAG. The play and mural reflect on their engagement as advisors in various research projects. They reflect on the challenges of first coming together with different people, getting to know them, sharing and learning from each other, growing confident and to sharing their experiences and now expertise with other young people. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact "When we participate meaningfully, it isn't taking something away because it is already within us. We are just sharing it" (Western Cape TAG participant)- This participant's reflection speaks to the fact that young people are willing to share their views and perspectives and wish to do it in a meaningful way. This re-affirms the importance of meaningfully engaging participants in research about them- they have the interest and can advise researchers. 
 
Title Year One Meeting Infopack 
Description Accelerate Hub sent out a detailed and professionally designed info pack to all attendees prior to the Year One Meeting. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact Approximately 80 delegates received this info pack via email and expressed excitement at attending the Year One meeting because of it. 
 
Title Year One meeting SDG group photo 
Description We gathered attendees of the Year One meeting to capture a photo from above with the team holding SDG signs. 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact We gathered approximately 80 delegates of the Year One meeting for this group shot. We are using this photo on marketing materials, on our website and in proposals. 
URL https://www.acceleratehub.org/photos
 
Description KEY RESEARCH AND ENGAGEMENT FINDINGS
Although the Accelerate Hub expects that the bulk of our evidence will emerge from studies and trials over the coming years, the first year has already generated a number of key findings.

[A] ACCELERATOR PROOF OF CONCEPT: The Accelerate Hub's paper 'Improving lives by accelerating progress towards the UN Sustainable Development Goals for adolescents living with HIV', published in the 'Lancet Child and Adolescent Health' journal in April 2019, provided early 'proof-of-concept' evidence that development accelerators (interventions which achieve progress towards multiple SDG goals and targets at the same time) exist and can advance adolescent development. Specifically, the research found that 'safe schools', 'cash transfers' and 'good parenting' are effective accelerators which can help adolescents meet a range of health and welfare goals and targets. Building on this early finding, other trials and studies are now working to identify, test and evaluate further potential accelerator interventions - which will ultimately benefit male and female adolescents in DAC countries.

[B] VIOLENCE PREVENTION: In response to requests from violence prevention partner organisations, one study (under Work Package 2) has looked at interventions that can tackle a range of adolescent-related violence outcomes. The study found that positive parenting, parental monitoring and support, and food security at home can significantly reduce sexual abuse, crime involvement, transactional sex, physical abuse, emotional abuse and community violence victimisation, particularly for girls. The evidence also suggests that consistent (as opposed to intermittent) access to services can have substantial impacts in delaying exposure to sexual risk in younger adolescents. The findings have significant potential to help address violence and sexual violence and abuse, issues which particularly affect adolescent girls and young women. Hub Director Professor Lucie Cluver and early-career researcher (ECR) Dr Will Rudgard are now co-authoring a paper with major global violence prevention partners World Health Organisation and Global Partnership to End Violence Against Children to share these findings (publication Spring 2020).

[C] YOUTH EMPLOYMENT ACCELERATORS:
HARAMBEE TRIAL (WORK PACKAGE 4): The first key finding from the Harambee trial (Work Package 4) is that counselling work-seekers on their relative performance on standardised assessments only becomes significantly effective when the intervention is complemented with certification of the assessment results. Combining counselling with certification improves work-seekers' employment rates from 31 to 36% after 3-5 months, relative to a control group. It also increases weekly earnings by 34%, due to an increase in employment and higher earnings for those in employment. Counselling on its own was found to be less effective, which highlights the potential of combining different interventions to improve labour market outcomes for young work-seekers. The trial also showed that the intervention was more effective for relatively disadvantaged work-seekers, and that work-seekers with less work experience, less education, and generally worse employment prospects, benefitted most. These findings offer great potential to support the most disadvantaged adolescents struggling to find jobs in DAC countries, where youth employment is a major challenge for both young women and young men.

ASPIRATIONS TRIAL (WORK PACKAGE 4): This study considered the effects of large unconditional cash transfers of $2300, a hybrid behavioural intervention (a video and worksheet which uses growth mindsets and goal-setting for parents) and the two interventions in combination in a sample of 7,200 of the poorest households in 415 rural villages in the poorest villages in Western Kenya. While the cash only intervention showed large effects on key outcomes including psychological and economic status within a recipient household, the study found that adding an inexpensive behavioural intervention increased the amount of the transfer spent on children's education, particularly at later years of schooling when dropout is high. The effect of these interventions was not found to be different for girls relative to boys. This study generates randomised trial 'gold standard' evidence of an accelerator intervention, with the combination of the two interventions having a stronger effect across a greater range of outcomes than either of them alone.

[D] ADOLESCENT ENGAGEMENT: Engagement with our Teen Advisory Groups (TAGs) has led to greater understanding of the needs and priorities of adolescents, as well as the enormous contribution they can make to research and policy engagement. Our TAG groups have clearly demonstrated that adolescents are experts in their own situations, and that meaningful, gender-sensitive adolescent engagement that reaches out to teens from diverse backgrounds can benefit our research, as well as the young people involved.

TAG participants were able to offer us unique insights and perspectives about the ways in which research topics affect their lives and also suggest new research topics pertinent to their interests and priorities. They also were able to advise on tools and methods when presented with relevant concepts through participatory research methods. Lessons learned from youth engagement have now been shared with researchers both within the Hub and externally and generated a great deal of interest. Researchers have requested further information and training so they can bring adolescent engagement approaches into their own research studies.

[E] OTHER STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT: Stakeholder engagement at all levels (district, national, regional and international) and by all members of the Hub (Early Career Researchers, Directors and Work Package Leads, and policy and support staff) demonstrate that Accelerate Hub is well-connected to decision makers and service delivery organisations and well positioned to influence policy and programmes with our research evidence. We have also found stakeholders have a strong appetite to engage with our findings, from UN agencies such as UNDP, UNICEF, UNAIDS and the Global Partnership to End Violence Against Children, to national-level ministries, NGOs and institutions, and we have received numerous requests from stakeholders to work with them to build evidence-based policies and programmes.
Exploitation Route Our evidence will be used by a range of governments. agencies and institutions to develop evidence-based policies and services to benefit adolescents.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Healthcare

 
Description IMPACT NARRATIVE Enabling adolescents to achieve positive outcomes depends on our research having an impact on policy and programming. Stakeholder participation, policy engagement and influencing are therefore an essential part of everything we do - and involve all staff and partners from early career researchers to Hub directors and academic leads. As part of this process, we are continuously consulting with governments, donors, agencies and most importantly adolescents to explore their needs and challenges, the questions they want us to investigate, and how they can turn research findings into adolescent-sensitive public policy and services. Our consultation with stakeholders takes place through specific forums such as our Teen Advisory Group (TAG) and Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA); with district and national-level bodies and institutions in research countries; and in international forums with major global agencies concerned with welfare and economic development in DAC countries. Feedback from stakeholders so far tells us that adolescents want services designed for them and to make progress across the full range of SDGs (not just health and welfare); that governments need robust evidence about interventions that can achieve multiple outcomes for different groups (girls, boys, rural and urban teens, marginalised and disadvantaged youth) and information about how to rapidly scale-up interventions; and that agencies want smarter and more cost-effective programmes that achieve better out outcomes. We can already cite examples where our policy engagement has achieved ODA impact or progress towards impact (see below). In addition, developing these relationships ensures that we build the views, needs and expectations of stakeholders into our work, ensures they are interested in and receptive to our findings, and has helped us develop an influencing strategy to achieve greater policy impact over the next few years. Examples of ODA impact/progress or steps towards ODA impact [A] The Lancet Paper: The Hub's proof-of-concept paper was published in the high-profile and prestigious 'Lancet Child and Adolescent Health' journal, where it has been widely read and cited in nine published papers, including the Bulletin of the World Health organisation. It was also included in the UNAIDS Global AIDS Update 2019 and the forthcoming WHO Global Status Report on Preventing Violence against Children 2020. [B] Merged sexual health and violence prevention programme: The Accelerate Hub worked with USAID, PEPFAR (The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief) and regional NGO, Clowns Without Borders South Africa, to merge a parenting programme to reduce violence and a sexual violence prevention programme. The programme was completed in 2019 and is currently being rolled out in Ethiopia, Botswana and South Sudan, reaching nearly 180,000 families and teens. There are now plans to roll it out to five more PEPFAR countries. The Parenting for Lifelong Health Progamme (PLH) has also been included as one of the PEPFAR-approved parenting programmes for use in Africa with 9-14 year olds, and included in the PEPFAR Country Operational Plan Guidance (p175). [C] SUPER Evaluation. The SUPER study (Scale Up of Parenting Evaluation Research) is evaluating the impact of the PLH programme in 24 countries. In South Sudan, an evaluation was completed by Accelerate Hub ECRs Roselinde Janowski and Sam Bojo, assessing the PLH's impact on 205 families. It found that the programme has reduced violence, emotional abuse, and physical violence - and enhanced positive parenting, parental monitoring and parent self-efficacy. The team used this evidence to engage with the Jubek State Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Development in South Sudan, which has now included the programme in its National Work Plan. The findings were also used to persuade the USAID 4Children Programme to continue to fund this programme in Juba. [D] Partnership with the UNDP Gambia Accelerator Lab: A relationship with the UNDP Accelerator Labs, developed by Dr Mona Ibrahim, a Hub researcher seconded to the UNDP Health team, has enabled us to share research findings about, and approaches to, youth employment. The Gambia Lab have now included monitoring and evaluation of a job matching programme (GamJobs) in their youth employment programme and is increasingly using the SDG framework as an impact measure, considering progress across multiple (rather than single) goals and targets. [E] UNDP secondment: The UNDP secondment has also allowed the Accelerate Hub to build relationships with UNDP departments and to influence a range of UNDP proposals, plans and communications. These include a proposal for a road safely programme in Zambia, which did not originally include youth as a risk group even though road traffic accidents are one of the most significant killers of adolescents, and an agricultural project that originally included youth as assistants in a farming programme but was restructured to include youth groups as implementing partners. Overall, the secondment at UNDP has allowed us to identify appropriate entry points to disseminate Hub approaches, analyses, and evidence, which will be invaluable in helping us to influence UN policy and practice in future years. [G] Zifune/Thula Sana work with Department of Education in SA. The Zifune trial (Work Package 4) has well established and continuing links with the South African Department of Education. It has now secured funding for work in 30 schools on adolescent mental health. The work will draw heavily on lessons from Zifune research and has links to WHO's 'Helping Adolescents to Thrive' programme. The programme, involves teachers and learner support agents will be rolled out in 2020, and will include education clubs for learners and training for staff. [H] Youth employment Accelerators: Harambee trial policy influencing: The Harambee trial (Work Package 4) identified two cost-effective interventions to boost employment: a skills audit helps young people identify and feel confident in their own skills and a certificate summarising these which enables them to share this information with a potential employer. Both interventions have increased young unemployed people's likelihood of finding employment, and helped them find better quality jobs with higher earnings and more formal contracts. These findings have been presented to policy makers in a number of contexts. Researcher engagement with one local authority in South Africa (Cape Town) has influenced the inclusion of a similar work-seeker support package in their 2019-24 Economic Plan which, if implemented, will help up to 60,000 adolescents. Aspirations trial policy engagement: The 'Aspirations' trial is investigating the impact of unconditional cash transfers and an aspirational intervention on households in western Kenya. In November, the team conducted a 'policy engagement' roadshow with stakeholders to share early findings and find out what they wanted to know from the next stage of the research, which will focus on adolescents. The team met with key national government departments including the Social Assistance Unit, Social Protection Secretariat, and the Siaya Ministry of Education, as well as agencies such as World Bank and UNICEF. Stakeholders were particularly interested in seeing randomised trial results for vulnerable sub-groups, such as women and girls, and wanted more evidence about the 'cash plus interventions' approach. The team will return to share findings and discuss their policy implications with stakeholders later in the year. [I] Social Protection Study - Zambia: ECR David Chipanta is investigating the impact of 'social protection plus awareness-raising' on the uptake of HIV services in four districts of Luapula Province in Zambia. In February, he presented his base-line report to a meeting of more than 30 representatives from government, UN agencies, donors, adolescents and people living with HIV. Stakeholders were surprised by the number of disabled people in the study (and therefore the local population), and the evidence that participants have less access to HIV services than other groups. Government officials pledged to include follow-ups and expansion of the study in their HIV-related proposal to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS and TB. [J] Parenting for Lifelong Health Digital App: The PLH App is at the early stage of development, but has already built a major collaboration with UNICEF (South Africa and HQ) who are negotiating with Mobile Service Operators to zero-rate the app in Africa (thereby making it no data costs for users), as part of their 'Internet of Good Things'. The team is also working with a number of DAC organisations, institutions and community groups to explore their preferences and priorities and ensure the App meets user's needs. The project is an interdisciplinary collaboration with the core team made up of researchers from different backgrounds such as social work, education, literature and creative writing, and mathematics. [K] • The Monitoring and Evaluation Scaling Project is a research collaboration between Hub researchers and Young1ove (a youth-focused NGO in Botswana), working with a number of implementing organisations. The study is developing its first research paper, based on desk research and comparative case studies of the monitoring and evaluation processes of selected youth organisations undertaking intervention scale-ups, selected to include gender-sensitive interventions. The paper will share best practice ideas on monitoring and evaluation and will be relevant to policy makers and funders as well as to organisations, NGOs, and governments, meeting the need identified by numerous stakeholder groups for practical information about evaluation and scale-up. Development of policy impact strategy Broad stakeholder engagement and early examples of impact, have also helped us to identify opportunities and challenges for future policy influencing. Our ambition is to influence national governments to adopt Accelerate evidence in designing policies and services for adolescents, and to influence regional and international institutions to reflect our findings in country-level guidance, programmes and funding policies. To this end, we have developed an initial influencing strategy which engages key decision makers and civil servants at national level with one-to-one meetings and multi-stakeholder events, supported by written briefings, research communications materials, and information on cost-effectiveness. This national-level engagement will build on the relationships already being developed at study/trial level as well as our analysis of opportunities to achieve impact (eg where governments or institutions have a strong focus on adolescence). We will also be targeting international institutions and processes, including the High-Level Political Forum on SDGs, presenting evidence at meetings and forums where appropriate and building relationships with high-level decision makers. Going forward, the Hub will prioritise building the policy engagement motivation and capacity of all hub researchers, developing compelling materials to communicate our findings, and actively engaging with decision makers and practitioners at national, regional and international level. In this way, we intend to ensure our Accelerate research achieves maximum impact -- and delivers real, tangible welfare benefits for African adolescents.
First Year Of Impact 2019
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy
Impact Types Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description ACCELERATE HUB DEMONSTRATON OF CONCEPT PAPER INCLUDED IN UNAIDS GLOBAL AIDS UPDATE
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
Impact ACCELERATE HUB DEMONSTRATON OF CONCEPT PAPER INCLUDED IN UNAIDS GLOBAL AIDS UPDATE The Accelerate Hub has published a demonstration of concept paper: "Improving lives by accelerating progress towards the UN Sustainable Development Goals for adolescents living with HIV: a prospective cohort study" in the Lancet Child & Adolescent Health. The study aimed to test the UN Development Programme's proposed approach of development accelerators- provisions that lead to progress across multiple SDGs-and synergies between accelerators on achieving SDG-aligned targets in a highly vulnerable group of adolescents in South Africa. This demonstration of concept paper suggests that the UN's accelerator approach for this high-risk adolescent population has policy and potential financing usefulness. It showed that provisions are associated with progress across multiple SDG goals, even for a vulnerable group, and that combination of two or more accelerators delivers increased benefits. The paper's found that safe schools, parenting support and cash transfers were effective accelerators and that all three provisons together were associated with greater benefits across more Global Goals. We have developed and shared a policy brief, and the findings have been included in the UNAIDS Global AIDS Update 2019.
URL https://www.unaids.org/en/resources/documents/2019/2019-global-AIDS-update
 
Description Facilitated a space for DAC collaborations across Africa through the Independent Advisory Board
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description IDENTIFYING VIOLENCE PREVENTION ACCELERATORS WITH THE WHO AND GLOBAL PARTNERSHIP TO END VIOLENCE AGAINST CHILDREN
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact The Global Partnership is supporting countries to implement the WHO 'INSPIRE' framework - a recommended package of programmes to reduce violence against children. Many countries however are struggling to implement the full package due to limited resources, and have requested that Accelerate Hub identify 'accelerators' that can prevent multiple forms of violence. Working directly with WHO and the Global Partnership, Accelerate Hub merged data from two studies to provide a dataset large enough to test for impacts on incidence of even rarely-reported forms of violence such as sexual assault. Analyses found that improved parenting and food security could significantly reduce sexual abuse, crime involvement, transactional sex, physical abuse, emotional abuse and community violence victimisation. Accelerate Hub Director Lucie Cluver and ECR Will Rudgard are now coauthoring a paper with WHO and Global Partnership to share findings, which will also be directly incorporated into the Global Partnership's countrylevel support.
 
Description Invitation for Lucie Cluver to join the WHO Adolescent Service Delivery Working Group (ASDWG)
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Invitation for Lucie Cluver, Frances Gardner and Catherine Ward to join the Parent Training Guideline Development Group led by the World Health Organization
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
 
Description Invitation to present on Zifune at the Helping Adolescents Thrive (HAT) Intervention consultation meeting
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Merged Sexual Health and Violence Programme
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
Impact SEXUAL VIOLENCE PREVENTION PROGRAMME IN THREE AFRICAN COUNTRIES - SERVICES TO BENEFIT 180,000 FAMILIES AND TEENS The Accelerate Hub worked with USAID, PEPFAR (The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief) and regional NGO, Clowns Without Borders South Africa, to merge two adolescent interventions: a parenting programme to reduce violence and substance use and improve family budgeting, and a sexual violence prevention programme. The programme was completed in 2019 and is currently being rolled out in Ethiopia, Botswana and South Sudan, reaching nearly 180,000 families and teens. There are plans to roll it out to five more PEPFAR countries. The Parenting for Lifelong Health Programme has also been included as one of only two PEPFAR-approved parenting programmes for use in Africa with 9-14 year olds, by the PEPFAR Country Operational Plan Guidance (p175).
URL https://www.state.gov/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/PEPFAR-Fiscal-Year-2019-Country-Operational-Plan-Gu...
 
Description PARENTING SUPPORT IN A CONFLICT SETTING - SERVICES INCLUDED IN THE NATIONAL WORK PLAN FOR SOUTH SUDAN
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
Impact The SUPER study (Scale Up of Parenting Evaluation Research) is evaluating the impact of the Parenting for Lifelong Health (PLH) programmes in 28 countries. In South Sudan, an evaluation was completed by Accelerate Hub early career researchers (ECR) Roselinde Janowski and Sam Bojo with 205 families. It found that the programme has achieved reduced violence, emotional abuse, and physical violence; and enhanced positive parenting, parental monitoring and parent self-efficacy. The team used this evidence to engage with the South Sudan Jubek State Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Development, which has now included the programme in its National Work Plan. The findings were also used to persuade the USAID 4Children Programme to continue funding this programme in Juba.
 
Description Policy Brief: HIV Sensitive Social Protection. 'Leaving no-one behind'
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
Impact This policy brief outlines WFP's role in ensuring social protection systems are inclusive of people living with, at risk of and affected by HIV. The research team co-drafted a policy brief outlining the role WFP can play in ensuring social protection systems are inclusive of people living with, at risk of or affected by HIV at the policy, programme and intervention levels. It highlights pieces of evidence on the impact of HIV-sensitive social protection; it identifies potential entry points, and opportunities in the development and implementation of national HIV response, poverty-reduction and development plans; and it speaks to broader social policies, programmes and schemes. It further highlights relevant partnerships to complement WFP approaches. The policy brief accessible on the WFP website and has been disseminated to 20 country offices ((Angola, Burundi, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe) in the Eastern and Southern Africa Region.
URL https://www.wfp.org/publications/leaving-no-one-behind-how-wfps-approach-hiv-sensitive-social-protec...
 
Description Policy Impact recommendations by Prof. Lucie Cluver, at UNAIDS PCB, Geneva, Switzerland (December, 2019)
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
URL https://www.unaids.org/sites/default/files/media_asset/28112019_UNAIDS_PCB45_Thematic-Segment-Backgr...
 
Description Support to the UNDP Zambia $1.2 mil. Road Safety programme
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
Impact Working with UNDP colleagues and the Zambian Ministry of Local Government; an Accelerate Hub researcher Dr Mona Ibrahim (seconded to UNDP), co-wrote a road safety proposal in Zambia which included adolescents as a major target group. The $1.2 million project, which has now been funded by the UN's Road Safety Fund, aims to reduce pedestrian and cyclist fatalities in Lusaka by 66% over the next three years by improving road safety measures and boosting non-motorised road transport.
 
Description The Accelerate Hub included in the official UNDP 2020 Work Plan
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
Impact The Accelerate Hub was included in the 2020 UNDP work plans, which allows for the strategic channeling of evidence from the Hub to the Global UNDP team. This improves the evidence base for policies and services provided by the UNDP. This also puts the Hub in a good position to push for/ advise on adolescent inclusion in UNDP programmes. A Hub research officer is seconded to the UNDP office in New York, and will be able to contribute to this work plan, and would maintain the communication flow between both organisations.
URL https://www.undp.org/content/dam/undp/library/HIV-AIDS/UNDP%20HIV%20Health%20and%20Development%20Str...
 
Description Training of Early Career Researchers - Jan 2020
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact BUILDING CAREERS FOR EARLYCAREER AFRICAN RESEARCHERS Our 43 early-career researchers (ECRs) have completed training needs analyses; joined training workshops on statistical analyses, presentation skills, policy engagement; and are being mentored to develop their career plans and next steps. Nationalities from the African continent include Zimbabwean, South Sudanese, Sudanese, Zambian, Swazi, South African, Malawian, Ghanaian, Kenyan, Nigerian, and Cameroonian, as well as others globally - British, Brazilian, American, Spanish, Italian, Israeli, German, Canadian, Belgian, Chinese and Belarusian. One of our goals is to increase the number of PhDs for early-career researchers. This year, six of our early-career researchers have won externally-funded scholarships for their doctorates: Samuel Bojo (South Sudan), Nontokozo Langwenya (eSwatini), David Chipanta (Zambia), Kathryn Roberts (UK), Kopano Monaisa and Siyanai Zhou (Zimbabwe); and Diana Ocholla (Kenya/South Africa) is starting an MPhil this year.
 
Description Workshop at National Department of Health - South Africa - Pediatrics' and Adolescent (0-19 years olds)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Workshop delivered by Early Career Researcher on "HIV-Sensitive Social Protection" at a World Food Programme Learning Event (6-8 May) for Regional Bureau Nairobi.
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Research team was invited to deliver a workshop on "HIV-Sensitive Social Protection" at a World Food Programme Learning Event (6-8 May) for Regional Bureau Nairobi. Early career researcher (Wittesaele) delivered the session which included: 1) covering definition of HIV-Sensitive protection; 2) what WFP's role is in this and 3) participatory activities. Objectives: for attendees to 1) gain understanding of different cash and care social protection provisions that can support young people living with HIV; 2) become confident understanding some of the evidence that supports cash + care social protection for HIV prevention and supporting adherence and 3) understanding how cash transfers and food security can support HIV presentation + adherence. Participants engaged in activities to design HIV-sensitive social protection programme into school-feeding programmes. After the session we also shared social protection policy briefs to WFP Regional Bureau Nairobi - these has been disseminated to all countries covered by the regional office: Burundi, Djibouti, Kenya, Uganda, South Sudan, Somalia, Ethiopia. 25-30 attendees representing WFP HQ (Rome); WFP Regional Bureau of Cairo (MENA) Johannesburg (Southern Africa) and Nairobi (Central and Eastern Africa region) and country offices. Djibouti, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Kenya, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Uganda, Egypt, South Africa,
 
Description Cash Transfers, Aspirations Interventions and Student Learning - QR GCRF grant awarded to the University of Oxford by Research England
Amount £33,000 (GBP)
Funding ID KCD00141- LE01.01 
Organisation University of Oxford 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2019 
End 07/2020
 
Description Cash Transfers, Growth Mindsets, and Student Learning
Amount $202,945 (USD)
Funding ID GR-1146 
Organisation Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Sector Academic/University
Country United States
Start 01/2020 
End 04/2021
 
Description Job Search and Hiring with Two-Sided Limited Information about Workseekers' Skills
Amount $299,000 (USD)
Organisation National Science Foundation (NSF) 
Sector Public
Country United States
Start  
 
Description Knowledge translation and implementation science in humanitarian programmes: Taking advantage of the Parenting for Lifelong Health roll­out
Amount R 647,480 (ZAR)
Funding ID 118571 
Organisation South African National Research Foundation (NRF) 
Sector Public
Country South Africa
Start 01/2019 
End 11/2020
 
Description Oxford University Innovation GCRF Sustainable Impact Fund (PLH Digital; WP4)
Amount £60,968 (GBP)
Funding ID KCD00141-CV02.01 
Organisation University of Oxford 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2019 
End 07/2020
 
Description The Furaha Adolescent Implementation Research (FAIR) Study of the Kizazi Kipya Project
Amount $199,967 (USD)
Organisation The Evaluation Fund 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Start 03/2020 
End 08/2021
 
Description UCT Conference hosting grant
Amount R 25,000 (ZAR)
Organisation University of Cape Town 
Sector Academic/University
Country South Africa
Start 09/2019 
End 08/2020
 
Description UCT Enabling Grant-seekers Excellence Award (2019)
Amount R 100,000 (ZAR)
Organisation University of Cape Town 
Sector Academic/University
Country South Africa
Start 09/2019 
End 08/2020
 
Description UCT University Research Committee Start-Up grant (2019)
Amount R 20,000 (ZAR)
Organisation University of Cape Town 
Sector Academic/University
Country South Africa
Start 09/2019 
End 08/2020
 
Description Untransmittable: reducing HIV transmission among young women living with HIV, their partners and children in South Africa
Amount $487,453 (USD)
Funding ID K43TW011434 
Organisation Fogarty International Centre 
Sector Public
Country United States
Start 08/2019 
End 04/2024
 
Title Adapted version of the Mullen Scales of Early Learning 
Description A simple and child-friendly observational tool to document child physical and cognitive development will be used to measure development of adolescents' children across five domains: gross motor skills, fine motor skills, receptive language, expressive language, and visual reception. This involves a series of game-like tasks which have been adapted to the study context. For example the list of age-appropriate words a child should know was translated into the local language - Xhosa - and unfamiliar toys were replaced with substitutes available in the study area. 
Type Of Material Model of mechanisms or symptoms - human 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact This tool is currently being used to to measure motor and cognitive development in children of young mothers participating in the study. During baseline data collection, over 1100 motor and cognitive development assessments were administered to children over 3 months old. This tool will be implemented during follow-up data collection among all child in the sample to allow examining of child outcomes longitudinally. 
 
Title Adolescent Health & Wellbeing questionnaire 
Description The adolescent health & wellbeing questionnaire was drafted over several consultations with health practitioners and adolescents who are part of the study's Teen Advisory Group. Participants choose the site of their interviews to allow for maximum privacy. The adolescent health questionnaire includes items to assess socio-demographics, healthcare service access (i.e. transport, costs, waiting times, distance and satisfaction of health services), self-reported health outcomes, and risk factors hypothesized to influence adolescent ART adherence and sexual reproductive service uptake. Measures use (where available) tools validated in Southern Africa. The adolescent health and wellbeing self-report questionnaire is administered through tablets. The questionnaire includes teen-friendly images and language designed to engage youth. 
Type Of Material Model of mechanisms or symptoms - human 
Year Produced 2014 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact This questionnaire was used to collect real-life data for the world's largest longitudinal cohort of adolescents living with HIV. This has created unique opportunity to investigate risk and resilience promoting factors among adolescents living with HIV in South Africa. The study has already had major impact on policy, UN guidelines and programming for adolescents living with HIV. The team has presented findings in nearly 60 presentations at over twenty-five conferences and workshops. Findings and research priorities have been shared with several hundred of stakeholders engaged in adolescent health and HIV/AIDS policy and programming. The study has to date resulted in 42 peer-reviewed publications in journals including the Lancet Child and Adolescent Health, AIDS, Journal of the International AIDS Society and PloS One. This questionnaire is now also being used to investigate predictors of maternal healthcare use amongst high-risk adolescents in South Africa. During baseline data collection, the fieldwork team have conducted 1027 surveys with adolescent mothers aged 10-19 who have at least one child. In 2020-21, the data collection team will trace the full cohort of adolescent mother-child dyads and administer the survey. 
URL https://static1.squarespace.com/static/54e3c4b3e4b02a415877e452/t/5dc952e3e8290d7830fee50d/157347508...
 
Title Adolescent Parent Questionnaire 
Description The Adolescent parent questionnaire was drafted over several months in consultation with health practitioners and young mothers in the Eastern Cape. The questionnaire was pre-piloted with teen mothers and fathers who are part of the study's Teen Advisory Group. The adolescent parent questionnaire measures adolescent's parenting experiences, parenting stress, pregnancy experiences and assesses their child's health, nutrition and care. Measures use (where available) tools validated in Southern Africa. After pilot testing the questionnaire was further adapted so that research assistants are able to collect information about the child's care from the child's primary caregivers (usually maternal grandmothers) instead of adolescent parents. Pilot testing revealed that adolescent parents were often not able to recall or answer questions about their children's care, nutrition and health. In the study context, childcare is often provided by the adolescent parent's caregivers or extended family to ensure that the adolescent parent can return to school or to reduce stigma of associated with being an adolescent parent. By asking the primary caregiver of these children to respond to questions about childrens' health, nutrition and care we are able to collect data that is prone to biases. The adolescent parent questionnaire is administered through tablets. Participants choose the site of their interviews to avoid unnecessary transport and associated child-minding costs. The questionnaire includes teen-friendly images and language designed to engage youth. 
Type Of Material Model of mechanisms or symptoms - human 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact During baseline data collection, the fieldwork team have conducted 1027 adolescent-parent self-report surveys with adolescent mothers aged 10-19 who have at least one child. In 2020-21, the data collection team will trace the full cohort of adolescent mother-child dyads and administer the survey. 
URL http://www.youngcarers.org.za/s/HEY-BABY-Adolescent-Primary-caregiver-Questionnaire_2018_Reducedsize...
 
Title Labor market questionnaires (Harambee, WP2) 
Description We have developed questionnaires that reliably measure job-search behavior, expectations and knowledge about the labor market, and employment history and outcomes. The questionnaires were carefully piloted with a relevant sample of young job-seekers to ensure contextual appropriateness and reliability of survey items. The surveys are designed to be self-administered or administered over the phone. We have written a blog post on how we designed the income expectations measures (see URL included below). We will publish the full questionnaires upon publication of the final paper. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The questionnaires were used to create the data set used the research activities in the research stream. 
URL https://mbrg.bsg.ox.ac.uk/method/measuring-income-expectations-using-phone-surveys
 
Title Telling stories about our own adolescence: Methodology of Self-Immersion 
Description The methodology emerged from an icebreaker, initially developed for the Understanding Adolescence in African contexts workshop, organised by the Hub's Work Package 3 researchers and staff in Oxford in October 2019. The organisers hope that the approach may prove useful in a variety of workshop or teaching contexts, in particular for researchers working with groups of individuals different from themselves, and where negative attitudes towards adolescents may be leading to inappropriate interventions. Indeed several researchers attending the workshop have reported using the exercise themselves in their own research. We will conduct an evaluation to assess the extend to which the methodology has been adopted by researchers. Methodology. Participants were asked to answer the question in two words or in a sentence: 'What kind of adolescent were you?' 2. Following the introductions the participants divided into breakout groups around tables of 6-8 people and were asked to list as many characteristics of adolescence as they could, and to group these words into positive, negative and neutral categories. 3. Each group reported back on their discussions, which was followed by general then general discussion. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Potential for more effective understanding and engagement from research participants. The methodology is still at an early stage but we intend to evaluate it - and if it proves effective - to develop some guidance or toolkit so that others can use it. 
 
Title Template analysis script in Stata that hub researchers can use to guide the design of their analyses of factors in adolescents' lives (e.g. food security) and multiple health and wellbeing outcomes related to the Sustainable Development Goalss 
Description The tool is a step by step template analysis script which demonstrates to hub researchers how they can program Stata to estimate the association between factors in adolescents' lives (e.g. food security) and multiple health and wellbeing outcomes related to the Sustainable Development Goals. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The research tool has been accessed and used by hub researchers in their analyses. 
URL https://osf.io/n6jy7/?view_only=17f148085fde4b3fb645106c6c6e418b
 
Title HEY BABY Dataset 
Description The research team is currently implementation data collection that will contribute to building a complex two-wave data including over 1000 adolescent parent and child dyads. Variables collected from self-report questionnaire as well as extraction from participants health records will allow the research team to identify barriers and facilitators of healthcare utilisation amongst high-risk adolescent mothers and their children. A team of early career researchers and doctoral candidates and research assistants (Saal, Langwenya, He, Anquandah, Carlqvist, Shenderovich, Wittesaele, Zhou, Jochim and Roberts) have led ambitious data cleaning activities for complex relational data collected as part of HEY BABY baseline. In the end, this dataset will include baseline data containing (1) self-report data from adolescent mothers about their experiences and access to health services, school, mental health, well-being, access to services and parenting experiences; (2) self-report data about children of adolescent mothers; (3) data extracted from home-based Road To Health Immunization cards and (4) cognitive development and motor skills assessment data for children. This will build a unique and complex dataset that will allow us to determine predictors of maternal healthcare use amongst high-risk adolescents in South Africa. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact This dataset will be there the first known primary research in Africa examining predictors of adolescent maternal healthcare use. Initiating data cleaning of baseline data will allow us to conduct preliminary analysis and inform adaptations for follow-up data collection. 
 
Title Kenya - Adolescent Outcomes From Cash & Aspirational Video (WP4) 
Description Baseline data collection occurred in 2016 (data was collected via surveys) for about 8,000 households in western Kenya. The video intervention and goal-setting exercise was administered in 2017. Endline data was conducted in 2018 and wrapped up in early 2019. The following information was gathered during the trial: production, yields, investment, consumption, aspirations, self-efficacy, depression, other psychological outcomes, beliefs, finances (savings, remittances, loans), assets, labour supply, education, risk and time preferences. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2019 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Dataset has not yet been made public in order to achieve notable impacts. 
 
Title Mzantsi Wakho - adolescent self-report data 
Description This database includes data from a three-wave longitudinal cohort study of 1050 adolescents living with HIV and 350 uninfected adolescents. This data was collected between 2014-2018. The database is currently composed of two-waves of data with final wave of data cleaning nearing completion. This database includes self-report survey data aiming to answer several research questions about youth health, with a focus on long-term medication, contraception, and sexual and reproductive health. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact This questionnaire was used to collect real-life data for the world's largest longitudinal cohort of adolescents living with HIV. This has created unique opportunity to investigate risk and resilience promoting factors among adolescents living with HIV in South Africa. The study has already had major impact on policy, UN guidelines and programming for adolescents living with HIV. The team has presented findings in nearly 60 presentations at over twenty-five conferences and workshops. Findings and research priorities have been shared with several hundred of stakeholders engaged in adolescent health and HIV/AIDS policy and programming. The study has to date resulted in 42 peer-reviewed publications in journals including the Lancet Child and Adolescent Health, AIDS, Journal of the International AIDS Society and PloS One. 
 
Title PLH Digital WP4 - online survey 
Description Recently, we launched a pan-African online survey and promoted it via Facebook targeted ads. We wanted to explore the feasibility and acceptability of our future parenting app. We also wanted to know among potential users how common smartphones are, how easy it is to get internet access, people's experiences with apps and their feelings about using an app to improve relationships between caregivers and teenagers. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact As data collection is still in progress, no impact has been achieved yet. 
 
Title Workerseeker longitudinal database (Harambee, WP2) 
Description The database contains data on employment history and status, job-search activities, self-beliefs, beliefs about the job market, skills, and demographics of 6,889 job-seeking South African youths. All respondents are part of a large randomized controlled trial (RCT) that tested the impact of counseling on one's ability and counseling on and public certification of one's ability. The data is longitudinal and contains a maximum of three entries per respondent. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2019 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact We have shared this database with our partner Harambe who will use it to conduct internal analysis. We will share the data publicly upon publication of the research paper. 
 
Description Adolescent Engagement in Kenya- Partnering with local organisation, Centre for the Study of Adolescence, in initiating a Teenage Advisory Group 
Organisation Centre for the Study of Adolescence
Country Kenya 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution One of our aims with the Teenage Advisory Group in Kenya was to test some of the methods we had developed with our South African Teenage Advisory Groups in South Africa with a younger cohort. We led the development of the programme, we trained our colleagues at the Centre for the Study of Adolescence on this programme. We co-facilitated the sessions over the weekend.
Collaborator Contribution Members of Centre for the Study of Adolescence's team recruited the participants for the first Teenage Advisory Group; they approached the schools where participants were recruited from, they spoke to the caregivers of the participants to gain their consent, they also spoke to the participants themselves to gain the consent. As our local partner, they organised accommodation, booked flights, booked the venue and were responsible for all the local logistical planning. As experienced facilitators, they helped with adapting the programme for local acceptability and understanding, they led the facilitation of the sessions as well.
Impact As an initial engagement in the partnership, the most important outcome was building a relationship which led to interest from both partners to continue the engagement. One of the initial outcomes has been identifying the possible ways in which the partnership could further be nurtured. From the participants, there was interest for follow-up sessions.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Collaboration between University College London, the University of Cape Town and the University of Oxford 
Organisation University College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Since inception of the project, the research team at the University of Oxford has entered into a tripartite collaboration agreement with the University of Cape Town and University College London. This collaboration continues to support a long-standing and established research collaboration between researchers at the University of Cape Town and Oxford. This joint research team actively engages and collaborates to academically conceptualise research design, support data collection activities, produce high-impact research and engage closely with local, national and international partners. This collaboration supports mixed-methods research lead by Dr Elona Toska (co-PI) and Dr Rebecca Hodes (quantitative co-Investigator) at the AIDS and Society Research Unit, University of Cape Town. Co-Principal Investigators (Professor Lucie Cluver & Dr Elona Toska) also provide strategic and conceptual oversight for the team and co-Investigators at the University of Cape Town. This award contributes £247,553 to this inter-disciplinary team of researchers and project & data management capacity at the University of Cape Town (Dr Hodes, Rebecca Maughan-Brown, Nontokozo Langwenya, Lameez Mota, Akhona Mfeketo and Marius Coqui). In the upcoming grant period, the research team will also identify a cost-effectiveness and allocative efficiency analysis researcher and coordinate Sr N Bungane based at University of Fort Hare. This collaboration creates opportunity for early-career researchers based in South Africa to lead in ground-breaking research that will impact social and health policy in South Africa and the region. The research team has also entered into collaboration with Professor Lorraine Sherr at University College London. The collaboration will contribute resulting data to enable high-impact research lead by Professor Lorraine Sherr and doctoral candidate Kathryn Roberts. In addition, Prof Sherr has regularly contributed to review of quantitative research tools, specifically including review of measures on child development and health outcomes as well as mental health measures for adolescent mothers.
Collaborator Contribution Firstly, the research team at the University of Cape Town and Professor Sherr have been instrumental in the development of the research design, sampling strategy and data collection tools. This has been repeated in preparation and planning activities related to follow-up data collection for the study and will continue as the research team proceeds with follow-up data collection activities in 2020-21. This included overseeing literature reviewing and designing and testing of research tools. Dr Elona Toska has maintained oversight of baseline data collection activities with support of Professor Cluver. Dr Rebecca Hodes has lead qualitative research activities. Qualitative research took place between May and November 2018. Qualitative research focused exploring intergenerational adversity, experiences of service delivery and fatherhood. The University of Cape Town also manages partnerships with South-African based partners including PATA, University of Stellenbosch and Sr N Bungane at the University of Fort Hare. In this capacity, lead researchers at the University of Cape Town also provide skills building for early career researchers such as doctoral candidate Siyanai Zhou and Director-General Conny Nxumalo at the National Department of Social Development and post-doctoral students Dr Wylene Saal. Through this collaboration, University of Cape Town also provides project management to ensure smooth running of fieldwork operations and successful data collection. This has led to successful recruitment of adolescent-parent (n=1027) and child (n=1124) dyads completing multiple data points. The research team at the University of Cape Town is also contributing to data cleaning of complex adolescent-parent and child dataset. As co-Investigator Professor Lorraine Sherr, has been highly involved since the initial phase of the project. Professor Sherr has provided her expertise to conceptualise the sampling and recruitment strategy of highly vulnerable young mothers. During early engagement, Professor Sherr also supervised literature reviews that were used to inform design of research tools and provided consultation about implementation of child cognitive development assessments. Professor Sherr has subsequently maintained active engagement with lead investigators by providing expert advice on use of child development outcome measures for follow-up data collection. Throughout baseline data collection, collaborators have provided extensive oversight on research, data collection and data management activities. In addition, researchers have provided feedback on ethical quandaries that arose during baseline data collection and challenges related to ambitiously recruiting a large small of vulnerable adolescent mothers and their children.
Impact This tripartite collaboration has been crucial for successful inception of the study and unique opportunity to establish data collection activities sooner than planned. We are delighted to report major outputs and outcomes. Set-up and implementation of HEY BABY baseline data collection 2018-19. The research team successfully secured funding through a UNICEF-ESARO Small-Scale Funding Agreement (SSFA) with partners at UNICEF-ESARO (US$45,000) and through Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) from Research England (£187,000). These funds were awarded during completion of the Mzantsi Wakho data collection. Having secured these funds allowed us to set-up HEY BABY data collection earlier than planned. The research team took advantage of established infrastructure and a highly-trained team of local researchers to support the pilot and baseline data collection for the HEY BABY study. This involved piloting new research tools, delivering additional training to the research team about new data collection tools, developing sampling strategy and engaging with local stakeholders and partners to support recruitment efforts. Design and piloting of research tools for two rounds of data collection. The research team based at Oxford, University of Cape Town and University College London developed two additional research tools: 1) adolescent parent questionnaires and 2) adapted Mullen Scales of Early Learning tool. The adolescent parent questionnaire was piloted with adolescent mums who provided feedback on priority concerns of young mothers and framing of questions. For example, young mums felt it was important to include questions about access and quality of creches and day-care. In consultation with researchers at Stellenbosch University, the Mullen Scales of Early Learning was adapted to improve contextual relevance and feasibility of implementation. For example, items that would not be easily recognised by children in the Eastern Cape would be replaced with more appropriate objects. Recruitment of young adolescent mothers (n=1027) and their children (n=1124): The research team developed a sampling strategy that would enable us to include adolescent mothers aged 10-19 who both engaged and did not engage in formal services. This led to the successful recruitment of 1027 adolescent mothers and 1124 of their children. Between March 2018 and July 2019, we interviewed N=1,712 adolescent girls and young women. We utilised seven parallel sampling strategies to reach adolescent girls (including mothers) and adolescents girls living with HIV (10-19 years) who were both engaged and not engaged in services, and that we reached comparison adolescent girls with matched demographic profiles. Through each sampling strategy we collected details of adolescent girls, who were then traced to their communities and interviewed in their homes. First, we included all ART-initiated adolescent girls, irrespective of whether they were engaged in care, in all district health facilities providing HIV services (n=73) between March 2014 to September 2015. This group was re-traced for follow-up interviews in 2018 with 94% retention in the study. Second, we identified all maternity obstetric units (n=9) in the health district and used case files to identify all adolescent mothers. Third, we interviewed neighbouring adolescent girls of those approached through clinic files. Fourth, secondary schools were randomly selected per municipal area (n=43) within the study's catchment area (n=43) within the study's catchment area. Fifth, we used referrals by social workers and NGO service providers to identify adolescent mothers. Sixth, we included community referrals by adolescent mothers themselves. Finally, an advisory group of adolescent mothers devised recruitment methods for especially hard-to-reach adolescent mothers. For each sampling channel, we recorded refusals and consenting adolescents. Through this methodology, research participants included in the sample will report on variable experiences of health services use/access and parenting experiences which will in turn allow the research team to conduct analysis that is both rigorous and policy-relevant. Data cleaning for baseline data: A team of early career researchers and doctoral candidates and research assistants (Saal, Langwenya, He, Anquandah, Carlqvist, Shenderovich, Wittesaele, Zhou, Jochim and Roberts) have led ambitious data cleaning activities for complex relational data collected as part of HEY BABY baseline. In the end, this dataset will include baseline data containing (1) self-report data from adolescent mothers about their experiences and access to health services, school, mental health, well-being, access to services and parenting experiences; (2) self-report data about children of adolescent mothers; (3) data extracted from home-based Road To Health Immunization cards and (4) cognitive development and motor skills assessment data for children. This will build a unique and complex dataset that will allow us to determine predictors of maternal healthcare use amongst high-risk adolescents in South Africa. Engagement with local stakeholders: Since inception of our previous study (Mzantsi Wakho) the team has engaged closely with policy-makers and implementers at local, national and international levels. This has resulted in close collaboration with local stakeholders such as the Departments of Basic Education and Health. These collaborations have been instrumental in supporting pilot and baseline data collection activities for this project. Meetings with district hospital and healthcare workers have helped us identify key research priorities that will support service delivery that will meet the needs of young parents and their children. Additionally, collaboration with the Department of Basic Education led to meeting opportunities with Learner Support Agents and schools to support research activities and also provide input into on priority research questions regarding attendance of young mothers at schools. These collaborations as well as working closely with local NGOs has also supported recruitment activities allowing us to successfully recruit over 1000 adolescent parents and child dyads. As follow-up data collection activities get underway, onsite fieldwork managers will liaise closely with local stakeholders to facilitate next wave of data collection activities due to start in early 2020. Early dissemination and abstract submissions: Due to concerted effort of data cleaning team, lead investigators and early career researchers have been able to conduct preliminary analysis of HEY BABY baseline data in order to respond to urgent policy questions. In December 2019, on behalf of Dr Toska, Camille Wittesaele presented preliminary HEY BABY baseline data analysis focusing on adolescent mother living with HIV and their child who are HIV exposed at the 20th International Conference on AIDS and STIs in Africa (ICASA) Kigali, Rwanda. In addition, several abstracts have been submitted for IAS 2020.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Collaboration between University College London, the University of Cape Town and the University of Oxford 
Organisation University of Cape Town
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Since inception of the project, the research team at the University of Oxford has entered into a tripartite collaboration agreement with the University of Cape Town and University College London. This collaboration continues to support a long-standing and established research collaboration between researchers at the University of Cape Town and Oxford. This joint research team actively engages and collaborates to academically conceptualise research design, support data collection activities, produce high-impact research and engage closely with local, national and international partners. This collaboration supports mixed-methods research lead by Dr Elona Toska (co-PI) and Dr Rebecca Hodes (quantitative co-Investigator) at the AIDS and Society Research Unit, University of Cape Town. Co-Principal Investigators (Professor Lucie Cluver & Dr Elona Toska) also provide strategic and conceptual oversight for the team and co-Investigators at the University of Cape Town. This award contributes £247,553 to this inter-disciplinary team of researchers and project & data management capacity at the University of Cape Town (Dr Hodes, Rebecca Maughan-Brown, Nontokozo Langwenya, Lameez Mota, Akhona Mfeketo and Marius Coqui). In the upcoming grant period, the research team will also identify a cost-effectiveness and allocative efficiency analysis researcher and coordinate Sr N Bungane based at University of Fort Hare. This collaboration creates opportunity for early-career researchers based in South Africa to lead in ground-breaking research that will impact social and health policy in South Africa and the region. The research team has also entered into collaboration with Professor Lorraine Sherr at University College London. The collaboration will contribute resulting data to enable high-impact research lead by Professor Lorraine Sherr and doctoral candidate Kathryn Roberts. In addition, Prof Sherr has regularly contributed to review of quantitative research tools, specifically including review of measures on child development and health outcomes as well as mental health measures for adolescent mothers.
Collaborator Contribution Firstly, the research team at the University of Cape Town and Professor Sherr have been instrumental in the development of the research design, sampling strategy and data collection tools. This has been repeated in preparation and planning activities related to follow-up data collection for the study and will continue as the research team proceeds with follow-up data collection activities in 2020-21. This included overseeing literature reviewing and designing and testing of research tools. Dr Elona Toska has maintained oversight of baseline data collection activities with support of Professor Cluver. Dr Rebecca Hodes has lead qualitative research activities. Qualitative research took place between May and November 2018. Qualitative research focused exploring intergenerational adversity, experiences of service delivery and fatherhood. The University of Cape Town also manages partnerships with South-African based partners including PATA, University of Stellenbosch and Sr N Bungane at the University of Fort Hare. In this capacity, lead researchers at the University of Cape Town also provide skills building for early career researchers such as doctoral candidate Siyanai Zhou and Director-General Conny Nxumalo at the National Department of Social Development and post-doctoral students Dr Wylene Saal. Through this collaboration, University of Cape Town also provides project management to ensure smooth running of fieldwork operations and successful data collection. This has led to successful recruitment of adolescent-parent (n=1027) and child (n=1124) dyads completing multiple data points. The research team at the University of Cape Town is also contributing to data cleaning of complex adolescent-parent and child dataset. As co-Investigator Professor Lorraine Sherr, has been highly involved since the initial phase of the project. Professor Sherr has provided her expertise to conceptualise the sampling and recruitment strategy of highly vulnerable young mothers. During early engagement, Professor Sherr also supervised literature reviews that were used to inform design of research tools and provided consultation about implementation of child cognitive development assessments. Professor Sherr has subsequently maintained active engagement with lead investigators by providing expert advice on use of child development outcome measures for follow-up data collection. Throughout baseline data collection, collaborators have provided extensive oversight on research, data collection and data management activities. In addition, researchers have provided feedback on ethical quandaries that arose during baseline data collection and challenges related to ambitiously recruiting a large small of vulnerable adolescent mothers and their children.
Impact This tripartite collaboration has been crucial for successful inception of the study and unique opportunity to establish data collection activities sooner than planned. We are delighted to report major outputs and outcomes. Set-up and implementation of HEY BABY baseline data collection 2018-19. The research team successfully secured funding through a UNICEF-ESARO Small-Scale Funding Agreement (SSFA) with partners at UNICEF-ESARO (US$45,000) and through Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) from Research England (£187,000). These funds were awarded during completion of the Mzantsi Wakho data collection. Having secured these funds allowed us to set-up HEY BABY data collection earlier than planned. The research team took advantage of established infrastructure and a highly-trained team of local researchers to support the pilot and baseline data collection for the HEY BABY study. This involved piloting new research tools, delivering additional training to the research team about new data collection tools, developing sampling strategy and engaging with local stakeholders and partners to support recruitment efforts. Design and piloting of research tools for two rounds of data collection. The research team based at Oxford, University of Cape Town and University College London developed two additional research tools: 1) adolescent parent questionnaires and 2) adapted Mullen Scales of Early Learning tool. The adolescent parent questionnaire was piloted with adolescent mums who provided feedback on priority concerns of young mothers and framing of questions. For example, young mums felt it was important to include questions about access and quality of creches and day-care. In consultation with researchers at Stellenbosch University, the Mullen Scales of Early Learning was adapted to improve contextual relevance and feasibility of implementation. For example, items that would not be easily recognised by children in the Eastern Cape would be replaced with more appropriate objects. Recruitment of young adolescent mothers (n=1027) and their children (n=1124): The research team developed a sampling strategy that would enable us to include adolescent mothers aged 10-19 who both engaged and did not engage in formal services. This led to the successful recruitment of 1027 adolescent mothers and 1124 of their children. Between March 2018 and July 2019, we interviewed N=1,712 adolescent girls and young women. We utilised seven parallel sampling strategies to reach adolescent girls (including mothers) and adolescents girls living with HIV (10-19 years) who were both engaged and not engaged in services, and that we reached comparison adolescent girls with matched demographic profiles. Through each sampling strategy we collected details of adolescent girls, who were then traced to their communities and interviewed in their homes. First, we included all ART-initiated adolescent girls, irrespective of whether they were engaged in care, in all district health facilities providing HIV services (n=73) between March 2014 to September 2015. This group was re-traced for follow-up interviews in 2018 with 94% retention in the study. Second, we identified all maternity obstetric units (n=9) in the health district and used case files to identify all adolescent mothers. Third, we interviewed neighbouring adolescent girls of those approached through clinic files. Fourth, secondary schools were randomly selected per municipal area (n=43) within the study's catchment area (n=43) within the study's catchment area. Fifth, we used referrals by social workers and NGO service providers to identify adolescent mothers. Sixth, we included community referrals by adolescent mothers themselves. Finally, an advisory group of adolescent mothers devised recruitment methods for especially hard-to-reach adolescent mothers. For each sampling channel, we recorded refusals and consenting adolescents. Through this methodology, research participants included in the sample will report on variable experiences of health services use/access and parenting experiences which will in turn allow the research team to conduct analysis that is both rigorous and policy-relevant. Data cleaning for baseline data: A team of early career researchers and doctoral candidates and research assistants (Saal, Langwenya, He, Anquandah, Carlqvist, Shenderovich, Wittesaele, Zhou, Jochim and Roberts) have led ambitious data cleaning activities for complex relational data collected as part of HEY BABY baseline. In the end, this dataset will include baseline data containing (1) self-report data from adolescent mothers about their experiences and access to health services, school, mental health, well-being, access to services and parenting experiences; (2) self-report data about children of adolescent mothers; (3) data extracted from home-based Road To Health Immunization cards and (4) cognitive development and motor skills assessment data for children. This will build a unique and complex dataset that will allow us to determine predictors of maternal healthcare use amongst high-risk adolescents in South Africa. Engagement with local stakeholders: Since inception of our previous study (Mzantsi Wakho) the team has engaged closely with policy-makers and implementers at local, national and international levels. This has resulted in close collaboration with local stakeholders such as the Departments of Basic Education and Health. These collaborations have been instrumental in supporting pilot and baseline data collection activities for this project. Meetings with district hospital and healthcare workers have helped us identify key research priorities that will support service delivery that will meet the needs of young parents and their children. Additionally, collaboration with the Department of Basic Education led to meeting opportunities with Learner Support Agents and schools to support research activities and also provide input into on priority research questions regarding attendance of young mothers at schools. These collaborations as well as working closely with local NGOs has also supported recruitment activities allowing us to successfully recruit over 1000 adolescent parents and child dyads. As follow-up data collection activities get underway, onsite fieldwork managers will liaise closely with local stakeholders to facilitate next wave of data collection activities due to start in early 2020. Early dissemination and abstract submissions: Due to concerted effort of data cleaning team, lead investigators and early career researchers have been able to conduct preliminary analysis of HEY BABY baseline data in order to respond to urgent policy questions. In December 2019, on behalf of Dr Toska, Camille Wittesaele presented preliminary HEY BABY baseline data analysis focusing on adolescent mother living with HIV and their child who are HIV exposed at the 20th International Conference on AIDS and STIs in Africa (ICASA) Kigali, Rwanda. In addition, several abstracts have been submitted for IAS 2020.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Collaboration between the University of Oxford and Stellenbosch University 
Organisation University of Stellenbosch
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research team has collaborated with Professor Mark Tomlinson at Stellenbosch University's Department of Psychology in the conceptual planning and design of the HEY BABY study. The no-funds collaboration is formally governed by a no-fund collaboration agreement between Oxford University and the Stellenbosch University.
Collaborator Contribution Professor Mark Tomlinson has been involved in the conceptual planning and design of the HEY BABY study, specifically through expertise on investigating early child development. Marguerite Marlow, a doctoral-candidate, supervised by Professor Tomlinson, was highly involved in piloting and training the research team in early child development research tools. In 2018, Marguerite Marlow delivered two week-long training session to 40 members of the fieldwork team in South Africa's Eastern Cape. Marguerite Marlow's engagement also involved supporting the adaptation and translation of a research tool that measures motor skills and cognitive development among children of the adolescent mothers involved the study. Baseline early child development data was successfully collected for all but two children (out of 1200 children) of adolescent mothers participating in the HEY BABY study. Since completion of baseline data collection, the research team at Stellenbosch has provided advice about considerations for cleaning and analysis of this data for the study. In addition, in preparation for HEY BABY follow-up data collection, Dr Marlow and Professor Tomlinson's team continue to provide expert advice and training support for early child development research tools and measures.
Impact This collaboration has resulted in the training of 40 data collectors in the South Africa. The fieldwork team in South Africa has to do conducted nearly 1200 child development assessments which will analysed as part of HEY BABY baseline data. Through this collaboration, the research team has additionally received feedback on additional literature reviews conducted on early childhood development measures for use in comparable cohorts and settings. This informed and lead to revisions and further adaptation of research tools to be used for follow-up data collection.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Collaboration with Nace Mikus (University of Vienna) and Dr Barak Morgan (University of Cape Town) 
Organisation University of Cape Town
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution As part of the Zifune project, a collaboration between Nace Mikus and Dr Barak Morgan was set up in order to include behavioural experiments and morality tasks in the post-intervention follow-up assessment. These behavioural experiments measure neuroeconomics decision-making and emotional responding, which reflect underlying brain architecture known to be influenced by experience during early childhood and adolescence. The post-intervention follow-up assessment, behavioural experiments and morality tasks were administered by the Zifune data collection team.
Collaborator Contribution Dr Barak Morgan and Nace Mikus are both experienced in the application and analysis of behavioural experiments and morality tasks. Their knowledge and experience in the field allows us to measure the effect that the Zifune intervention programme had on how participants perform these tasks. The setting-up of behavioural experiments and morality tasks, on the laptops used during assessment, was done by Nace Mikus. In addition, he provided training to all data collectors on the administering of the tasks. He is also responsible for the analysis of all data collected from these behavioural experiments and morality tasks.
Impact All data from the behavioural experements and morality tasks has been collected and cleaned by the research team. The data is currently being analysed by Nace Mikus. This collaboration is multi-disciplinary in nature as Dr Barak Morgan and Nace Mikus are interdisciplinary neuroscientist and the research team has a background in psychology.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Collaboration with Nace Mikus (University of Vienna) and Dr Barak Morgan (University of Cape Town) 
Organisation University of Vienna
Country Austria 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution As part of the Zifune project, a collaboration between Nace Mikus and Dr Barak Morgan was set up in order to include behavioural experiments and morality tasks in the post-intervention follow-up assessment. These behavioural experiments measure neuroeconomics decision-making and emotional responding, which reflect underlying brain architecture known to be influenced by experience during early childhood and adolescence. The post-intervention follow-up assessment, behavioural experiments and morality tasks were administered by the Zifune data collection team.
Collaborator Contribution Dr Barak Morgan and Nace Mikus are both experienced in the application and analysis of behavioural experiments and morality tasks. Their knowledge and experience in the field allows us to measure the effect that the Zifune intervention programme had on how participants perform these tasks. The setting-up of behavioural experiments and morality tasks, on the laptops used during assessment, was done by Nace Mikus. In addition, he provided training to all data collectors on the administering of the tasks. He is also responsible for the analysis of all data collected from these behavioural experiments and morality tasks.
Impact All data from the behavioural experements and morality tasks has been collected and cleaned by the research team. The data is currently being analysed by Nace Mikus. This collaboration is multi-disciplinary in nature as Dr Barak Morgan and Nace Mikus are interdisciplinary neuroscientist and the research team has a background in psychology.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Collaboration with Prof Robert Kumsta from Rhur University 
Organisation Ruhr University Bochum
Country Germany 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The collaboration with Prof Robert Kumsta, from Ruhr University, provided us with the novel opportunity to measure "differential genetic susceptibility to interventions". During a earlier phase of the Zifune Study, the Thula Sana study, it was found that the influence of the original intervention (Thula Sana) was found to be driven entirely by one genotype, 5HTTLPR serotonin transporter molecule gene. This finding dramatically underscored the importance of including genetic information when measuring psychosocial outcomes. During the Zifune phase of the study, we extended this gene-environment study by collecting further DNA samples from participants.
Collaborator Contribution Prof Robert Kumsta is responsible for all the analysis of the DNA samples collected from the Zifune study participants. The gene-environment study was extended to other genes using polygenic scores and get set approaches. Both approaches rely on performing a genome-wide screen using arrays that capture single base variation at >700.000 sites in the genome. Polygenic scores are genetic summary measures, derived from large genome-wide association studies, and capture genetic liability for traits of interest. These scores are increasingly being used to examine gene-environment interactions. Gene set approaches combine polymorphisms of genes involved in certain physiological pathways of interest, e.g. hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis regulator genes, or pro-inflammatory signaling. Both polygenic scores and gene sets will be used in a plasticity score fashion with regard to key outcomes at different ages (e.g. attachment security at 18 months, internalising/externalising behaviours at 12-13 years, social skills at 16-19 years).
Impact This collaboration is multi-disciplinary in that Prof Robert Kumsta comes from a genetic psychology background, while the research team includes academics from social science disciplines.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Collaboration with UK Department for International Development (DFID) 
Organisation Government of the UK
Department Department for International Development (DfID)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub policy engagement team was approached by DFID Advisers and specialists at Social Development Direct and that are working on adolescent girls and young women (AGYW). Their team wanted to synthesize recent evidence on what works in development contexts. The Hub responded with an up-to-date summary of the findings we have on AGYW in Africa, including successful interventions/services as well as bottlenecks to development.
Collaborator Contribution The evidence update on AGYW (produced by the Hub) was distributed to DFID Advisers that are working on AGYW well-being, as well as internal audience at Social Development Direct. It was aimed to influence research groups and development groups to increasingly consider the gender vulnerability and risk factors that they may encounter in their respective studies and projects.
Impact The outputs of this collaboration focused on multiple disciplines surrounding adolescent girls and young women- this ranges from health to education, from parenting support to stigma control. The aim is to collaboratively support a holistic approach towards female empowerment in development programmes.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Collaboration with UK Department for International Development (DFID) 
Organisation Social Development Direct
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub policy engagement team was approached by DFID Advisers and specialists at Social Development Direct and that are working on adolescent girls and young women (AGYW). Their team wanted to synthesize recent evidence on what works in development contexts. The Hub responded with an up-to-date summary of the findings we have on AGYW in Africa, including successful interventions/services as well as bottlenecks to development.
Collaborator Contribution The evidence update on AGYW (produced by the Hub) was distributed to DFID Advisers that are working on AGYW well-being, as well as internal audience at Social Development Direct. It was aimed to influence research groups and development groups to increasingly consider the gender vulnerability and risk factors that they may encounter in their respective studies and projects.
Impact The outputs of this collaboration focused on multiple disciplines surrounding adolescent girls and young women- this ranges from health to education, from parenting support to stigma control. The aim is to collaboratively support a holistic approach towards female empowerment in development programmes.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Collaboration with UNICEF ESARO 
Organisation UNICEF
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution In November 2018 the research team based at Oxford University and the University of Cape Town entered into a Programme Cooperation Agreement with UNICEF Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Office (ESARO). The UNICEF-ESARO Programme Cooperation Agreement aims to build relevant and robust evidence to identify factors affecting adolescent programming and inform provision of services and support. It will also provide expert capacity building to programme implementers, UNICEF country teams and UNICEF partners to provide differentiated services for adolescents. The research team's contribution for the duration of this the UNICEF-ESARO Programme Cooperation Agreement totals US$1,059,304. This includes costs of: cleaning the research data; ongoing training of local research teams in South Africa; ongoing engagement with policymakers; engaging annually with adolescent advisory groups to ensure that the research is adolescent-relevant and adolescent-friendly; and contribution into the dissemination of findings, reviews of evidence, and training of UNICEF staff and partners. This Programme Cooperation Agreement will also make use of two research studies which involved 5 years of data collection, training local research teams in South Africa, and engagement with policymakers in planning the research. This includes 3 years for Mzantsi Wakho data ($2,514,165) and 1 year for HEY BABY data ($793,113).
Collaborator Contribution UNICEF-ESARO will contribute US$400,000 towards 1) staff costs, workshop expenses and travel for the research team and 2) access to evidence-sharing and capacity-building opportunities for UNICEF ESARO country partners. Contributions from the research team and UNICEF-ESARO will support three main programme outputs: (1) generating real-life high-quality evidence on programming for better adolescent health and wellbeing outcomes, (2) provide expert-level knowledge exchange with ESARO country partners to strengthen the provision of differentiated adolescent programmes and (3) build the capacity of UNICEF Eastern and Southern African Regional Country Offices to engage in research and translate evidence into impactful programming. Activities corresponding to these outputs are described below. This contribution will support existing Mzantsi Wakho study and provide co-funding for data cleaning and 2 publications for this project. Programme output 1: data cleaning, merging and analysis on key programming-related research questions conducted on two major studies, manuscript drafting and policy briefs. Programme output 2: webinars, regional meetings, conferences or workshops to disseminate evidence with UNICEF and country partners and allow evidence building on programming for good health and HIV outcomes among adolescents and young people. Programme output 3: capacity building research clinics with priority countries to implement evidence-building tools to strengthen programming for good health and HIV outcomes among adolescents.
Impact Several outputs within three distinct collaboration objectives have resulted from this collaboration. ========================================================================================================= 1) Generating real-life high-quality evidence on programming for better adolescent health outcomes ========================================================================================================= 1a) Publication of three peer-reviewed articles and high-quality evidence shared to support programming for better adolescent health outcomes Paper 1: The systematic review provides an evidence update on interventions designed to improve antiretroviral therapy adherence and retention among adolescents (10-19) and youth (15-24) living with HIV. This reviewed empirical evidence published between January 2016 and June 2018. A search of 11 health and humanities databases generated 2425 citations and 10 relevant studies, the large majority conducted in sub-Saharan Africa. These include six clinic-level interventions, one individual-level m-Health trial, and three community- or household-level interventions. Findings highlight the need to further develop and test multi-faceted interventions that go beyond health facilities, to address broader social barriers to adherence and retention. Casale, C., et al. "Recent Interventions to Improve Retention in HIV Care and Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment Among Adolescents and Youth: A Systematic Review." AIDS Patient Care and STDs, vol. 33, no. 6, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, June 2019, pp. 237-52, doi:10.1089/apc.2018.0320. Paper 2: This analysis examined pathways in HIV care. Pathways were identified by tracing movements across facility and care types. Associations between transition pathways and viral failure, mortality, loss to follow-up, and viral load change were tested in sequential multivariate regressions. Two main pathways were identified: classical transition to adult HIV care (43.3%) and down-referral transition to primary healthcare clinics (56.7%). Across pathways, 27.3% experienced cyclical transition, or repeated movement between paediatric and non-paediatric care. Adolescents who experienced down-referral transition were less likely to demonstrate viral failure. Mortality and loss to follow-up were not associated with either pathway. Median post-transition viral load change was not clinically significant or associated with transition pathways. Interviews with healthcare providers found that informal "protocols" are implemented to mitigate risk of negative post-transition HIV outcomes. These findings propose a contextually relevant model for transitions out of paediatric HIV care in South Africa. Feasible and scalable "protocols" may mitigate risk of worsening post-transition HIV outcomes. Haghighat, R., et al. "Transition Pathways Out of Paediatric Care and Associated HIV Outcomes for Adolescents Living With HIV in South Africa." JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, vol. 82, no. 2, 2019. Key findings and policy messages in the recently published article on adolescent transition pathways by Roxanna Haghighat et al. will be summarised in a policy brief. This will extend the impact of these highly relevant findings to reach programme implementers as well as adolescent healthcare service providers. This policy brief will present newly identified patterns of transitions in care amongst adolescents living with HIV. Draft is currently in review. This policy brief will be disseminated to UNICEF Eastern and Southern Africa Country Offices who deliver programming and services for adolescents living with HIV. Furthermore, the policy brief will be disseminated more widely to policymakers and programme implementers. Paper 3: This paper examines differences in educational outcomes for adolescents living with HIV, in order to i) identify educational markers for targeting HIV testing, counselling and linkages to care, and ii) to identify essential foci of educational support for adolescents living with HIV. Living with HIV was associated with poorer attendance and educational delay. Key school-based markers for identifying unreached adolescents living with HIV may be low attendance, frequent sickness, low mood and slow learning. Toska, E., et al. "Educational Experiences and Needs of Adolescents Living with HIV in a South African Cohort." BMC Public Health, vol. 19, no. 1, 2019, p. 272, doi:10.1186/s12889-019-6580-0. 1b) Dataset cleaning activities: In preparation for the planned analysis to take place the research team has reached final stages of finalising a three-wave dataset using data collected from the world's largest longitudinal cohort study of adolescents living with HIV. 1c) Regular meetings held to discuss ongoing analysis and updates on activities between the research team and UNICEF-ESARO ========================================================================================================= 2) Expert-level knowledge exchange with UNICEF Eastern & Southern Africa Region country partners to strengthen the provision of differentiated adolescent programmes ========================================================================================================= 2a) Webinar Series: Evidence & Solutions for Adolescents in Eastern & Southern Africa The first webinar of the planned series was successfully held in September 2019. The webinar series provides an opportunity for UNICEF Eastern & Southern Africa Regional Country Offices to learn about the latest evidence and solutions to strengthen their programming and services for adolescents. The webinar was attended by 14 participants from UNICEF Eastern & Southern Africa Regional Country Offices. The webinar presentation slides, and recording were disseminated and shared to all 21 UNICEF Eastern & Southern Africa Regional Country Offices. The first webinar was titled: Beyond the Third 90: Supporting Adolescents Living with HIV To Remain Engaged in Care as They Transition to Adulthood. During the webinar findings were presented from two recent publications: 1. Dr Marisa Casale introduced the webinar by presenting results from a systematic review of Interventions to improve retention in HIV care and adherence to antiretroviral treatment among adolescents and youth. 2. This was followed by a presentation by doctoral researcher Roxanna Haghighat, presenting newly identified transition trajectories for adolescents living with HIV. Participants highlighted that was the first they have considered the complexity of transitions in adolescent HIV care and treatment. 2b) Review of evidence for UNICEF Eastern & Southern Africa countries The first review of evidence has been conducted and published in the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. This systematic review provides an evidence update of empirically evaluated interventions that keep adolescents in HIV treatment and care. Key messages were presented to UNICEF Eastern & Southern Africa Country Offices during a webinar in September 2019. This included identification of clinic and home-based interventions that show promise in improving adherence outcomes. The systematic review also highlights evidence gap and need to further develop and test multi-faceted interventions that go beyond health facilities. These may be important to address broader social barriers to adherence and retention. ========================================================================================================= 3) Build the capacity of UNICEF ESARO country offices to engage in research and use evidence-building tools in programme implementation ========================================================================================================= Oxford-UCT team provided feedback on a study protocol developed for research by UNICEF Zimbabwe: Prof Lucie Cluver and Dr Elona Toska provided feedback on the strengths of a study protocol drafted by UNICEF Zimbabwe. This included feedback on both the strengths of data collection tools as well as study design. Further feedback was provided in a follow-up meeting which allowed the Oxford -UCT team to provide expert knowledge exchange. The discussion from this meeting supported the implementation of research tools that would enhance the country office's (Zimbabwe) capacity to implement evidence-building tools. Oxford-UCT team provided feedback on a study protocol developed for research by UNICEF Tanzania: In early April 2019, the collaborators met with UNICEF Tanzania to discuss a study on adolescents living with HIV and education. Feedback on this study protocol allowed the country office to ensure that research aims are feasible to answer and applied appropriate research design. This consultation provided the country office with feedback that enhances the country to office to successfully implement evidence-building activities.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Collaboration with the Accelerator Labs in four African countries 
Organisation UNDP Accelerator Lab Eswatini
Country Swaziland 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Since November 2019, the policy engagement team in the Accelerate Hub started engaging with some of the UNDP Accelerator (Innovation) Labs in Africa. We started by communicating with the Gambia Lab on youth employment, then later expanded our contact to the South Sudanese, the Ethiopian and the Eswatini Accelerator Labs around the same employment focus. Through our collaboration we have shared: 1) the relevant evidence coming out of the Hub, 2) guidance on expanding impact across the SDGs, 3) youth engagement methodologies and, 4) academic skills (via survey design, monitoring advice and ethics guidelines). In February 2020, we set up an in-person meeting in New York with the Gambia, South Sudan and Ethiopia Lab to discuss the progress they've achieved so far.
Collaborator Contribution The Accelerator Labs have communicated with us with an open mind and a willingness to build on our evidence to help improve their interventions. Our goals are aligned in that the labs want to improve adolescent well being (via employment) through projects, programmes and workshops, while the Hub is able to provide the evidence on which services are likely to be most effective. Accordingly, the collaboration has created a co-learning environment for both the Hub and the Labs.
Impact The outcomes from this partnership spans multiple disciplines. The most significant outcomes were: - The Hub has supported the planning and advised on the evaluation of a 3D Printing workshop for youth in the Gambia. While aiming to 'localize' the UNDP in the Gambia, the Accelerator lab organised a 3-day event, where they brought tens of local youth teams to participate in a Hackathon. Looking through a youth employment scope; the event fostered a platform where young people can note which waste products could be recycled (via 3D printing) to form useful equipment that could be sold. The workshop built a foundation for youth entrepreneurship. - The Gambia Lab has rolled out GamJobs (https://www.facebook.com/gamjobs/posts/undp-gambia-office-is-accepting-application-for-position-of-ta-httpwwwgamjobscom/1042216815861575/) and the Hub has advised on methods to monitor the outputs and evaluate its impact across SDGs.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Collaboration with the Accelerator Labs in four African countries 
Organisation UNDP in South Sudan
Department The Accelerator Labs
Country South Sudan 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Since November 2019, the policy engagement team in the Accelerate Hub started engaging with some of the UNDP Accelerator (Innovation) Labs in Africa. We started by communicating with the Gambia Lab on youth employment, then later expanded our contact to the South Sudanese, the Ethiopian and the Eswatini Accelerator Labs around the same employment focus. Through our collaboration we have shared: 1) the relevant evidence coming out of the Hub, 2) guidance on expanding impact across the SDGs, 3) youth engagement methodologies and, 4) academic skills (via survey design, monitoring advice and ethics guidelines). In February 2020, we set up an in-person meeting in New York with the Gambia, South Sudan and Ethiopia Lab to discuss the progress they've achieved so far.
Collaborator Contribution The Accelerator Labs have communicated with us with an open mind and a willingness to build on our evidence to help improve their interventions. Our goals are aligned in that the labs want to improve adolescent well being (via employment) through projects, programmes and workshops, while the Hub is able to provide the evidence on which services are likely to be most effective. Accordingly, the collaboration has created a co-learning environment for both the Hub and the Labs.
Impact The outcomes from this partnership spans multiple disciplines. The most significant outcomes were: - The Hub has supported the planning and advised on the evaluation of a 3D Printing workshop for youth in the Gambia. While aiming to 'localize' the UNDP in the Gambia, the Accelerator lab organised a 3-day event, where they brought tens of local youth teams to participate in a Hackathon. Looking through a youth employment scope; the event fostered a platform where young people can note which waste products could be recycled (via 3D printing) to form useful equipment that could be sold. The workshop built a foundation for youth entrepreneurship. - The Gambia Lab has rolled out GamJobs (https://www.facebook.com/gamjobs/posts/undp-gambia-office-is-accepting-application-for-position-of-ta-httpwwwgamjobscom/1042216815861575/) and the Hub has advised on methods to monitor the outputs and evaluate its impact across SDGs.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Collaboration with the Accelerator Labs in four African countries 
Organisation UNDP, Accelerator Labs
Department Ethiopia Accalerator Labs
Country Ethiopia 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Since November 2019, the policy engagement team in the Accelerate Hub started engaging with some of the UNDP Accelerator (Innovation) Labs in Africa. We started by communicating with the Gambia Lab on youth employment, then later expanded our contact to the South Sudanese, the Ethiopian and the Eswatini Accelerator Labs around the same employment focus. Through our collaboration we have shared: 1) the relevant evidence coming out of the Hub, 2) guidance on expanding impact across the SDGs, 3) youth engagement methodologies and, 4) academic skills (via survey design, monitoring advice and ethics guidelines). In February 2020, we set up an in-person meeting in New York with the Gambia, South Sudan and Ethiopia Lab to discuss the progress they've achieved so far.
Collaborator Contribution The Accelerator Labs have communicated with us with an open mind and a willingness to build on our evidence to help improve their interventions. Our goals are aligned in that the labs want to improve adolescent well being (via employment) through projects, programmes and workshops, while the Hub is able to provide the evidence on which services are likely to be most effective. Accordingly, the collaboration has created a co-learning environment for both the Hub and the Labs.
Impact The outcomes from this partnership spans multiple disciplines. The most significant outcomes were: - The Hub has supported the planning and advised on the evaluation of a 3D Printing workshop for youth in the Gambia. While aiming to 'localize' the UNDP in the Gambia, the Accelerator lab organised a 3-day event, where they brought tens of local youth teams to participate in a Hackathon. Looking through a youth employment scope; the event fostered a platform where young people can note which waste products could be recycled (via 3D printing) to form useful equipment that could be sold. The workshop built a foundation for youth entrepreneurship. - The Gambia Lab has rolled out GamJobs (https://www.facebook.com/gamjobs/posts/undp-gambia-office-is-accepting-application-for-position-of-ta-httpwwwgamjobscom/1042216815861575/) and the Hub has advised on methods to monitor the outputs and evaluate its impact across SDGs.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Collaboration with the Department of Basic Education South Africa and Vodacom 
Organisation Department of Basic Education
Country South Africa 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Following the Zifune project, and in partnership with the Department of Education in South Africa, a national school intervention package will be developed to target bullying in schools. This anti-bullying initiative, called STOP-THINK-CONNECT is based on a model that focuses on the strength and quality of social connection. Core components from the Zifune intervention programme, along with findings from the Helping Adolescents Thrive (HAT) evidence review, will be incorporated into the STOP-THINK-CONNECT intervention package. The intervention package will be developed by the same research team involved in the development of the Zifune intervention programme. The intervention package will be developed in collaboration with the Department of Basic Education South Africa, learners of the targeted age group, as well as teachers.
Collaborator Contribution The anti-bulling initiative is co-designed with the Department of Basic Education. Resources and structures that are already put into place by the Department of Education will be used for the implementation and sustainability of the initiative.
Impact The collaboration is multi-disciplinary - it includes partners from the Department of Basic Education, learners from the targeted age group, teachers from various involved schools, and members from the Zifune research team who have a background in psychology.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Collaboration with the UNDP Global HIV and Health team 
Organisation United Nations (UN)
Department United Nations Development Programme
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The UNDP Global HIV and Health team started collaborating with the Accelerate Hub since its inception. In September 2019 the Hub hired a research officer that is now based in the UNDP HIV and Health team office in New York. The officer works closely with the team to identify routes to impact and to support an evidence-based approach to increasing adolescent well being in development contexts- specifically in Africa.
Collaborator Contribution One of the Hub's major goals is to translate research to impact, and the UNDP is a key partner that can strategically engage with the evidence produced throughout the lifetime of the award. The UNDP has contributed to this collaboration through: 1) Providing support and advise in the consolidation of the "Accelerator" concept 2) Participating in the Hubs' strategic advisory group (STRATA) and offering advice on which outcomes would be most useful to international development 3) Identifying potential entry points for youth and adolescent research in their workplans
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary partnership that connects health to other sectors and disciplines (especially to education, cash transfers, social welfare and climate change) . An Accelerate Hub research officer is now placed in the UNDP offices to further support the partnership; this has rippled on to support the inclusion of youth in UNDP country office programmes and to create a platform for supportive evidence from the Hub.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Collaboration with the UNDP Regional Service Center for Africa (RSCA) 
Organisation United Nations (UN)
Department United Nations Development Programme
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Through the Hub's partnership with the UNDP, we were introduced to the Climate team in UNDP regional service center for Africa (RSCA), based in Ethiopia. The UNDP RSCA leads on UNDP climate change policies and programmes across Africa. The Hub's role including the provision of evidence surrounding successful youth engagement. This supported more youth-inclusive planning within the UNDP RSCA office.
Collaborator Contribution To be able to turn evidence into practice, the UNDP RSCA is a key partner, especially since they're responsible for oversight of all country offices across Africa. They are keen to take up the evidence produced by the Accelerate Hub, as well as our approach to addressing the SDGs. On the other hand, the RSCA also provides the Hub with more contextual understanding on which evidence is most relevant to the UN country offices in Africa.
Impact This collaboration aggregates multiple disciplines to benefit young people, those include: agriculture, health, nutrition and digital technologies. Outputs: In Dec 2019, the RSCA was drafting out a programme promoting agriculture in peri-urban areas. The Hub supported the planning of this programme through highlighting the importance of including youth and digital technologies in agriculture; and the benefit of re-framing agriculture to be more appealing to youth and promote their involvement. The project proposal was submitted to the UNDP regional office in Feb 2020.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Collaboration with the UNDP-Global Fund partnership team 
Organisation United Nations (UN)
Department United Nations Development Programme
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Global Fund Partnership team is a group within the global UNDP team that holds the Global Fund grants to Southern and Eastern Africa. We have started collaborating with them for the well-being of Adolescent Girls and Young Women (AGYW). The Global Partnership team is well known for focusing on HIV, TB and Malaria; however, since AGYW are particularly vulnerable to those illnesses, they will be launching an AGYW programme (in 2021) to improve their conditions and promote gender equity. Combining evidence that came up from our studies, the Accelerate Hub will be providing an 'evidence summary' of the interventions/ policies/ services that positively impact AGYW.
Collaborator Contribution The summary will be distributed to UNDP country offices and is intended to guide planning for AGYW programmes in UNDP country offices around Africa. They are keen to have a concrete evidence base for the AGYW programmes they will enroll in 2021.
Impact This work focuses on multiple disciplines surrounding adolescent girls and young women- this ranges from health to education, from parenting support to stigma control. The aim is to collaboratively support a holistic approach towards female empowerment in development programmes.
Start Year 2019
 
Description GCRF Hubs cohort collaboration 
Organisation Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Our Hub manager, Maria Michalopoulou, engages on a regular and systematic basis with the Managers from the other Hubs in the cohort, through meetings, workshops, exchange of ideas, addressing common challenges, sharing of resources, drafting of common plan on joined up activities. This is a very effective forum and one that been created since the beginning of- and because of this award.
Collaborator Contribution Resources and issues raised by partners are communicated through the Hub manager across to this collaborative forum of Hub managers to offer or seek solutions that would benefit all Hubs in the cohort, especially on common processes and challenges.
Impact 1. Monthly Hub managers meeting, sharing progress, solutions and discussing issues raised within the Hubs. 2. Hub managers workshop in Newcastle, Nov 2019, led to a common statement/feedback shared with UKRI GCRF team. 3. Hub managers workshop in Cambridge, March 2020, to discuss current and new challenges across the cohort. 4. Coordination and cohort meetings on MEL framework, ongoing, to create a collaborative understanding and approach on MEL throughout the cohort.
Start Year 2019
 
Description GCRF Hubs cohort collaboration 
Organisation Coventry University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our Hub manager, Maria Michalopoulou, engages on a regular and systematic basis with the Managers from the other Hubs in the cohort, through meetings, workshops, exchange of ideas, addressing common challenges, sharing of resources, drafting of common plan on joined up activities. This is a very effective forum and one that been created since the beginning of- and because of this award.
Collaborator Contribution Resources and issues raised by partners are communicated through the Hub manager across to this collaborative forum of Hub managers to offer or seek solutions that would benefit all Hubs in the cohort, especially on common processes and challenges.
Impact 1. Monthly Hub managers meeting, sharing progress, solutions and discussing issues raised within the Hubs. 2. Hub managers workshop in Newcastle, Nov 2019, led to a common statement/feedback shared with UKRI GCRF team. 3. Hub managers workshop in Cambridge, March 2020, to discuss current and new challenges across the cohort. 4. Coordination and cohort meetings on MEL framework, ongoing, to create a collaborative understanding and approach on MEL throughout the cohort.
Start Year 2019
 
Description GCRF Hubs cohort collaboration 
Organisation Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our Hub manager, Maria Michalopoulou, engages on a regular and systematic basis with the Managers from the other Hubs in the cohort, through meetings, workshops, exchange of ideas, addressing common challenges, sharing of resources, drafting of common plan on joined up activities. This is a very effective forum and one that been created since the beginning of- and because of this award.
Collaborator Contribution Resources and issues raised by partners are communicated through the Hub manager across to this collaborative forum of Hub managers to offer or seek solutions that would benefit all Hubs in the cohort, especially on common processes and challenges.
Impact 1. Monthly Hub managers meeting, sharing progress, solutions and discussing issues raised within the Hubs. 2. Hub managers workshop in Newcastle, Nov 2019, led to a common statement/feedback shared with UKRI GCRF team. 3. Hub managers workshop in Cambridge, March 2020, to discuss current and new challenges across the cohort. 4. Coordination and cohort meetings on MEL framework, ongoing, to create a collaborative understanding and approach on MEL throughout the cohort.
Start Year 2019
 
Description GCRF Hubs cohort collaboration 
Organisation London International Development Centre
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our Hub manager, Maria Michalopoulou, engages on a regular and systematic basis with the Managers from the other Hubs in the cohort, through meetings, workshops, exchange of ideas, addressing common challenges, sharing of resources, drafting of common plan on joined up activities. This is a very effective forum and one that been created since the beginning of- and because of this award.
Collaborator Contribution Resources and issues raised by partners are communicated through the Hub manager across to this collaborative forum of Hub managers to offer or seek solutions that would benefit all Hubs in the cohort, especially on common processes and challenges.
Impact 1. Monthly Hub managers meeting, sharing progress, solutions and discussing issues raised within the Hubs. 2. Hub managers workshop in Newcastle, Nov 2019, led to a common statement/feedback shared with UKRI GCRF team. 3. Hub managers workshop in Cambridge, March 2020, to discuss current and new challenges across the cohort. 4. Coordination and cohort meetings on MEL framework, ongoing, to create a collaborative understanding and approach on MEL throughout the cohort.
Start Year 2019
 
Description GCRF Hubs cohort collaboration 
Organisation London School of Economics and Political Science (University of London)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our Hub manager, Maria Michalopoulou, engages on a regular and systematic basis with the Managers from the other Hubs in the cohort, through meetings, workshops, exchange of ideas, addressing common challenges, sharing of resources, drafting of common plan on joined up activities. This is a very effective forum and one that been created since the beginning of- and because of this award.
Collaborator Contribution Resources and issues raised by partners are communicated through the Hub manager across to this collaborative forum of Hub managers to offer or seek solutions that would benefit all Hubs in the cohort, especially on common processes and challenges.
Impact 1. Monthly Hub managers meeting, sharing progress, solutions and discussing issues raised within the Hubs. 2. Hub managers workshop in Newcastle, Nov 2019, led to a common statement/feedback shared with UKRI GCRF team. 3. Hub managers workshop in Cambridge, March 2020, to discuss current and new challenges across the cohort. 4. Coordination and cohort meetings on MEL framework, ongoing, to create a collaborative understanding and approach on MEL throughout the cohort.
Start Year 2019
 
Description GCRF Hubs cohort collaboration 
Organisation Newcastle University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our Hub manager, Maria Michalopoulou, engages on a regular and systematic basis with the Managers from the other Hubs in the cohort, through meetings, workshops, exchange of ideas, addressing common challenges, sharing of resources, drafting of common plan on joined up activities. This is a very effective forum and one that been created since the beginning of- and because of this award.
Collaborator Contribution Resources and issues raised by partners are communicated through the Hub manager across to this collaborative forum of Hub managers to offer or seek solutions that would benefit all Hubs in the cohort, especially on common processes and challenges.
Impact 1. Monthly Hub managers meeting, sharing progress, solutions and discussing issues raised within the Hubs. 2. Hub managers workshop in Newcastle, Nov 2019, led to a common statement/feedback shared with UKRI GCRF team. 3. Hub managers workshop in Cambridge, March 2020, to discuss current and new challenges across the cohort. 4. Coordination and cohort meetings on MEL framework, ongoing, to create a collaborative understanding and approach on MEL throughout the cohort.
Start Year 2019
 
Description GCRF Hubs cohort collaboration 
Organisation Royal Veterinary College (RVC)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our Hub manager, Maria Michalopoulou, engages on a regular and systematic basis with the Managers from the other Hubs in the cohort, through meetings, workshops, exchange of ideas, addressing common challenges, sharing of resources, drafting of common plan on joined up activities. This is a very effective forum and one that been created since the beginning of- and because of this award.
Collaborator Contribution Resources and issues raised by partners are communicated through the Hub manager across to this collaborative forum of Hub managers to offer or seek solutions that would benefit all Hubs in the cohort, especially on common processes and challenges.
Impact 1. Monthly Hub managers meeting, sharing progress, solutions and discussing issues raised within the Hubs. 2. Hub managers workshop in Newcastle, Nov 2019, led to a common statement/feedback shared with UKRI GCRF team. 3. Hub managers workshop in Cambridge, March 2020, to discuss current and new challenges across the cohort. 4. Coordination and cohort meetings on MEL framework, ongoing, to create a collaborative understanding and approach on MEL throughout the cohort.
Start Year 2019
 
Description GCRF Hubs cohort collaboration 
Organisation United Nations (UN)
Department UN Environment World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Our Hub manager, Maria Michalopoulou, engages on a regular and systematic basis with the Managers from the other Hubs in the cohort, through meetings, workshops, exchange of ideas, addressing common challenges, sharing of resources, drafting of common plan on joined up activities. This is a very effective forum and one that been created since the beginning of- and because of this award.
Collaborator Contribution Resources and issues raised by partners are communicated through the Hub manager across to this collaborative forum of Hub managers to offer or seek solutions that would benefit all Hubs in the cohort, especially on common processes and challenges.
Impact 1. Monthly Hub managers meeting, sharing progress, solutions and discussing issues raised within the Hubs. 2. Hub managers workshop in Newcastle, Nov 2019, led to a common statement/feedback shared with UKRI GCRF team. 3. Hub managers workshop in Cambridge, March 2020, to discuss current and new challenges across the cohort. 4. Coordination and cohort meetings on MEL framework, ongoing, to create a collaborative understanding and approach on MEL throughout the cohort.
Start Year 2019
 
Description GCRF Hubs cohort collaboration 
Organisation University of Edinburgh
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our Hub manager, Maria Michalopoulou, engages on a regular and systematic basis with the Managers from the other Hubs in the cohort, through meetings, workshops, exchange of ideas, addressing common challenges, sharing of resources, drafting of common plan on joined up activities. This is a very effective forum and one that been created since the beginning of- and because of this award.
Collaborator Contribution Resources and issues raised by partners are communicated through the Hub manager across to this collaborative forum of Hub managers to offer or seek solutions that would benefit all Hubs in the cohort, especially on common processes and challenges.
Impact 1. Monthly Hub managers meeting, sharing progress, solutions and discussing issues raised within the Hubs. 2. Hub managers workshop in Newcastle, Nov 2019, led to a common statement/feedback shared with UKRI GCRF team. 3. Hub managers workshop in Cambridge, March 2020, to discuss current and new challenges across the cohort. 4. Coordination and cohort meetings on MEL framework, ongoing, to create a collaborative understanding and approach on MEL throughout the cohort.
Start Year 2019
 
Description GCRF Hubs cohort collaboration 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our Hub manager, Maria Michalopoulou, engages on a regular and systematic basis with the Managers from the other Hubs in the cohort, through meetings, workshops, exchange of ideas, addressing common challenges, sharing of resources, drafting of common plan on joined up activities. This is a very effective forum and one that been created since the beginning of- and because of this award.
Collaborator Contribution Resources and issues raised by partners are communicated through the Hub manager across to this collaborative forum of Hub managers to offer or seek solutions that would benefit all Hubs in the cohort, especially on common processes and challenges.
Impact 1. Monthly Hub managers meeting, sharing progress, solutions and discussing issues raised within the Hubs. 2. Hub managers workshop in Newcastle, Nov 2019, led to a common statement/feedback shared with UKRI GCRF team. 3. Hub managers workshop in Cambridge, March 2020, to discuss current and new challenges across the cohort. 4. Coordination and cohort meetings on MEL framework, ongoing, to create a collaborative understanding and approach on MEL throughout the cohort.
Start Year 2019
 
Description National Health Laboratory Services of South Africa 
Organisation National Health Laboratory Services, South Africa
Country South Africa 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Since the study started, the research team has built a collaboration with Professor Gayle Sherman at the National Health Laboratory Services (NHLS) of South Africa. Through this partnership, we will match - using an algorithm developed and tested by the NHLS team - adolescent parent and child laboratory outcomes (HIV test results, viral load, TB tests) to their interview data in 2018-2021. The research will collect secondary data to link adolescent and child medical records to adolescent interviews in collaboration with the National Health Laboratory Service of South Africa. Most adolescent parents and their children access public health services in one of the 79 health facilities with whom our research team works closely. These facilities collect and store health information such as access to PMTCT (prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV) care, child HIV testing and results, and child immunisation records. The study has asked consent from all adolescent parents and caregivers to access this information from their medical files. Upon completion of baseline data collection in July 2019, lead investigator (Dr Toska) and a team of early career researchers (Nontokozo Langwenya, Eda He, Roxanna Haghighat, Dr Anna Carlqvist, Siya Zhou & Silinga Dzumbunu) will prepare a dataset to facilitate matching of up to 1500 adolescents living with HIV (including adolescent mothers and their children). Facilitated through a formal collaboration agreement with the NHLS team, data will be transferred for matching to take place from mid-2020 onwards. The team of researchers leading this endeavour are in the final stages of finalising the dataset required for the NHLS team to run matching algorithms. The first round of matching results is set to be completed by mid-2020.
Collaborator Contribution Professor Gayle Sherman at the National Health Laboratory Services (NHLS) of South Africa will use participant information collected by the research team to match study participants to data stored at the NHLS repository. Professor Sherman's team has provided consultation about type of information the research team should collect from participants - for example, variations in name spellings - in order to maximise possibility of accurately matching research participants to data sorted at the NHLS.
Impact This will enable us to use social science data and methods to identify what can help with health outcomes measured through rigorous biomedical tests. The collaboration with NHLS extends the existing medical records data collection that the team has been already conducting, by ensuring that data available from health facilities outside the catchment area are included in the dataset, with adolescent patient and caregiver consent.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Partnership with the UNDP Global Youth Team 
Organisation United Nations (UN)
Department United Nations Development Programme
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution In October 2019, the Hub started a partnership with the Global UNDP Youth team in New York. The Hub has agreed to provide evidence to the youth team (especially on adolescent health and its benefit across SDGs), and assist with our in-team academic expertise.
Collaborator Contribution The Global UNDP Youth team is responsible for oversight of all the UNDP teams that are working on youth development, they are also the organisational focal point for other UN agencies that want to start projects/ policies surrounding the well-being of young people. The Youth team has been eager to use the evidence arising from the Hub to improve on their current programmes as well as start planning new ones.
Impact The outputs from this partnership connect adolescents' health to multiple disciplines (education, violence prevention, political capita...etc). So far we have been working with the Youth team on a call of action for violence prevention, on an external UN webinar, on youth engagement in UN programmes and on focusing further on African services/ projects.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation African Union Development Agency
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria
Country Switzerland 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation International AIDS Society (IAS)
Department Collaborative Initiative for Paediatric HIV Education and Research
Country Switzerland 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation New York University
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation Oak Foundation
Country Global 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation UN Women
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation UNAIDS, Eastern and Southern Africa
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation UNDP, Accelerator Labs
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation UNICEF
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation United Kingdom Research and Innovation
Department Economic and Social Research Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation United Nations (UN)
Department United Nations Development Programme
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation United Nations (UN)
Department United Nations Development Programme
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation United Nations Population Fund
Department Adolescent and Youth Programme
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation United Nations University-International Institute for Global Health
Country Malaysia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation United States Agency for International Development
Department Orphans and Vulnerable Children Department
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation United States Agency for International Development
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) 
Organisation World Health Organization (WHO)
Department Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health
Country Switzerland 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has developed a Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA)', a group of international partners and collaborators who are interested in our work and able and willing to provide strategic advice on how to take it forward to ensure it has maximum impact on policy and practice. The group includes representatives from many high-profile agencies, including UNDP, African Union, WHO, World Food Programme, Oak Foundation, UNAIDS, UNICEF, Bill & Belinda Gates Foundation, USAID-PEPFAR, The Global Fund, UNFPA, International AIDS Society, UN University and UN Women. Representatives include high-profile men and women, representatives from DAC countries, and those working in a variety of disciplines. The group met face-to-face in New York in September, where Hub Leads presented on the 'Accelerator' concept, shared evidence from the Hub's proof-of-concept paper published in the Lancet in 2019, and talked about future research plans and work with our Teen Advisory Group.
Collaborator Contribution The partners shared their thoughts and insights on the Accelerator concept, early evidence and work plans - and offered strategic advice and guidance on how to take forward and develop our work in a number of areas. In particular they highlighted the need to develop a focused and systematic approach to policy engagement and influencing, particularly at country level, in order to maximise the impact of its evidence by national governments, institutions and agencies. We continue to engage with STRATA members on an ongoing basis according to their interests, and to take forward particular elements of our research or influencing with individual members..
Impact STRATA is multi-disciplinary and includes members from various organisations, including UN organisations, private foundations, and other agencies. Their backgrounds range from health and social welfare to economics and development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description UKRI GCRF Accelerating Achievement for Africa's Adolescents Hub Research Partnership 
Organisation African School of Economics
Country Benin 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has made research grants available to the research partners listed above. We also provide coordination, support, capacity building and administrative support available to the partners.
Collaborator Contribution Research partners are contributing to the development of individual trials and studies. They are also contributing to the overall development of our thinking and understanding about accelerators.
Impact This collaboration is multi-disciplinary. The collaboration covers social science, economics, psychology, health sciences, english and humanities.
Start Year 2019
 
Description UKRI GCRF Accelerating Achievement for Africa's Adolescents Hub Research Partnership 
Organisation African Union Development Agency
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has made research grants available to the research partners listed above. We also provide coordination, support, capacity building and administrative support available to the partners.
Collaborator Contribution Research partners are contributing to the development of individual trials and studies. They are also contributing to the overall development of our thinking and understanding about accelerators.
Impact This collaboration is multi-disciplinary. The collaboration covers social science, economics, psychology, health sciences, english and humanities.
Start Year 2019
 
Description UKRI GCRF Accelerating Achievement for Africa's Adolescents Hub Research Partnership 
Organisation Agency for Research and Development Initiative
Country South Sudan 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has made research grants available to the research partners listed above. We also provide coordination, support, capacity building and administrative support available to the partners.
Collaborator Contribution Research partners are contributing to the development of individual trials and studies. They are also contributing to the overall development of our thinking and understanding about accelerators.
Impact This collaboration is multi-disciplinary. The collaboration covers social science, economics, psychology, health sciences, english and humanities.
Start Year 2019
 
Description UKRI GCRF Accelerating Achievement for Africa's Adolescents Hub Research Partnership 
Organisation Busara Center for Behavioral Economics
Country Kenya 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has made research grants available to the research partners listed above. We also provide coordination, support, capacity building and administrative support available to the partners.
Collaborator Contribution Research partners are contributing to the development of individual trials and studies. They are also contributing to the overall development of our thinking and understanding about accelerators.
Impact This collaboration is multi-disciplinary. The collaboration covers social science, economics, psychology, health sciences, english and humanities.
Start Year 2019
 
Description UKRI GCRF Accelerating Achievement for Africa's Adolescents Hub Research Partnership 
Organisation London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has made research grants available to the research partners listed above. We also provide coordination, support, capacity building and administrative support available to the partners.
Collaborator Contribution Research partners are contributing to the development of individual trials and studies. They are also contributing to the overall development of our thinking and understanding about accelerators.
Impact This collaboration is multi-disciplinary. The collaboration covers social science, economics, psychology, health sciences, english and humanities.
Start Year 2019
 
Description UKRI GCRF Accelerating Achievement for Africa's Adolescents Hub Research Partnership 
Organisation National Institute for Medical Research, Tanzania
Department Mwanza Intervention Trials Unit (MITU)
Country Tanzania, United Republic of 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has made research grants available to the research partners listed above. We also provide coordination, support, capacity building and administrative support available to the partners.
Collaborator Contribution Research partners are contributing to the development of individual trials and studies. They are also contributing to the overall development of our thinking and understanding about accelerators.
Impact This collaboration is multi-disciplinary. The collaboration covers social science, economics, psychology, health sciences, english and humanities.
Start Year 2019
 
Description UKRI GCRF Accelerating Achievement for Africa's Adolescents Hub Research Partnership 
Organisation North-West University
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has made research grants available to the research partners listed above. We also provide coordination, support, capacity building and administrative support available to the partners.
Collaborator Contribution Research partners are contributing to the development of individual trials and studies. They are also contributing to the overall development of our thinking and understanding about accelerators.
Impact This collaboration is multi-disciplinary. The collaboration covers social science, economics, psychology, health sciences, english and humanities.
Start Year 2019
 
Description UKRI GCRF Accelerating Achievement for Africa's Adolescents Hub Research Partnership 
Organisation University College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has made research grants available to the research partners listed above. We also provide coordination, support, capacity building and administrative support available to the partners.
Collaborator Contribution Research partners are contributing to the development of individual trials and studies. They are also contributing to the overall development of our thinking and understanding about accelerators.
Impact This collaboration is multi-disciplinary. The collaboration covers social science, economics, psychology, health sciences, english and humanities.
Start Year 2019
 
Description UKRI GCRF Accelerating Achievement for Africa's Adolescents Hub Research Partnership 
Organisation University of Cape Town
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has made research grants available to the research partners listed above. We also provide coordination, support, capacity building and administrative support available to the partners.
Collaborator Contribution Research partners are contributing to the development of individual trials and studies. They are also contributing to the overall development of our thinking and understanding about accelerators.
Impact This collaboration is multi-disciplinary. The collaboration covers social science, economics, psychology, health sciences, english and humanities.
Start Year 2019
 
Description UKRI GCRF Accelerating Achievement for Africa's Adolescents Hub Research Partnership 
Organisation University of Dodoma
Country Tanzania, United Republic of 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has made research grants available to the research partners listed above. We also provide coordination, support, capacity building and administrative support available to the partners.
Collaborator Contribution Research partners are contributing to the development of individual trials and studies. They are also contributing to the overall development of our thinking and understanding about accelerators.
Impact This collaboration is multi-disciplinary. The collaboration covers social science, economics, psychology, health sciences, english and humanities.
Start Year 2019
 
Description UKRI GCRF Accelerating Achievement for Africa's Adolescents Hub Research Partnership 
Organisation University of Edinburgh
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has made research grants available to the research partners listed above. We also provide coordination, support, capacity building and administrative support available to the partners.
Collaborator Contribution Research partners are contributing to the development of individual trials and studies. They are also contributing to the overall development of our thinking and understanding about accelerators.
Impact This collaboration is multi-disciplinary. The collaboration covers social science, economics, psychology, health sciences, english and humanities.
Start Year 2019
 
Description UKRI GCRF Accelerating Achievement for Africa's Adolescents Hub Research Partnership 
Organisation University of Ibadan
Country Nigeria 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has made research grants available to the research partners listed above. We also provide coordination, support, capacity building and administrative support available to the partners.
Collaborator Contribution Research partners are contributing to the development of individual trials and studies. They are also contributing to the overall development of our thinking and understanding about accelerators.
Impact This collaboration is multi-disciplinary. The collaboration covers social science, economics, psychology, health sciences, english and humanities.
Start Year 2019
 
Description UKRI GCRF Accelerating Achievement for Africa's Adolescents Hub Research Partnership 
Organisation University of KwaZulu-Natal
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has made research grants available to the research partners listed above. We also provide coordination, support, capacity building and administrative support available to the partners.
Collaborator Contribution Research partners are contributing to the development of individual trials and studies. They are also contributing to the overall development of our thinking and understanding about accelerators.
Impact This collaboration is multi-disciplinary. The collaboration covers social science, economics, psychology, health sciences, english and humanities.
Start Year 2019
 
Description UKRI GCRF Accelerating Achievement for Africa's Adolescents Hub Research Partnership 
Organisation University of Stellenbosch
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has made research grants available to the research partners listed above. We also provide coordination, support, capacity building and administrative support available to the partners.
Collaborator Contribution Research partners are contributing to the development of individual trials and studies. They are also contributing to the overall development of our thinking and understanding about accelerators.
Impact This collaboration is multi-disciplinary. The collaboration covers social science, economics, psychology, health sciences, english and humanities.
Start Year 2019
 
Description UKRI GCRF Accelerating Achievement for Africa's Adolescents Hub Research Partnership 
Organisation University of Zambia
Country Zambia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has made research grants available to the research partners listed above. We also provide coordination, support, capacity building and administrative support available to the partners.
Collaborator Contribution Research partners are contributing to the development of individual trials and studies. They are also contributing to the overall development of our thinking and understanding about accelerators.
Impact This collaboration is multi-disciplinary. The collaboration covers social science, economics, psychology, health sciences, english and humanities.
Start Year 2019
 
Description UKRI GCRF Accelerating Achievement for Africa's Adolescents Hub Research Partnership 
Organisation University of the Western Cape
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has made research grants available to the research partners listed above. We also provide coordination, support, capacity building and administrative support available to the partners.
Collaborator Contribution Research partners are contributing to the development of individual trials and studies. They are also contributing to the overall development of our thinking and understanding about accelerators.
Impact This collaboration is multi-disciplinary. The collaboration covers social science, economics, psychology, health sciences, english and humanities.
Start Year 2019
 
Description UKRI GCRF Accelerating Achievement for Africa's Adolescents Hub Research Partnership 
Organisation Wellcome Trust
Department KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme
Country Kenya 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Accelerate Hub has made research grants available to the research partners listed above. We also provide coordination, support, capacity building and administrative support available to the partners.
Collaborator Contribution Research partners are contributing to the development of individual trials and studies. They are also contributing to the overall development of our thinking and understanding about accelerators.
Impact This collaboration is multi-disciplinary. The collaboration covers social science, economics, psychology, health sciences, english and humanities.
Start Year 2019
 
Description WP4&5: Partnership with Clowns Without Borders South Africa 
Organisation Clowns Without Borders South Africa
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Several researchers from the GCRF Accelerate Hub working on the Parenting for Lifelong Health (PLH) suite of parenting programmes have partnered with Clowns Without Borders South Africa (CWBSA) since 2013. CWBSA, as the dissemination and capacity-building partner for PLH, has led the implementation and scale-up of programmes across 25 low- and middle-income countries, reaching over 600 000 beneficiaries. Through the Hub's PLH-SUPER study (WP5), our team has contributed to building the evidence-base of the programmes that CWBSA delivers. Our team has also provided intellectual input into the development of monitoring and evaluation tools and training that CWBSA provides to its clients. Through this, and through ongoing studies of PLH, we have contributed to building the evidence-base of the programmes that CWBSA delivers. Through the Hub's PLH Digital study (WP4), our team has provided CWBSA with an opportunity to contribute to a digital interaction of one of their programmes, which will draw greater interest to their work.
Collaborator Contribution For PLH-SUPER, CWBSA provides valuable connections to implementing partners delivering the PLH programmes and is the vehicle through which monitoring and evaluation support is provided to programme implementers. CWBSA offers critical insights into the realities of implementation on the ground, which can inform programme development and the research's team's research approach. For PLH Digital, CWBSA will be central to developing the script for the digital version of the programme.
Impact This collaboration is multi-disciplinary in that CWBSA is an arts-based non-profit organisation, which includes staff members who are performing artists, while the research team includes academics from social science disciplines (i.e., Psychology, Social Work).
Start Year 2013
 
Description WP4: Collaboration with UNICEF Headquarters and UNICEF South Africa 
Organisation UNICEF
Department UNICEF South Africa
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Our research team has organised and held several meetings with the Child Protection and Information and Communication Technology (ICT) teams of UNICEF to discuss the possibility of them collaborating with us on the Parenting for Lifelong Health (PLH) Digital project. As a result of these meetings, we had staff from UNICEF South Africa and UNICEF Headquarters (HQ) participate in the development meeting we held in January 2020 with the app developers and other key stakeholders. At the invitation of UNICEF HQ, we presented on PLH Digital at UNICEF HQ in New York. Based on the recommendation of UNICEF HQ, we developed personas and user stories of potential users, which led to more fruitful brainstorming sessions with them. Further, at their request, we are working on building a business case for the project.
Collaborator Contribution Although the collaboration with UNICEF on PLH Digital was only initiated in November 2019, they have already made invaluable contributions to the project. In our development meetings, colleagues from UNICEF South Africa and UNICEF HQ actively contributed to app conceptualisation and planning. Our meetings with the ICT team at the HQ led to the development of personas and user stories. These tools have enabled us to conceptualise and visualise what potential users would want to see in the app. Additionally, staff of UNICEF HQ introduced us to the UNICEF team working on Internet of Good Things (IOGT) which offers data-free access to the internet to people all over the world; IOGT is presently in 64 countries but is expanding. The collaboration with the IOGT team may lead to the app being embedded within IOGT thus allowing adolescents and parents to use the app without the worry of data costs.
Impact No outputs yet.
Start Year 2019
 
Description WP4: Collaboration with UNICEF Headquarters and UNICEF South Africa 
Organisation UNICEF
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Our research team has organised and held several meetings with the Child Protection and Information and Communication Technology (ICT) teams of UNICEF to discuss the possibility of them collaborating with us on the Parenting for Lifelong Health (PLH) Digital project. As a result of these meetings, we had staff from UNICEF South Africa and UNICEF Headquarters (HQ) participate in the development meeting we held in January 2020 with the app developers and other key stakeholders. At the invitation of UNICEF HQ, we presented on PLH Digital at UNICEF HQ in New York. Based on the recommendation of UNICEF HQ, we developed personas and user stories of potential users, which led to more fruitful brainstorming sessions with them. Further, at their request, we are working on building a business case for the project.
Collaborator Contribution Although the collaboration with UNICEF on PLH Digital was only initiated in November 2019, they have already made invaluable contributions to the project. In our development meetings, colleagues from UNICEF South Africa and UNICEF HQ actively contributed to app conceptualisation and planning. Our meetings with the ICT team at the HQ led to the development of personas and user stories. These tools have enabled us to conceptualise and visualise what potential users would want to see in the app. Additionally, staff of UNICEF HQ introduced us to the UNICEF team working on Internet of Good Things (IOGT) which offers data-free access to the internet to people all over the world; IOGT is presently in 64 countries but is expanding. The collaboration with the IOGT team may lead to the app being embedded within IOGT thus allowing adolescents and parents to use the app without the worry of data costs.
Impact No outputs yet.
Start Year 2019
 
Description WP4: Collaboration with the African Maths Initiative (AMI) and Innovations in Development, Education and the Mathematical Sciences (IDEMS) 
Organisation African Maths Initiative
Country Kenya 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Parenting for Lifelong Health Digital (PLH Digital) project includes a collaboration with the African Maths Initiative (AMI) and Innovations in Development, Education and the Mathematical Sciences (IDEMS). To facilitate this collaboration, our team organised several meetings with members of both of these organisations, where we laid the initial groundwork of the partnership. Additionally, to provide relevant background on the project and the PLH for Teens programme, we held a development meeting which was attended by IDEMS, AMI, developers of the PLH for Teens programme, implementers and other relevant parties. Thereafter, we held focus group discussions with past PLH for Teens participants so that the team, including IDEMS and AMI, could learn more about the impact of the in-person programme and the expectations of potential app users. The focus group discussions also provide IDEMS and AMI access to families that will form the app co-creation team. For successful collaboration, we have made and continue to make available to IDEMS and AMI our network of resources. This collaboration will also give young Kenyan coders an opportunity to get experience in a project-oriented atmosphere thereby contributing to capacity building in DAC countries and enabling us to adhere to the theme of "for DAC families, by DAC families".
Collaborator Contribution IDEMS is a UK Community Interest Company that aims to create the next generation of software and app developers in DAC countries. In addition to the experience in software development that they bring on board, they have worked extensively in DAC countries and understand the context. Hence, they are in an excellent position to design and develop an app that will be usable and acceptable in DAC countries. Their vision for capacity-building through the development of app developers in Kenya aligns with our mission to build capacity in DAC countries. We have been deeply impressed by their enthusiasm and commitment, both of which are crucial to the project's success. AMI is a Kenyan NGO formed by mathematicians and mathematics educators who are working to create a stronger mathematical community and culture of mathematics across Africa in all academic levels. Besides the enthusiasm and commitment that AMI has shown in the project, they have graciously offered the use of their office, at no cost, for the focus group discussions in Kenya. These discussions are aimed at building a co-creation team for the app development and design. Both IDEMS and AMI will work together to design and develop the app, with feedback from the co-creation team.
Impact Through this partnership, our team conducted focus group discussions with past PLH for Teens participants in South Africa to inform app development. These discussions also led to the creation of the co-development team, which includes caregivers and adolescents.
Start Year 2019
 
Description WP4: Collaboration with the African Maths Initiative (AMI) and Innovations in Development, Education and the Mathematical Sciences (IDEMS) 
Organisation Innovations in Development, Education and the Mathematical Sciences
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Parenting for Lifelong Health Digital (PLH Digital) project includes a collaboration with the African Maths Initiative (AMI) and Innovations in Development, Education and the Mathematical Sciences (IDEMS). To facilitate this collaboration, our team organised several meetings with members of both of these organisations, where we laid the initial groundwork of the partnership. Additionally, to provide relevant background on the project and the PLH for Teens programme, we held a development meeting which was attended by IDEMS, AMI, developers of the PLH for Teens programme, implementers and other relevant parties. Thereafter, we held focus group discussions with past PLH for Teens participants so that the team, including IDEMS and AMI, could learn more about the impact of the in-person programme and the expectations of potential app users. The focus group discussions also provide IDEMS and AMI access to families that will form the app co-creation team. For successful collaboration, we have made and continue to make available to IDEMS and AMI our network of resources. This collaboration will also give young Kenyan coders an opportunity to get experience in a project-oriented atmosphere thereby contributing to capacity building in DAC countries and enabling us to adhere to the theme of "for DAC families, by DAC families".
Collaborator Contribution IDEMS is a UK Community Interest Company that aims to create the next generation of software and app developers in DAC countries. In addition to the experience in software development that they bring on board, they have worked extensively in DAC countries and understand the context. Hence, they are in an excellent position to design and develop an app that will be usable and acceptable in DAC countries. Their vision for capacity-building through the development of app developers in Kenya aligns with our mission to build capacity in DAC countries. We have been deeply impressed by their enthusiasm and commitment, both of which are crucial to the project's success. AMI is a Kenyan NGO formed by mathematicians and mathematics educators who are working to create a stronger mathematical community and culture of mathematics across Africa in all academic levels. Besides the enthusiasm and commitment that AMI has shown in the project, they have graciously offered the use of their office, at no cost, for the focus group discussions in Kenya. These discussions are aimed at building a co-creation team for the app development and design. Both IDEMS and AMI will work together to design and develop the app, with feedback from the co-creation team.
Impact Through this partnership, our team conducted focus group discussions with past PLH for Teens participants in South Africa to inform app development. These discussions also led to the creation of the co-development team, which includes caregivers and adolescents.
Start Year 2019
 
Description WP4: GiveDirectly in Kenya 
Organisation GiveDirectly
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution GiveDirectly was the implementing partner in our research trial. We contributed to this partnership in a few ways. 1. We supplied the theory and resources around developing the a video / documentary that targets psychological constraints of GiveDirectly beneficiaries. 2. We conducted a randomized controlled trial with almost 8,000 of GiveDirectly beneficiaries to test the impact of whether aspirational video used in testing whether alleviating internal constraints can improve economic outcomes
Collaborator Contribution GiveDirectly has contributed to this partnership in a few ways: 1. They allow us to a run scientific study as part of their normal operations. They covered the expenses for the logistical part of the randomized controlled trial and provided the necessary contacts to the study participants. 2. They have given each household a cash transfer of $1,100 (USD in nominal terms) to a total of 8,000 households in western Kenya as part of the study to see impact of cash transfers and aspirational videos.
Impact Outputs will be a working paper, forthcoming.
Start Year 2016
 
Description WP4: IPA in Kenya 
Organisation Innovations for Poverty Action (IPA)
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We contributed to this partnership in a few ways: 1. We provided the intervention needed (an aspirational documentary) in order to implement the randomised trial. 2. We worked with IPA staff members weekly to ensure study design was implemented to the highest standards, helped troubleshoot issues in the field, and gave overall guidance (timelines, data quality, etc) needed for the study.
Collaborator Contribution Innovations for Poverty Action (IPA) was our collaboration research partner for the GiveDirectly research trial in western Kenya. IPA contributed in two ways: 1. They dedicated existing staff time before, during, and after the execution of the randomised trial to ensure study was done to the standards of principal investigators 2. They were our on-the-ground partners in gathering data and administering the intervention. This included all hiring, training, and field monitoring needed to ensure the randomised trial was implemented correctly.
Impact A working paper will be the output, forthcoming.
Start Year 2016
 
Description WP4: JPAL in South Africa 
Organisation J-PAL
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We contributed to this partnership in a few ways: 1. We provided the intervention needed (assessments tests that illustrated skill signalling) in order to implement the randomised trial. 2. We worked with JPAL staff members weekly to ensure study design was implemented to the highest standards, helped troubleshoot issues in the field, and gave overall guidance (timelines, data quality, etc) needed for the study.
Collaborator Contribution JPAL was our collaboration research partner for the Harambee research trial in Johannesburg. JPAL contributed in two ways: 1. They dedicated existing staff time before, during, and after the execution of the randomised trial to ensure study was done to the standards of principal investigators 2. They were our on-the-ground partners in gathering data and administering the intervention. This included all hiring, training, and field monitoring needed to ensure the randomised trial was implemented correctly.
Impact Working paper "Job Search and Matching with Two-Sided Limited Information".
Start Year 2012
 
Description WP5 Collaboration-Young1ove 
Organisation Young1ove, Botswana
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Collaboration with Young1ove: the main contributions so far have been: (1) setting up the project and administering the collaboration/liaising with GCRF; (2) running the entire recruitment process for the post-doc position; (3) my visit to Young 1ove and meetings with management there to solidify the collaborative relationship; and (4) my visit to and meetings with Young 1ove and current work writing up the Young 1ove M&E scaling case study. This last point is an essential component of the partnership. N.B. Young 1ove's research manager will be coming to visit Oxford but this is not yet arranged and clearly isn't covered in the reporting period.
Collaborator Contribution Collaboration with Young1ove-In terms of contributions to the collaboration, Noam's input to: (1) the overall project focus, design and set-up; and (2) recruitment of the post-doc who will jointly based in Oxford and at Young1ove in Botswana, are key from the Young1ove side. The Young1ove research manager also e-met with the top two candidates as part of the recruitment vetting process. In addition, Young1ove hosted me when I visited the organisation.
Impact • Comparative case studies of selected multi-disciplinary organisations working with African youth undertaking intervention scale-ups about their monitoring and evaluation processes.
Start Year 2019
 
Description WP5: Collaboration with Parenting for Lifelong Health Implementing Partners 
Organisation Clowns Without Borders South Africa
Department Parenting for Lifelong Health Implementing Partners
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Together with Clowns Without Borders South Africa, the Parenting for Lifelong Health Scale-Up of Parenting Evaluation Research (PLH-SUPER) study has partnered with various implementing partners delivering the PLH programmes across the globe, including in 14 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa (Botswana, Cameroon, Cote D'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Eswatini, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, South Africa, South Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia). Implementing partners include large international development agencies, including Pact (Eswatini, Tanzania), Catholic Relief Services (DRC, Cameroon, Lesotho, Malawi, South Sudan, Uganda), AMPATH, FHI360 (Ethiopia) and Stepping Stones International (Botswana), smaller community-based organisations, such as the Keiskamma Trust (South Africa), and national programmes, such as the Programme National des Orphelins et Enfants (Cote D'Ivoire). The scale of implementation ranges from site to site, but has typically been between several hundred families to 40,000 families. Our research team works with partners to strengthen their monitoring and evaluation processes so that they are more able to track the programme delivery and impact among their beneficiaries. Capacity-building in this area is valued by partners as it allows for strengthened services provision and ability to report on outcomes to donors.
Collaborator Contribution Implementing partners are invited to share their anonymised routine monitoring and evaluation data with the research team. To date, we have received data contributions from the DRC, South Sudan and Tanzania. This sharing of data will allow the research team to create a multi-country dataset that will enable much-needed real-world insights into programme delivery and effective at scale and in the real-world (and across contexts). Partners also provide the research team with an understanding of on the ground implementation challenges which helps us interpret incoming data and inform the monitoring and evaluation training we provide to them.
Impact This collaboration brings together academic researchers and staff from non-profit organisations. Several outputs are in preparation, including a commentary on the PLH-SUPER study and a journal article on findings from the implementation of PLH for Young Children and PLH for Teens in South Sudan.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Young Carers; HEY BABY; Mzantsi Wakho & Sinovuyo Teen Study: Lifeline South Africa 
Organisation Lifeline South Africa
Country South Africa 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The research team pays for counselling services for our most vulnerable research participants and local fieldwork staff. The research team also provides knowledge exchanges by reporting on relevant research findings to partners at Lifeline South Africa.
Collaborator Contribution We provide referral of participants and local staff to counselling services. Lifeline South Africa provides counselling for all of our local staff who may have experienced vicarious trauma throughout conducting fieldwork activities. Lifeline also provides counselling to our young research participants.
Impact Access to Lifeline allows us to refer research participants to counselling services. During interviews participants may disclose traumatic events they have experienced and ask research assistants support for accessing local services to support mental health and wellbeing. In addition, we have found this service useful to refer team members to who may experience vicarious trauma.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Expert meeting to review the preliminary findings and discuss the main messages of the Global status report on preventing violence against children, 19-20 Nov 2019, organised by World Health Organisation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Lucie Cluver delivered a presentation on 'How violence prevention can accelerate SDG achievement for children and adolescents. The seminar explored how approaches from the INSPIRE technical package of interventions to prevent violence against children and adolescents can accelerate the achievement of several SDG targets for children and
adolescents.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description UKRI Arts Humanities Research Council 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact On 6 March 2019, Prof. Lucie Cluver presented on "Cash, care, confidence intervals, and cockroaches: science to serve the most vulnerable"
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description 10th International Workshop on HIV & Women - Boston, USA 6-7 March 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Plenary session delivered by Professor Lorraine Sherr, Accelerate Hub Co-Director, at 10th International Workshop on HIV & Women, in Boston MA, USA on 6 March
Talk - 'Psychosocial issues for women living with HIV'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description AIDSImpact conference, London, UK - Aug 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Various presentations at the 14th AIDS Impact conference July 29th - 31st 2019, London, United Kingdom - given by members of the Hub team.

Conference looking at HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment and care, focusing both globally and on specific communities and countries hardest hit by the HIV/AIDS epidemic.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://www.aidsimpact.com/
 
Description Accelerate Hub Seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact 22 October: Dr Elona Toska and team presented at University of Cape Town. Seminar was attended by about 25 people: 10 Hub colleagues, 8 NGO partners and 7 students (give or take)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Alliance for Medical and Relief Services (AMRES) - South Sudanese National Organization partnership engagement 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact -Held meetings and discussed the scope of work and funding for the Accelerate Hub;
-Ongoing discussions on possible areas of collaboration in consortia work and sharing resources for enhancing adolescents HIV health education.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description An update to funding organisations (GCRF, BEIS and the Newton Fund) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact In January 2020, the Accelerate Hub had a meeting in South Africa that brought together all the research teams and working groups. During the same time, some representatives from BEIS, GCRF and the Newton Fund came to visit the country. So a meeting was set up to a) introduce the Hub, its findings and methodologies, b) share experiences of policy engagement, and c) to hear and learn from their input and feedback.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Article (Umthombo e-magazine) "New evidence that the Work of UN Agencies is EFFECTIVE" 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Article in UCT e-Magazine Umthombo Issue 3/2019 (page 33). This article further disseminates concept of effective SDG-accelerators.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.paperturn-view.com/uctresearchoffice/umthombo-3?pid=NTM53953&v=1.1
 
Description Article published on the UNAIDS Website 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Article: Development Accelerators for Adolescents Living with HIV (pgs.169-171), Chapter: Integrated People-Centred Services (pgs. 160-171), UNAIDS Global AIDS UPDATE 2019: Communities at the centre: Defending rights breaking barriers reaching people with HIV services.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.unaids.org/sites/default/files/media_asset/2019-global-AIDS-update_en.pdf
 
Description CSAE and Mind & Behaviour Research Group 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 20 June: Meta-analysis in Development Economics at Blavatnik School of Govt with speakers: Michael Gechter (Penn State), Rachael Meager (LSE), Eva Vivalt (ANU), Marc Witte (Oxford). Organisers: Ondine Berland, Kate Orkin, Marc Witte
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Capacity sharing and building workshop for Early Career Researchers at the annual Hub meeting in Cape Town in January 2020 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact The Hub organised a full day capacity sharing and building workshop for early career researchers at its annual meeting, held in Cape Town in January 2020. This included sessions on research methods, research mentoring, communication skills, and policy engagement and influencing. 23 ECRs from DAC and other countries participated in the workshop. The majority of these were female (15); eight males also participated in the workshop.

This workshop emphasised the importance of networking and established and launched a community of practice on the Basecamp online platform, where all researchers are connected and can discuss common issues affecting them and their work with their peers.

Career development and sustainability are also important to the Hub's understanding of 'equitable partnerships' and ECRs were therefore engaged in discussions regarding mentorship and explored future opportunities to identify mentors and mentees using the African Academy of Sciences (AAS) mentorship platform.

Policy engagement is obviously crucial to achieving research impact, as well as to ensuring that early career researchers are able to establish fulfilling and sustainable careers. The session on policy engagement was therefore designed to build confidence and skills in this area. Participants considered the wide range of activities involved in policy engagement and wrote and presented short elevator pitches for policy makers. The workshop was accompanied by a handout, 'An introduction to policy engagement' which contained advice on how to get started, links to further resources, and case-studies of Hub staff and researchers involved in policy engagement.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.acceleratehub.org/resources
 
Description Centre for Social Science Research Seminar on the PLH-SUPER Study hosted by the GCRF Accelerate Hub, University of Cape Town, 12 November 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Professor Catherine Ward (Co-PI) delivered a presentation on the Parenting for Lifelong Health Scale-Up of Parenting Evaluation Research (PLH-SUPER) study (WP5). The meeting was well-attended by NGO partners, postgraduate students and researchers. The presentation provided the audience with background on the study and created a space for rich discussion on parenting programme scale-up. Several new connections with non-profits interested in PLH and PLH-SUPER were made at this seminar.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Course lecture 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact 1 July: Dr. Elona Toska lectured Adolescent and Youth Health Policy course at UCT, presenting to 35 implementers, policy makers from South Africa and Zimbabwe
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Field Visit to Young1ove in Botswana 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact The research visited two research sites where a partner/collaborator was engaging in interventions targets at school going children.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.young1ove.org/programs
 
Description Global What Works summit 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact 17 October: Global what works summit 2019 on PLH (Sinovuyo) Teen findings and the design of SUPER study. Yulie
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description HIV-sensitive social protection presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact 16 October: HIV-sensitive social protection to ±30 World Food Programme regional and HQ colleagues from the nutrition and social protection teams
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Helping Adolescents Thrive - Intervention consultation meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact A presentation on Zifune was done at the Helping Adolescents Thrive, Intervention consultation meeting. The presentation was delivered in order to provide attendees an example of an adolescent intervention that was co-developed by adolescents from the target population. The presentation was partially deliver by adolescents from the advisory board who worked in collaboration with the research team in creating the intervention. In addition, the purpose of the intervention was also to provide an overview of what intervention components should be considered for an adolescent intervention.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Hub Inception Meeting, January 2019, Cape Town, South Africa 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was the Hub's Inception meeting, including all partners, researchers, study leads, work leads, management staff and representatives from policy makers. During this 3-day meeting there were sessions around research strategy, study work plans, Hub policies and processes, next steps in the award and other Hub-wide issues. It was also the first opportunity for all Hub partners to meet face to face, network among them, since the application stage. Partners left the meeting with a sense of a "Hub team" and a clearer idea of what this undertaking really means and what their responsibilities are.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.acceleratehub.org/article/hub-kicks-off-with-a-week-of-inception-meetings
 
Description ICASA 2019 Oral presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Presentation of preliminary HEY BABY baseline data analysis focusing on adolescent mother living with HIV and their child who are HIV exposed. In collaboration with International AIDS Society. Audience: ~90 people, conference attendees (policy makers, practitioners). Location: Kigali, Rwanda.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description International Meeting on HIV-sensitive Social Protection Webinar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact On 14 February 2019, Prof. Lucie Cluver presented initial SDG findings from the Lancet CAH paper
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Knowledge exchange with UNDP Regional Office in Bangkok 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The UNDP Regional Office in Bangkok is responsible for oversight of all UNDP offices in South East Asia. In 2019, they launched Youth CoLab, a platform for youth entrepreneurship that facilitates their engagement with employers and policymakers from the public and private sector. They had a meeting with the Accelerate Hub to share experiences and findings on 'what works' when it comes to engaging youth. The Bangkok office also advised the Hub on routes to engaging with industry.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Leading Minds Conference presentation, UNICEF, Florence, November 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Lucie Cluver presented at high-level UNICEF-WHO meeting on accelerators. Lucie gave an Espresso presentation (short presentation) on mental health care for families and communities in South Africa.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Media articles highlighting workseeker signalling study - Harambee Youth Employment Accelerator (WP4) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact An opinion piece was written in South Africa's Daily Maverick, Africa Portal, and BizCommunity, and City Press highlighting the Harambee Accelerator study and why signalling matters.
• https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/opinionista/2019-05-15-why-signals-can-matter-as-much-as-skills-in-youth-employment/
• https://www.africaportal.org/features/its-not-just-about-skills-its-about-employability/ .
• https://www.bizcommunity.com/Article/196/626/193037.html
• https://city-press.news24.com/Business/why-young-people-cannot-find-work-but-businesses-struggle-to-hire-20190607
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/opinionista/2019-05-15-why-signals-can-matter-as-much-as-skills-in-y...
 
Description Media interview: Breakthrough on HIV adolescence: Prof. Mark Orkin 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Lead statistician, Professor Mark Orkin, delivered a media interview on behalf of research team at SABC News, Johannesburg, South Africa. This news broadcast has a national reach to an estimated 38,000 public audience. Prof Orkin presented new evidence that could help governments have better policies and programmes to support adolescents living with HIV and achieve the UN's sustainable development goals. During the interview Prof Orkin shared findings of three development accelerators (parental support, financial support and being in safe schools where there is no bullying) that could support these adolescent to achieve the SDGs.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BeXfH7MFs30
 
Description Meeting with Global Fund, CCM and the National AIDS Council in Zambia, July 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Clarified the objectives of the GCRF and linkage between HIV prevention, Treatment and Global Fund Zambia Programme
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Meeting with ILO in Zambia - July 23, 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Clarified the objectives of the GCRF and linkage between the United Nations Partnership for Rights of People with Disability (UNPRPD) received inputs on items include in the research protocol to capture the needs of adolescents with disability
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Meeting with National Social Assistance Unit in Kenya - Adolescent Outcomes From Cash & Aspirational Video (WP4) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact A meeting was held with Kenya Social Assistance Unit (SAU) to discuss first phase of trial and potential design for next phase. It included 6 members of the Social Assistance Unit including John Gachigi, Head of Social Assistance Unit. SAU is within the national structure of the Ministry of Labour and Social Protection and is the implementation arm of the National Safety Net Programme (NSNP). There are 4 cash transfer programmes within NSNP.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Meeting with Siaya Ministry of Education official Kenya - Adolescent Outcomes From Cash & Aspirational Video (WP4) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Had a meeting and gave short presentation to an official with the Siaya Ministry of Education about the research design of the next phase of research trial. Met with an official from the County Director of Education's (CDE) office. The CDE is in charge of the education in the county and operates within the County (not National) structure in Kenya.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Meeting with Social Protection Secretariat in Kenya - Adolescent Outcomes From Cash & Aspirational Video (WP4) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact A meeting and presentation was held with the Kenya Social Protection Secretariat office to discuss first phase of trial and potential design for nex tphase. the meeting included 5 members of the Social Protection Secretariat office including Madame Jacynter Omondi. The Secretariat's Office is within the national structure of the Ministry of Labour and Social Protection and is the strategic arm of the National Safety Net Programme (NSNP).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Meeting with partners at the Zambian Ministry of Community Development and Social Services, July 24, 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Clarified the objectives of the GCRF and explained the linkages between the UNPRPD and the research and the overall on cash transfers of the ministry of community development and social welfare
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Meeting: Global status report on preventing violence against children expert 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A meeting held in Geneva - organised by the World Health Organization (WHO), attended by Professor Lucie Cluver, to discuss the main messages of the Global Status Report on Preventing Violence Against Children
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Methodologies for i) longitudinal data analysis, and ii) modelling multiple exposures and outcomes 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The group of 6 researchers was established to inform research methodologies that would be used in work package 2. The group includes 3 senior and 3 early career researchers from the Universities of Cape Town (South Africa), Oxford (UK), and Witwatersrand (South Africa) (50:50 gender balance). The group meets regularly and works to discuss progress on applying statistical methodologies to two key areas of research for the hub i) longitudinal data analysis, and ii) modelling multiple exposures and outcomes. The group are currently working on i) mixed effects probit regression, and ii) multivariate probit regression, for the respective areas of research. The long term goal is to integrate the methods for these two areas of research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019,2020
 
Description Mzantsi Wakho researcher network on i) longitudinal data analysis, and ii) modelling multiple exposures and outcomes, September 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The purpose of the webinar session was to update the Mzantsi Wakho researcher network on methods being used for longitudinal data analysis, and study of multiple health and wellbeing outcomes. The session was attended by 15 researchers from across different social sciences: public health, and development studies, and methodological disciplines: quantitative science and qualitative science. Researchers from both University of Cape Town and University of Oxford attended. The session sparked questions relating to the specifics of the methods used, and increased awareness in the researcher network of the methods presented. It also helped to strengthen the network between researchers at both University of Cape Town and University of Oxford that are involved in the Mzantsi Wakho study.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Oak foundation presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 21 October: Presented Accelerate Hub to 8 members of Oak Foundation
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Organisation of 'Narrative and Adolescence' workshop, 1-3 March 2020, Cape Town, South Africa 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact This workshop involved groups of adolescents from East Cape Town and the Cape Town Flats. The focus of the workshop was on narrative - how adolescents in African contexts use story-telling, performance and narrative -to understand their worlds and their place in it. The workshop explored the stories adolescents tell others about themselves; the stories they tell themselves, their 'internal narrative', which helps them to make sense of the world and their interactions with it; and, the stories that are told about adolescents, such as by researchers, and which shape the interactions adolescents have with others. The workshop will take a multi-disciplinary approach, bringing in perspectives from psychiatry to literary studies, public health to geography and economics to medical humanities and philosophy. Participants were extremely receptive to the workshop approaches, very open to engaging and sharing about their lives, and keen to continue to engage and work with the researchers in future. A particular theme to emerge is the Black Consciousness Movement, which will be future explored. The development of a working paper is in progress.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Ox Social Sciences Division Article 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact 22 July: Lucie Cluver- Accelerating Achievement: profile piece on LC to promote research success stories in Ox Social Sciences Division and for potential extended reach (Radio 4's Life Scientific programme)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Oxford Social Sciences Profile Article 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact 1 August: From social worker to international policy influencer (Oxford Social Sciences profile), profile on Prof. Lucie Cluver
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.socsci.ox.ac.uk/article/from-social-worker-to-international-policy-influencer
 
Description Oxford University Presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 4 July: Prof. Lucie Cluver chaired Session 1: Impact and challenge-led research at The Good, the Bad and the Project: Interdisciplinary Ethics in Development Research and Practice, University of Oxford
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description PATA Summit 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 18 October: PATA 2019 Summit, attended by ±200 teams from Cameroon, DRC, eSwatini, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Pact South Sudan - collaborative work with the USAID funded ACHIVE Project in South Sudan 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Followed up discussion on collaborative work with the USAID funded ACHIVE Project in South Sudan to support social protection for adolescents living with or affected by HIV and AIDS. Other areas of collaboration include sharing of training resources for case care workers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Planning a UNDP 'Youth engagement in Agriculture' project across Africa 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The UNDP Regional Service Center for Africa (RSCA) is planning a project that will extend across 12 African countries. The project aims to encourage youth involvement in 'smart' agriculture; which is predicted to improve the efficiency of peri-urban agriculture using digital technologies and reduce food waste. It is intended to engage around 5000 young people across the continent. Accelerate Hub has provided support in planning by co-writing the project proposal, providing evidence on how this could improve employment, and suggesting a range of methodologies to engage with young people.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019,2020
 
Description Policy Engagement with the Central Equatoria State Ministry of Gender, Child and Social Welfare 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact -Discussed the scope and funding for the Accelerate hub in Juba;
-Obtained key policy documents such as the South Sudan child Act, 2008 to guide design and implementation of the study;
-Participated in protection technical working group meetings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Policy level engagement with the Ministry of Health - South Sudan 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact -Provided overview and shared understanding on the scope of work and GCRF funding;
-Sought guidance on MoH priority interventions for adolescents including access to key policy documents ( Sexual and reproductive health strategy);
-Obtained guidance on ERB requirements, submission documents and timelines;
-Secured acceptance of the Director General for Sexual and Reproductive health from the MoH as co-investigator in the study;
-Participated in health education and HIV technical working group meetings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Policy meeting - UNICEF HQ (Sept 2019) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Meeting on HEY BABY to UNICEF Adolescent participation team in New York.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Policy meeting - World Health Organization (WHO), Geneva - Nov 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Meeting: Global status report on preventing violence against children expert
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Presentation (October, 2019) in Cape Town, South Africa for GCRF Hub colleagues and NGO partners 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Supporters
Results and Impact Presentation "Development Accelerators - A Game-changer for Africa's Adolescents"
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Presentation (online) - Johnson & Johnson (Sept 2019) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Online presentation sharing results from mixed methods quantitative and participatory research activities on use and experience of injectables among adolescent girl and boys.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Presentation - 2gether 4SRHR project (Feb 2020) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Elona Toska and Nontokozo Langwenya presented to representatives of five country teams implementing 2gether 4SRHR project (SIDA funded, implemented by UNICEF, UNFPA, UNAIDS & WHO). Presentation title: Opportunities in HIV & SRHR Programming for the Second Decade of Life in East and Southern Africa.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Presentation - Social Innovation Seminar ERCEA/REA (Jan 2020) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Organised jointly by the European Research Council Executive Agency (ERCEA) and the Research Executive Agency (REA), the seminar was an occasion to demonstrate the different ways research can engage with social innovation and how it translates into societal impact. The aim of the seminar was to showcase excellent research and enhance awareness about social innovation among researchers and policymakers. Professor Lucie Cluver presented work on developing the free child abuse prevention program, SAFE. The program has been translated into 18 languages and reached over 600,000 families in 22 countries across Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Eastern Europe.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Presentation - WFP Satellite Symposium at ICASA 2019 Conference; Kigali, Rwanda (Dec 2019) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Conference: ICASA (non-academic)
Dissemination: oral presentation
Title: HIV-Sensitive Social Protection: Harnessing SDGs for people living with HIV
Presented findings on impact of cash transfers and combination of cash + care provision on HIV risk and adherence outcomes for adolescent living with HIV.
In collaboration with World Food Programme
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Presentation and discussion to the UNAIDS Programme Coordinating Board, on 12 Dec, Geneva 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Professor Lucie Cluver was invited to speak to the UNAIDS Programme Coordinating Board in Geneva about the UKRI's GCRF Accelerate Hub's recent findings. This was an opportunity to present the 'accelerator' concept in relation to HIV and adolescents and the very low rates of adherence to antiretroviral medication. The Hub's results show that simple social and economic solutions (cash transfers, safe schools and parenting support) can improve retention in HIV care for vulnerable adolescents, and that they also improve multiple other Sustainable Development Goals. This provides real opportunities to capitalise on the SDG agenda, and also to provide services to adolescents living with HIV that allow them to reach their wider goals.

The PCB is a high-level advisory group that advises the United Nations on policy and programming. It includes the UNAIDS representatives of 22 countries, UNFPA, UNICEF, WFP, UNESCO, ILO, WHO, World Bank, UNDP, UNHCR and UNODC, and meets at the World Health Organisation. Lucie spoke at the 'children and adolescents' thematic day on Thursday 12 December, which then makes clear plans for UNAIDS actions. Afterwards, she said: "We are really honoured that the Accelerate Hub was invited to speak at the UNAIDS Planning Coordination Board. We presented our new findings, showing that parenting support, cash transfers and safe schools can improve HIV care and also multiple SDGs for adolescents living with HIV. After our talk, the US Ambassador for the AIDS response, the Deputy Executive Director of UNAIDS and DFID all highlighted that these findings are informing the design of their programmes to fight the AIDS epidemic."
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.spi.ox.ac.uk/article/accelerator-interventions-at-unaids
 
Description Presentation at AIDS Impact, London, UK - "Can we harness the Sustainable Development Goals to reach viral suppression for adolescents living with HIV?" 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Can we harness the Sustainable Development Goals to reach viral suppression for adolescents living with HIV? 
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Presentation at AIDS Impact, London, UK - "Mental wellbeing amongst caregivers of HIV-affected children in South Africa: predictors of positive mental health and its implications for child wellbeing" 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presentation at Conference - Mental wellbeing amongst caregivers of HIV-affected children in South Africa: predictors of positive mental health and its implications for child wellbeing 
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://www.aidsimpact.com/
 
Description Presentation at AIDS Impact, London, UK - "Young leaders left behind: challenges and new solutions for adolescents living with HIV" 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presentation: Young leaders left behind: challenges and new solutions for adolescents living with HIV 
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Presentation at South African AIDS Conference, Durban, South Africa, June 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact South African AIDS Conference, Durban, South Africa
Presentation - '"If you are found taking medicine, you will be called names and considered less of a man.": HIV-positive adolescent boys' engagement with HIV treatment and care during and following ulwaluko (traditional initiation/circumcision) in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Presentation at the INSPIRE Implementation Working Group in Vienna, 27-29 January 2020 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The INSPIRE Implementation Working Group is a small group of experts convened to help the Global Partnership to End Violence Against Children support states to implement the seven strategies to end violence against children outlined in the INSPIRE booklet. The PLH programmes are mentioned as exemplars in the INSPIRE booklet, and Professor Catherine Ward was invited in that capacity. She presented the PLH-SUPER project to that group, and several attendees (Stephen Blight, UNICEF; Alex Butchart, WHO; and Sabine Rakotomalala, Global Partnership) agreed to serve on the study's advisory board.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Presentation by Janina Jochim at Oxford, Green Templeton College 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact presentation on Adolescent Motherhood & School Outcomes in South African Girls and Young Women .
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Presentation by Janina Jochim at the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, University of Oxford 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Presentation on "Teenage Mothers and Schooling - Going from "door-to-door" to collect primary data in South Africa"
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Presentation by Yulia Shenderovich at Department of Social Policy and Intervention, Oxford University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Presentation on "Mental health and anti-retroviral adherence in a cohort of adolescents in South Africa: Analysis plan"
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Presentation for Academics by Janina Jochim, in Cape Town, South Africa 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Presentation HEY BABY - A mixed-methods study on resilience factors in adolescent mothers in the Eastern Cape, South Africa" - dissemination of doctoral research findings by Janina Jochim.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Presentation in Johanesburg, South Africa (Oct, 2019) to PATA Teams (from Cameroon, DRC, eSwatini, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact presentation - Resilient Relationships for Adolescents & Young People Living with HIV. What can we do in clinics and communities? (18/10/19)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Presentation on Mzantsi Wakho & HEY BABY at 9th Southern African AIDS Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presentation on Mzantsi Wakho & HEY BABY at 9th Southern African AIDS Conference, held at the Foundation for Professional Development (FPD)_Durban, South Africa
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://www.saaids.co.za/
 
Description Presentation on PLH-SUPER at the Global What Works Summit in Mexico, 16 Oct 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Yulia Shenderovich presented on the PLH-SUPER study at the Global What Works Summit in Mexico. This summit brings together key decision makers in the area of social and health policy and programming. This presentation provided an opportunity for Dr Shenderovich to meet colleagues from the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab and discuss the project and potential collaboration. She was also approached by representative from the South African Department of Basic Education who had follow-up questions on the study. After the presentation, Dr Shenderovich was invited to present (together with Dr Jamie Lachman) at the CEDIL - Centre for Evaluation Lecture Series.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Presentation to Accelerate Hub Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) meeting in New York 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presentation about the Accelerate Hub, accelerator concept, and early evidence from our proof of concept paper published in the Lancet, presented at the first face-to-face meeting of the Strategic Advisory Panel (STRATA) in New York by Hub Directors and Work Package Leads.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Presentation to Global Partnership to End Violence Against Children by Lucie Cluver, 18 Sept 2019, New York City 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This presentation shared Accelerate findings on measures to prevent a range of violence outcomes for adolescents to the Global Partnership to End Violence Against Children, which is a major coalition of (mainly) UN agencies working to end violence. The GP is a significant Accelerate partner and we are now co-authoring a paper to share these findings with them, and will continue to work with them to embed the findings in their policy and practice, and those of other agencies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Presentation to Global Partnership to End Violence Against Children, New York City, September 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Supporters
Results and Impact Presentation
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Presentation to the African Journal of AIDS Research short course on writing for publication 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation to the African Journal of AIDS Research short course on writing for publication
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Production of a written commentary by team of Parenting for Lifelong Health researchers and NGO implementers 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Parenting for Lifelong Health Scale-Up of Parenting Evaluation Research (PLH-SUPER) has submitted its first output for publication. This output takes the form of a commentary that outlines the motivation for the research on implementation of parenting and other violence prevention initiatives and for the PLH-SUPER study. The commentary involved the research team working with 16 of the PLH implementers and several research teams conducting studies on PLH to develop the text and get input before submission. This process provided an opportunity to engage more deeply with partners on the study, its methodology and next steps, and has strengthened relationships between partners.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Public facing website for statisical methodologies related to i) longitudinal data analysis, and (ii) modelling multiple exposures and outcomes 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Open Science Framework "Development Accelerator Methods" website was established as a public facing platform that enables researchers both within the hub and the broader academic community to access materials on statistical methodologies related to identifying development accelerators. The current focus is on i) longitudinal data analysis, and ii) modelling multiple exposures and outcomes. The link for the website is: https://osf.io/n6jy7/?view_only=17f148085fde4b3fb645106c6c6e418b
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://osf.io/n6jy7/?view_only=17f148085fde4b3fb645106c6c6e418b
 
Description Refinitiv Black Employee Network and Bright Insights Global 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact 19 September: Prof. Lucie Cluver participated in Refinitiv Black Employee Network and Bright Insights Global (B.I.G) think tank focused on sustainable business in sub-saharan Africa
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/big-sustainable-business-roundtable-convenes-africa-nyc-nash-carter/
 
Description Regular meetings with City of Cape Town; Scale up testing with the Harambee Youth Employment Accelerator 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Government employees within the City of Cape Town mayoral office attended a presentation on findings of Harambee study
Government employees within the City of Cape Town mayoral office attended a workshop about randomised control trials
Series of meetings held with implementation partner, Harambee Youth Accelerator, about scaling up testing intervention within Johannesburg office as well as potential scale in newly opened Rwanda office.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Regular meetings with the Harambee Youth Employment Accelerator 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The research team has at least three meetings per year with Harambee that serve multiple purposes. The most important purpose is to update Harambee about the progress and results of the research. Our presentation of preliminary results in 2019 influenced their decision to scale the intervention beyond the initial study participants. Other topics where future collaborations and understanding the priorities of policymakers in the youth unemployment space.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018,2019,2020
 
Description Report posted on Nuffield Foundation website "Identifying psychosocial, family and service mechanisms to improve anti-retroviral adherence amongst adolescents living with HIV in Southern Africa" 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Title of report "Identifying psychosocial, family and service mechanisms to improve anti-retroviral adherence amongst adolescents living with HIV in Southern Africa". This report summarises the study findings and impact of the Mzantsi Wakho research project implemented jointly by the Universities of Oxford and Cape Town.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description SABC news interview 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact 16 March: Mark Orkin, Breakthrough on HIV adolescence
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BeXfH7MFs30&feature=youtu.be
 
Description Sharing policy briefs on adolescent health and HIV interventions with the Global Fund 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A series of policy briefs have been written and shared with Global Fund country offices to support programme planning. The briefs, based on Hub research papers, examine the barriers and opportunities to adolescent HIV treatment and retention in care. Alexandra Plowright of the Global Fund, who advises countries on appropriate services for young women and girls, commented: "Huge thanks for these policy briefs - they are excellent - really useful and in a great and useable format for the countries." Country teams will be able to use the briefs in developing funding proposals and they will also help the Global Fund review and assess the proposals against key evidence.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description South Sudan HIV and AIDS commission policy engagement 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact -Discussed the scope of work and GCRF funding and obtained guidance on priority interventions for adolescents (social protection) including access to key policy documents.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description South Sudan Network of people Living with HIV and AIDS (partnership engagement) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact -Discussed the scope of work and GCRF funding;
-Ongoing discussions on collaborative work in HIV testing and treatment for adolescents (social protection).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Support in planning a UNDP 'Tobacco control' project in Southern Africa 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The Accelerate Hub supported the planning of a Tobacco control programme arranged by the Southern Africa UNDP country offices for . The programme focuses on policy change on governmental and parliamentarian levels across multiple countries in Southern Africa. Since most smokers start during using during their teenage years, the Hub advised on broad policies and services that focus particularly on preventing tobacco use in teenagers. The Hub suggestions were incorporated in the final proposal submitted from the UNDP country office.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Symposium, July 2019 - Durban, South Africa - for audience of Higher Education, Practitioners, Students, Academics 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Sex, Sexuality and Education in South Africa: A symposium
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Teen Advisory Group South Africa - Western Cape & Eastern Cape (2019) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact 2019 brought to a close ten years of our Teen Advisory Group in Cape Town, South Africa. This group has been central to the team's success by co-developing protocols for Young Carers, Mzantsi Wakho and HEY BABY. In order to reflect on the progress and celebrate the contributions of our adolescent co-researchers, we ran a graduation programme for them. Adolescents were provided with a menu of methodologies to choose from as a way of reflecting on their engagement to date and as part of closing this particular group. They chose to share their insights via a focus group discussion, theatre production and a participatory mural development and painting. These interactive and collaborative methodologies were implemented successfully over the course of 2019.

In addition to the graduation programme, our team established a new Teen Advisory Group in the Eastern Cape in June 2019. The adolescents in this cohort were recruited from existing studies, including Mzantsi Wakho. At our first engagement with this group, we focused on building a relationship, creating a safe space for interaction, dialogue and sharing, as well as to exploring the different ways the adolescents would like to interact and work with the Teen Advisory Group. This successful meeting was followed up by a storytelling workshop in November 2019. We look forward to ongoing collaboration with this group.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Teenage Advisory Group (TAG) Eastern Cape, South Africa 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Sixteen participants were recruited from existing studies: Hey Baby, a study on adolescent parents and Mzansi Wakho on medicine-taking among HIV positive adolescents. The group is made up of 10 girls and 6 boys, aged 17-21 years. The planning and conceptualisation of the activity was a joint effort between a Post-Doctoral Fellow in Public Health, Qualitative Researchers and experienced facilitators in adolescent engagement. Our first engagement, a weekend camp, focused on building a relationship and understanding participant views on research and participation. Similar to the Western Cape, participants were introduced to key participatory research principles and methods. Using embodied activities, writing and art-based methods, participants told us how they wanted to participate in research and topics of research which are important and relevant to their lives. The highlighted areas included health, employment, teenage pregnancy, which are at the fore of the Hub's work. The following activity was a one-day engagement five months later. The aim was to build on the foundation of rapport established at our initial meeting and to gain better understanding of the areas participants had highlighted in the previous session. We acknowledge that adolescents are experts in their own lives and can offer unique insights, views and experiences and possible suited solutions to the challenges they face. This activity was built on this foundation and we aimed to use participatory activities to gain a better understanding of these areas. Similar to all TAG activities, the day started with co-creating ground rules, setting expectations for the day and recapping on the previous session. Participants recapped on participatory research principles at the start of the day through smaller group discussions and giving feedback to the bigger group. After this activity, participants reflected individually on the six areas which were: teenage pregnancy, health & medicine-taking, bullying & peer pressure, substance abuse, blessers (age disparate and transactional relationships) and careers & unemployment. In a gallery setting, participants individually reflected on each of these areas using sticky notes as a starting point to write their reflections. Following this, participants chose 1) the area that resonated with them the most 2) to work in a group or individually 3) to tell us a story about the area, whether fictional or true, through a medium of their choosing. Some participants chose storytelling, song performance, drawing and drama. In their stories participants highlighted the underlying social and structural issues that led to some of these challenges. A participant-led discussion followed the performances where participants reflected on these challenges, brainstormed possible solutions and the collective responsibility they have towards each other as young people.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Teenage Advisory Group (TAG) Kisumu, Kenya 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact To test the methods and tools developed with TAGs in South Africa, as part of an iterative process, we established a TAG in Kenya in February 2020. The objectives of this first engagement was to test the tools and concepts with a younger group of adolescents and to work with a local partner. We built a relationship with Centre for the Study of Adolescence (CSA), a local non-profit organisation which seeks to promote and improve the health and well-being of young people through innovative research, evidence-based programming, capacity building, policy development, and advocacy. Through CSA, participants from a rural background, had never been part of a research study, were recruited through their existing relationships with local schools. The group is made up of 8 boys and 8 girls, aged 10-15 years. The programme was co-developed with a Post-Doctoral Fellow in Public Health, qualitative researchers and colleagues at CSA who are experienced in program development and facilitators in adolescent engagement. CSA was particularly important in ensuring that the programme was suitable for the local context with regards to the norms and making sure that the language was appropriate and accessible to participants. Similar to the TAGs in South Africa, participants were introduced to participatory research principles and methods over a weekend camp. The aims of this activity were to build a relationship with the participants and local partner and to understand participant views on research. Participants used sticky notes in a gallery setting to share their thoughts on key participatory research concepts. Using embodied activities, writing and art-based activities, participants told us how they wanted to participate in research and also highlighted areas which are important and relevant to their lives and communities. Some of the highlighted areas included: School drop-out, lack of school fees, food insecurity, child labour, early pregnancy, lack of parental support, gender inequality, substance abuse and harassment. At the end of the camp, next steps were decided with the partner and participants.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Teenage Advisory Group (TAG) Western Cape, South Africa 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Our Western Cape Teenage Advisory Group, made up of 11 girl and 9 boys, aged 15-27 years, has been a core research partner in the Hub for 10 years. In 2019, we engaged this group in a process of critically reflecting on meaningful youth engagement in research and meaningfully closing-out this engagement. To this end, a smaller cohort of this group was identified and recruited to engage with in more focused sessions. A group of experienced facilitators, Post-Doctoral Fellow in Public Health and qualitative researchers experienced in youth engagement conceptualised and co-created the engagement activities. In our initial activity, we co-created ground rules and participants were introduced to key participatory research principles and methods and in a democratic voting process, chose methods of engagement for a meaningful close-out process. The first engagement, a focus group discussion followed a few months later, where in participants reflected on what we had done well, what didn't do well in the past 10 years of engagement, and also highlighted topics of research which are relevant to their lives and communities, including mental health issues, substance abuse and career guidance. As part of the focus group discussion, participants were trained as facilitators and facilitated the focus group discussions. Most recently, over a weekend camp, participants co-created a theatre play and co-conceptualised a mural painting, reflecting on their experiences of being partners in research with adolescents. The play and mural reflect on the highlights of participation in TAG which included sharing your story with peers who have similar challenges and receiving support, boosted self-esteem and a space to explore oneself. Some of the challenges highlighted in the play include limited resources, limited understanding of the research process for some. The lessons learned from these engagements were implemented in establishing a TAG in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description UCT News article 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact 14 March: New evidence that UN agencies' work is effective
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.news.uct.ac.za/article/-2019-03-14-new-evidence-that-un-agencies-work-is-effective
 
Description UCT news article 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact 20 March: Article published on Helping African adolescents achieve their potential
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.news.uct.ac.za/news/research-office/-article/2019-03-15-helping-african-adolescents-achi...
 
Description UCT- Umthombo magazine articles 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact 1 July: Two 20 million research hubs; new evidence that the work of UN agencies is effective
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.paperturn-view.com/uctresearchoffice/umthombo-3?pid=NTM53953&p=35&v=1.1
 
Description UKRI GCRF Hubs and UNDP workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact In Feb 2020, the Accelerate Hub was invited to a workshop that brought together all the UKRI GCRF Hubs as well as the Accelerator (Innovation) Labs. Through the workshop, the Hubs and Labs shared their visions, noted where their goals align and brainstormed routes to engagement. On the last day of the workshop, an official MOU was signed between the UKRI and the Global UNDP team.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description UKRI web news 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact 15 March: Combining services to improve the lives of vulnerable teenagers with HIV
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.ukri.org/news/combining-services-to-improve-the-lives-of-vulnerable-teenagers-with-hiv/
 
Description UNAIDS - partnership engagement in South Sudan 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact -Engaged and brief UNAIDS country team on the scope of work for the Accelerate hub and currently exploring additional funding for a potential scale up.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description UNAIDS Global AIDS Update 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 1 September: UNAIDS Global AIDS update 2019, "COMMUNITIES AT THE CENTRE: DEFENDING RIGHTS, BREAKING BARRIERS, REACHING PEOPLE WITH HIV SERVICES" (Lancet CAH work on p169-170)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.unaids.org/sites/default/files/media_asset/2019-global-AIDS-update_en.pdf
 
Description UNAIDS report 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact 1 July: Lancet CAH paper included in UNAIDS Midyear Global AIDS Report 2019
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description UNDP Accelerator Lab partnership engagement in South Sudan 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact -Meetings and discussion within the scope of work and funding for the Accelerate Hub;
-Ongoing discussions on possible areas of collaboration in financial services such as mobile money transfer through M-Gurush.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description UNDP HIV and Health Community of Practice Meeting, 22-29 October 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Mona Ibrahim, Accelerate Hub UNDP Research Officer, and Lucie Cluver, Accelerate Hub Director, attended this UNDP community of practice meeting in Istanbul from 22-29 October 2019. Lucie Cluver moderated a panel discussion on Strategies for reducing inequalities and advancing health equity on Tue 22 Oct. UNDP holds this meeting annually to set their priorities for the following year. The meeting was an opportunity to build relationships with UNDP colleagues, share Hub research plans and evidence, and identify entry points for collaboration that align with their yearly priorities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description UNDP Regional Bureau of Africa 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In Jan 2020, the Accelerate Hub was invited to present an introduction about our research in the Regional Bureau of Africa (RBA). The meeting was broadcast (via Zoom) and all the UNDP offices in Africa were invited to join. The presentation started with a brief overview of the ongoing research, then went on to discuss its usefulness and its alignment with the RBA's mandate and yearly targets. Towards the end of the meeting the Hub facilitated an opened discussion about next steps and potential entry points for our findings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description UNFPA - partnership engagement in South Sudan 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact -Provided overview of the scope of work and funding for the Accelerate Hub;
-Ongoing discussions on possible areas of collaboration in GBV prevention and response including adolescent sexual and reproductive health ( Menstrual hygiene promotion).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description UNICEF HIV Newsletter Issue 2: Special edition on ICASA 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The ICASA satellite session titled: The Drive to Thrive: How are the children and adolescents HIV-exposed yet uninfected doing? was highlighted in the UNICEF HIV Newsletter Issue: Special edition on ICASA. Camille Wittesaele, presented on behalf of Dr Elona Toska and HEY BABY team on outcomes of HIV-exposed and uninfected children in the HEY BABY cohort data. This presentation shared preliminary analysis of HEY BABY baseline data.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description UNICEF webinar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 18 September: Accelerate Hub and HEY BABY present to UNICEF HQ and 30 country offices
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description UNICEF-ESARO webinar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact 10 September: UNICEF-ESARO webinar: 14 attendees from across UNICEF ESAR country offices and slides and recording of the webinar will be shared to all 21 UNICEF Eastern-Southern Africa Region Country Offices. Marisa Casale (PhD) and Roxanna Haghighat (DPhil Candidate)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description USAID 4Children consortium project in Juba, South Sudan 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Engaged with USAID 4Children project team in Juba and advocated for increased funding into positive parenting programs for adolescents (10-17) by using evidence generated from the PLH study showing program effectiveness in reducing violence against adolescents with improved communication with caregivers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Understanding Adolescence in African Contexts 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact The Understanding Adolescence in African Contexts Workshop took place in Oxford, between the 31st October and the 2nd November 2019. The workshop, organized by researchers and staff from the Hub's Work-package 3 - the 'innovation' strand - involved around thirty participants, who gathered in Oxford from Africa, Europe and the United States. Around half were members of the Hub, and half were academics and researchers from a wide variety of disciplinary backgrounds, not associated with the Hub itself but experts in various aspects of adolescence. The workshop was profoundly multi-disciplinary, convening conversations about how combined contextual and narrative understandings can work to support young people's well-being in various ways which required participants to transcend disciplines, bringing in perspectives from psychiatry to literary studies, and from public health to geography. Participants were extremely engaged in all sessions, and reported changes in their understanding of adolescence from their own discipline. Participants also found that the participatory methodologies to be interesting and useful, and report that they have since used similar approaches in their own work.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Voice of the Cape radio interview 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact 18 March: Dr Elona Toska was interviewed on national radio
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description WP4: Focus groups with past Parenting for Lifelong Health for Teens participants 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Twenty-four dyads of caregivers and their teenagers (10-19) - all past participants of the in-person PLH for Teens parenting programme - participated in three focus group discussions in Hamburg, South Africa. They shared with us the way the in-person PLH programme impacted their lives, the proactive approach of sharing core ideas with their relatives and friends, and felt that a parenting app would be an effective means of delivering PLH on a broad scale. They shared their input on the modules of the programme that they thought would be most important to include the parenting app. They also showed keen interest in joining the co-development team.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description WP4: Presentation at GCRF Accelerate Hub Year One meeting, Cape Town, 28 January 2020 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Members of our team presented on Parenting for Lifelong Health Digital during the GCRF Accelerate Hub Year One meeting. The meeting had an audience of about 80 people, all of whom keenly listened to the presentation and responded with questions and positive feedback.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Webinar/media conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact 15 March: Dr Elona Toska and Prof. Lucie Cluver participated in a media conference with 16 African reporters from Cameroon, Congo, Egypt, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, South Africa, Uganda and Zimbabwe on the Lancet paper.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Webinar: Beyond The Third 90: Supporting Adolescents Living With HIV To Remain Engaged In Care As They Transition To Adulthood 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Marisa Casale (PhD) and Roxanna Haghighat (DPhil Candidate) presented webinar in collaboration with UNICEF-ESARO. Presented (1) systematic review of interventions to improve adolescent retention in care and (2) adolescent transition pathways.
Attended by 14 attendees from across UNICEF ESAR country offices and slides and recording of the webinar will be shared to all 21 UNICEF Eastern-Southern Africa Region Country Offices (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Comoros, Eritrea, Eswatini (Swaziland), Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe)

Impact: some country offices highlighted that this is the first they have ever considered the complexity of transitions in adolescent HIV care and treatment.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Year 1 Annual Accelerate Hub Annual Meeting Presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Youth Engagement work stream team and 3 participants of the Western Cape Teenage Advisory Group (TAG) co-presented at the Annual Accelerate Hub Meeting held in January 2020. In the presentation, we reported on the youth engagement activities that had taken place in the previous year, under this award. Using participatory methods and the same activities we use at our TAG events, we shared the lessons we had learned, highlights and challenges we encountered.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Zifune presentation - Sexual Violence Research Initiative 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact A presentation of the Zifune study was delivered at the Sexual Violence Research Initiative Conference 2019, which was help in Cape Town. The presentation included a overview of the both the research being conducted through the Zifune intervention programme, as well as content of the Zifune intervention.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description to Hub Early Career Researchers on how to conduct analyses with multiple exposures and outcomes (given by formal working group on methodologies), January 2020 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The session was intended to introduce early career researchers to the concept of development accelerators, and how to evaluate their impact on adolescent health and wellbeing outcomes. The session highlighted the concept of a hierarchy of evidence, introduced two approaches for impact evaluation: randomised control trials, and observational data analysis. Key economic considerations in accelerator analysis were also presented. The session ended with a group discussion of the methodological needs of Hub early career researchers.

The session was presented by methodologists from across 3 different social science disciplines: public health, development Studies, and economics. They presented on topics ranging from rigorous research, observational data analysis, and randomised control trials. The audience also spanned several research fields. 2 presenters (senior researchers) were from South African Unversities: (University of Kwa Zulu Natal, and University of Witwatersrand), and 2, who were themselves Early Career Researchers, were from University of Oxford in the UK.

100+ Early Career Researchers and members of the broader GCRF Hub Community attended and the session was reported to be hugely useful for unpacking both the ways to evaluate accelerators and the steps required for each approach.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://osf.io/n6jy7/?view_only=17f148085fde4b3fb645106c6c6e418b
 
Description to Work Package 2 hub researchers conducting analyses with multiple exposures and outcomes (given by formal working group on methodologies), January 2020 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The purpose of the session was to consolidate understanding of the research methodology used to study the relationship between factors in adolescents' lives (e.g. food security) and multiple health and wellbeing outcomes related to the Sustainable Development Goals. The session was developed as a follow-up to a previous methods session delivered in October 2019. Additional areas that were not covered in the previous session included how to account for multiple hypothesis testing, and estimating predicted probabilities.

The 20 attendees were from Ghana, Nigeria, South Africa, South Sudan, UK, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Departments from 1 Nigerian Univeristy (University of Ibadan), 4 UK Universities (University College London (UCL), University of Edinburgh, University of Oxford, and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM)), 1 Zambian University (University of Lusaka), and 2 South African Universities (University of Cape Town; University of Witwatersrand) were present. There was a 70:30 female:male gender ratio.

The presentation was developed and presented by 1 senior statistician from University of Witwatersrand (South Africa) and 1 early career researcher from University of Oxford (UK). A motivating example used a recent analysis investigating the association between family factors and multiple types of child violence (sexual abuse, transactional sex, emotional abuse, physical abuse, youth lawbreaking and community violence victimisation).

The presentation helped researchers further understand how they will go about conducting accelerator analyses and strengthened links between methodologists and researchers. Specific questions that arose relating to planned analyses were discussed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://osf.io/n6jy7/?view_only=17f148085fde4b3fb645106c6c6e418b
 
Description to Work Package 2 hub researchers conducting analyses with multiple exposures and outcomes (given by formal working group on methodologies), October 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The purpose of the session was to introduce the research methodology used to study the relationship between factors in adolescents' lives (e.g. food security) and multiple health and wellbeing outcomes related to the Sustainable Development Goals. 11 senior and 7 early career researchers attended (67:33 attendance by female:male). Attendees were from Nigeria, South Africa, South Sudan, UK, and Zambia. Departments from 1 Nigerian Univeristy (University of Ibadan), 4 UK Universities (UCL, University of Edinburgh, University of Oxford, and LSHTM), 1 Zambian University (University of Lusaka), and 2 South African Universities (University of Cape Town; University of Witwatersrand). The presentation was developed and presented by 1 senior statistician from University of Witwatersrand (South Africa) and 1 early career researcher from University of Oxford (UK). A motivating example used work published by the team in the Lancet Child and Adolescent Health academic journal (https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanchi/article/PIIS2352-4642(19)30033-1/fulltext). The presentation helped researchers understand how they will go about conducting accelerator analyses and strengthened links between methodologists and researchers. Specific questions that arose relating to the datasets being used by researchers in work package 2 were discussed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://osf.io/n6jy7/?view_only=17f148085fde4b3fb645106c6c6e418b