Biomedical Catalyst – Q-CANCER: development of a sample to result device for low cost, rapid tumour profiling

Lead Research Organisation: Newcastle University

Abstract

This project is concerned with the development of a fully integrated, low test cost, sample to result medical device that will enable a histopathologist (or a technician) to perform multiplex genotyping and tumour staging & profiling, within minutes, from formalin fixed &/or fresh tissue samples, providing a molecular adjunct to a histopathologist's standard practice. The device will automate sample prep & DNA sequencing at the press of a single button, following the introduction of a sample. The tissue sample is processed using a number of novel & innovative but proven microfluidic and nanotechnologies that allow for massive multiplexing potential. The device will enable fast turnaround of high quality genotyping that integrates with established clinical practice. Furthermore, the ability to rapidly profile & stage a tumour or identify genetic mutations will lead to improvements in patient outcomes, reduce patient anxiety & result in cost savings in treatment programmes

Technical Summary

This project is concerned with the development of a fully integrated, low test cost, sample to result medical device that will enable a histopathologist (or a technician) to perform multiplex genotyping and tumour staging & profiling, within minutes, from formalin fixed &/or fresh tissue samples, providing a molecular adjunct to a histopathologist's standard practice. The device will automate sample prep & DNA sequencing at the press of a single button, following the introduction of a sample. The tissue sample is processed using a number of novel & innovative but proven microfluidic and nanotechnologies that allow for massive multiplexing potential. The device will enable fast turnaround of high quality genotyping that integrates with established clinical practice. Furthermore, the ability to rapidly profile & stage a tumour or identify genetic mutations will lead to improvements in patient outcomes, reduce patient anxiety & result in cost savings in treatment programmes.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description Electrical characterisation of DNA on silicon surfaces 
Organisation National University of Singapore
Department Department of Chemistry
Country Singapore 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution DNA target sequences were immobilised onto silicon wafers using a technique developed but eh Q_CANCER projects which were then shipped to the National University of Singapore for some preliminary testing by the EGaIn technique developed there under the direction of Prof C Nijhuis.
Collaborator Contribution Prof C Nijhiuis and his group at NUS are experts in electro-characterisation of self-assembled monolayers through a soft-tip approach method. The surfaces fabricated in Newcastle are characterised for the first time using this method in Singapore and may lead to the development of DNA mismatch detection.
Impact Newcastle University awarded the PI a Global Excellence Award (£10K) to build this relationship. Prof C Nijuis was the invited plenary speaker at the annual Chemical Nanoscience Symposium at Newcastle in 201 (CNSN-6). Dr Pike has been invited to speak at the MRS-Singapore meeting in July 2017. PhD student has been awarded travel funding from Santander to visit Singapore to complete experiments to fully characterise the DNA chips fabricated in Newcastle to investigate their suitability for possible early stage cancer detection.
Start Year 2015
 
Title Methods for detecting target polynucleotides 
Description The present invention provides a thermocycling method for increasing the number of tandem repeats of a unit sequence that is 1 to 60 nucleotides long in a linear polypeptide. The 5 invention also provides a solid substrate with a surface, the surface having at least one linear probe polynucleotide immobilised thereon, wherein the at least one linear probe polynucleotide comprises at least two tandem repeats of a unit sequence that is 1 to 60 nucleotides long. Methods of determining the presence of a linear target polynucleotide sequence in a test sample using such solid substrates are also provided. 
IP Reference P246026GB/NL 
Protection Patent application published
Year Protection Granted 2018
Licensed No
Impact Internal idea-to-innovation funding from Newcastle University has been received to exploit this patent to examine rapid detection of the CTFR gene. (£15,000 investment)