Measuring the impact of monoclonal antibody drugs in cancer and rheumatoid arthritis

Lead Research Organisation: King's College London

Abstract

It is now over 40 years since the first mab drugs were approved. Today six out of ten of the best selling drugs in the world are mab therapeutics. Mab drugs currently make up a third of all introduced new treatments. Despite their success, no systematic study has been done to assess how many millions of patients have taken such drugs and the extent to which they have benefited their lives. The goal of this project is to determine the impact of the best-selling mAb drugs for cancer and rheumatoid arthritis, two key disease areas where such therapy has had some of its most profound impact. In this study we will measure benefit in terms of clinical benefit (life extension and quality improvement). Previous studies have estimated benefit for a limited number of patients in a given trial. In this project we propose to multiply the estimated benefits by the number of users over a specified period.

Technical Summary

It is now over 40 years since the first mab drugs were approved. Today six out of ten of the best selling drugs in the world are mab therapeutics. Mab drugs currently make up a third of all introduced new treatments. Despite their success, no systematic study has been done to assess how many millions of patients have taken such drugs and the extent to which they have benefited their lives. The goal of this project is to determine the impact of the best-selling mAb drugs for cancer and rheumatoid arthritis, two key disease areas where such therapy has had some of its most profound impact. In this study we will measure benefit in terms of clinical benefit (life extension and quality improvement). Previous studies have estimated benefit for a limited number of patients in a given trial. In this project we propose to multiply the estimated benefits by the number of users over a specified period.

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