MICA: Whole body 3-D imaging of cancer and inflammation in live zebrafish using optical tomography and fluorescence lifetime readouts of signalling

Lead Research Organisation: Imperial College London
Department Name: Dept of Physics

Abstract

Our overarching aim is to develop a new optical technology platform to directly image mechanisms of disease throughout whole live organisms as they progress over time with a view to improving our understanding of" global" responses to disease progression, and to specific treatments, in order to develop new therapies. To visualise internal processes requires transparent organisms. Zebrafish embryos are particularly interesting because they are inherently transparent and are vertebrates - and so represent better human biology than other transparent organisms. They are increasingly used for biomedical research, with cellular processes being studied using microscopes, and many zebrafish disease models have been produced, including for cancer and inflammation. Unfortunately the use of embryos precludes full studies of disease progression such as tumour development or chronic inflammation and it would be useful to be able to image such processes in more mature fish. Imaging larger fish, however, is challenged by the onset of absorption and scattering of light and the lack of instrumentation for high resolution 3-D imaging through cm scale samples. We would work with non-pigmented mutations of zebrafish and develop new techniques to counter light scattering that we would implement in a novel tomographic imaging system to enable detailed 3-D imaging of changes in tissue structures, cell migration and signalling processes throughout whole juvenile and adult live zebrafish.
Such "global" 3-D imaging is important for cancer because tumour cells typically spread from their original site to other organs. This is called metastasis, which is very difficult to treat and often leads to death. Observing the growth and spread of tumour cells throughout an organism and how they grow at new sites is not possible using the mammalian disease models such as mice that are often used to study cancer biology because they are not optically accessible. Global 3-D imaging is also important for inflammation to study how the response to pollutants spreads throughout an organism, leading to chronic inflammation, and how the body's defences recruit immune cells. However, even with non-pigmented zebrafish, the established optical imaging techniques are restricted to image near the surface and are strongly compromised by optical scattering. Our approach would build on a method called "optical projection tomography" that is similar to x-ray tomography but works with visible light. We would combine it with novel image reconstruction software that builds on the basic physics of light propagation and advanced techniques to exploit characteristic properties of the scattered light. We will apply this novel imaging platform to the study of cancer and inflammation using genetically modified adult zebrafish. To study cancer, we would breed zebrafish in which we can either induce tumours with a chemical reagent or in which we can transplant zebrafish-derived tumours. These cancer models resemble the disease state in humans. To study inflammation, we would use adult zebrafish models that have an analogous immune response to humans and we would study the progression of inflammation resulting from chemical pollutants including cigarette smoke. The various zebrafish models would also be genetically engineered such that specific proteins found in tumour cells, immune cells or blood vessels would be labelled with fluorescent molecules to facilitate imaging of the disease-related structural changes and cell migration. We would also use fluorescently labelled "biosensors" that change their fluorescence properties when specific molecular interactions take place as part of the signalling processes that determine normal cellular function and which become dysregulated in cancer and inflammation. By observing when and where signalling processes are activated or otherwise, we can study the effects of potential therapies such as anti-cancer or anti-inflammatory drugs.

Technical Summary

This project aims to develop and apply a new optical tomographic imaging platform to directly observe the progression of disease, including quantitative assays of morphological changes, physiological and molecular signalling processes in live whole juvenile and adult zebrafish that benefit from fully developed vasculature and immune system. We aim to extend optical projection tomography (OPT) to rapid imaging of cell migration using a novel (patent filed) configuration and realise 3-D mapping of optical absorption and fluorescence signals (including fluorescence lifetime imaging - FLIM) in cm-scale non-pigmented zebrafish lines using novel computational reconstruction algorithms to account for weakly scattered light propagation and ballistic light techniques to improve 3-D image quality. We will develop this technology in the context of its application to disease models for both cancer and inflammation. For this we will perform crosses and modify already available zebrafish strains, with fluorescently labelled vasculature and cell types (tumour cells, neutrophils and macrophages). For cancer we would make 3-D measurements of developing (inducible, syngeneic) tumours and the surrounding vasculature and map the localisation and size of resulting metastases over time. We would also read out the activation of Src, MT1-MMP & Rac biosensors using FLIM FRET and correlate changes in these important signalling pathways with tumour development. For inflammation we would image the kinetics of recruitment of inflammatory cell populations throughout a single fish in response to chemical pollutants and correlate this with the activation of signalling networks (Nalp3 inflammasome, TLR) using sensors for cathepsin B, caspase 1 and NF-kB. We would thereby study how chemically induced inflammation varies between larval, juvenile and adult zebrafish. As a basis for future projects, we would start exploring the inflammatory response in tumour bearing zebrafish.

Planned Impact

Our local strategic intent is to build on our experience imaging disease models and developing FLIM and FRET technology to establish novel capabilities for global 3-D imaging of biological processes in live organisms such as juvenile/adult zebrafish that would provide an unprecedented resource for disease/drug studies and developmental biology. Once proven, we would make it available via collaboration to academe and industry and ultimately establish a user-contribution-to-costs model to share and sustain the facility, as well as exploring access to industry on a commercial basis. We would also work to make the proposed new imaging technology more widely available to industry and other users through its commercialisation. This would hopefuly benefit academic, clinical and industrial researchers who could buy the commercial instruments and would stimulate the development of competitive techniques, which would benefit the instrumentation sector - particularly companies serving the pharmaceutical and biomedical research communities.

Malignant and chronic inflammatory diseases remain areas of major unmet need and commercial opportunity for the pharmaceutical industry. The capabilities of the proposed instrumentation to image global responses to gene knockdowns or therapeutic interventions in live organisms and to correlate bulk physical changes with changes in the activation of cell signalling pathways would be important for pharmacology and drug testing. It could increase the efficiency of the drug discovery pipeline, e.g. by reducing the time to failure for unsuccessful drug candidates and increasing the opportunities for off-target discovery. The new capabilities to image cancer processes in vivo should benefit the drug discovery industry, providing new tools and information concerning mechanisms of cancer development and progression, and clinical oncologists, who could increase their understanding of cancer metastasis and the value of different therapeutic approaches. The enhanced abilities to image tumour-vasculature interactions, tumour progression and metastasis could increase understanding of the behaviour of tumour cell subpopulations in relation to therapeutic targeting. Along with researchers and clinicians, drug companies could benefit from the improved capability to evaluate the efficacy of drug compounds to slow down or prevent tumour progression and metastasis afforded by imaging whole organisms in vivo and from the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Most importantly, cancer patients could benefit in terms of improved understanding of their disease and increased opportunities to identify effective pharmacological therapies and to develop new ones. In the longer term, this could impact on the development of preventative and therapeutic strategies for cancer that would benefit policy makers and health care providers across the world and could ultimately help reduce the economic burden and human suffering caused by this disease. Beyond cancer, the capability to track the spatio-temporal behaviour of leukocytes and signalling in the context of entire organisms would provide a currently unique resource for understanding the basic physiology of immunity and inflammation as well as disease processes. It could enable genetic or drug screens to understand at a mechanistic level processes that underlie and/or are involved in an extremely broad range of pathologies including cardiac disease, arthritis and obesity and so could impact a very wide range of pharmaceutical researchers, clinicians and patients. Beyond medicine the imaging techniques could be applied to plants and animals to impact food security.

The knowledge and skills gained by the staff working on this project would directly benefit them in terms of increasing their potential for research impact and future employment and could benefit the biophotonics instrumentation and medical research communities who could employ them.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description BHF funded UCL Complex PhD Studentship
Amount £100,000 (GBP)
Funding ID SP/08/004 
Organisation British Heart Foundation (BHF) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2013 
End 08/2016
 
Description Brian Mercer Feasibility Award
Amount £30,000 (GBP)
Organisation The Royal Society 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2015 
End 10/2016
 
Description EPSRC DTP studentship
Amount £85,000 (GBP)
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2015 
End 09/2019
 
Description EPSRC Doctoral Prize Fellowship
Amount £60,594 (GBP)
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2016 
End 01/2017
 
Description Non-clinical PhD Studentship
Amount £110,000 (GBP)
Funding ID FS/16/41/32235 
Organisation British Heart Foundation (BHF) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2016 
End 09/2019
 
Description Proof of Concept Fund
Amount £39,602 (GBP)
Organisation Higher Education Innovation Funding (HEIF) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2016 
End 07/2017
 
Description Research England GCRF fund: openScope - phase 1
Amount £174,089 (GBP)
Organisation Imperial College London 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2018 
End 09/2019
 
Title Optimal Anesthetic Regime for Motionless Three-Dimensional Image Acquisition During Longitudinal Studies of Adult Nonpigmented Zebrafish. 
Description With many live imaging techniques, it is crucial that a deep level of anesthesia is reached and maintained throughout image acquisition without reducing zebrafish viability. This is particularly true for three-dimensional tomographic imaging modalities. Currently, the most commonly used anesthetic in the zebrafish community, MS-222 (tricaine methanesulfonate), does not allow this. We show, using a combination of both MS-222 and isoflurane, that we can significantly improve the anesthetic regime required for motionless image acquisition of live adult zebrafish. We have benchmarked this against the requirements of our novel quantitative imaging platform, compressive sensing optical projection tomography. Using nonpigmented transgenic zebrafish, we show that a combination of 175 ppm of both anesthetics improves the maintenance of deep anesthesia for prolonged periods of time and it can be used repeatedly to enable longitudinal imaging. Importantly, it does not affect the health or viability of the adult zebrafish. We also show that nonpigmented fish, with a mutated form of the gene transparent, took significantly longer to reach deep anesthesia. The anesthetic regime presented in this study should lead to significant improvements in accuracy and information achievable from imaging live adult zebrafish and in its application to longitudinal studies. 
Type Of Material Model of mechanisms or symptoms - non-mammalian in vivo 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact This novel methodology is a direct result of the research performed durring the course of the grant. We have disseminated this information through publication in the Journa Zebrafish (Reference Below). Lockwood N, Parker J, Wilson C, Frankel P. (2017). Optimal Anesthetic Regime for Motionless Three-Dimensional Image Acquisition During Longitudinal Studies of Adult Nonpigmented Zebrafish. Zebrafish. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 28135163. 
URL https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28135163
 
Title Transgenic zebrafish 
Description We have developed a range of new transgenic zebrafish lines including an inducible liver tumour model for cancer and a range of lines expressing FRET biosensors: TraNac TG(fabp10-rtTA) TraNac TG(TRE-Src bios) TraNac TG(TRE-Rac1 bios) TraNac TG(TRE-MT1-MMP) TraNac TG(TRE-iRFP-KRasV12) TraNac Tg(Ubi:Caspase1 YVHDA bios) TraNac Tg(Ubi:Caspase3 bios) TraNac Tg(Ubi:Rac1 bios) TraNac Tg(Ubi:SECFP) TraNac Tg(MPEG1:Caspase1 YVHDA bios) TraNac Tg(MPEG1:Caspase3 bios) TraNac Tg(IFABP 4.5Kb:Caspase1 YVHDA bios) TraNac Tg(MPEG1:Caspase1 YVHDA bios; KDR:mCherry) 
Type Of Material Biological samples 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact We have demonstrated the capability to undertake longitudinal imaging of live zebrafish with induced tumour and have imaged temporal development of both tumour and vasculature in a cross-sectional study in which we validated in vivo imaging results with histopathology. 
 
Description Cairn Research Ltd 
Organisation CAIRN Research Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We have developed TIRF and STORM microscopy techniques which we have published. Cairn have implemented these ideas into their product development and will be able to provide the benefit of low-cost TIRF and STORM microscopy to the community. We have developed optical projection tomography (OPT) technology which we have published. Cairn are intending to introduce our ideas into their product development and will be able to provide the benefit of low-cost OPT to the community.
Collaborator Contribution Cairn have advised on components and practical implementations of various aspects of our instruments and have provided us with prototypes at significant discounts that have been customised to our requirements. We have advised them on key research issues for microscopy and designed open source optical instrumentation for which they are now making components available on a commercial basis to the wider user community who wish to access the technology but cannot or do not wish to fabricate it themselves. This instrumentation is intended to work with open source software, including our open source software. Cairn will now provide our openFrame microscope that can be used to implement low cost STORM and TIRF microscopy and almost any other microscope modality. openFrame is our original concept and the design has been refined with input from Cairn. Cairn will also provide low-cost OPT instrumentation based significantly on our design.
Impact The instrumentation development is essentially optical physics but the applications are multidisciplinary - mainly biomedical
Start Year 2015
 
Description Kentech Instruments Ltd 
Organisation Kentech Instruments Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We have advised Kentech on improvements to be made to their gated optical image intensifiers and related components and have tested prototypes. We have demonstrated that their gated intensifiers can be integrated into a range of optical instruments, particularly for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for biomedical applications, and this has led to increased sales for them. We collaborated with them on an EPSRC Healthcare Partnership project that built on earlier collaborations with Kentech and also on two MRC projects to develop FLIM instrumentation.
Collaborator Contribution Kentech Instruments Ltd advised us (with no charge) on the design of FLIM systems using gated optical image intensifiers and supplied us with a custom device for handheld FLIM that we designed in collaboration. They have sold us customised gated intensifier systems and refined the specifications of their products at our request.
Impact Joint publications Feedback to Kentech's product development
 
Description Magnus Life Science 
Organisation Magnus Life Science
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Magnus were an industrial partner in our MICA award. . We continue to develop our zebrafish imaging technology and aim to consult them with a view to ensuring that our technology is relevant to drug discovery.
Collaborator Contribution Besides their financial contribution, Magnus have provided advice and an industrial perspective for our project and take an interest in our research with a view to exploiting it for drug discovery
Impact This project is multidisciplinary. Magnus Life Science are a drug discovery company. They do not develop technology. The academic Imperial/UCL team has developed technology of interest to Magnus. The Imperial College London team includes physicists and biologists and the UCL team includes biologists and computer scientists
Start Year 2013
 
Description The role of CAS family members BCAR1/p130Cas and NEDD9 in angiogenesis 
Organisation National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre
Country Japan 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We have provided an enhanced understanding of BMP mediated signalling pathways in angiogenesis, which is a key focus of Both Professor Mochhizuki's research and Professor Mayor's research groups.
Collaborator Contribution Professor Mochizuki's lab provide us with the plasmids listed below and with transgenic zebrafish lines: Tg(UAS:RaichuEV-Cdc42) and Tg(UAS:RaichuEV-Cdc42 NC). Plasmids: 1. heat shock protein (hsp)70l:noggin3-FLAG 2. UAS:GFP,bmpr1DC-FLAG Tol2 3. UAS:mCherry,GFP-NWASP CRIB Tol2 4. UAS:mCherry,GFP-NWASP CRIB H211D 5. UAS:RaichuEV-Cdc42 WT 6. UAS:RaichuEV-Cdc42 NC 7. Gal4FF-2A-mCherry 8. Myr-GFP-ACK42 9. MO-resistant mRNA encoding GFP-Arhgef9b 10. MO-resistant mRNA encoding catalytically inactive GFP-Arhgef9b 11. MO-resistant mRNA encoding fmnl3 12. MO-resistant mRNA encoding dominant-negative mutant of Fmnl3 (Fmnl3 I684A-GFP) In addition his lab agreed to collaborate by providing expertise in the use of these reagents and are very happy to discuss aspects of our research moving forward. Professor Mayor, is a long standing collaborator is providing us with expertise in performing the required FRET analysis of in vivo GTPase biosensor activity in zebrafish embryos.
Impact These collaborations has resulted in the awarding of BHF Project Grant: BHF Project Grant: PG/18/34/33785 "The role of CAS family members BCAR1/p130Cas and NEDD9 in angiogenesis" to myself as PI.
Start Year 2018
 
Description The role of CAS family members BCAR1/p130Cas and NEDD9 in angiogenesis 
Organisation University College London
Department Division of Biosciences
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have provided an enhanced understanding of BMP mediated signalling pathways in angiogenesis, which is a key focus of Both Professor Mochhizuki's research and Professor Mayor's research groups.
Collaborator Contribution Professor Mochizuki's lab provide us with the plasmids listed below and with transgenic zebrafish lines: Tg(UAS:RaichuEV-Cdc42) and Tg(UAS:RaichuEV-Cdc42 NC). Plasmids: 1. heat shock protein (hsp)70l:noggin3-FLAG 2. UAS:GFP,bmpr1DC-FLAG Tol2 3. UAS:mCherry,GFP-NWASP CRIB Tol2 4. UAS:mCherry,GFP-NWASP CRIB H211D 5. UAS:RaichuEV-Cdc42 WT 6. UAS:RaichuEV-Cdc42 NC 7. Gal4FF-2A-mCherry 8. Myr-GFP-ACK42 9. MO-resistant mRNA encoding GFP-Arhgef9b 10. MO-resistant mRNA encoding catalytically inactive GFP-Arhgef9b 11. MO-resistant mRNA encoding fmnl3 12. MO-resistant mRNA encoding dominant-negative mutant of Fmnl3 (Fmnl3 I684A-GFP) In addition his lab agreed to collaborate by providing expertise in the use of these reagents and are very happy to discuss aspects of our research moving forward. Professor Mayor, is a long standing collaborator is providing us with expertise in performing the required FRET analysis of in vivo GTPase biosensor activity in zebrafish embryos.
Impact These collaborations has resulted in the awarding of BHF Project Grant: BHF Project Grant: PG/18/34/33785 "The role of CAS family members BCAR1/p130Cas and NEDD9 in angiogenesis" to myself as PI.
Start Year 2018
 
Title Compressive sensing OPT 
Description We have developed a software tool to reconstruct OPT data sets that have been significantly under-sampled, thereby permitting faster image acquisition, which is important for in vivo imaging. This utilises an iterative reconstruction algorithm and has been used with both zebrafish embryos and with adult zebrafish. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact This compressive sensing approach means that we can acquire useful tomographic data sets with as few as ~30 projections (where 100's of projections would be required for fully sampled reconstructions using filtered back projection). This essentially makes multispectral OPT of live zebrafish possible, since it reduces the time spent under anaesthetic and the light dose to the sample. 
 
Title FLIM OPT system 
Description This is a complete OPT system that can be coupled to a gated image intensifier to implement 3-D tomographic FLIM. It includes software to control the instrument for data acquisition and OPT reconstruction using Filtered back projection, which can utilise GPU to provide reconstruction at unprecedented speed. 
Type Of Technology New/Improved Technique/Technology 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact We have used this FLIM OPT instrument to image live zebrafish embryos and adult zebrafish expressing FRET biosensor for Caspase 3. This approach enables in vivo 3-D maps of apoptosis to be acquired over time. We are now working towards implementing FLIM OPT of FRET biosensors expressed in tumour-bearing fish. 
 
Title Multiplexed OPT system for adult zebrafish 
Description This unique 3-D imaging platform for multiplexed OPT can be combined with compressive sensing to permit the in vivo multispectral imaging of adult zebrafish. The system utilises two excitation lasers (for intensity imaging of GFP and mCherryFP) and can acquire a 3D image of adult zebrafish with a field of view of 3 cm in aprroximately 1 minute per spectral channel. The instrument includes custom-written software to register image acquired from the two image channels and to upload them to an OMERO server. We have also written software to access these OPT data from the OMERO server and reconstruct 3-D images using filtered back projection or iterative reconstruction for under-sampled data sets. We have also integrated a third imaging channel for FLIM OPT. 
Type Of Technology New/Improved Technique/Technology 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact This instrument enables use to undertake longitudinal imaging of live zebrafish, including cancer models. Specifically we have imaged adult zebrafish with inducible liver tumour labelled with GFP and vasculature labelled with mCherry. We have also used it to study infection using iFP-labelled bacteria. This instrument and its software has been continually refined 
 
Title in vivo 3-D cell tracking technique integrated with OPT 
Description We have developed a novel approach to 3D tracking of objects including cells in live organisms. This entails acquiring pairs of images from different angles and using triangulation to locate the objects. This image acquisition is integrated into the OPT acquisition so that we obtain an in vivo 3D image with trajectories of individual cells. 
Type Of Technology New/Improved Technique/Technology 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact We applied this to image neutrophil migration in zebrafish larvae following a tail wound 
 
Description Archer Academy Year 8 Science Day - 2020 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact I gave a 15 minute presentation on our current research into zebrafish heart regeneration to all year 8 classes at the Archer Academy in East Finchley.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Biophotonics Summer School Hven 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact I lectured on the Biophotonics Summer School organised in Hven, Sweden every two years. This is probably the highest level school int he field in terms of the lecturers and attracts students from all over the world. I presented the basic principles of fluorescence microscopy and our latest research in multidimensional fluorescence imaging including super-resolved microscopy, FLIM and optical tomography as well as clinical applications
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.biop.dk/biophotonics15/school/school.asp?page=main_school_lecturers
 
Description Imperial College Festival 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We presented our wok on imaging zebrafish and their use as disease models to the public and to school children as part of the Imperial College Festival
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.imperial.ac.uk/festival/about/festival-2016
 
Description International Women's Day at Imperial College - Women at Imperial reception 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We presented our interdisciplinary work on 'Modelling Inflammation in Zebrafish' and, in relation to this MRC grant, displayed 3-D images acquired using optical projection tomography of zebrafish with a tumour labelled with GFP on a 3D monitor. The public asked many questions regarding genetically modified organisms and understood the benefits GMOs have in our research. We also interacted with other scientists at Imperial who were interested in our 3D imaging technology and benefitted from demonstrations of the 3D visualisation software. Members of the public and Imperial also went away with an understanding of OPT as a tool to quantify changes in tumour volume and angiogenesis, and how this could benefit cancer research and drug development
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.imperial.ac.uk/equality/support-for-staff/imperial-women/women2016/
 
Description London Vascular Biology Forum 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Small molecule inhibition of Neuropilin-1: development of a novel optical projection tomography (OPT) imaging platform to study
vascularisation in vivo'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description MDFI for HCA workshop 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact This workshop on multidimensional imaging for high content analysis was intended to showcase our MDFI technology, including FLIM and FRET, implemented in automated multiwell plate readers, endoscopes, microscopes and in vivo tomographic imaging of zebrafish. Our target audience was industry, including pharma and technology developers, as well as research students and academics from Imperial and other universities.
Discussions with industry led to new collaborations with SME to develop advanced imaging technology and continued interest from pharma who gave feedback on our technology and potential applications. This event included an internet presentation from Rainer Pepperkok at EMBL.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description MDFI user-orientated workshop 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact This one day user-orientated workshop entitled "Multidimensional fluorescence imaging technology: super-resolution, HCA and preclinical imaging" showcased the biophotonics instrumentation and applications of the technologies developed in the Photonics Group at Imperial College London. It attracted 80 participants including 11 from industry and 40 for other research organisation. The talks and posters were well received and this event led to further collaborations, including with industry.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation at the UCL Division of Medicine Research Retreat 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Poster Presentation at the divisional research retreat. This conference attracted most of the research staff across the whole breadth of the Division of Medicine (DoM). As a result of the presentation, a collaboration with Professor Alan Salama (UCL, Renal) was established. In addition, we had an informative discussion with the UCL Technology Transfer Office (TTO) regarding our novel imaging modality, Optical projection tomography.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description School visit (Horsted Keynes) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact I presented the impact of biophotonics and imaging technology on the world around us and on medicine and drug discovery
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Workshop at Francis Crick Institute 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Luxendo (an SME recently acquired by Bruker) organsed a workshop on light sheet microscopy with the Fracnis Crick Intitute and Sunil Kumar was invited to present our work on OPT, as a lower cost, faster complementary technique. Several delegates were intersted in the work and asked for futher information. We have installed an OPT instrument at the Francis Crick Institute so that potential users can try their samples.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019