Stratified Medicine to Optimise Treatment for Hepatitis C Virus Infection

Lead Research Organisation: University of Oxford
Department Name: Experimental Medicine

Abstract

Stratified Medicine is a type of personalised medicine where treatments are directed specifically at people who are most likely to respond to them, often using detailed information about individuals. We believe that the treatment of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) would benefit enormously from this approach.

About 300,000 people in the UK are infected with HCV, only half of whom have been diagnosed as carrying the virus. The virus has a high tendency to persist as the body's immune system is usually unable to clear infection. HCV infects the liver, causing liver cirrhosis (scarring), liver failure and liver cancer. HCV exists in different genetic forms called genotypes. In the UK, most infections are caused by either genotype 1 or 3, which occur at about equal frequency.

Treatment for HCV has consisted of two drugs interferon and ribavirin. Approximately half of patients receiving treatment respond and are successfully cured of infection. Until recently, no additional drugs were available to treat those who failed treatment. The number of people who develop severe liver disease from HCV is expected to continue to rise over the next two decades. Those who develop liver failure can be given a transplant but the transplanted organ is rapidly infected with the virus and often becomes diseased within a few years.

New drugs, which directly act against the virus (called DAAs), are being used in combination with interferon and ribavirin in NHS patients for the first time in the clinic in 2012. DAA drugs increase the cure rate to 70%. However, there are drawbacks: the drugs are very expensive costing in excess of £20,000 per patient; the virus can become resistant to new drugs, rendering them useless and increasing the frequency of resistant strains in the community; the first wave of new drugs are effective against genotype 1 but not genotype 3 strains; additional side effects can be associated with the new drugs, so that treatment may be stopped before the viru is eliminated.

We have developed a team of experts in the clinical care of HCV patients, who will work with HCV scientists, in partnership with industry. Combining expertise in this way should serve to benefit patients. The group is already working well together collecting blood samples and information from 10,000 people across the UK into a single bio-bank, supported by government infrastructure. We aim to assess the genetic make up of both the virus and the infected person. We will also look at the way in which the immune system responds to the virus, and measure protein markers in the blood. We will assess these in patients receiving therapy and also in those with serious liver disease to try to work out in advance who will develop further complications of their disease. A unique feature of our group will be the ability to draw all these strands together.

We will develop new technologies so that we rapidly obtain the host and viral sequence in thousands of infected people. In this way we hope to improve treatment options for patients so that the right therapies are given to patients who are most likely to benefit from them. We will focus our efforts especially on HCV genotype 3, which is a particular problem in UK patients, and also on patients with more serious liver disease, who are more difficult to treat with the new therapies. Ultimately we hope to predict the likelihood of treatment response in individuals, and possibly through our investigations develop new therapies. This could bring considerable cost-savings to the NHS and means that drugs are given to HCV-infected people who are most likely to respond to them.

Technical Summary

HCV infects 300,000 people within the UK and is an MRC priority research area. We have developed a flexible and dynamic UK wide consortium(STOP-HCV) that will use patient stratification to optimise treatment of infected patients. The consortium builds on existing cutting edge clinical and scientific expertise, in genuine partnership with industry, supported by NIHR infrastructure.
Our overarching aim is to define and develop a deeper understanding of patient strata and to develop prognostic models so that rational treatment strategies can be deployed. In a new era of novel Directly Acting Antiviral (DAA) therapies, treating only a subset of patients with DAA will cost the NHS an estimated £96 million/year with an expected overall treatment failure rate of 30%. Moreover, 40% of patients receiving DAAs would respond to current cheaper therapies. Therefore, refined patient stratification will be of enormous clinical and economic benefit. A focus of our program will be study of HCV genotype-3 infection, highly prevalent in the UK, with a characteristic clinical phenotype, and a high relapse rate with standard therapy. We will also focus on difficult-to-treat patient groups such as those with cirrhosis and those co-infected with HIV, where optimal management pathways will be of particular benefit in patients.
Our consortium is underpinned by HCV Research UK, a network of 18 UK centres biobanking samples from 10,000 HCV infected patients, linked to a state-of-the-art clinical database. The consortium has been purposefully constructed to support rational enquiry and will be divided into integrated themes including cohort development, host and viral genomics, immune phenotyping and biomarker evaluation. The program is supported by health economic, methodological, statistical, and bioinformatics expertise. The STOP-HCV consortium draws together UK expertise in collaborative working to ensure stratification at a national level for the optimal treatment of patients with HCV

Planned Impact

The economic and societal impacts of our consortium will be far reaching:

Enhancing the quality of life, health and well- being: Our overarching aim is to use stratification to enhance clinical decision-making and thereby achieve maximum effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of therapeutic regimens for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We also aim to understand disease mechanisms that define patient strata so that new rational therapeutic approaches can be developed and deployed. We will focus on patients that are difficult to treat with advanced disease, and those with genotype-3 infection a strain that is particularly common in the UK. To achieve this we have developed a consortium in partnership with industry that unites academics from different disciplines, and clinicians at the forefront of the field. Impact on society will be achieved through direct health benefits to the 300,000 patients infected with HCV within the UK, many of whom develop liver cirrhosis, liver failure and hepatocellular cancer.

Contributing towards evidence based policy-making: Through integration between scientists, clinicians, statisticians and health economics, our consortium will drive national guidelines for the treatment of HCV.

Economic impacts: New directly acting antivirals (DAAs) are now available at a cost of >£20,000/treatment course. Treating only 1% of infected people will cost the NHS £96 million. With effective stratification these therapies will be given to those people most likely to obtain maximum benefit with direct economic savings to the NHS.

Economic prosperity:
Our program of work involves the identification and integrated analysis of host and viral genomic markers and other biomarkers of disease progression and treatment response. This work may enhance UK competitiveness and prosperity (i) through the commercialisation and exploitation of predictive models of clinical outcomes, (ii) the development of high throughput assays for in-vitro assays of drug resiance testing, and (iii) high throughput integrative genomics. (vi) innovative statistical methodology that may be commercially exploited.
Furthermore, New insights into disease biology may lead to the development of novel therapeutic avenues and early phase clinical studies.
Our work will increase innovative research capacity within academic organisations that seek to develop new therapies and diagnostic tools.

Industry: Our consortium has been developed in alignment with industry needs in the arenas of both HCV pharama and diagnostics, and the industrial sector will benefit directly from our consortium.

Voluntary sector: The hepatitis C Trust, a charity run by patients for patients is represented on the STOP-HCV steering committee. One additional direct spin-off from the consortium will be an increased participation of UK patients in clinical trials - an area in which historically, the UK has performed very badly.

Technological advances: Society will also benefit through technological advances made within the strategic aims of the projects. This will include the deployment and high throughput of novel genetic sequencing technologies and integrative platforms for host and viral genomics, immune phenotyping, and biomarkers.

Realistic time scales for benefits to be achieved is 5 years.

Publications

10 25 50

 
Description Big Data for Human Health Seed Grant
Amount $81,000 (USD)
Organisation Li Ka Shing Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country Hong Kong
Start 04/2014 
End 03/2015
 
Description DPhil studentship-NHIC STOP-HCV
Amount £130,000 (GBP)
Organisation National Institute for Health Research 
Department NIHR Biomedical Research Centre
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2015 
End 08/2018
 
Description Efficacy & Mechanism Evaluation (EME) programme
Amount £1,700,000 (GBP)
Organisation National Institute for Health Research 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2016 
End 02/2018
 
Description MRC Global Challenges Research Fund
Amount £456,000 (GBP)
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2017 
End 03/2019
 
Description Nottingham BRU funds
Amount £50,000 (GBP)
Organisation National Institute for Health Research 
Department NIHR Biomedical Research Unit, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust
Sector Learned Society
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2014 
End 09/2016
 
Description Oxford NIHR principle fellow award
Amount £45,000 (GBP)
Organisation Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust 
Department NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2015 
End 02/2018
 
Description Senior Investigator Award
Amount £1,600,000 (GBP)
Organisation Wellcome Trust 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2017 
End 07/2022
 
Description Wellcome Trust Institutional Strategic Support Fund
Amount £62,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of Oxford 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2016 
End 09/2018
 
Title Antibody-free detection and quantitation of serum protein biomarkers for liver fibrosis in hepatitis C patients 
Description We have developed a mass spectrometry based assay to detect and quantify serum protein biomarkers for liver fibrosis in hepatitis C patients. In this method, tryptic peptides and their fragments are analysed by mass spectrometry. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27592286; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28935895. We now plan to use this method to detect and quantify our biomarkers using serum samples from hepatitis C patients who have had a FibroScan. 
Type Of Material Biological samples 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact This is the first ever antibody-free serum protein biomarker assay for liver fibrosis. Also this is the only assay capable of quantifying several biomarkers using a single calibration curve with a universal calibration mix. Ulike other assays in the clinic, our assay can generate this calibration curve and determine the concentration of biomarkers in a single acquisition. 
URL https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1570023216307036?via%3Dihub#sec0100
 
Title In vitro HCV replicon system 
Description The STOP-HCV consortium has successfully established a hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicon system to measure the replication/fitness of HCV in vitro. The replicon system provides a valuable tool for monitoring the susceptibility and resistance of a wide range of HCV genotypes to direct-acting antiviral drugs, and determining the relevance of viral SNPs identified in vivo. 
Type Of Material Technology assay or reagent 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The system is currently being used to assess the impact, and relevance, of baseline HCV resistance associated substitutions on treatment outcome. The initial focus has been with the drugs sofosbuvir and daclatisvir, but studies are being extended to include the most recent generation of licensed HCV direct-acting antiviral drugs. 
 
Title NGS for HCV 
Description NGS for ful length HCV sequencing 
Type Of Material Technology assay or reagent 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The first tool for high throughput HCV sequencing 
 
Title Statistical methods for joint host and viral genome association analysis 
Description Statistical methods developed in order to perform joint host and pathogen genome wide association analysis 
Type Of Material Technology assay or reagent 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact To be determined 
 
Title HCV-GLUE 
Description An online resource for the analysis of HCV sequence data. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact STOP-HCV is working closely with the team at the MRC-CVR in Glasgow to implement HCV-GLUE as a tool for the community (for both researchers and clinicians). 
URL http://hcv.glue.cvr.ac.uk/#home
 
Title SNORK 
Description Snork is designed generate and report on on HCV whole-genome sequencing and drug resistance. 
Type Of Material Data handling & control 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact STOP-HCV Oxford is currently collaborating with Public Health England (PHE) to test the Snork pipeline in the hope that the ve-SEQ probe-based enrichment protocol and the Snork bioinformatics pipeline for interpreting the data will form the basis of routine Hepatitis C virus surveillance by PHE. 
 
Title STOP-HCV patient registry 
Description A database containing an anonymised, searchable listing of all patients whose samples have been analysed within STOP-HCV studies 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact This registry allows STOP-HCV researchers to easily identify and prioritise relevant sub-groups of patients for future analyses 
URL https://stop-hcv.nottingham.ac.uk
 
Description Birmingham-STOP-HCV 
Organisation University of Birmingham
Department School of Immunity and Infection
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Sharing of knowledge & expertise
Collaborator Contribution Sharing of knowledge & expertise
Impact none to report to date
Start Year 2013
 
Description Dundee-STOP-HCV 
Organisation University of Dundee
Department School of Medicine
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Sharing of knowledge & expertise
Collaborator Contribution Sharing of knowledge & expertise
Impact none to report to date
Start Year 2013
 
Description Gilead Sciences - Boson study 
Organisation Gilead Sciences, Inc.
Country United States 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Intellectual input into protocol, recruitment of UK patients, analysis of samples and data from patients enrolled into the study
Collaborator Contribution Provision of samples and data from patients enrolled in the study
Impact Clinical findings from the study were published in 2015 (Foster et al; Gastroenterology). The success of UK recruitment to this study resulted in an increased confidence by Pharma to undertake Phase 3 trials in hepatitis C within the UK. Two further studies have been initiated - Gilead ASTRAL-1 study, Merck C-ISLE study. Further publications describing joint host and viral genome association studies, from use of patient samples, have been listed elsewhere (Pedergnana et al)
Start Year 2013
 
Description Glasgow - HCV NGS pilot 
Organisation University of Glasgow
Department MRC - University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Sharing of knowledge and expertise
Collaborator Contribution Provision of samples and data, sharing of knowledge and expertise
Impact This collaboration formed part of the STOP-HCV pilot HCV next generation sequencing study - an exercise to formally compare HCV next generation sequencing methods undertaken in different UK centres. Results of the pilot study have been accepted for presentation at the 2016 EASL Liver meeting (April) and a manuscript is under review at the Journal of Clinical Microbiology.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Glasgow Caledonian University 
Organisation Glasgow Caledonian University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Research funding, sharing knowledge and expertise
Collaborator Contribution Investigation into the development of a prognostic model for HCV-associated cirrhosis
Impact The collaboration is at its initial stages
Start Year 2018
 
Description Health economics-STOP-HCV 
Organisation London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM)
Department Faculty of Public Health and Policy
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Sharing of knowledge & expertise
Collaborator Contribution Sharing of knowledge & expertise
Impact Publication describing how HCV treatment should be prioritised in the era of new direct acting antiviral drugs
Start Year 2013
 
Description Health economics-STOP-HCV 
Organisation University of Bristol
Department School of Social and Community Medicine
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Sharing of knowledge & expertise
Collaborator Contribution Sharing of knowledge & expertise
Impact Publication describing how HCV treatment should be prioritised in the era of new direct acting antiviral drugs
Start Year 2013
 
Description Hepatitis C Trust-STOP-HCV 
Organisation Hepatitis C Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Sharing of knowledge and expertise
Collaborator Contribution Sharing of knowledge and expertise
Impact Engagement with patient groups, patient perspective on clinical studies and policies related to STOP-HCV Consortium
Start Year 2013
 
Description Imperial - STOP-HCV-1 
Organisation Imperial College London
Department Imperial College Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Sharing of knowledge & expertise, intellectual input into study protocol for STOP-HCV-1 trial
Collaborator Contribution Sharing of knowledge & expertise, provision of samples and data from STOP-HCV-1 trial for analysis
Impact Trial in progress, actively recruiting patients
Start Year 2013
 
Description Imperial - STOP-HCV-1 
Organisation University of Oxford
Department Oxford Clinical Trials Unit (CTU)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Sharing of knowledge & expertise, intellectual input into study protocol for STOP-HCV-1 trial
Collaborator Contribution Sharing of knowledge & expertise, provision of samples and data from STOP-HCV-1 trial for analysis
Impact Trial in progress, actively recruiting patients
Start Year 2013
 
Description Janssen-STOP-HCV 
Organisation Janssen Diagnostics
Country United States 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Sharing of knowledge & expertise
Collaborator Contribution Sharing of knowledge & expertise, exploration of use of miRNA as a biomarker for liver disease progression
Impact Preliminary studies to Identify miRNA profiles associated with different stages of liver fibrosis completed.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Merck-STOP-HCV 
Organisation Merck
Country Germany 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Sharing of knowledge and expertise
Collaborator Contribution Sharing of knowledge and expertise, provision of samples and data from relevant clinical studies
Impact Manuscript in preparation
Start Year 2013
 
Description Nottingham - STOP-HCV 
Organisation University of Nottingham
Department Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Sharing of knowledge and expertise
Collaborator Contribution Sharing of knowledge and expertise, data management support, provision of study coordination support
Impact Development of STOP-HCV patient registry, establishment of STOP-HCV Cirrhosis Study (UKCRN, observational study)
Start Year 2013
 
Description Nottingham - STOP-HCV 
Organisation University of Nottingham
Department Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Sharing of knowledge and expertise
Collaborator Contribution Sharing of knowledge and expertise, data management support, provision of study coordination support
Impact Development of STOP-HCV patient registry, establishment of STOP-HCV Cirrhosis Study (UKCRN, observational study)
Start Year 2013
 
Description OncImmune-STOP-HCV 
Organisation Oncimmune
Country United States 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Sharing of knowledge & expertise
Collaborator Contribution R&D to develop a diagnostic test to detect hepatocellular cancer
Impact Feasibility testing completed, panel of antigens developed to use for further development and phase 2 testing
Start Year 2013
 
Description PHE - HCV NGS pilot 
Organisation Public Health England
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Provision of samples and data, sharing of knowledge and expertise
Collaborator Contribution Sharing of knowledge and expertise
Impact This collaboration formed part of the STOP-HCV pilot HCV next generation sequencing study - an exercise to formally compare HCV next generation sequencing methods undertaken in different UK centres. Results of the pilot study have been accepted for presentation at the 2016 EASL Liver meeting (April) and a manuscript is under review at the Journal of Clinical Microbiology.
Start Year 2013
 
Description QMUL-STOP-HCV 
Organisation Queen Mary University of London
Department Blizard Institute
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Sharing of knowledge & expertise
Collaborator Contribution Sharing of knowledge & expertise
Impact Boson study, Merck C-ISLE study
Start Year 2013
 
Description Southampton-STOP-HCV 
Organisation University of Southampton
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Sharing of knowledge & expertise
Collaborator Contribution Sharing of knowledge & expertise
Impact none to report to date
Start Year 2013
 
Description UCL-HCV NGS pilot 
Organisation University College London
Department Department of Infection and Population Health
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Access to samples and data; expertise and sharing of knowledge
Collaborator Contribution Analysis of samples and data; sharing of knowledge and expertise
Impact This collaboration formed part of the STOP-HCV pilot HCV next generation sequencing study - an exercise to formally compare HCV next generation sequencing methods undertaken in different UK centres. Results of the pilot study have been accepted for presentation at the 2016 EASL Liver meeting (April) and a manuscript is under review at the Journal of Clinical Microbiology.
Start Year 2014
 
Title Boson study 
Description Large phase 3 study of patients with geno 3a HCV treated with sofosbuvir integrated with STOP-HCV 
Type Therapeutic Intervention - Drug
Current Stage Of Development Late clinical evaluation
Year Development Stage Completed 2014
Development Status Under active development/distribution
Impact Largest phase-3 hep C study in the UK-major benefits to patients and the economy 
 
Title STOP-HCV-1 
Description Drugs being used - VIEKIRAX, EXVIERA (Abbvie) and HARVONI (Gilead) - are licensed for use in the UK 
Type Therapeutic Intervention - Drug
Current Stage Of Development Wide-scale adoption
Year Development Stage Completed 2015
Development Status Closed
Clinical Trial? Yes
Impact Currently recruiting for trial - expected impact will be an improved, stratified approach to short course all-oral drug treatment for HCV infected patients with mild liver disease. 
 
Description 5th World Congress on Hepatitis and Liver Diseases 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr. Bevin Gangadharan gave a talk at an international conference on hepatitis and liver diseases which sparked questions and discussion from hepatologists around the world. The abtract is below: Background: Liver biopsy is the reference standard for assessing liver fibrosis and no reliable serum biomarkers are available to discriminate between the intermediate stages of fibrosis. We used proteomics to identify novel fibrosis biomarkers in hepatitis C patients with different degrees of liver fibrosis. Methods: Novel liver fibrosis biomarkers were identified by analysing proteins in plasma/serum samples from controls and hepatitis C patients with varying stages of liver fibrosis using a proteomics technique: two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE). Identified markers were validated across all Ishak fibrosis stages and compared to the markers used in FibroTest, Enhanced Liver Fibrosis (ELF) test, Hepascore and FIBROSpect by Western blotting. For the most promising biomarkers, an antibody-free assay (parallel reaction monitoring using mass spectrometry) was used which detects tryptic peptides of the biomarkers and their fragments. Results: Forty four candidate biomarkers for hepatic fibrosis were identified of which 20 were novel biomarkers of liver fibrosis. Western blot validation of all candidate markers using plasma samples from patients across all Ishak fibrosis scores showed that the markers which changed with increasing fibrosis most consistently included lipid transfer inhibitor protein, complement C3d, corticosteroid-binding globulin, apolipoprotein J and apolipoprotein L1. These five novel fibrosis markers which are secreted in blood showed a promising consistent change with increasing fibrosis stage when compared to the markers used for the FibroTest, ELF test, Hepascore and FIBROSpect. Conclusion: This study identifies 20 novel fibrosis biomarker candidates. The proteins identified may help to assess hepatic fibrosis and eliminate the need for invasive liver biopsies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.omicsonline.org/proceedings/discovery-and-quantitation-of-novel-liver-fibrosis-biomarker...
 
Description A Very Short Introduction to the Immune system (OUP) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact A book for the public on the immune system also accompanied by upcoming talks, blog and e-book.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-immune-system-a-very-short-introduction-9780198753902?cc...
 
Description BSCGT Public Engagement Event - Vaccines & Infectious Disease (hosted stall) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact This all-day event included a series of seminars and a 2hr exhibitor event at which STOP-HCV Consortium hosted a stall. ~100-200 delegates registered for the event, and the target audience was primarily secondary school children and the general public. There was a high level of interest in the stall, from both school children and the general public, and the feedback received will inform plans for future events.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Barnes, E & Hudson, E. STOP-HCV - Stratified Medicine to Optimise Treatment for Hepatitis C Virus Infection. Impact, Volume 2017, Number 6, August 2017, pp. 81-83(3) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact STOP-HCV published an article with Science Impact Ltd showcasing the work of the consortium. The article appeared in the August edition of the magazine (the focus of which is 'Effective and cost-effective solutions')
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/sil/impact/2017/00002017/00000006/art00029
 
Description Didcot All Saints Primary School Workshop, 23rd June 2017 'Hand cleanliness, viruses and treatment' - in association with University Hospital Southampton 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Questions and discussions
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description International Liver Congress, EASL 2017 (Barcelona) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Registry grant presentation" Thursday 14 April 2016 from 12:00 to 13:30.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Interview with Oxford Centre for Personalised Medicine 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact An interview with the Centre for Personalised Medicine (St Anne's College, Oxford) regarding personalised medicine & STOP-HCV.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.well.ox.ac.uk/cpm/prof-ellie-barnes-2
 
Description NK cell workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact We had a presentation a poster presentation at the NK2017 meeting for the work.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.nk2016.it
 
Description Oxford Curiosity Carnival, 29th September 2017 (part of 'European Researchers' Night) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Questions, discussions
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Public Outreach Session 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Virology outreach talk
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Public event (hosted stall) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Stall sparked questions and answers surrounding virology and personalised medicine

Positive feedback from attendees at the stall resulted in an invitation to host the stall at another public event (Oxford Open Doors)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.ndm.ox.ac.uk/cheltenham-science-festival-2014-2
 
Description Public event (hosted stall) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Stall sparked interest/further questions surounding virology and personalised medicine

Increased awareness for STOP-HCV project - new followers on twitter
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Radio packages 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A series of radio packages produced by or involving JKB that were aired on BBC R4 and also BBC World Radio
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description STOP-HCV Podcast 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Podcast with STOP-HCV researchers describing their work within the consortium. Published on the STOP-HCV website.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.stop-hcv.ox.ac.uk/stop-hcv-podcasts
 
Description Spotlight on CRN hepatitis C research - interview for website 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Interview for NIHR CRN spotlight on hepatitis C research - published on CRN website
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL https://www.crn.nihr.ac.uk/hepatology/about-hepatology-research/spotlight-on-hepatitis/researcher/
 
Description World Hepatitis Day, 18th July 2017 (The John Radcliffe Hospital) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Questions and discussion
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017