Consortium on Vulnerability to Externalizing Disorders and Addictions [c-VEDA]

Lead Research Organisation: King's College London
Department Name: Social Genetic and Dev Psychiatry Centre

Abstract

Alcohol use disorders (AUD) account for a disproportionately high share of the health burden in India and other low- and middle-income countries. This increasing burden is linked to societal changes in emerging nations, which include growing availability of alcohol, greater normalization of use and rapid changes in socio-economic conditions. Individuals with externalising behaviour, which are characterised by altered brain activity during reward processing and behavioural control have a higher risk for AUD. AUD and externalizing disorders share moderate to high heritability with environmental factors being important contributors. While both environmental and genetic factors conveying risk and resilience have been identified it is not established to what extent these factors are dependent on the wider socio-cultural and psychosocial context they are embedded in, or whether they are influenced by epigenetic and genetic factors that are specific for certain ethnicities. It is therefore unknown to what extent environmental and genetic risk factors are similar or distinct in industrialised nations and emerging societies such as in India. Furthermore, some environmental risk factors are largely specific to emerging societies, including exposure to nutritional stress, environmental neurotoxins and culturally dependent forms of psychosocial stress.
We propose to investigate in collaboration with Prof. Vivek Benegal of the National Institute for Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Bangalore and our Indian partners from Bangalore, Mysore, Calcutta, Chandigarh and Pune if environmental and genetic risk factors in industrialised countries and emerging societies shape brain function and behaviour in distinct ways, thus leading to different risk constellations and neurobehavioural trajectories for substance misuse and externalising disorders.
To address this aim we will establish a comprehensive database allowing comparative analyses of behavioural trajectories in childhood and adolescence, which provide a platform for sustained India-UK collaborations in mental health research. This platform will ascertain a great variety of environmental factors (exposome), biological samples as well as detailed neuroimaging analyses. We propose to compare insights into etiology and trajectories into substance abuse and externalising disorders gained from major European and UK studies including the longitudinal imaging genetics study "Reinforcement-related behaviour in normal development and psychopathology" (IMAGEN) and the "Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children" (ALSPAC) with existing Indian cohorts. The Indian cohorts, which comprise >14.000 participants with aged 0-25 years include both high risk for substance misuse and population-based individuals from different social and environmental (rural and urban) backgrounds. They have been selected to cover the developmental period assessed in the UK cohorts, thus rendering the studies comparable. We aim to enrich the Indian cohorts, which have mainly been designed to investigate somatic disorders by adding a comprehensive assessment of mental health, externalising behaviour and substance use disorders involving psychometric and neuropsychological characterisation, as well as biological sampling in >10.000 participants with an age range of 6-23 years. Assessment instruments and protocols have been selected to allow comparison to IMAGEN and ALSPAC. We will randomly select among the cohort participants 1000 individuals aged between 10 and 23 years for neuroimaging, genetic and epigenetic analyses. We will control for socio-cultural and environmental influences by investigating determinants of substance abuse in SCAMP, a UK cohort recruiting 6.500 11-13 year old adolescents, >1000 of which are of South Asian descent. Together these data will allow for the most comprehensive comparative analysis of brain development and behaviour across different social and cultural environments to date.

Technical Summary

Alcohol use disorders (AUD) account for a high share of the health burden in India. While environmental and genetic factors conveying risk for AUD and related externalizing disorders have been identified it is not established if these factors are dependent on the socio-cultural and psychosocial context, or whether they are influenced by epigenetic and genetic factors specific for certain ethnicities. Furthermore, some environmental risk factors are specific to emerging societies, including exposure to nutritional stress, environmental neurotoxins and culturally dependent forms of psychosocial stress. We will investigate in collaboration with the National Institute for Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore and partners from Bangalore, Mysore, Calcutta, Chandigarh and Pune if environmental and genetic risk factors in industrialised countries and emerging societies shape brain function and behaviour in distinct ways, thus leading to different risk constellations and neurobehavioural trajectories for substance misuse and externalising disorders. Our objectives are: (1)Establishment of an accelerated longitudinal cohort of >10.000 individuals in India aged 6-23 years. (2)Assessment of addictive behaviour and detailed behavioural and clinical characterisation, with emphasis on externalising behaviour. (3)Assessment of environmental exposures to risk and resilience factors impacting gene expression, brain development, temperaments and behaviours. (4)Collection of biological samples in all participants. (5)Assessing neural processes using functional and structural neuroimaging in a subgroup of 1000 individuals. (6)Investigation of gene x environment modulation of brain development, and externalising and addictive behaviour through genetic and epigenetic studies. (7)Establishment of a bioresource with integrated database and biobank. (8)Capacity building through joint UK-Indian research activities. (9)Providing pilot data for a nationwide mental health cohort in India.

Planned Impact

This study will for the first time compare trajectories into substance abuse and externalising disorder in emerging nations and industrialised societies, and investigate their neurobehavioural underpinnings. As the majority of the world's population is living in emerging societies, and development of mental disorders in these societies has been understudied, our subject is of global public health relevance. Various stakeholders will benefit from our project and include:
1.) Academic researchers will benefit from the new knowledge generated within two years from the start of the project, as well as from the databank and bioresource established for future projects.
2.) Joint UK-India academic research benefits through the extensive collaborative network and the establishment of a sustained infrastructure and datasets which facilitate follow-up research projects as early as two years after the start of the project.
3.) A national mental health cohort, which can be planned on the basis of the expertise generated by this project, which will provide unparalleled information about mental health and disorders, and their determinants in the second most populous country in the world.
4.) Indian researchers will benefit immediately through the transfer of know how, methodologies and technology.
5.) Young investigators having an opportunity to become highly skilled in a cutting edge area of mental health research will also benefit immediately.
6.) Policy makers will benefit through detailed data on risk for substance use disorders and mental disorders which we will provide at the end of the project.
7.) Public policies at the regional and national level will be influenced by our report to the Government of India and other dissemination activities in the course of the project. International influence might be exerted by engaging and disseminating our findings to WHO and other international organisations.
8.) Clinical practice by public sector and charities might be influenced by specifically targeting at risk populations in early interventions. This benefit might be exerted five years after the end of the project.
9.) Enhancing quality of life, health and well-being through targeted interventions five years after the end of the project.
10.) Contributing to increasing public awareness and understanding of science through the dissemination of evidenced-based mental health information throughout the project.

Organisations

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description International Max Planck Research School for Translational Psychiatry
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact We are contributing to the IMPRS, a prestigious and highly selective international postgraduate education programme, with global applicants who are trained to be world leaders in the field of translational psychiatry.
 
Description Scientific advisory committees of the Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology and the IMI AETIONOMY
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description ERC advanced grant 'STRATIFY'
Amount € 3,490,000 (EUR)
Organisation European Research Council (ERC) 
Sector Public
Country European Union (EU)
Start 10/2016 
End 09/2021
 
Description Horizon 2020
Amount € 4,000,000 (EUR)
Organisation JPND Research 
Sector Academic/University
Country Global
Start 07/2016 
End 06/2019
 
Description IMAGEN pathways (ERANID)
Amount £193,162 (GBP)
Organisation Government of Catalonia 
Department Department of Health
Sector Public
Country Spain
Start 01/2017 
End 12/2019
 
Title Currently developing COINSTAC 
Description To enhance our collaborative research, we will enable integrated analysis of cohort data by adapting an existing decentralized platform for large scale analyses called 'COINSTAC' (Plis et al, 2016), which allows anonymous analyses of multiple cohorts and large-scale aggregated datasets, including neuroimaging data. COINSTAC incorporates tools enabling distributed computation and virtual pooling of data. These measures will enable analyses to identify and rank urbanisation-related risk to mental health, and to identify predictors and stratification markers using multivariate techniques developed in our group. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact This is currently not developed but is in the early stages of establishing and adapting. 
 
Title Developing a framework to study urban ecology and its relation to brain and behaviour 
Description We are currently assembling data on urban living in a shared framework that enables the analysis of their relation to neuroimaging, behavioural and genetic data in geocoded individuals in Europe and globally.. 
Type Of Material Model of mechanisms or symptoms - human 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact in preparation 
 
Title Developing an algorithm to identify behavioural symptoms based on shared biological underpinnings 
Description We have developed a multiple sparse canonical correlation analysis to identify symptoms with a shared biological underpinning measures using functional and structural neuroimaging data, as well as -omics and environmental characterisation (Ing et al. Nature NS, in revision). 
Type Of Material Model of mechanisms or symptoms - human 
Year Produced 2015 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Not published yet 
 
Title Geospatial tool to characterize physical environment 
Description We are establishing and adapting a geospatial data tool to identify environmental risks, developed with the NIHR-funded MindTech Healthcare Technology Cooperative supported by the Centre for Wireless and Population Health Systems at UCSD and the Centre for Translational Informatics. Together with our local partners in India, we will map requirements of stakeholders, including participants and contract software developers to develop and test an app adapted to local needs. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2016 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact This is currently in progress 
 
Title cVEDA database 
Description The cVEDA database currently contains baseline data of over 8000 individuals aged 6-23 years, including over 1300 neuroimaging scans. We are currently completing baseline analysis and carrying out follow-up assessments to complete our accelerated longitudinal study. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2019 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Currently largest deep-phenotyping population-based database in India, specialising on children and adolescent development. 
 
Description Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) 
Organisation Beijing Normal University
Country China 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) aims at establishing and analysing big neuroimaging genetic datasets to precisely identify brain mechanisms underlying behaviour, and their genetic and environmental mediators, thus enabling prediction and stratification of mental disorders. The generation of well-characterised large scale databases internationally, the advent of deep phenotyping through biological assessments, including neuroimaging and -omics technologies, and the development of novel computer science and statistical tools to relate and analyse different data levels enable powerful new solutions to elucidate the biological basis of dysfunctional behaviour and mental disorders in its environmental context on a population-wide and global scale.
Collaborator Contribution To realize this potential PONS brings together an interdisciplinary group of world leading clinical and basic researchers. The Centre is led by Gunter Schumann, Chair in Biological Psychiatry at the Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre (MRC). Main researchers involved in the PONS Centre include Gareth Barker, Professor of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Centre for Neuroimaging Science), Ted Barker, Reader in Developmental Psychopathology (Dept. of Psychology), Sylvane Desrivieres, Reader in Genetics (MRC-SGDP Centre), Sukhwinder Shergill, Professor of Psychiatry (Dept. of Psychosis Studies), Ulrike Schmidt, Professor of Eating Disorders and Head of Department of Psychological Medicine), Steve Williams, Professor of Imaging Sciences and Director of the Centre for Neuroimaging Science. To complement the strengths of the research team at IoPPN we have established close links with leading biomathematicians and computer scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology of Brain-like Intelligence (ISTBI) at Fudan University, Shanghai, led by Professor Jianfeng Feng. ISTBI develops new theories of artificial intelligence inspired and developed from neuroscience that will be applied to computer science and medicine.
Impact Multi-disciplinary collaboration that has resulted in several publications since summer 2017 (see website https://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/research/centres/pons/about.aspx)
Start Year 2017
 
Description Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) 
Organisation Central Institute for Mental Health
Country Germany 
Sector Hospitals 
PI Contribution The Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) aims at establishing and analysing big neuroimaging genetic datasets to precisely identify brain mechanisms underlying behaviour, and their genetic and environmental mediators, thus enabling prediction and stratification of mental disorders. The generation of well-characterised large scale databases internationally, the advent of deep phenotyping through biological assessments, including neuroimaging and -omics technologies, and the development of novel computer science and statistical tools to relate and analyse different data levels enable powerful new solutions to elucidate the biological basis of dysfunctional behaviour and mental disorders in its environmental context on a population-wide and global scale.
Collaborator Contribution To realize this potential PONS brings together an interdisciplinary group of world leading clinical and basic researchers. The Centre is led by Gunter Schumann, Chair in Biological Psychiatry at the Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre (MRC). Main researchers involved in the PONS Centre include Gareth Barker, Professor of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Centre for Neuroimaging Science), Ted Barker, Reader in Developmental Psychopathology (Dept. of Psychology), Sylvane Desrivieres, Reader in Genetics (MRC-SGDP Centre), Sukhwinder Shergill, Professor of Psychiatry (Dept. of Psychosis Studies), Ulrike Schmidt, Professor of Eating Disorders and Head of Department of Psychological Medicine), Steve Williams, Professor of Imaging Sciences and Director of the Centre for Neuroimaging Science. To complement the strengths of the research team at IoPPN we have established close links with leading biomathematicians and computer scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology of Brain-like Intelligence (ISTBI) at Fudan University, Shanghai, led by Professor Jianfeng Feng. ISTBI develops new theories of artificial intelligence inspired and developed from neuroscience that will be applied to computer science and medicine.
Impact Multi-disciplinary collaboration that has resulted in several publications since summer 2017 (see website https://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/research/centres/pons/about.aspx)
Start Year 2017
 
Description Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) 
Organisation Charité - University of Medicine Berlin
Country Germany 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) aims at establishing and analysing big neuroimaging genetic datasets to precisely identify brain mechanisms underlying behaviour, and their genetic and environmental mediators, thus enabling prediction and stratification of mental disorders. The generation of well-characterised large scale databases internationally, the advent of deep phenotyping through biological assessments, including neuroimaging and -omics technologies, and the development of novel computer science and statistical tools to relate and analyse different data levels enable powerful new solutions to elucidate the biological basis of dysfunctional behaviour and mental disorders in its environmental context on a population-wide and global scale.
Collaborator Contribution To realize this potential PONS brings together an interdisciplinary group of world leading clinical and basic researchers. The Centre is led by Gunter Schumann, Chair in Biological Psychiatry at the Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre (MRC). Main researchers involved in the PONS Centre include Gareth Barker, Professor of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Centre for Neuroimaging Science), Ted Barker, Reader in Developmental Psychopathology (Dept. of Psychology), Sylvane Desrivieres, Reader in Genetics (MRC-SGDP Centre), Sukhwinder Shergill, Professor of Psychiatry (Dept. of Psychosis Studies), Ulrike Schmidt, Professor of Eating Disorders and Head of Department of Psychological Medicine), Steve Williams, Professor of Imaging Sciences and Director of the Centre for Neuroimaging Science. To complement the strengths of the research team at IoPPN we have established close links with leading biomathematicians and computer scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology of Brain-like Intelligence (ISTBI) at Fudan University, Shanghai, led by Professor Jianfeng Feng. ISTBI develops new theories of artificial intelligence inspired and developed from neuroscience that will be applied to computer science and medicine.
Impact Multi-disciplinary collaboration that has resulted in several publications since summer 2017 (see website https://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/research/centres/pons/about.aspx)
Start Year 2017
 
Description Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) 
Organisation Fudan University
Country China 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) aims at establishing and analysing big neuroimaging genetic datasets to precisely identify brain mechanisms underlying behaviour, and their genetic and environmental mediators, thus enabling prediction and stratification of mental disorders. The generation of well-characterised large scale databases internationally, the advent of deep phenotyping through biological assessments, including neuroimaging and -omics technologies, and the development of novel computer science and statistical tools to relate and analyse different data levels enable powerful new solutions to elucidate the biological basis of dysfunctional behaviour and mental disorders in its environmental context on a population-wide and global scale.
Collaborator Contribution To realize this potential PONS brings together an interdisciplinary group of world leading clinical and basic researchers. The Centre is led by Gunter Schumann, Chair in Biological Psychiatry at the Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre (MRC). Main researchers involved in the PONS Centre include Gareth Barker, Professor of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Centre for Neuroimaging Science), Ted Barker, Reader in Developmental Psychopathology (Dept. of Psychology), Sylvane Desrivieres, Reader in Genetics (MRC-SGDP Centre), Sukhwinder Shergill, Professor of Psychiatry (Dept. of Psychosis Studies), Ulrike Schmidt, Professor of Eating Disorders and Head of Department of Psychological Medicine), Steve Williams, Professor of Imaging Sciences and Director of the Centre for Neuroimaging Science. To complement the strengths of the research team at IoPPN we have established close links with leading biomathematicians and computer scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology of Brain-like Intelligence (ISTBI) at Fudan University, Shanghai, led by Professor Jianfeng Feng. ISTBI develops new theories of artificial intelligence inspired and developed from neuroscience that will be applied to computer science and medicine.
Impact Multi-disciplinary collaboration that has resulted in several publications since summer 2017 (see website https://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/research/centres/pons/about.aspx)
Start Year 2017
 
Description Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) 
Organisation Imperial College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) aims at establishing and analysing big neuroimaging genetic datasets to precisely identify brain mechanisms underlying behaviour, and their genetic and environmental mediators, thus enabling prediction and stratification of mental disorders. The generation of well-characterised large scale databases internationally, the advent of deep phenotyping through biological assessments, including neuroimaging and -omics technologies, and the development of novel computer science and statistical tools to relate and analyse different data levels enable powerful new solutions to elucidate the biological basis of dysfunctional behaviour and mental disorders in its environmental context on a population-wide and global scale.
Collaborator Contribution To realize this potential PONS brings together an interdisciplinary group of world leading clinical and basic researchers. The Centre is led by Gunter Schumann, Chair in Biological Psychiatry at the Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre (MRC). Main researchers involved in the PONS Centre include Gareth Barker, Professor of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Centre for Neuroimaging Science), Ted Barker, Reader in Developmental Psychopathology (Dept. of Psychology), Sylvane Desrivieres, Reader in Genetics (MRC-SGDP Centre), Sukhwinder Shergill, Professor of Psychiatry (Dept. of Psychosis Studies), Ulrike Schmidt, Professor of Eating Disorders and Head of Department of Psychological Medicine), Steve Williams, Professor of Imaging Sciences and Director of the Centre for Neuroimaging Science. To complement the strengths of the research team at IoPPN we have established close links with leading biomathematicians and computer scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology of Brain-like Intelligence (ISTBI) at Fudan University, Shanghai, led by Professor Jianfeng Feng. ISTBI develops new theories of artificial intelligence inspired and developed from neuroscience that will be applied to computer science and medicine.
Impact Multi-disciplinary collaboration that has resulted in several publications since summer 2017 (see website https://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/research/centres/pons/about.aspx)
Start Year 2017
 
Description Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) 
Organisation Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR)
Country India 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) aims at establishing and analysing big neuroimaging genetic datasets to precisely identify brain mechanisms underlying behaviour, and their genetic and environmental mediators, thus enabling prediction and stratification of mental disorders. The generation of well-characterised large scale databases internationally, the advent of deep phenotyping through biological assessments, including neuroimaging and -omics technologies, and the development of novel computer science and statistical tools to relate and analyse different data levels enable powerful new solutions to elucidate the biological basis of dysfunctional behaviour and mental disorders in its environmental context on a population-wide and global scale.
Collaborator Contribution To realize this potential PONS brings together an interdisciplinary group of world leading clinical and basic researchers. The Centre is led by Gunter Schumann, Chair in Biological Psychiatry at the Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre (MRC). Main researchers involved in the PONS Centre include Gareth Barker, Professor of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Centre for Neuroimaging Science), Ted Barker, Reader in Developmental Psychopathology (Dept. of Psychology), Sylvane Desrivieres, Reader in Genetics (MRC-SGDP Centre), Sukhwinder Shergill, Professor of Psychiatry (Dept. of Psychosis Studies), Ulrike Schmidt, Professor of Eating Disorders and Head of Department of Psychological Medicine), Steve Williams, Professor of Imaging Sciences and Director of the Centre for Neuroimaging Science. To complement the strengths of the research team at IoPPN we have established close links with leading biomathematicians and computer scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology of Brain-like Intelligence (ISTBI) at Fudan University, Shanghai, led by Professor Jianfeng Feng. ISTBI develops new theories of artificial intelligence inspired and developed from neuroscience that will be applied to computer science and medicine.
Impact Multi-disciplinary collaboration that has resulted in several publications since summer 2017 (see website https://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/research/centres/pons/about.aspx)
Start Year 2017
 
Description Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) 
Organisation Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education And Research
PI Contribution The Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) aims at establishing and analysing big neuroimaging genetic datasets to precisely identify brain mechanisms underlying behaviour, and their genetic and environmental mediators, thus enabling prediction and stratification of mental disorders. The generation of well-characterised large scale databases internationally, the advent of deep phenotyping through biological assessments, including neuroimaging and -omics technologies, and the development of novel computer science and statistical tools to relate and analyse different data levels enable powerful new solutions to elucidate the biological basis of dysfunctional behaviour and mental disorders in its environmental context on a population-wide and global scale.
Collaborator Contribution To realize this potential PONS brings together an interdisciplinary group of world leading clinical and basic researchers. The Centre is led by Gunter Schumann, Chair in Biological Psychiatry at the Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre (MRC). Main researchers involved in the PONS Centre include Gareth Barker, Professor of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Centre for Neuroimaging Science), Ted Barker, Reader in Developmental Psychopathology (Dept. of Psychology), Sylvane Desrivieres, Reader in Genetics (MRC-SGDP Centre), Sukhwinder Shergill, Professor of Psychiatry (Dept. of Psychosis Studies), Ulrike Schmidt, Professor of Eating Disorders and Head of Department of Psychological Medicine), Steve Williams, Professor of Imaging Sciences and Director of the Centre for Neuroimaging Science. To complement the strengths of the research team at IoPPN we have established close links with leading biomathematicians and computer scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology of Brain-like Intelligence (ISTBI) at Fudan University, Shanghai, led by Professor Jianfeng Feng. ISTBI develops new theories of artificial intelligence inspired and developed from neuroscience that will be applied to computer science and medicine.
Impact Multi-disciplinary collaboration that has resulted in several publications since summer 2017 (see website https://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/research/centres/pons/about.aspx)
Start Year 2017
 
Description Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) 
Organisation National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM)
Country France 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) aims at establishing and analysing big neuroimaging genetic datasets to precisely identify brain mechanisms underlying behaviour, and their genetic and environmental mediators, thus enabling prediction and stratification of mental disorders. The generation of well-characterised large scale databases internationally, the advent of deep phenotyping through biological assessments, including neuroimaging and -omics technologies, and the development of novel computer science and statistical tools to relate and analyse different data levels enable powerful new solutions to elucidate the biological basis of dysfunctional behaviour and mental disorders in its environmental context on a population-wide and global scale.
Collaborator Contribution To realize this potential PONS brings together an interdisciplinary group of world leading clinical and basic researchers. The Centre is led by Gunter Schumann, Chair in Biological Psychiatry at the Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre (MRC). Main researchers involved in the PONS Centre include Gareth Barker, Professor of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Centre for Neuroimaging Science), Ted Barker, Reader in Developmental Psychopathology (Dept. of Psychology), Sylvane Desrivieres, Reader in Genetics (MRC-SGDP Centre), Sukhwinder Shergill, Professor of Psychiatry (Dept. of Psychosis Studies), Ulrike Schmidt, Professor of Eating Disorders and Head of Department of Psychological Medicine), Steve Williams, Professor of Imaging Sciences and Director of the Centre for Neuroimaging Science. To complement the strengths of the research team at IoPPN we have established close links with leading biomathematicians and computer scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology of Brain-like Intelligence (ISTBI) at Fudan University, Shanghai, led by Professor Jianfeng Feng. ISTBI develops new theories of artificial intelligence inspired and developed from neuroscience that will be applied to computer science and medicine.
Impact Multi-disciplinary collaboration that has resulted in several publications since summer 2017 (see website https://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/research/centres/pons/about.aspx)
Start Year 2017
 
Description Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) 
Organisation Regional Institute of Medical Sciences
PI Contribution The Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) aims at establishing and analysing big neuroimaging genetic datasets to precisely identify brain mechanisms underlying behaviour, and their genetic and environmental mediators, thus enabling prediction and stratification of mental disorders. The generation of well-characterised large scale databases internationally, the advent of deep phenotyping through biological assessments, including neuroimaging and -omics technologies, and the development of novel computer science and statistical tools to relate and analyse different data levels enable powerful new solutions to elucidate the biological basis of dysfunctional behaviour and mental disorders in its environmental context on a population-wide and global scale.
Collaborator Contribution To realize this potential PONS brings together an interdisciplinary group of world leading clinical and basic researchers. The Centre is led by Gunter Schumann, Chair in Biological Psychiatry at the Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre (MRC). Main researchers involved in the PONS Centre include Gareth Barker, Professor of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Centre for Neuroimaging Science), Ted Barker, Reader in Developmental Psychopathology (Dept. of Psychology), Sylvane Desrivieres, Reader in Genetics (MRC-SGDP Centre), Sukhwinder Shergill, Professor of Psychiatry (Dept. of Psychosis Studies), Ulrike Schmidt, Professor of Eating Disorders and Head of Department of Psychological Medicine), Steve Williams, Professor of Imaging Sciences and Director of the Centre for Neuroimaging Science. To complement the strengths of the research team at IoPPN we have established close links with leading biomathematicians and computer scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology of Brain-like Intelligence (ISTBI) at Fudan University, Shanghai, led by Professor Jianfeng Feng. ISTBI develops new theories of artificial intelligence inspired and developed from neuroscience that will be applied to computer science and medicine.
Impact Multi-disciplinary collaboration that has resulted in several publications since summer 2017 (see website https://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/research/centres/pons/about.aspx)
Start Year 2017
 
Description Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) 
Organisation Trinity College Dublin
Country Ireland 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) aims at establishing and analysing big neuroimaging genetic datasets to precisely identify brain mechanisms underlying behaviour, and their genetic and environmental mediators, thus enabling prediction and stratification of mental disorders. The generation of well-characterised large scale databases internationally, the advent of deep phenotyping through biological assessments, including neuroimaging and -omics technologies, and the development of novel computer science and statistical tools to relate and analyse different data levels enable powerful new solutions to elucidate the biological basis of dysfunctional behaviour and mental disorders in its environmental context on a population-wide and global scale.
Collaborator Contribution To realize this potential PONS brings together an interdisciplinary group of world leading clinical and basic researchers. The Centre is led by Gunter Schumann, Chair in Biological Psychiatry at the Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre (MRC). Main researchers involved in the PONS Centre include Gareth Barker, Professor of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Centre for Neuroimaging Science), Ted Barker, Reader in Developmental Psychopathology (Dept. of Psychology), Sylvane Desrivieres, Reader in Genetics (MRC-SGDP Centre), Sukhwinder Shergill, Professor of Psychiatry (Dept. of Psychosis Studies), Ulrike Schmidt, Professor of Eating Disorders and Head of Department of Psychological Medicine), Steve Williams, Professor of Imaging Sciences and Director of the Centre for Neuroimaging Science. To complement the strengths of the research team at IoPPN we have established close links with leading biomathematicians and computer scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology of Brain-like Intelligence (ISTBI) at Fudan University, Shanghai, led by Professor Jianfeng Feng. ISTBI develops new theories of artificial intelligence inspired and developed from neuroscience that will be applied to computer science and medicine.
Impact Multi-disciplinary collaboration that has resulted in several publications since summer 2017 (see website https://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/research/centres/pons/about.aspx)
Start Year 2017
 
Description Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) 
Organisation University Hospital Erlangen
Country Germany 
Sector Hospitals 
PI Contribution The Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) aims at establishing and analysing big neuroimaging genetic datasets to precisely identify brain mechanisms underlying behaviour, and their genetic and environmental mediators, thus enabling prediction and stratification of mental disorders. The generation of well-characterised large scale databases internationally, the advent of deep phenotyping through biological assessments, including neuroimaging and -omics technologies, and the development of novel computer science and statistical tools to relate and analyse different data levels enable powerful new solutions to elucidate the biological basis of dysfunctional behaviour and mental disorders in its environmental context on a population-wide and global scale.
Collaborator Contribution To realize this potential PONS brings together an interdisciplinary group of world leading clinical and basic researchers. The Centre is led by Gunter Schumann, Chair in Biological Psychiatry at the Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre (MRC). Main researchers involved in the PONS Centre include Gareth Barker, Professor of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Centre for Neuroimaging Science), Ted Barker, Reader in Developmental Psychopathology (Dept. of Psychology), Sylvane Desrivieres, Reader in Genetics (MRC-SGDP Centre), Sukhwinder Shergill, Professor of Psychiatry (Dept. of Psychosis Studies), Ulrike Schmidt, Professor of Eating Disorders and Head of Department of Psychological Medicine), Steve Williams, Professor of Imaging Sciences and Director of the Centre for Neuroimaging Science. To complement the strengths of the research team at IoPPN we have established close links with leading biomathematicians and computer scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology of Brain-like Intelligence (ISTBI) at Fudan University, Shanghai, led by Professor Jianfeng Feng. ISTBI develops new theories of artificial intelligence inspired and developed from neuroscience that will be applied to computer science and medicine.
Impact Multi-disciplinary collaboration that has resulted in several publications since summer 2017 (see website https://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/research/centres/pons/about.aspx)
Start Year 2017
 
Description Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) 
Organisation University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf
Country Germany 
Sector Hospitals 
PI Contribution The Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) aims at establishing and analysing big neuroimaging genetic datasets to precisely identify brain mechanisms underlying behaviour, and their genetic and environmental mediators, thus enabling prediction and stratification of mental disorders. The generation of well-characterised large scale databases internationally, the advent of deep phenotyping through biological assessments, including neuroimaging and -omics technologies, and the development of novel computer science and statistical tools to relate and analyse different data levels enable powerful new solutions to elucidate the biological basis of dysfunctional behaviour and mental disorders in its environmental context on a population-wide and global scale.
Collaborator Contribution To realize this potential PONS brings together an interdisciplinary group of world leading clinical and basic researchers. The Centre is led by Gunter Schumann, Chair in Biological Psychiatry at the Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre (MRC). Main researchers involved in the PONS Centre include Gareth Barker, Professor of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Centre for Neuroimaging Science), Ted Barker, Reader in Developmental Psychopathology (Dept. of Psychology), Sylvane Desrivieres, Reader in Genetics (MRC-SGDP Centre), Sukhwinder Shergill, Professor of Psychiatry (Dept. of Psychosis Studies), Ulrike Schmidt, Professor of Eating Disorders and Head of Department of Psychological Medicine), Steve Williams, Professor of Imaging Sciences and Director of the Centre for Neuroimaging Science. To complement the strengths of the research team at IoPPN we have established close links with leading biomathematicians and computer scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology of Brain-like Intelligence (ISTBI) at Fudan University, Shanghai, led by Professor Jianfeng Feng. ISTBI develops new theories of artificial intelligence inspired and developed from neuroscience that will be applied to computer science and medicine.
Impact Multi-disciplinary collaboration that has resulted in several publications since summer 2017 (see website https://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/research/centres/pons/about.aspx)
Start Year 2017
 
Description Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) 
Organisation University of Cambridge
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) aims at establishing and analysing big neuroimaging genetic datasets to precisely identify brain mechanisms underlying behaviour, and their genetic and environmental mediators, thus enabling prediction and stratification of mental disorders. The generation of well-characterised large scale databases internationally, the advent of deep phenotyping through biological assessments, including neuroimaging and -omics technologies, and the development of novel computer science and statistical tools to relate and analyse different data levels enable powerful new solutions to elucidate the biological basis of dysfunctional behaviour and mental disorders in its environmental context on a population-wide and global scale.
Collaborator Contribution To realize this potential PONS brings together an interdisciplinary group of world leading clinical and basic researchers. The Centre is led by Gunter Schumann, Chair in Biological Psychiatry at the Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre (MRC). Main researchers involved in the PONS Centre include Gareth Barker, Professor of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Centre for Neuroimaging Science), Ted Barker, Reader in Developmental Psychopathology (Dept. of Psychology), Sylvane Desrivieres, Reader in Genetics (MRC-SGDP Centre), Sukhwinder Shergill, Professor of Psychiatry (Dept. of Psychosis Studies), Ulrike Schmidt, Professor of Eating Disorders and Head of Department of Psychological Medicine), Steve Williams, Professor of Imaging Sciences and Director of the Centre for Neuroimaging Science. To complement the strengths of the research team at IoPPN we have established close links with leading biomathematicians and computer scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology of Brain-like Intelligence (ISTBI) at Fudan University, Shanghai, led by Professor Jianfeng Feng. ISTBI develops new theories of artificial intelligence inspired and developed from neuroscience that will be applied to computer science and medicine.
Impact Multi-disciplinary collaboration that has resulted in several publications since summer 2017 (see website https://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/research/centres/pons/about.aspx)
Start Year 2017
 
Description Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) 
Organisation University of Nottingham
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) aims at establishing and analysing big neuroimaging genetic datasets to precisely identify brain mechanisms underlying behaviour, and their genetic and environmental mediators, thus enabling prediction and stratification of mental disorders. The generation of well-characterised large scale databases internationally, the advent of deep phenotyping through biological assessments, including neuroimaging and -omics technologies, and the development of novel computer science and statistical tools to relate and analyse different data levels enable powerful new solutions to elucidate the biological basis of dysfunctional behaviour and mental disorders in its environmental context on a population-wide and global scale.
Collaborator Contribution To realize this potential PONS brings together an interdisciplinary group of world leading clinical and basic researchers. The Centre is led by Gunter Schumann, Chair in Biological Psychiatry at the Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre (MRC). Main researchers involved in the PONS Centre include Gareth Barker, Professor of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Centre for Neuroimaging Science), Ted Barker, Reader in Developmental Psychopathology (Dept. of Psychology), Sylvane Desrivieres, Reader in Genetics (MRC-SGDP Centre), Sukhwinder Shergill, Professor of Psychiatry (Dept. of Psychosis Studies), Ulrike Schmidt, Professor of Eating Disorders and Head of Department of Psychological Medicine), Steve Williams, Professor of Imaging Sciences and Director of the Centre for Neuroimaging Science. To complement the strengths of the research team at IoPPN we have established close links with leading biomathematicians and computer scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology of Brain-like Intelligence (ISTBI) at Fudan University, Shanghai, led by Professor Jianfeng Feng. ISTBI develops new theories of artificial intelligence inspired and developed from neuroscience that will be applied to computer science and medicine.
Impact Multi-disciplinary collaboration that has resulted in several publications since summer 2017 (see website https://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/research/centres/pons/about.aspx)
Start Year 2017
 
Description Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) 
Organisation University of Southampton
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) aims at establishing and analysing big neuroimaging genetic datasets to precisely identify brain mechanisms underlying behaviour, and their genetic and environmental mediators, thus enabling prediction and stratification of mental disorders. The generation of well-characterised large scale databases internationally, the advent of deep phenotyping through biological assessments, including neuroimaging and -omics technologies, and the development of novel computer science and statistical tools to relate and analyse different data levels enable powerful new solutions to elucidate the biological basis of dysfunctional behaviour and mental disorders in its environmental context on a population-wide and global scale.
Collaborator Contribution To realize this potential PONS brings together an interdisciplinary group of world leading clinical and basic researchers. The Centre is led by Gunter Schumann, Chair in Biological Psychiatry at the Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre (MRC). Main researchers involved in the PONS Centre include Gareth Barker, Professor of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Centre for Neuroimaging Science), Ted Barker, Reader in Developmental Psychopathology (Dept. of Psychology), Sylvane Desrivieres, Reader in Genetics (MRC-SGDP Centre), Sukhwinder Shergill, Professor of Psychiatry (Dept. of Psychosis Studies), Ulrike Schmidt, Professor of Eating Disorders and Head of Department of Psychological Medicine), Steve Williams, Professor of Imaging Sciences and Director of the Centre for Neuroimaging Science. To complement the strengths of the research team at IoPPN we have established close links with leading biomathematicians and computer scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology of Brain-like Intelligence (ISTBI) at Fudan University, Shanghai, led by Professor Jianfeng Feng. ISTBI develops new theories of artificial intelligence inspired and developed from neuroscience that will be applied to computer science and medicine.
Impact Multi-disciplinary collaboration that has resulted in several publications since summer 2017 (see website https://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/research/centres/pons/about.aspx)
Start Year 2017
 
Description Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) 
Organisation University of Southern California
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) aims at establishing and analysing big neuroimaging genetic datasets to precisely identify brain mechanisms underlying behaviour, and their genetic and environmental mediators, thus enabling prediction and stratification of mental disorders. The generation of well-characterised large scale databases internationally, the advent of deep phenotyping through biological assessments, including neuroimaging and -omics technologies, and the development of novel computer science and statistical tools to relate and analyse different data levels enable powerful new solutions to elucidate the biological basis of dysfunctional behaviour and mental disorders in its environmental context on a population-wide and global scale.
Collaborator Contribution To realize this potential PONS brings together an interdisciplinary group of world leading clinical and basic researchers. The Centre is led by Gunter Schumann, Chair in Biological Psychiatry at the Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre (MRC). Main researchers involved in the PONS Centre include Gareth Barker, Professor of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Centre for Neuroimaging Science), Ted Barker, Reader in Developmental Psychopathology (Dept. of Psychology), Sylvane Desrivieres, Reader in Genetics (MRC-SGDP Centre), Sukhwinder Shergill, Professor of Psychiatry (Dept. of Psychosis Studies), Ulrike Schmidt, Professor of Eating Disorders and Head of Department of Psychological Medicine), Steve Williams, Professor of Imaging Sciences and Director of the Centre for Neuroimaging Science. To complement the strengths of the research team at IoPPN we have established close links with leading biomathematicians and computer scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology of Brain-like Intelligence (ISTBI) at Fudan University, Shanghai, led by Professor Jianfeng Feng. ISTBI develops new theories of artificial intelligence inspired and developed from neuroscience that will be applied to computer science and medicine.
Impact Multi-disciplinary collaboration that has resulted in several publications since summer 2017 (see website https://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/research/centres/pons/about.aspx)
Start Year 2017
 
Description Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) 
Organisation University of Toronto
Country Canada 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) aims at establishing and analysing big neuroimaging genetic datasets to precisely identify brain mechanisms underlying behaviour, and their genetic and environmental mediators, thus enabling prediction and stratification of mental disorders. The generation of well-characterised large scale databases internationally, the advent of deep phenotyping through biological assessments, including neuroimaging and -omics technologies, and the development of novel computer science and statistical tools to relate and analyse different data levels enable powerful new solutions to elucidate the biological basis of dysfunctional behaviour and mental disorders in its environmental context on a population-wide and global scale.
Collaborator Contribution To realize this potential PONS brings together an interdisciplinary group of world leading clinical and basic researchers. The Centre is led by Gunter Schumann, Chair in Biological Psychiatry at the Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre (MRC). Main researchers involved in the PONS Centre include Gareth Barker, Professor of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Centre for Neuroimaging Science), Ted Barker, Reader in Developmental Psychopathology (Dept. of Psychology), Sylvane Desrivieres, Reader in Genetics (MRC-SGDP Centre), Sukhwinder Shergill, Professor of Psychiatry (Dept. of Psychosis Studies), Ulrike Schmidt, Professor of Eating Disorders and Head of Department of Psychological Medicine), Steve Williams, Professor of Imaging Sciences and Director of the Centre for Neuroimaging Science. To complement the strengths of the research team at IoPPN we have established close links with leading biomathematicians and computer scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology of Brain-like Intelligence (ISTBI) at Fudan University, Shanghai, led by Professor Jianfeng Feng. ISTBI develops new theories of artificial intelligence inspired and developed from neuroscience that will be applied to computer science and medicine.
Impact Multi-disciplinary collaboration that has resulted in several publications since summer 2017 (see website https://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/research/centres/pons/about.aspx)
Start Year 2017
 
Description Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) 
Organisation University of Vermont
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Centre for Population Neuroscience and Precision Medicine (PONS) aims at establishing and analysing big neuroimaging genetic datasets to precisely identify brain mechanisms underlying behaviour, and their genetic and environmental mediators, thus enabling prediction and stratification of mental disorders. The generation of well-characterised large scale databases internationally, the advent of deep phenotyping through biological assessments, including neuroimaging and -omics technologies, and the development of novel computer science and statistical tools to relate and analyse different data levels enable powerful new solutions to elucidate the biological basis of dysfunctional behaviour and mental disorders in its environmental context on a population-wide and global scale.
Collaborator Contribution To realize this potential PONS brings together an interdisciplinary group of world leading clinical and basic researchers. The Centre is led by Gunter Schumann, Chair in Biological Psychiatry at the Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre (MRC). Main researchers involved in the PONS Centre include Gareth Barker, Professor of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Centre for Neuroimaging Science), Ted Barker, Reader in Developmental Psychopathology (Dept. of Psychology), Sylvane Desrivieres, Reader in Genetics (MRC-SGDP Centre), Sukhwinder Shergill, Professor of Psychiatry (Dept. of Psychosis Studies), Ulrike Schmidt, Professor of Eating Disorders and Head of Department of Psychological Medicine), Steve Williams, Professor of Imaging Sciences and Director of the Centre for Neuroimaging Science. To complement the strengths of the research team at IoPPN we have established close links with leading biomathematicians and computer scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology of Brain-like Intelligence (ISTBI) at Fudan University, Shanghai, led by Professor Jianfeng Feng. ISTBI develops new theories of artificial intelligence inspired and developed from neuroscience that will be applied to computer science and medicine.
Impact Multi-disciplinary collaboration that has resulted in several publications since summer 2017 (see website https://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/research/centres/pons/about.aspx)
Start Year 2017
 
Description Global Imaging Genetics of Adolescents (GIGA) 
Organisation Beijing Normal University
Country China 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Global Imaging Genetics of Adolescents initiative is a collaboration between several major cohorts in UK, Europe, USA, China, and India who investigate health outcomes in children and adolescents via behavioral and imaging genetic studies. Its aim is to enable comparative research on brain development and behaviour in different cultures, environments and ethnic groups, both in industrialised nations and low and medium income countries (LMIC). To this end GIGA is working towards harmonised data acquisition, retrieval and analysis.
Collaborator Contribution The GIGA consortium consists of cohorts of up to 220.000 young people aged 6-25 years, including more than 20.000 neuroimaging scans in Europe, India, China, South Africa and the United States , the largest mental health consortium of neuroimaging and environmental data of young people worldwide.
Impact Both psychopathology and brain function are influenced by environmental factors, therefore it is necessary for precision medicine to be applicable in a global setting that it takes into account local environmental determinants of mental illness. For this reason we have established the consortium on Global Imaging Genetics in Adolescents (GIGA) that brings together samples Europe, India, China and the U.S. to comparatively investigate environmental effects on brain development and behaviour in a global context. We have started several collaborative projects and expect the first research outputs in the form of publications in 2019.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Global Imaging Genetics of Adolescents (GIGA) 
Organisation Charité - University of Medicine Berlin
Country Germany 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Global Imaging Genetics of Adolescents initiative is a collaboration between several major cohorts in UK, Europe, USA, China, and India who investigate health outcomes in children and adolescents via behavioral and imaging genetic studies. Its aim is to enable comparative research on brain development and behaviour in different cultures, environments and ethnic groups, both in industrialised nations and low and medium income countries (LMIC). To this end GIGA is working towards harmonised data acquisition, retrieval and analysis.
Collaborator Contribution The GIGA consortium consists of cohorts of up to 220.000 young people aged 6-25 years, including more than 20.000 neuroimaging scans in Europe, India, China, South Africa and the United States , the largest mental health consortium of neuroimaging and environmental data of young people worldwide.
Impact Both psychopathology and brain function are influenced by environmental factors, therefore it is necessary for precision medicine to be applicable in a global setting that it takes into account local environmental determinants of mental illness. For this reason we have established the consortium on Global Imaging Genetics in Adolescents (GIGA) that brings together samples Europe, India, China and the U.S. to comparatively investigate environmental effects on brain development and behaviour in a global context. We have started several collaborative projects and expect the first research outputs in the form of publications in 2019.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Global Imaging Genetics of Adolescents (GIGA) 
Organisation Fudan University
Country China 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Global Imaging Genetics of Adolescents initiative is a collaboration between several major cohorts in UK, Europe, USA, China, and India who investigate health outcomes in children and adolescents via behavioral and imaging genetic studies. Its aim is to enable comparative research on brain development and behaviour in different cultures, environments and ethnic groups, both in industrialised nations and low and medium income countries (LMIC). To this end GIGA is working towards harmonised data acquisition, retrieval and analysis.
Collaborator Contribution The GIGA consortium consists of cohorts of up to 220.000 young people aged 6-25 years, including more than 20.000 neuroimaging scans in Europe, India, China, South Africa and the United States , the largest mental health consortium of neuroimaging and environmental data of young people worldwide.
Impact Both psychopathology and brain function are influenced by environmental factors, therefore it is necessary for precision medicine to be applicable in a global setting that it takes into account local environmental determinants of mental illness. For this reason we have established the consortium on Global Imaging Genetics in Adolescents (GIGA) that brings together samples Europe, India, China and the U.S. to comparatively investigate environmental effects on brain development and behaviour in a global context. We have started several collaborative projects and expect the first research outputs in the form of publications in 2019.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Global Imaging Genetics of Adolescents (GIGA) 
Organisation Imperial College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Global Imaging Genetics of Adolescents initiative is a collaboration between several major cohorts in UK, Europe, USA, China, and India who investigate health outcomes in children and adolescents via behavioral and imaging genetic studies. Its aim is to enable comparative research on brain development and behaviour in different cultures, environments and ethnic groups, both in industrialised nations and low and medium income countries (LMIC). To this end GIGA is working towards harmonised data acquisition, retrieval and analysis.
Collaborator Contribution The GIGA consortium consists of cohorts of up to 220.000 young people aged 6-25 years, including more than 20.000 neuroimaging scans in Europe, India, China, South Africa and the United States , the largest mental health consortium of neuroimaging and environmental data of young people worldwide.
Impact Both psychopathology and brain function are influenced by environmental factors, therefore it is necessary for precision medicine to be applicable in a global setting that it takes into account local environmental determinants of mental illness. For this reason we have established the consortium on Global Imaging Genetics in Adolescents (GIGA) that brings together samples Europe, India, China and the U.S. to comparatively investigate environmental effects on brain development and behaviour in a global context. We have started several collaborative projects and expect the first research outputs in the form of publications in 2019.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Global Imaging Genetics of Adolescents (GIGA) 
Organisation National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences
Country India 
Sector Hospitals 
PI Contribution The Global Imaging Genetics of Adolescents initiative is a collaboration between several major cohorts in UK, Europe, USA, China, and India who investigate health outcomes in children and adolescents via behavioral and imaging genetic studies. Its aim is to enable comparative research on brain development and behaviour in different cultures, environments and ethnic groups, both in industrialised nations and low and medium income countries (LMIC). To this end GIGA is working towards harmonised data acquisition, retrieval and analysis.
Collaborator Contribution The GIGA consortium consists of cohorts of up to 220.000 young people aged 6-25 years, including more than 20.000 neuroimaging scans in Europe, India, China, South Africa and the United States , the largest mental health consortium of neuroimaging and environmental data of young people worldwide.
Impact Both psychopathology and brain function are influenced by environmental factors, therefore it is necessary for precision medicine to be applicable in a global setting that it takes into account local environmental determinants of mental illness. For this reason we have established the consortium on Global Imaging Genetics in Adolescents (GIGA) that brings together samples Europe, India, China and the U.S. to comparatively investigate environmental effects on brain development and behaviour in a global context. We have started several collaborative projects and expect the first research outputs in the form of publications in 2019.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Global Imaging Genetics of Adolescents (GIGA) 
Organisation National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Department National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Global Imaging Genetics of Adolescents initiative is a collaboration between several major cohorts in UK, Europe, USA, China, and India who investigate health outcomes in children and adolescents via behavioral and imaging genetic studies. Its aim is to enable comparative research on brain development and behaviour in different cultures, environments and ethnic groups, both in industrialised nations and low and medium income countries (LMIC). To this end GIGA is working towards harmonised data acquisition, retrieval and analysis.
Collaborator Contribution The GIGA consortium consists of cohorts of up to 220.000 young people aged 6-25 years, including more than 20.000 neuroimaging scans in Europe, India, China, South Africa and the United States , the largest mental health consortium of neuroimaging and environmental data of young people worldwide.
Impact Both psychopathology and brain function are influenced by environmental factors, therefore it is necessary for precision medicine to be applicable in a global setting that it takes into account local environmental determinants of mental illness. For this reason we have established the consortium on Global Imaging Genetics in Adolescents (GIGA) that brings together samples Europe, India, China and the U.S. to comparatively investigate environmental effects on brain development and behaviour in a global context. We have started several collaborative projects and expect the first research outputs in the form of publications in 2019.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Global Imaging Genetics of Adolescents (GIGA) 
Organisation Neurospin
Country France 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Global Imaging Genetics of Adolescents initiative is a collaboration between several major cohorts in UK, Europe, USA, China, and India who investigate health outcomes in children and adolescents via behavioral and imaging genetic studies. Its aim is to enable comparative research on brain development and behaviour in different cultures, environments and ethnic groups, both in industrialised nations and low and medium income countries (LMIC). To this end GIGA is working towards harmonised data acquisition, retrieval and analysis.
Collaborator Contribution The GIGA consortium consists of cohorts of up to 220.000 young people aged 6-25 years, including more than 20.000 neuroimaging scans in Europe, India, China, South Africa and the United States , the largest mental health consortium of neuroimaging and environmental data of young people worldwide.
Impact Both psychopathology and brain function are influenced by environmental factors, therefore it is necessary for precision medicine to be applicable in a global setting that it takes into account local environmental determinants of mental illness. For this reason we have established the consortium on Global Imaging Genetics in Adolescents (GIGA) that brings together samples Europe, India, China and the U.S. to comparatively investigate environmental effects on brain development and behaviour in a global context. We have started several collaborative projects and expect the first research outputs in the form of publications in 2019.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Global Imaging Genetics of Adolescents (GIGA) 
Organisation Tianjin Medical University
Country China 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Global Imaging Genetics of Adolescents initiative is a collaboration between several major cohorts in UK, Europe, USA, China, and India who investigate health outcomes in children and adolescents via behavioral and imaging genetic studies. Its aim is to enable comparative research on brain development and behaviour in different cultures, environments and ethnic groups, both in industrialised nations and low and medium income countries (LMIC). To this end GIGA is working towards harmonised data acquisition, retrieval and analysis.
Collaborator Contribution The GIGA consortium consists of cohorts of up to 220.000 young people aged 6-25 years, including more than 20.000 neuroimaging scans in Europe, India, China, South Africa and the United States , the largest mental health consortium of neuroimaging and environmental data of young people worldwide.
Impact Both psychopathology and brain function are influenced by environmental factors, therefore it is necessary for precision medicine to be applicable in a global setting that it takes into account local environmental determinants of mental illness. For this reason we have established the consortium on Global Imaging Genetics in Adolescents (GIGA) that brings together samples Europe, India, China and the U.S. to comparatively investigate environmental effects on brain development and behaviour in a global context. We have started several collaborative projects and expect the first research outputs in the form of publications in 2019.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Global Imaging Genetics of Adolescents (GIGA) 
Organisation University of Bristol
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Global Imaging Genetics of Adolescents initiative is a collaboration between several major cohorts in UK, Europe, USA, China, and India who investigate health outcomes in children and adolescents via behavioral and imaging genetic studies. Its aim is to enable comparative research on brain development and behaviour in different cultures, environments and ethnic groups, both in industrialised nations and low and medium income countries (LMIC). To this end GIGA is working towards harmonised data acquisition, retrieval and analysis.
Collaborator Contribution The GIGA consortium consists of cohorts of up to 220.000 young people aged 6-25 years, including more than 20.000 neuroimaging scans in Europe, India, China, South Africa and the United States , the largest mental health consortium of neuroimaging and environmental data of young people worldwide.
Impact Both psychopathology and brain function are influenced by environmental factors, therefore it is necessary for precision medicine to be applicable in a global setting that it takes into account local environmental determinants of mental illness. For this reason we have established the consortium on Global Imaging Genetics in Adolescents (GIGA) that brings together samples Europe, India, China and the U.S. to comparatively investigate environmental effects on brain development and behaviour in a global context. We have started several collaborative projects and expect the first research outputs in the form of publications in 2019.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Global Imaging Genetics of Adolescents (GIGA) 
Organisation University of New Mexico
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Global Imaging Genetics of Adolescents initiative is a collaboration between several major cohorts in UK, Europe, USA, China, and India who investigate health outcomes in children and adolescents via behavioral and imaging genetic studies. Its aim is to enable comparative research on brain development and behaviour in different cultures, environments and ethnic groups, both in industrialised nations and low and medium income countries (LMIC). To this end GIGA is working towards harmonised data acquisition, retrieval and analysis.
Collaborator Contribution The GIGA consortium consists of cohorts of up to 220.000 young people aged 6-25 years, including more than 20.000 neuroimaging scans in Europe, India, China, South Africa and the United States , the largest mental health consortium of neuroimaging and environmental data of young people worldwide.
Impact Both psychopathology and brain function are influenced by environmental factors, therefore it is necessary for precision medicine to be applicable in a global setting that it takes into account local environmental determinants of mental illness. For this reason we have established the consortium on Global Imaging Genetics in Adolescents (GIGA) that brings together samples Europe, India, China and the U.S. to comparatively investigate environmental effects on brain development and behaviour in a global context. We have started several collaborative projects and expect the first research outputs in the form of publications in 2019.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Global Imaging Genetics of Adolescents (GIGA) 
Organisation University of Oxford
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Global Imaging Genetics of Adolescents initiative is a collaboration between several major cohorts in UK, Europe, USA, China, and India who investigate health outcomes in children and adolescents via behavioral and imaging genetic studies. Its aim is to enable comparative research on brain development and behaviour in different cultures, environments and ethnic groups, both in industrialised nations and low and medium income countries (LMIC). To this end GIGA is working towards harmonised data acquisition, retrieval and analysis.
Collaborator Contribution The GIGA consortium consists of cohorts of up to 220.000 young people aged 6-25 years, including more than 20.000 neuroimaging scans in Europe, India, China, South Africa and the United States , the largest mental health consortium of neuroimaging and environmental data of young people worldwide.
Impact Both psychopathology and brain function are influenced by environmental factors, therefore it is necessary for precision medicine to be applicable in a global setting that it takes into account local environmental determinants of mental illness. For this reason we have established the consortium on Global Imaging Genetics in Adolescents (GIGA) that brings together samples Europe, India, China and the U.S. to comparatively investigate environmental effects on brain development and behaviour in a global context. We have started several collaborative projects and expect the first research outputs in the form of publications in 2019.
Start Year 2016
 
Description IMAGEN 
Organisation Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA)
Country France 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Coordinator The IMAGEN study is a longitudinal, multi-centre functional and structural genetic-neuroimaging study of a cohort of 2000+ adolescents, studying the neurobiological basis of individual differences in brain responses to reward, punishment and emotional cues at 14, 16 and 19 years. It involves 8 recruitment centres in four European countries.
Collaborator Contribution See above
Impact see publication list
Start Year 2007
 
Description IMAGEN 
Organisation Heidelberg University
Country Germany 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Coordinator The IMAGEN study is a longitudinal, multi-centre functional and structural genetic-neuroimaging study of a cohort of 2000+ adolescents, studying the neurobiological basis of individual differences in brain responses to reward, punishment and emotional cues at 14, 16 and 19 years. It involves 8 recruitment centres in four European countries.
Collaborator Contribution See above
Impact see publication list
Start Year 2007
 
Description IMAGEN 
Organisation Humboldt University of Berlin
Country Germany 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Coordinator The IMAGEN study is a longitudinal, multi-centre functional and structural genetic-neuroimaging study of a cohort of 2000+ adolescents, studying the neurobiological basis of individual differences in brain responses to reward, punishment and emotional cues at 14, 16 and 19 years. It involves 8 recruitment centres in four European countries.
Collaborator Contribution See above
Impact see publication list
Start Year 2007
 
Description IMAGEN 
Organisation National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM)
Country France 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Coordinator The IMAGEN study is a longitudinal, multi-centre functional and structural genetic-neuroimaging study of a cohort of 2000+ adolescents, studying the neurobiological basis of individual differences in brain responses to reward, punishment and emotional cues at 14, 16 and 19 years. It involves 8 recruitment centres in four European countries.
Collaborator Contribution See above
Impact see publication list
Start Year 2007
 
Description IMAGEN 
Organisation Technical University of Dresden
Country Germany 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Coordinator The IMAGEN study is a longitudinal, multi-centre functional and structural genetic-neuroimaging study of a cohort of 2000+ adolescents, studying the neurobiological basis of individual differences in brain responses to reward, punishment and emotional cues at 14, 16 and 19 years. It involves 8 recruitment centres in four European countries.
Collaborator Contribution See above
Impact see publication list
Start Year 2007
 
Description IMAGEN 
Organisation University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf
Country Germany 
Sector Hospitals 
PI Contribution Coordinator The IMAGEN study is a longitudinal, multi-centre functional and structural genetic-neuroimaging study of a cohort of 2000+ adolescents, studying the neurobiological basis of individual differences in brain responses to reward, punishment and emotional cues at 14, 16 and 19 years. It involves 8 recruitment centres in four European countries.
Collaborator Contribution See above
Impact see publication list
Start Year 2007
 
Description IMAGEN 
Organisation University of Cambridge
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Coordinator The IMAGEN study is a longitudinal, multi-centre functional and structural genetic-neuroimaging study of a cohort of 2000+ adolescents, studying the neurobiological basis of individual differences in brain responses to reward, punishment and emotional cues at 14, 16 and 19 years. It involves 8 recruitment centres in four European countries.
Collaborator Contribution See above
Impact see publication list
Start Year 2007
 
Description IMAGEN 
Organisation University of Dublin
Country Ireland 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Coordinator The IMAGEN study is a longitudinal, multi-centre functional and structural genetic-neuroimaging study of a cohort of 2000+ adolescents, studying the neurobiological basis of individual differences in brain responses to reward, punishment and emotional cues at 14, 16 and 19 years. It involves 8 recruitment centres in four European countries.
Collaborator Contribution See above
Impact see publication list
Start Year 2007
 
Description IMAGEN 
Organisation University of Nottingham
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Coordinator The IMAGEN study is a longitudinal, multi-centre functional and structural genetic-neuroimaging study of a cohort of 2000+ adolescents, studying the neurobiological basis of individual differences in brain responses to reward, punishment and emotional cues at 14, 16 and 19 years. It involves 8 recruitment centres in four European countries.
Collaborator Contribution See above
Impact see publication list
Start Year 2007
 
Description Workshop: Remote urbanisation sensing and mental health 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Train satellite data analysts and develop machine learning methods for image classification of built-up land cover established to include relevant rural parameters that relate to mental health.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description 19th International Neuroscience Winter Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Presentation talk of research portfolio of projects related to mental health and brain development
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description 2016 Alcohol and The Nervous System 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Gordon Research Conference
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description 23th Chinese Congress of Radiology (CCR) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Integration, Innovation and Evolution
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description AETIONOMY IV GENERAL ASSEMBLY 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact AETIONOMY - Steering Committee, General Assembly & ESAB Meeting
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Bangalore Engagement Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Collaborative workshop to discuss opportunities and begin to develop an engagement strategy, following the recent India Community of Practise and in recognition of a number of different connections with institutions in Bangalore. Outcomes of the session: map existing activity and identify ways in which King's Worldwide can support the development of research and education activity with key partners in Bangalore.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Biostatistics Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Munich, 2016
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity Pre-2006
 
Description Consortium on Vulnerability to Externalising Disorders and Addiction- study methods and application 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The methods and research goals of the cVEDA study were presented to colleagues involved in similar research studies focusing on precision medicine and international cohorts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Cveda Annual investigator`s meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Annual investigator`s meeting in Bangalore
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Educational Day in India 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The cVEDA consortium has agreed to invest in academic & research training for young scholars in psychiatry and related fields. Under this initiative we are organising a half-day educational programme conducted at NIMHANS, Bangalore, from 11:00 am- 4:00 pm on March 11th. The theme was 'basic concepts in genetics and imaging research and their applications in the behavioural sciences'. Postgraduate students in Psychiatry, molecular biology, radiology and neurology participated in this programme. We invited distinguished scientists and academicians from the US, Europe, and the UK to speak about psychiatry, imaging and genetics . As MD students in India typically get little exposure to advanced research methods in imaging and genetics, this was a unique opportunity for young aspiring postgraduate students to listen to experts in the field.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Global Imaging Genetics in Adolescents - Consortium Meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Annual GIGA Consortium Meeting
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Global Imaging Genetics in Adolescents - Consortium Meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Annual GIGA Consortium Meeting June 2018
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description HBP Meetings in Aachen/Juelich 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Collaboration meetings and presentation in "Precision medicine and global mental health" related to HBP
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description IMAGEN Annual Consortium Meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Annual Recruitment progress meeting of the IMAGEN Consortium
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description International conference for machine learning (ICML) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Workshop on the use of machine leaning techniques to address big data analysis.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Invited talk for National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry/High Risk Cohort Study on population neuroscience - 2nd edition (UFRGS/USP/UNIFESP- Sao Paolo, Brazil) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 100+ international researchers and students attended this conference to learn about population neuroscience as well as how to do collaborative research both nationally and internationally. Discussion about cVEDA and building international cohorts led to future ideas of collaboration, and how to conduct imaging genetic studies on adolescents.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description PONS center launch event 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The PONS center launch was celebrated on 28th and 29th June 2018 where leading expert presented and discussed current research in precision medicine in psychiatry and its role for global mental health.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Panel, Winter Conference on Brain Research 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Neurobehavioral, Neuroimmune and Neuroendocrine Mechanisms of Ethanol Dependence
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Plenary Lecture, Hungarian Society for Psychiatry 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Psychiatric Research in Europe: Policy and Practice
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Plenary Lecture, Turkish Society for Psychiatry 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact International research networks in imaging genetics: developing imaging predictors and neurobehavioural phenotypes for externalising disorders
Meet the experst session- Conversation with young psychiatrists and residents who have interest in research...
Research perspectives and opportunities in Europe, US and other regions of the world
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Presentation at National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) at National Institute of Health (Washington DC, USA) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Gave a lecture on the goals of cVEDA and international collaborations, which sparked further discussion of collaborative research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description WPA World Congress of Psychiatry 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact WPA Presentation
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Workshop on China-Europe-India Network of Large Cohorts of Brain and Behavior 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Large Cohorts of Brain and Behavior - gave presentation on rationale for large cohorts and shared data analyses highlighting the value of large cohorts for public health and society success
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description cvEDA Annual Investigators` Meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Annual investigator`s meeting in Kolkata and Bangalore followed by workshops
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017