Biomedical follow-up of 1958 Birth Cohort Study members at age 60

Lead Research Organisation: University College London
Department Name: Social Science

Abstract

The increase in human life expectancy over the last century has been one of the greatest achievements in public health. However, it also poses new challenges in health and social care, in particular the increased burden of ill health associated with older age, including cognitive impairment and frailty. Understanding the occurrence of these ageing outcomes and their determinants has become a global research priority with considerable policy implications. Several influential studies have been established in middle- and older-aged populations in the UK and in other countries with the capacity to offer much-needed insights into these issues. It has recently become evident, however, that the processes that underlie ageing states begin much sooner in the life course than originally thought, in some cases as early as birth or preconception.
It is in such studies that cover the lifespan that the UK excels. The 1958 Birth Cohort Study in the UK is the largest long-running study of this type. Its study members are approaching 60 years of age, when problems of ageing typically begin to emerge. We will therefore carry out a detailed survey which captures key domains of healthy ageing incorporating multiple dimensions of health (for example, cardiometabolic, cognitive, and physical health) combined with genetic and environmental factors that have been collected across the lifetime of the cohort. Uniquely, this new information will allow us to answer a series of important research questions of public health importance. These include the role of infection in early life in CVD, explaining why individuals remain undiagnosed or inadequately treated for CVD and diabetes, the extent to which CVD risk in early older age can be reversed by physical activity initiated in midlife, how physical function and co-ordination in childhood are related to physical function measures at age 60, and whether the duration and quality of employment over the lifetime is protective of cognitive decline. We will also be able to run a series cross-cohort comparisons, to allow us to highlight where such disease and ageing processes are changing across generations. These data will become publically available to scientists soon after collection, so providing an unparalleled resource for the scientific community to investigate a range of policy-relevant issues. This improved understanding will ultimately lead to changes in individual behaviour and improvements in public policy and professional practice that will lead to better public health and healthier longer lives.
In summary, what affects health and how fast we age was originally thought to be a result of what we did as adults, such as how much we smoked, drank, exercised, and our weight, as well as our genes. Research is now beginning to show that factors in our childhood may also have an impact on later illness and ageing. Financial help from the Medical Research Council will allow us to track the health of people who were born in the 1950s in the UK as they reach 60 years of age, to show how lifelong factors affect how we age, and to recommend policies that will improve the health of the older population.

Technical Summary

This application proposes an ambitious programme of work to inform key public health concerns among generations now transitioning between midlife and early older age, a critical time when major chronic disease events and other health concerns of older age accumulate.
Our work conceptualizes healthy ageing within a life-course framework in which we investigate the socioeconomic, biological, and psychological determinants of healthy ageing over a lifetime and their contribution to transitions in health outcomes measured objectively from midlife (44/45 years) to early older age (60 years). Our approach incorporates multiple interrelated dimensions of health and encompasses flexibly the mechanisms through which such exposures operate. Within such a framework, a set of interrelated hypotheses are set out concerning cardiometabolic health, physical function, cognitive decline, and biological ageing.
These scientific aims will be achieved through a major biomedical enhancement of the 1958 Birth Cohort Study, through collection of data on 9,600 study members when they reach 60 years of age. Proposed domains of data for collection include physical measurements (height, weight, body-fat, waist and hip circumference); physical functioning (grip strength, balance, chair rises, gait speed); blood pressure, pulse rate; the effect of static and dynamic exercise on blood pressure; the collection and storage of whole bloods; cognitive assessments (memory, processing speed, executive function). Data will be deposited with the UK Data Service for the widest possible use by bona fide researchers after collection and data cleaning, under exemplary access arrangements, and alongside a strong communications campaign to raise awareness of the new data.

Planned Impact

The benefits to the public of the proposed work will centre on identifying life-course factors that improve population health in the period between mid-forties and early older age (60), setting the course for healthy ageing trajectories thereafter. It will also enable a better understanding of how health has changed among a nationally representative sample of 60 year olds born in 1958 (in 2018) compared with those born in 1946 (in 2006). This in turn will inform the development of preventative health policies across the whole of life that will expand healthy life expectancy, and reduce the burden of ill health and disease at older ages.

The strongest impacts will relate to the major domains of the proposed data collection, covering cardiometabolic health, physical function, cognition, and biological ageing. Our work focuses both on identifying the early life risk factors for subsequent health, and on identifying whether such effects can be reversed. This will provide valuable information about which stages in the life course remediation of key risks for unhealthy ageing are possible, and ultimately enables the relative costs and benefits of prevention measures at different life stages to be assessed. For example, if it is found that early life conditions affect ageing risks in a largely irreversible way, this will demonstrate that preventive interventions are essential in early life, while where reversal of such risk is found to be possible later, then targeted remedial interventions might still be effective in promoting healthy ageing. One example of the potential benefit of our work is in cardiometabolic health, where current clinical practice is dominated by relatively short term risk perspectives (e.g., 10 year risk) which in effect favours late intervention, when irreversible damage may have already accrued. Our research will highlight the way in which the determinants of CVD/diabetes act over the life course, including in childhood (for example highlighting the potential benefits of influenza immunisation during pregnancy) and in adult life (focussing on polices to reduce dietary salt, and physical activity), thus providing vital information about the benefits of preventative strategies from birth and throughout life.

Intermediate beneficiaries will be policymakers such as those in the Department of Health, Public Health England, NHS Commissioning, Clinical Commissioning Groups, Health and Wellbeing Boards, and the Association of Directors of Public Health, as well as those in local government, who require evidence on where to invest vital resources (e.g., the relative benefit to investment in behaviour change at different life stages); third-sector campaigning agencies (representing the older population, patient groups); and medical practitioners.

The timing of the realisation of benefits is not known precisely since it relies on future funding of research based on the new data. Previous experience suggests a surge of initial papers in peer reviewed journals at three years from data collection, with the number of publications building strongly thereafter, and continuing to grow even after more than a decade. The benefits of the proposed data collection will be sustained over many years as they are used as a baseline against which health at older ages is judged.

Publications

10 25 50

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Jivraj S (2017) Testing Comparability Between Retrospective Life History Data and Prospective Birth Cohort Study Data. in The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences

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Mishra GD (2017) Early menarche, nulliparity and the risk for premature and early natural menopause. in Human reproduction (Oxford, England)

 
Description Alissa Goodman personally invited to meet at Public Health England with Gregor Henderson, Stretegic Adviser, and Elaine Rashbrook, Life course.
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Invited to judge UCL Excellence in Health Research Prize
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
 
Description Invited to present seminar at Department of Health and Social Care
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Member of the Academic Board Working Group to appoint next Director of MRC Unit Lifelong Health & Ageing
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
 
Description Membership to Understanding Society Scientific Advisory Committee, meeting twice a year
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
URL https://www.understandingsociety.ac.uk/about/people#part4
 
Description 58FORWARDS (The 1958 Birth Cohort: Fostering new Opportunities for Research via Wider Access to Reliable Data and Samples)
Amount £642,120 (GBP)
Funding ID 108439 
Organisation Wellcome Trust 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2016 
End 12/2020
 
Description Co-funding for NCDS study, supplement to MRC co-funding award
Amount £240,634 (GBP)
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2017 
End 03/2020
 
Description DWP: National Childhoold Development Study Wave 10
Amount £293,457 (GBP)
Organisation Department for Work and Pensions 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2017 
End 12/2021
 
Description Epigenetic Analyses with KCL
Amount £311,169 (GBP)
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2017 
End 12/2019
 
Description Healthy transitions from mid-life to early older age: biomedical follow-up of 1958 Birth Cohort Study members at age 60 (Year 2)
Amount $324,070 (USD)
Funding ID 5R01AG052519-02 
Organisation National Institutes of Health (NIH) 
Sector Public
Country United States
Start 08/2018 
End 05/2019
 
Description NCDS 60th Birthday Celebrations
Amount £122,680 (GBP)
Funding ID Grant Ref: ES/M001660/1 
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2018 
End 03/2018
 
Description NHS Digital record linkage
Amount £37,421 (GBP)
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 05/2017 
End 03/2020
 
Description NIH: Healthy transitions from mid-life to early older age: biomedical follow-up of 1958
Amount $499,806 (USD)
Funding ID 1R56AG052519-01 
Organisation National Institutes of Health (NIH) 
Sector Public
Country United States
Start 08/2016 
End 08/2018
 
Description NIH: Healthy transitions from mid-life to early older age: biomedical follow-up of 1958 (Year 1)
Amount $1,618,270 (USD)
Funding ID 1R01AG052519-01A1 
Organisation National Institutes of Health (NIH) 
Sector Public
Country United States
Start 09/2017 
End 05/2022
 
Description Polygenic scores in the National Child Development Study
Amount $117,924 (USD)
Funding ID 3R01AG052519-02S1 
Organisation National Institutes of Health (NIH) 
Sector Public
Country United States
Start 08/2018 
End 08/2019
 
Description UCL RCIF Equipment funds- Centrifuge and dynamoemters for NCDS fieldwork
Amount £25,000 (GBP)
Organisation University College London 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2019 
End 07/2019
 
Title NCDS Deaths Dataset, 1958-2016: Special Licence Access, 3rd Edition 
Description National Child Development Study Deaths Dataset, 1958-2016: Special Licence Access (3rd edition). For the 3rd edition (July 2018) an updated version of the data was deposited. The new edition includes data on known deaths among members of the National Child Development Study (NCDS) birth cohort up to 2016. The user guide has also been updated. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact None as yet. 
URL https://beta.ukdataservice.ac.uk/datacatalogue/studies/study?id=7717
 
Description 'Soc-B' Centre for Doctoral Training in Biosocial Research 
Organisation University College London
Department Research Department of Epidemiology and Public Health
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution CLS provides CLS bio-social data resources to be available to PhD students for their research, plus Ploubidis for CLS leads a significant element of the training, while CLS comms team contributes impact training to the partnership.
Collaborator Contribution Major doctoral training partnership
Impact Too early
Start Year 2016
 
Description CLOSER 
Organisation Cohort & Longitudinal Studies Enhancement Resources
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Learned Society 
PI Contribution Participation and collaboration with CLOSER - including direct work on a number of work packages and in attending the quarterly Leadership conferences and personal invitations to speak at workshops hosted by CLOSER CLS is contributing to a number of further work areas of CLOSER - for example in providing a teaching data set and material on methods for the CLOSER training hub.
Collaborator Contribution CLOSER's mission is to maximise the use, value and impact of the UK's longitudinal studies, which include the three birth cohort studies based at CLS.
Impact CLOSER participation has brought huge advantages to the CLS studies across all its key areas of work (see CLOSER website for further details)
Start Year 2012
 
Description Collaboration with Cohorts within UCL Population Health Sciences 
Organisation University College London
Department Faculty of Population Health Sciences
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This collaboration is aimed to bring cohorts at UCL together, on scientific and operational grounds. Alissa Goodman is attending monthly meetings with key colleagues leading cohorts the faculty of Population Health Sciences, including colleagues from ELSA, Whitehall II, SABRE and British Regional Heart Study.
Collaborator Contribution Nish Chaturvedi has facilitated and organised regular meetings to discuss strategic avenues for the collaboration.
Impact n/a
Start Year 2017
 
Description Collaboration with UCL Department of Economics to recruit shared position of Reader and Co-Investigator for NCDS 
Organisation University College London
Department Department of Economics
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In an appointment shared with UCL Economics, CLS recruited Gabriella Conti as co-investigator of NCDS.
Collaborator Contribution This post is jointly held by UCL Department of Economics and CLS.
Impact Gabriella was instrumental to the successful running of the scientific conference "NCDS - 60 years of our lives".
Start Year 2016
 
Description Collaboration with UCL: Faculty of Population Health Sciences and Institute of Cardiovascular Science 
Organisation University College London
Department Faculty of Population Health Sciences
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution As Principal Investigator of NCDS, Alissa leads the study in the next pivotal sweep at age 61 and is responsible for the content, design and analysis. For this biomedical sweep, Alissa collaborates with David Batty, Professor of Epidemiology, and Alun Hughes, Professor of Cardiovascular Physiology and Pharmacology.
Collaborator Contribution David Batty and Alun Hughes are Co-PIs to the NCDS age 61 biomedical sweep and complete the multidisciplinary team which have expertise in biomedical, epidemiological, and social science, ageing research on chronic disease using a life course perspective, and advanced statistical analysis.
Impact Biomedical sweep is in design - see contributions above.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Collaboration with UCL: Faculty of Population Health Sciences and Institute of Cardiovascular Science 
Organisation University College London
Department Institute of Cardiovascular Science
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution As Principal Investigator of NCDS, Alissa leads the study in the next pivotal sweep at age 61 and is responsible for the content, design and analysis. For this biomedical sweep, Alissa collaborates with David Batty, Professor of Epidemiology, and Alun Hughes, Professor of Cardiovascular Physiology and Pharmacology.
Collaborator Contribution David Batty and Alun Hughes are Co-PIs to the NCDS age 61 biomedical sweep and complete the multidisciplinary team which have expertise in biomedical, epidemiological, and social science, ageing research on chronic disease using a life course perspective, and advanced statistical analysis.
Impact Biomedical sweep is in design - see contributions above.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Collaboration with the MRC Unit for Lifelong Health and Ageing (UCL) 
Organisation University College London
Department MRC Unit for Lifelong Health and Ageing
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The MRC Unit for Lifelong Health and Ageing (LHA), and CLS have jointly recruited a new Senior Lecturer to build a social science research programme working across the NHSD (1946 birth cohort) and the four CLS cohorts (NCDS, BCS70, Next Steps and MCS). Their aim is to develop a substantive funding base to support this goal. The UCL Institute of Education has contributed 50% of the funding for this post for 3 years to support its initiation
Collaborator Contribution LHA has contributed 50% of the funding for this post for 3 years to support its initiation.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary collaboration - across biomedical and social science.The outcome so far is the recruitment of the post
Start Year 2017
 
Description International research collaborations for data collection for validation of life history questions, NCDS age 61 sweep 
Organisation The RAND Corporation
Country United States 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution In planning the age 61 sweep for NCDS, Alissa is leading discussion designing a validation of the HRS-family of studies' life history module using the 1958 British birth cohort.
Collaborator Contribution Collaborators travelled from USA and Belgium to bring their knowledge of the design of the Life History data in the HRS family of studies to NCDS. The group exchanged different methodological approaches to validating life history data.
Impact The life history module is in design.
Start Year 2017
 
Description International research collaborations for data collection for validation of life history questions, NCDS age 61 sweep 
Organisation University of Leuven
Country Belgium 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In planning the age 61 sweep for NCDS, Alissa is leading discussion designing a validation of the HRS-family of studies' life history module using the 1958 British birth cohort.
Collaborator Contribution Collaborators travelled from USA and Belgium to bring their knowledge of the design of the Life History data in the HRS family of studies to NCDS. The group exchanged different methodological approaches to validating life history data.
Impact The life history module is in design.
Start Year 2017
 
Description International research collaborations for data collection for validation of life history questions, NCDS age 61 sweep 
Organisation University of Manchester
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In planning the age 61 sweep for NCDS, Alissa is leading discussion designing a validation of the HRS-family of studies' life history module using the 1958 British birth cohort.
Collaborator Contribution Collaborators travelled from USA and Belgium to bring their knowledge of the design of the Life History data in the HRS family of studies to NCDS. The group exchanged different methodological approaches to validating life history data.
Impact The life history module is in design.
Start Year 2017
 
Description International research collaborations for data collection for validation of life history questions, NCDS age 61 sweep 
Organisation University of Michigan
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In planning the age 61 sweep for NCDS, Alissa is leading discussion designing a validation of the HRS-family of studies' life history module using the 1958 British birth cohort.
Collaborator Contribution Collaborators travelled from USA and Belgium to bring their knowledge of the design of the Life History data in the HRS family of studies to NCDS. The group exchanged different methodological approaches to validating life history data.
Impact The life history module is in design.
Start Year 2017
 
Description META-DAC 
Organisation University of Bristol
Department School of Social and Community Medicine
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The META-DAC governs the use of genetic data and depletable biological samples generated by CLS. As PI of NCDS and Director of CLS, Alissa Goodman is an 'observer' to the committee while Jon Johnson was a key part of the technical committee whilst at CLS.
Collaborator Contribution The META-DAC provides expertise on the governance of biosamples and associated specialised data (primarily genetic)
Impact The META-DAC 'S own research fish entry lists its outputs Disciplines: genetic epidemiology, data infrastructure and governance, social science
Start Year 2015
 
Description Record linkages with NHS Digital for tracing and research 
Organisation Health & Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The aim of this collaboration is to achieve linkage between data provided by a number of bodies via NHS digital to the CLS cohorts, and to achieve agreement for onward sharing with researchers
Collaborator Contribution We have worked closely with NHS Digital to achieve linkage for both tracing and research, and discussions relating to onward sharing are ongoing.
Impact n/a
Start Year 2013
 
Description 60 Years of Our Lives: Conference for the 60th Birthday of the National Child Development Study 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact We organized a conference for the 60th birthday of the NCDS. (http://www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/Conference.aspx?itemid=4650?emTitle=NCDS+60+years+of+our+lives&sitesectionid=28&sitesectiontitle=Events) It was a huge success, we put together a high-quality scientific programme and received much interest and positive feedback.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.cls.ioe.ac.uk/Conference.aspx?itemid=4650&itemTitle=NCDS+60+years+of+our+lives&sitesectio...
 
Description BHF Staff visit 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact This was a visit by British Heart Foundation staff members who worked principally in the engagement office and wanted an insight into the research we undertake, so that they could explain it better to donors and understand how what they do relates to research and outcomes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2018
 
Description Invited to MRC workshop: Adolescent mental health and the developing mind 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Alissa Goodman was invited to speak about the socioeconomic gap in child educational and health outcomes at the MRC led workshop on Adolescent mental health and the developing mind.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Invited to attend MRC workshop on the UKRI Infrastructure Roadmap project, supporting the development of future needs in Population Data for Research 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Alissa Goodman was invited to attend a workshop led by MRC on Friday 27 July consulting with leading experts to help shape the development of two potential new cohorts. The workshop was led by Professor Debbie Lawlor and asked experts to considering the purpose(s), design and management of two possible new longitudinal population cohorts;
• one addressing the biomedical and social determinants during childhood, adolescence and early adulthood; and
• another setting out the case for a frequently sampled cohort for the early detection of disease.
Delegates covered a range of disciplines and sectors including social and biomedical science; and academia and industry.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description NCDS 60th anniversary film 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact As part of CLS's celebration of the first 60 years of the 1958 National Child Development Study, we released a short film highlighting the impact and importance of the study. The film includes interviews with a study member, Principal Investigators past and present, and Rt. Hon. Alan Milburn. It showcases key impacts and discoveries in areas including smoking during pregnancy, adult basic skills and social mobility. The purpose of the film is to position NCDS as a leading source of evidence for policy and to secure support for its future, by showcasing its incredible achievements to date.

The film was launched in March 2019 to coincide with the study members' birthdays, and is being promoted through CLS's core digital communications channels, including its website and social media.

CLS will continue to monitor the engagement with the film and update this entry with the findings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://cls.ucl.ac.uk/cls-studies/1958-national-child-development-study/
 
Description Participant mailing: NCDS 60th birthday commemorative book 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact In March 2019, CLS released a 60-page commemorative book to the participants of the 1958 National Child Development Study. The book celebrates the first six decades of the study's history, and is intended as a thank-you gift to study members for their life-long commitment. It also serves to solidify that commitment and re-engage participants in advance of the Age 62 Sweep. The book was posted to 12,500 study members as part of their annual birthday mailing. An additional 1,500 study members will be given a copy of the book at their Age 62 home visit.

Each chapter of the book tells the story of the study and its members' lives in a given decade: beginning with birth and early years, through to middle age. It includes the findings, history and impact of the study to date, as well as personal reflections and stories from individual study members.

CLS has also adapted the contents of the book into web and social media content in an effort to share the material more widely. Throughout March 2019, we will share the content on our website and through Twitter to engage users of NCDS data and evidence across academic, policy and third sector circles.

CLS will carry out an evaluation of the book and accompanying digital communications and update this entry with those findings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://ncds.info/home/about/ncds-at-60/
 
Description Participation with Prospective Studies Engagement Group and ALSPAC 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Alissa Goodman is member of a new Prospective Studies Engagement Group (PSEG), run by ALSPAC, bringing together experts in the field of cohort engagement to explore the most effective ways of engaging with study participants involved in longitudinal population studies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Public lecture: Research on inequality: the long roots of childhood, informing policies, and generational change 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact In this lecture Professor Alissa Goodman spoke about her research on inequalities, showing how both cross-sectional and longitudinal data are being used to illuminate and address some of the major social and policy questions of our time. A recording of the lecture was made available on the UCL Institute of Education and CLS websites.

About the lecture

Alissa demonstrated how the UK's birth cohort studies - which each track large numbers of individuals (typically around 17,000) from birth and throughout their lives - reveal the long roots of childhood experience on later life, and the importance of tackling childhood mental health problems. Alissa also explored how earlier adult life is influencing the decisions of a generation now approaching retirement age, and some of the striking generational changes occurring in our society, including in income, and mental health.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://cls.ucl.ac.uk/events/research-on-inequality-the-long-roots-of-childhood-informing-policies-a...
 
Description Webinar: Introduction to the 1958 and 1970 British birth cohorts 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact On 15 May 2018, CLS hosted a webinar for new, existing and prospective users of NCDS and BCS70 data. There were 52 delegates registered for the event from across the UK and abroad.

About the webinar

This introductory webinar provided an overview of the 1958 National Child Development Study and the 1970 British Cohort Study, with a focus on wellbeing measures available in each cohort. It covered: study design, sweeps and samples, accessing the data, documentation, missing data, updates on what's new in each, wellbeing measures, and examples of how the wellbeing measures have been used in previous research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018