GCRF: The PRECISE (PREgnancy Care Integrating translational Science, Everywhere) Network: a sub-Saharan network for placental disorders

Lead Research Organisation: King's College London
Department Name: Women's Health

Abstract

The PRECISE Network is a new and broadly-based group of research scientists and health advocates mainly based in the UK and Africa, but also including the World Health Organization. We will establish this network through a shared project that will investigate three important complications of pregnancy, namely high blood pressure (hypertension), babies who are smaller than they should be before birth (fetal growth restriction) and babies who die before birth (stillbirth). We think that about 46,000 women and two-and-a-half million babies (both before and after birth) die due to these problems every year, and half of them die in Africa. In addition, about 50 million women and babies will have their short and long term health altered because of these complications. These numbers represent one of the great global inequalities of our time.
In developed countries like the UK, we know that these three pregnancy complications are caused by problems with the afterbirth (placenta), and we know quite a lot about how they develop and complicate pregnancies.
In contrast, in sub-Saharan Africa, we know very little about how and why these placental conditions occur. This is especially complex as women in Africa often have many other challenges: limited diets that change with the seasons, chronic infections such as HIV or malaria, acute infections like Ebola, limited power to make decisions for themselves, life in communities that are prone to either flooding or drought and are remote from health facilities. Therefore, the way that pregnancy complications arise are probably very different for these women in sub-Saharan Africa, compared with women living in the UK. Yet, these women and their babies bear most of the burden of death and illness related to pregnancy complications. We need to address this area of neglected global health research.
In PRECISE, we will train and mentor junior investigators in how to do pregnancy research, and we will establish new databases related to pregnant and some non-pregnant women, the context of their lives, their pregnancy complications and what happens at the end of their pregnancies. We will save samples of blood, urine and placental tissue, and test them to increase our knowledge about how women's bodies cope with both normal and complicated pregnancies. All the samples and the data will remain in Africa for use primarily by Africans in collaboration with UK-based and other scientists.
To have a sample of pregnancies that are typical of women in sub-Saharan Africa, we will invite about 12,000 women in The Gambia and Senegal (West Africa), Kenya (East Africa) and Mozambique (Southern Africa) to share their stories, the data related to their pregnancy and babies, and their blood, urine and placental samples with their regional team and the wider global research community, especially the PRECISE scientists. This large number of women will allow us to gain new and important insights into how and why women in sub-Saharan Africa develop these pregnancy complications, and how and why may of them and their babies die from these complications.
Through these activities, we hope to improve the health and well-being of women and their families in Africa, to build resilience to environmental events such as flooding or infectious disease outbreaks, to advise about where infrastructure such as roads will improve pregnancy outcomes, and to reduce the inequality of maternal and child deaths that is visited on families in sub-Saharan Africa.

Technical Summary

Through our work in West Africa (the Gambia & Senegal; both ODA 'least-developed' countries), East Africa (Kenya; ODA 'Other' low income country) and Southern Africa (Mozambique; ODA 'least developed' country), we have set ourselves the task of fulfilling the following objectives, each of which relates to at least one GCRF thematic area:
Objective 1: To increase and disseminate knowledge related to the origins and consequences of the placental disorders of pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa.
This addresses the thematic areas: (i) sustainable health and well-being; (ii) reducing gender and childhood inequalities, as the placental disorders are leading causes of maternal, fetal and infant death and disability; (iii) resilience to short-term environmental shocks (which will advise creating strong infrastructure for sustainable and inclusive development).
This requires an understanding of the complex interplay between an individual woman's biology, her burden of acute and chronic infectious disease, her nutritional and societal status, and her existence in place and time throughout a 2-year period. In addition, it requires an understanding of the biology of non-pregnant and physiologically-pregnant reproductive age women in these settings as these foundational data do not exist. Our targets for knowledge dissemination will be women, their communities, local and national decision makers, NGOs and multilaterals. Many of the key relationships already exist and will be strengthened through this shared set of activities.

Objective 2: To develop a collaborative team focussed on women's and reproductive health
This addresses the thematic areas of: (i) sustainable health and well-being; (ii) strengthening foundations and research infrastructure for inclusive innovation; (iii) reducing inequality within science; and (iv) creating inclusive and equitable education and training for all team members and their trainees.
While some members of the proposed PRECISE team have worked together previously, this initiative will create a team through activity in LMICs. We will grow capacity in both LMICs and the UK by developing and strengthening skills around pregnancy research, especially, but not exclusively, focussed on placental disorders. This is especially pertinent for the MRC Gambia unit, which does have a track record of research around the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV, but is otherwise limited in its pregnancy research portfolio. Through the Gates Foundation-funded PRE-EMPT (PRE-eclampsia - Eclampsia Monitoring, Prevention & Treatment) initiative lead by the PRECISE CI, Peter von Dadelszen, the Mozambique team has recently become engaged in pregnancy research related to pregnancy hypertension.
Twenty-two (55%) of the 40 named investigators and staff scientists are women, and some are gay.

Objective 3: To create an African-controlled resource of a regional biobank that is linked to replete clinical, epidemiological, nutritional, social context, and geographical data.
This will address the thematic areas of: (i) reducing inequality through ownership of research resources in Africa by Africans; (ii) inclusive and equitable quality research education and training; and (iii) sustainable health and well-being.
This model of local control of data and biological samples in central to our model of global health research and is essential for the development of research strength in Africa. These resources would underpin future hypothesis-driven and -generating projects in these areas and would contribute to the Global Pregnancy Collaboration established by PRE-EMPT. In addition, we believe that the PRECISE project will create a pregnancy cohort that could be followed-up in terms of both maternal and child outcomes related to the origins and consequences of non-communicable diseases

Planned Impact

The key groups with which we shall engage to ensure maximal impact include:
Pregnant women, non-pregnant women of reproductive age (WRA), and their communities in Sub-Saharan Africa (sSA). We have developed a highly interactive programme of formative qualitative research and community engagement with pregnant women, non-pregnant WRA, adolescent girls and boys, mothers-in-law, matrons, husbands, men's groups, faith leaders, and local chiefs and kings to advise what they perceive to be the status of women in their communities and the facilitators and barriers to healthy pregnancy. This will complement existing research activity that has been largely infectious disease-oriented. Also, we will learn about the burden of morbidity borne by women during and following pregnancy. The stories that women tell will inform the design of follow-on activities (e.g., clinical trials). With the increasing impact of urban drift across sSA, comparing and contrasting these stories between rural and urban poor will be important as we design precision medicine for all women, everywhere.
Health care providers including midwives, nurses, medical officers, and obstetricians in sSA. We are already engaged with local providers in many of these communities. Health care providers request accurate pregnancy dating and risk stratification tools to identify and manage those at greatest risk of, and at time-of-disease with, placental complications. We will invite these and other key health care providers to national launches of the network and engage with facility staff throughout. We have strong links with national societies of obstetrics and gynaecology and the relevant nursing and midwifery councils.
Heath Care Policy Makers. Early engagement with health care funders and policy makers is essential. During the course of this project, UK-based and local leads will continue to meet with staff of the district, provincial and national Departments and Ministries of Health. We will host an all-country roundtable where regional implications will be discussed.
Existing research, knowledge translation and advocacy networks. PRECISE will strengthen the PRE-EMPT-initiated Global Pregnancy Collaboration. The WHO Department of Reproductive Research has strong and effective links with WHO Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health, UNFPA, and UNICEF, their implementing partners. The AKU Nairbobi is linked with the Aga Khan Development Network of health facilites through South and Central Asia and East Africa.
National mapping agencies and ministries of public works. We will expand our existing relationships with the Mozambique and Zimbabwe mapping agencies to include the relevant agencies in the Gambia, Senegal, and Kenya. These maps and related app will enable ministries of public works to model the impact of proposed infrastructure spending (e.g., roads, bridges) on health-related outcomes.
UK and Africa clinicians and scientists in training. We will create opportunities for bi-directional knowledge transfer between UK and African researchers and students involved in the study to build capacity and research experience.
The commercial sector The St George's Joint Research and Enterprise Office, and equivalent offices at KCL, LSHTM and Oxford, will be engaged from the outset to strengthen exsting relationships with industry. Such relationships include those around devices (oximetry, BP), mobile health (ultrasound, clinical and demographic data collection), and point-of-care devices.
Researchers in the fields of pregnancy hypertension, fetal growth restriction, stillbirth, adolescent and pregnancy nutrition, and infectious diseases. Pathways to impact are well-established in the clinical and scientific community, but dissemination amongst sSA scientists and clinicians requires overcoming some, barriers including their inability to attend conferences due to financial constraints. We will disseminate our research outputs at local and regional meetings in Africa.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description Baobab Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) Training Workshop - Data and laboratory managers from PRECISE's partner institutions in Mozambique, Kenya and The Gambia attended a week-long training course on Baobab, an open source LIMS software developed by the South African National Bioinformatics Institute based at the University of the Western Cape. The course attendees were trained in programming the software and using the software to track biological samples from collection, through processing to long-term storage. In addition to providing essential training for the data and laboratory management teams, the training workshop has enabled the PRECISE Network to develop a partnership with SANBI and explore potential collaborations with other biobanking projects in Africa.
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
URL http://precisenetwork.org
 
Description Field Staff Training - The PRECISE Network held a field staff training workshop in September, hosted by the MRC Unit at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) in The Gambia. The meeting was attended by the project site leads from The Gambia, Kenya and Mozambique, the data management team from the University of British Columbia (UBC), the central team from King's College London (KCL) and data and laboratory management teams from the MRC Unit in The Gambia, Aga Khan University Nairobi and the Centro de Investigacao de Saude de Manhica (CISM). Standardised operability at each of the study sites was discussed and standard operating procedures for data collection and management, biological sample collection and processing and biobanking were finalised. In addition, the workshop was attended by members of the Gambian field staff team who were introduced to the PRECISE dataset and training on data and sample collection in The Gambia was initiated.
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
URL http://precisenetwork.org
 
Description Project Manager's Workshop - In July 2018 the central PRECISE team at King's College London hosted a Project Manager's Workshop to ensure all partners in the collaboration are able to contribute to the equal partnerships and accountability aims of the PRECISE Network. The workshop was attended by the site leads and co-investigators from The Gambia, Kenya and Mozambique, the Health Geography lead from Midland State University Zimbabwe as well as the data management and biobanking representatives from PRECISE's partner institutions in each of the study countries. In addition, the meeting was attended by the data management and programming team from the University of British Columbia (UBC) and Donna Russell of Donna Russell Consulting, who is the biobanking set-up consultant.
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
URL http://precisenetwork.org
 
Description GCRF Global Impact Accelerator Account 2018 Kings College London
Amount £180,000 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/S516041/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2018 
End 03/2019
 
Description Women and Childrens Global Health Programme
Amount $60,000 (CAD)
Organisation University of British Columbia 
Sector Academic/University
Country Canada
Start 01/2018 
End 01/2018
 
Description Women and Childrens Global Health Programme
Amount $15,000 (CAD)
Organisation University of British Columbia 
Sector Academic/University
Country Canada
Start 02/2018 
End 02/2018
 
Description PRECISE Network 
Organisation Africa Research Excellence Fund
Country Gambia 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution KCL has secured funding for and is hosting the PRECISE Network; Coordinating and managing the development of interdisciplinary research partnerships to support innovative work in Women and Children's Global Health. This includes establishing global interdisciplinary networks, training of staff, knowledge exchange and peer support.
Collaborator Contribution Aga Khan University, Nairobi: AKU is our institutional partner in Kenya, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Kilifi county. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica:CISM is our institutional partner in Mozambique, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Manhica district. University of Oxford; We are working with the engineering and fetal medicine departments at Oxford to develop a low cost device that can accurately date gestation for improved care pathways in pregnancy. St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL are leading the PRECISE work on aetiology and mechanisms of placental disease in partnership with researchers in Kenya and Mozambique. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Additionally, we are working with colleagues at LSHTM on questions relating to quality and respectful care in maternal and newborn health. World Health Organisation: The WHO is a global policy partner, many of the PRECISE co-Investigators are directly and indirectly involved with agenda and policy setting discussions at the WHO. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: MRCG is our institutional partner in The Gambia, leading the data and sample collection of 3000 women in the Farafenni region. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE. University of British Columbia: PRECISE is working closely with the team that ran the PREEMPT study to maximise learning and knowledge exchange between these programmes of work. UBC hosts the team of computer programmers who are leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Impact Aga Khan University, Nairobi: The team at AKU have worked with health facilities in Kilifi county to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Kenya. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica: The team at CISM have worked with health facilities in Manhica district to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Mozambique. This activity is due to start in December 2018. University of Oxford; The team at OU have developed software that uses ultra sound video loops to automatically measure the trans-cerebellar diameter in the fetal brain to ascertain the gestational age of the fetus. This software will be tested in the PRECISE study so the application can be validated for use in clinical settings to inform clinical care in pregnancy, St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL have contributed to a funding application to MRC PSMB (submitted SEptember 2018) to develop a platform for placental histology work in Kenya, at AKU. We will be informed of the funding decision in Spring 2019. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Colleagues at LSHTM have informed the data collection fields in the PRECISE data set from a neonatal and paediatric perspective and are co-leading the funding application for cohort follow up of infants and mothers to 36 months of age: PRECISE DYAD. World Health Organisation: Dialogue around agenda and policy setting with colleagues at the WHO will be ongoing throughout the life of the project. There are no specific outcomes to report at this early stage. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: The team at MRCG have worked with health facilities in Farafenni region to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in The Gambia. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE and have started a systematic review of the literature around environmental and geographical factors affecting pregnancy and placental disease in sub-Saharan Africa. This review will be published in 2019 and will inform the development of the health geography work package within PRECISE. University of British Columbia: The team of computer programmers leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE will have completed the databases ready for data and sample collection to begin in November 2018. Additionally the Qualitative Researchers in this team have worked in partnership with the PRECISE sites to develop the community engagement frameworks that will be used for sensitization in sites ahead of data collection starting. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Further funding applications with NIPH are planned to utilise the PRECISE database in other settings. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network. Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Start Year 2017
 
Description PRECISE Network 
Organisation Aga Khan University Hospital, Nairobi
Country Kenya 
Sector Hospitals 
PI Contribution KCL has secured funding for and is hosting the PRECISE Network; Coordinating and managing the development of interdisciplinary research partnerships to support innovative work in Women and Children's Global Health. This includes establishing global interdisciplinary networks, training of staff, knowledge exchange and peer support.
Collaborator Contribution Aga Khan University, Nairobi: AKU is our institutional partner in Kenya, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Kilifi county. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica:CISM is our institutional partner in Mozambique, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Manhica district. University of Oxford; We are working with the engineering and fetal medicine departments at Oxford to develop a low cost device that can accurately date gestation for improved care pathways in pregnancy. St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL are leading the PRECISE work on aetiology and mechanisms of placental disease in partnership with researchers in Kenya and Mozambique. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Additionally, we are working with colleagues at LSHTM on questions relating to quality and respectful care in maternal and newborn health. World Health Organisation: The WHO is a global policy partner, many of the PRECISE co-Investigators are directly and indirectly involved with agenda and policy setting discussions at the WHO. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: MRCG is our institutional partner in The Gambia, leading the data and sample collection of 3000 women in the Farafenni region. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE. University of British Columbia: PRECISE is working closely with the team that ran the PREEMPT study to maximise learning and knowledge exchange between these programmes of work. UBC hosts the team of computer programmers who are leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Impact Aga Khan University, Nairobi: The team at AKU have worked with health facilities in Kilifi county to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Kenya. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica: The team at CISM have worked with health facilities in Manhica district to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Mozambique. This activity is due to start in December 2018. University of Oxford; The team at OU have developed software that uses ultra sound video loops to automatically measure the trans-cerebellar diameter in the fetal brain to ascertain the gestational age of the fetus. This software will be tested in the PRECISE study so the application can be validated for use in clinical settings to inform clinical care in pregnancy, St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL have contributed to a funding application to MRC PSMB (submitted SEptember 2018) to develop a platform for placental histology work in Kenya, at AKU. We will be informed of the funding decision in Spring 2019. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Colleagues at LSHTM have informed the data collection fields in the PRECISE data set from a neonatal and paediatric perspective and are co-leading the funding application for cohort follow up of infants and mothers to 36 months of age: PRECISE DYAD. World Health Organisation: Dialogue around agenda and policy setting with colleagues at the WHO will be ongoing throughout the life of the project. There are no specific outcomes to report at this early stage. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: The team at MRCG have worked with health facilities in Farafenni region to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in The Gambia. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE and have started a systematic review of the literature around environmental and geographical factors affecting pregnancy and placental disease in sub-Saharan Africa. This review will be published in 2019 and will inform the development of the health geography work package within PRECISE. University of British Columbia: The team of computer programmers leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE will have completed the databases ready for data and sample collection to begin in November 2018. Additionally the Qualitative Researchers in this team have worked in partnership with the PRECISE sites to develop the community engagement frameworks that will be used for sensitization in sites ahead of data collection starting. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Further funding applications with NIPH are planned to utilise the PRECISE database in other settings. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network. Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Start Year 2017
 
Description PRECISE Network 
Organisation Francis Crick Institute
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution KCL has secured funding for and is hosting the PRECISE Network; Coordinating and managing the development of interdisciplinary research partnerships to support innovative work in Women and Children's Global Health. This includes establishing global interdisciplinary networks, training of staff, knowledge exchange and peer support.
Collaborator Contribution Aga Khan University, Nairobi: AKU is our institutional partner in Kenya, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Kilifi county. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica:CISM is our institutional partner in Mozambique, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Manhica district. University of Oxford; We are working with the engineering and fetal medicine departments at Oxford to develop a low cost device that can accurately date gestation for improved care pathways in pregnancy. St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL are leading the PRECISE work on aetiology and mechanisms of placental disease in partnership with researchers in Kenya and Mozambique. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Additionally, we are working with colleagues at LSHTM on questions relating to quality and respectful care in maternal and newborn health. World Health Organisation: The WHO is a global policy partner, many of the PRECISE co-Investigators are directly and indirectly involved with agenda and policy setting discussions at the WHO. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: MRCG is our institutional partner in The Gambia, leading the data and sample collection of 3000 women in the Farafenni region. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE. University of British Columbia: PRECISE is working closely with the team that ran the PREEMPT study to maximise learning and knowledge exchange between these programmes of work. UBC hosts the team of computer programmers who are leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Impact Aga Khan University, Nairobi: The team at AKU have worked with health facilities in Kilifi county to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Kenya. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica: The team at CISM have worked with health facilities in Manhica district to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Mozambique. This activity is due to start in December 2018. University of Oxford; The team at OU have developed software that uses ultra sound video loops to automatically measure the trans-cerebellar diameter in the fetal brain to ascertain the gestational age of the fetus. This software will be tested in the PRECISE study so the application can be validated for use in clinical settings to inform clinical care in pregnancy, St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL have contributed to a funding application to MRC PSMB (submitted SEptember 2018) to develop a platform for placental histology work in Kenya, at AKU. We will be informed of the funding decision in Spring 2019. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Colleagues at LSHTM have informed the data collection fields in the PRECISE data set from a neonatal and paediatric perspective and are co-leading the funding application for cohort follow up of infants and mothers to 36 months of age: PRECISE DYAD. World Health Organisation: Dialogue around agenda and policy setting with colleagues at the WHO will be ongoing throughout the life of the project. There are no specific outcomes to report at this early stage. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: The team at MRCG have worked with health facilities in Farafenni region to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in The Gambia. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE and have started a systematic review of the literature around environmental and geographical factors affecting pregnancy and placental disease in sub-Saharan Africa. This review will be published in 2019 and will inform the development of the health geography work package within PRECISE. University of British Columbia: The team of computer programmers leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE will have completed the databases ready for data and sample collection to begin in November 2018. Additionally the Qualitative Researchers in this team have worked in partnership with the PRECISE sites to develop the community engagement frameworks that will be used for sensitization in sites ahead of data collection starting. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Further funding applications with NIPH are planned to utilise the PRECISE database in other settings. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network. Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Start Year 2017
 
Description PRECISE Network 
Organisation London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution KCL has secured funding for and is hosting the PRECISE Network; Coordinating and managing the development of interdisciplinary research partnerships to support innovative work in Women and Children's Global Health. This includes establishing global interdisciplinary networks, training of staff, knowledge exchange and peer support.
Collaborator Contribution Aga Khan University, Nairobi: AKU is our institutional partner in Kenya, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Kilifi county. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica:CISM is our institutional partner in Mozambique, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Manhica district. University of Oxford; We are working with the engineering and fetal medicine departments at Oxford to develop a low cost device that can accurately date gestation for improved care pathways in pregnancy. St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL are leading the PRECISE work on aetiology and mechanisms of placental disease in partnership with researchers in Kenya and Mozambique. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Additionally, we are working with colleagues at LSHTM on questions relating to quality and respectful care in maternal and newborn health. World Health Organisation: The WHO is a global policy partner, many of the PRECISE co-Investigators are directly and indirectly involved with agenda and policy setting discussions at the WHO. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: MRCG is our institutional partner in The Gambia, leading the data and sample collection of 3000 women in the Farafenni region. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE. University of British Columbia: PRECISE is working closely with the team that ran the PREEMPT study to maximise learning and knowledge exchange between these programmes of work. UBC hosts the team of computer programmers who are leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Impact Aga Khan University, Nairobi: The team at AKU have worked with health facilities in Kilifi county to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Kenya. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica: The team at CISM have worked with health facilities in Manhica district to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Mozambique. This activity is due to start in December 2018. University of Oxford; The team at OU have developed software that uses ultra sound video loops to automatically measure the trans-cerebellar diameter in the fetal brain to ascertain the gestational age of the fetus. This software will be tested in the PRECISE study so the application can be validated for use in clinical settings to inform clinical care in pregnancy, St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL have contributed to a funding application to MRC PSMB (submitted SEptember 2018) to develop a platform for placental histology work in Kenya, at AKU. We will be informed of the funding decision in Spring 2019. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Colleagues at LSHTM have informed the data collection fields in the PRECISE data set from a neonatal and paediatric perspective and are co-leading the funding application for cohort follow up of infants and mothers to 36 months of age: PRECISE DYAD. World Health Organisation: Dialogue around agenda and policy setting with colleagues at the WHO will be ongoing throughout the life of the project. There are no specific outcomes to report at this early stage. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: The team at MRCG have worked with health facilities in Farafenni region to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in The Gambia. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE and have started a systematic review of the literature around environmental and geographical factors affecting pregnancy and placental disease in sub-Saharan Africa. This review will be published in 2019 and will inform the development of the health geography work package within PRECISE. University of British Columbia: The team of computer programmers leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE will have completed the databases ready for data and sample collection to begin in November 2018. Additionally the Qualitative Researchers in this team have worked in partnership with the PRECISE sites to develop the community engagement frameworks that will be used for sensitization in sites ahead of data collection starting. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Further funding applications with NIPH are planned to utilise the PRECISE database in other settings. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network. Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Start Year 2017
 
Description PRECISE Network 
Organisation Manhiça Health Research Centre (CISM)
Country Mozambique 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution KCL has secured funding for and is hosting the PRECISE Network; Coordinating and managing the development of interdisciplinary research partnerships to support innovative work in Women and Children's Global Health. This includes establishing global interdisciplinary networks, training of staff, knowledge exchange and peer support.
Collaborator Contribution Aga Khan University, Nairobi: AKU is our institutional partner in Kenya, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Kilifi county. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica:CISM is our institutional partner in Mozambique, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Manhica district. University of Oxford; We are working with the engineering and fetal medicine departments at Oxford to develop a low cost device that can accurately date gestation for improved care pathways in pregnancy. St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL are leading the PRECISE work on aetiology and mechanisms of placental disease in partnership with researchers in Kenya and Mozambique. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Additionally, we are working with colleagues at LSHTM on questions relating to quality and respectful care in maternal and newborn health. World Health Organisation: The WHO is a global policy partner, many of the PRECISE co-Investigators are directly and indirectly involved with agenda and policy setting discussions at the WHO. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: MRCG is our institutional partner in The Gambia, leading the data and sample collection of 3000 women in the Farafenni region. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE. University of British Columbia: PRECISE is working closely with the team that ran the PREEMPT study to maximise learning and knowledge exchange between these programmes of work. UBC hosts the team of computer programmers who are leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Impact Aga Khan University, Nairobi: The team at AKU have worked with health facilities in Kilifi county to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Kenya. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica: The team at CISM have worked with health facilities in Manhica district to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Mozambique. This activity is due to start in December 2018. University of Oxford; The team at OU have developed software that uses ultra sound video loops to automatically measure the trans-cerebellar diameter in the fetal brain to ascertain the gestational age of the fetus. This software will be tested in the PRECISE study so the application can be validated for use in clinical settings to inform clinical care in pregnancy, St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL have contributed to a funding application to MRC PSMB (submitted SEptember 2018) to develop a platform for placental histology work in Kenya, at AKU. We will be informed of the funding decision in Spring 2019. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Colleagues at LSHTM have informed the data collection fields in the PRECISE data set from a neonatal and paediatric perspective and are co-leading the funding application for cohort follow up of infants and mothers to 36 months of age: PRECISE DYAD. World Health Organisation: Dialogue around agenda and policy setting with colleagues at the WHO will be ongoing throughout the life of the project. There are no specific outcomes to report at this early stage. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: The team at MRCG have worked with health facilities in Farafenni region to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in The Gambia. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE and have started a systematic review of the literature around environmental and geographical factors affecting pregnancy and placental disease in sub-Saharan Africa. This review will be published in 2019 and will inform the development of the health geography work package within PRECISE. University of British Columbia: The team of computer programmers leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE will have completed the databases ready for data and sample collection to begin in November 2018. Additionally the Qualitative Researchers in this team have worked in partnership with the PRECISE sites to develop the community engagement frameworks that will be used for sensitization in sites ahead of data collection starting. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Further funding applications with NIPH are planned to utilise the PRECISE database in other settings. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network. Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Start Year 2017
 
Description PRECISE Network 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC)
Department MRC Unit, The Gambia
Country Gambia 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution KCL has secured funding for and is hosting the PRECISE Network; Coordinating and managing the development of interdisciplinary research partnerships to support innovative work in Women and Children's Global Health. This includes establishing global interdisciplinary networks, training of staff, knowledge exchange and peer support.
Collaborator Contribution Aga Khan University, Nairobi: AKU is our institutional partner in Kenya, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Kilifi county. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica:CISM is our institutional partner in Mozambique, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Manhica district. University of Oxford; We are working with the engineering and fetal medicine departments at Oxford to develop a low cost device that can accurately date gestation for improved care pathways in pregnancy. St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL are leading the PRECISE work on aetiology and mechanisms of placental disease in partnership with researchers in Kenya and Mozambique. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Additionally, we are working with colleagues at LSHTM on questions relating to quality and respectful care in maternal and newborn health. World Health Organisation: The WHO is a global policy partner, many of the PRECISE co-Investigators are directly and indirectly involved with agenda and policy setting discussions at the WHO. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: MRCG is our institutional partner in The Gambia, leading the data and sample collection of 3000 women in the Farafenni region. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE. University of British Columbia: PRECISE is working closely with the team that ran the PREEMPT study to maximise learning and knowledge exchange between these programmes of work. UBC hosts the team of computer programmers who are leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Impact Aga Khan University, Nairobi: The team at AKU have worked with health facilities in Kilifi county to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Kenya. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica: The team at CISM have worked with health facilities in Manhica district to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Mozambique. This activity is due to start in December 2018. University of Oxford; The team at OU have developed software that uses ultra sound video loops to automatically measure the trans-cerebellar diameter in the fetal brain to ascertain the gestational age of the fetus. This software will be tested in the PRECISE study so the application can be validated for use in clinical settings to inform clinical care in pregnancy, St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL have contributed to a funding application to MRC PSMB (submitted SEptember 2018) to develop a platform for placental histology work in Kenya, at AKU. We will be informed of the funding decision in Spring 2019. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Colleagues at LSHTM have informed the data collection fields in the PRECISE data set from a neonatal and paediatric perspective and are co-leading the funding application for cohort follow up of infants and mothers to 36 months of age: PRECISE DYAD. World Health Organisation: Dialogue around agenda and policy setting with colleagues at the WHO will be ongoing throughout the life of the project. There are no specific outcomes to report at this early stage. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: The team at MRCG have worked with health facilities in Farafenni region to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in The Gambia. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE and have started a systematic review of the literature around environmental and geographical factors affecting pregnancy and placental disease in sub-Saharan Africa. This review will be published in 2019 and will inform the development of the health geography work package within PRECISE. University of British Columbia: The team of computer programmers leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE will have completed the databases ready for data and sample collection to begin in November 2018. Additionally the Qualitative Researchers in this team have worked in partnership with the PRECISE sites to develop the community engagement frameworks that will be used for sensitization in sites ahead of data collection starting. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Further funding applications with NIPH are planned to utilise the PRECISE database in other settings. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network. Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Start Year 2017
 
Description PRECISE Network 
Organisation Midlands State University
PI Contribution KCL has secured funding for and is hosting the PRECISE Network; Coordinating and managing the development of interdisciplinary research partnerships to support innovative work in Women and Children's Global Health. This includes establishing global interdisciplinary networks, training of staff, knowledge exchange and peer support.
Collaborator Contribution Aga Khan University, Nairobi: AKU is our institutional partner in Kenya, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Kilifi county. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica:CISM is our institutional partner in Mozambique, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Manhica district. University of Oxford; We are working with the engineering and fetal medicine departments at Oxford to develop a low cost device that can accurately date gestation for improved care pathways in pregnancy. St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL are leading the PRECISE work on aetiology and mechanisms of placental disease in partnership with researchers in Kenya and Mozambique. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Additionally, we are working with colleagues at LSHTM on questions relating to quality and respectful care in maternal and newborn health. World Health Organisation: The WHO is a global policy partner, many of the PRECISE co-Investigators are directly and indirectly involved with agenda and policy setting discussions at the WHO. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: MRCG is our institutional partner in The Gambia, leading the data and sample collection of 3000 women in the Farafenni region. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE. University of British Columbia: PRECISE is working closely with the team that ran the PREEMPT study to maximise learning and knowledge exchange between these programmes of work. UBC hosts the team of computer programmers who are leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Impact Aga Khan University, Nairobi: The team at AKU have worked with health facilities in Kilifi county to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Kenya. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica: The team at CISM have worked with health facilities in Manhica district to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Mozambique. This activity is due to start in December 2018. University of Oxford; The team at OU have developed software that uses ultra sound video loops to automatically measure the trans-cerebellar diameter in the fetal brain to ascertain the gestational age of the fetus. This software will be tested in the PRECISE study so the application can be validated for use in clinical settings to inform clinical care in pregnancy, St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL have contributed to a funding application to MRC PSMB (submitted SEptember 2018) to develop a platform for placental histology work in Kenya, at AKU. We will be informed of the funding decision in Spring 2019. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Colleagues at LSHTM have informed the data collection fields in the PRECISE data set from a neonatal and paediatric perspective and are co-leading the funding application for cohort follow up of infants and mothers to 36 months of age: PRECISE DYAD. World Health Organisation: Dialogue around agenda and policy setting with colleagues at the WHO will be ongoing throughout the life of the project. There are no specific outcomes to report at this early stage. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: The team at MRCG have worked with health facilities in Farafenni region to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in The Gambia. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE and have started a systematic review of the literature around environmental and geographical factors affecting pregnancy and placental disease in sub-Saharan Africa. This review will be published in 2019 and will inform the development of the health geography work package within PRECISE. University of British Columbia: The team of computer programmers leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE will have completed the databases ready for data and sample collection to begin in November 2018. Additionally the Qualitative Researchers in this team have worked in partnership with the PRECISE sites to develop the community engagement frameworks that will be used for sensitization in sites ahead of data collection starting. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Further funding applications with NIPH are planned to utilise the PRECISE database in other settings. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network. Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Start Year 2017
 
Description PRECISE Network 
Organisation Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Country Norway 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution KCL has secured funding for and is hosting the PRECISE Network; Coordinating and managing the development of interdisciplinary research partnerships to support innovative work in Women and Children's Global Health. This includes establishing global interdisciplinary networks, training of staff, knowledge exchange and peer support.
Collaborator Contribution Aga Khan University, Nairobi: AKU is our institutional partner in Kenya, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Kilifi county. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica:CISM is our institutional partner in Mozambique, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Manhica district. University of Oxford; We are working with the engineering and fetal medicine departments at Oxford to develop a low cost device that can accurately date gestation for improved care pathways in pregnancy. St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL are leading the PRECISE work on aetiology and mechanisms of placental disease in partnership with researchers in Kenya and Mozambique. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Additionally, we are working with colleagues at LSHTM on questions relating to quality and respectful care in maternal and newborn health. World Health Organisation: The WHO is a global policy partner, many of the PRECISE co-Investigators are directly and indirectly involved with agenda and policy setting discussions at the WHO. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: MRCG is our institutional partner in The Gambia, leading the data and sample collection of 3000 women in the Farafenni region. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE. University of British Columbia: PRECISE is working closely with the team that ran the PREEMPT study to maximise learning and knowledge exchange between these programmes of work. UBC hosts the team of computer programmers who are leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Impact Aga Khan University, Nairobi: The team at AKU have worked with health facilities in Kilifi county to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Kenya. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica: The team at CISM have worked with health facilities in Manhica district to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Mozambique. This activity is due to start in December 2018. University of Oxford; The team at OU have developed software that uses ultra sound video loops to automatically measure the trans-cerebellar diameter in the fetal brain to ascertain the gestational age of the fetus. This software will be tested in the PRECISE study so the application can be validated for use in clinical settings to inform clinical care in pregnancy, St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL have contributed to a funding application to MRC PSMB (submitted SEptember 2018) to develop a platform for placental histology work in Kenya, at AKU. We will be informed of the funding decision in Spring 2019. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Colleagues at LSHTM have informed the data collection fields in the PRECISE data set from a neonatal and paediatric perspective and are co-leading the funding application for cohort follow up of infants and mothers to 36 months of age: PRECISE DYAD. World Health Organisation: Dialogue around agenda and policy setting with colleagues at the WHO will be ongoing throughout the life of the project. There are no specific outcomes to report at this early stage. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: The team at MRCG have worked with health facilities in Farafenni region to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in The Gambia. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE and have started a systematic review of the literature around environmental and geographical factors affecting pregnancy and placental disease in sub-Saharan Africa. This review will be published in 2019 and will inform the development of the health geography work package within PRECISE. University of British Columbia: The team of computer programmers leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE will have completed the databases ready for data and sample collection to begin in November 2018. Additionally the Qualitative Researchers in this team have worked in partnership with the PRECISE sites to develop the community engagement frameworks that will be used for sensitization in sites ahead of data collection starting. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Further funding applications with NIPH are planned to utilise the PRECISE database in other settings. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network. Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Start Year 2017
 
Description PRECISE Network 
Organisation St George's University of London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution KCL has secured funding for and is hosting the PRECISE Network; Coordinating and managing the development of interdisciplinary research partnerships to support innovative work in Women and Children's Global Health. This includes establishing global interdisciplinary networks, training of staff, knowledge exchange and peer support.
Collaborator Contribution Aga Khan University, Nairobi: AKU is our institutional partner in Kenya, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Kilifi county. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica:CISM is our institutional partner in Mozambique, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Manhica district. University of Oxford; We are working with the engineering and fetal medicine departments at Oxford to develop a low cost device that can accurately date gestation for improved care pathways in pregnancy. St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL are leading the PRECISE work on aetiology and mechanisms of placental disease in partnership with researchers in Kenya and Mozambique. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Additionally, we are working with colleagues at LSHTM on questions relating to quality and respectful care in maternal and newborn health. World Health Organisation: The WHO is a global policy partner, many of the PRECISE co-Investigators are directly and indirectly involved with agenda and policy setting discussions at the WHO. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: MRCG is our institutional partner in The Gambia, leading the data and sample collection of 3000 women in the Farafenni region. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE. University of British Columbia: PRECISE is working closely with the team that ran the PREEMPT study to maximise learning and knowledge exchange between these programmes of work. UBC hosts the team of computer programmers who are leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Impact Aga Khan University, Nairobi: The team at AKU have worked with health facilities in Kilifi county to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Kenya. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica: The team at CISM have worked with health facilities in Manhica district to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Mozambique. This activity is due to start in December 2018. University of Oxford; The team at OU have developed software that uses ultra sound video loops to automatically measure the trans-cerebellar diameter in the fetal brain to ascertain the gestational age of the fetus. This software will be tested in the PRECISE study so the application can be validated for use in clinical settings to inform clinical care in pregnancy, St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL have contributed to a funding application to MRC PSMB (submitted SEptember 2018) to develop a platform for placental histology work in Kenya, at AKU. We will be informed of the funding decision in Spring 2019. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Colleagues at LSHTM have informed the data collection fields in the PRECISE data set from a neonatal and paediatric perspective and are co-leading the funding application for cohort follow up of infants and mothers to 36 months of age: PRECISE DYAD. World Health Organisation: Dialogue around agenda and policy setting with colleagues at the WHO will be ongoing throughout the life of the project. There are no specific outcomes to report at this early stage. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: The team at MRCG have worked with health facilities in Farafenni region to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in The Gambia. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE and have started a systematic review of the literature around environmental and geographical factors affecting pregnancy and placental disease in sub-Saharan Africa. This review will be published in 2019 and will inform the development of the health geography work package within PRECISE. University of British Columbia: The team of computer programmers leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE will have completed the databases ready for data and sample collection to begin in November 2018. Additionally the Qualitative Researchers in this team have worked in partnership with the PRECISE sites to develop the community engagement frameworks that will be used for sensitization in sites ahead of data collection starting. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Further funding applications with NIPH are planned to utilise the PRECISE database in other settings. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network. Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Start Year 2017
 
Description PRECISE Network 
Organisation The Global Health Network
Country Global 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution KCL has secured funding for and is hosting the PRECISE Network; Coordinating and managing the development of interdisciplinary research partnerships to support innovative work in Women and Children's Global Health. This includes establishing global interdisciplinary networks, training of staff, knowledge exchange and peer support.
Collaborator Contribution Aga Khan University, Nairobi: AKU is our institutional partner in Kenya, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Kilifi county. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica:CISM is our institutional partner in Mozambique, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Manhica district. University of Oxford; We are working with the engineering and fetal medicine departments at Oxford to develop a low cost device that can accurately date gestation for improved care pathways in pregnancy. St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL are leading the PRECISE work on aetiology and mechanisms of placental disease in partnership with researchers in Kenya and Mozambique. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Additionally, we are working with colleagues at LSHTM on questions relating to quality and respectful care in maternal and newborn health. World Health Organisation: The WHO is a global policy partner, many of the PRECISE co-Investigators are directly and indirectly involved with agenda and policy setting discussions at the WHO. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: MRCG is our institutional partner in The Gambia, leading the data and sample collection of 3000 women in the Farafenni region. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE. University of British Columbia: PRECISE is working closely with the team that ran the PREEMPT study to maximise learning and knowledge exchange between these programmes of work. UBC hosts the team of computer programmers who are leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Impact Aga Khan University, Nairobi: The team at AKU have worked with health facilities in Kilifi county to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Kenya. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica: The team at CISM have worked with health facilities in Manhica district to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Mozambique. This activity is due to start in December 2018. University of Oxford; The team at OU have developed software that uses ultra sound video loops to automatically measure the trans-cerebellar diameter in the fetal brain to ascertain the gestational age of the fetus. This software will be tested in the PRECISE study so the application can be validated for use in clinical settings to inform clinical care in pregnancy, St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL have contributed to a funding application to MRC PSMB (submitted SEptember 2018) to develop a platform for placental histology work in Kenya, at AKU. We will be informed of the funding decision in Spring 2019. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Colleagues at LSHTM have informed the data collection fields in the PRECISE data set from a neonatal and paediatric perspective and are co-leading the funding application for cohort follow up of infants and mothers to 36 months of age: PRECISE DYAD. World Health Organisation: Dialogue around agenda and policy setting with colleagues at the WHO will be ongoing throughout the life of the project. There are no specific outcomes to report at this early stage. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: The team at MRCG have worked with health facilities in Farafenni region to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in The Gambia. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE and have started a systematic review of the literature around environmental and geographical factors affecting pregnancy and placental disease in sub-Saharan Africa. This review will be published in 2019 and will inform the development of the health geography work package within PRECISE. University of British Columbia: The team of computer programmers leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE will have completed the databases ready for data and sample collection to begin in November 2018. Additionally the Qualitative Researchers in this team have worked in partnership with the PRECISE sites to develop the community engagement frameworks that will be used for sensitization in sites ahead of data collection starting. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Further funding applications with NIPH are planned to utilise the PRECISE database in other settings. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network. Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Start Year 2017
 
Description PRECISE Network 
Organisation University of British Columbia
Country Canada 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution KCL has secured funding for and is hosting the PRECISE Network; Coordinating and managing the development of interdisciplinary research partnerships to support innovative work in Women and Children's Global Health. This includes establishing global interdisciplinary networks, training of staff, knowledge exchange and peer support.
Collaborator Contribution Aga Khan University, Nairobi: AKU is our institutional partner in Kenya, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Kilifi county. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica:CISM is our institutional partner in Mozambique, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Manhica district. University of Oxford; We are working with the engineering and fetal medicine departments at Oxford to develop a low cost device that can accurately date gestation for improved care pathways in pregnancy. St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL are leading the PRECISE work on aetiology and mechanisms of placental disease in partnership with researchers in Kenya and Mozambique. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Additionally, we are working with colleagues at LSHTM on questions relating to quality and respectful care in maternal and newborn health. World Health Organisation: The WHO is a global policy partner, many of the PRECISE co-Investigators are directly and indirectly involved with agenda and policy setting discussions at the WHO. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: MRCG is our institutional partner in The Gambia, leading the data and sample collection of 3000 women in the Farafenni region. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE. University of British Columbia: PRECISE is working closely with the team that ran the PREEMPT study to maximise learning and knowledge exchange between these programmes of work. UBC hosts the team of computer programmers who are leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Impact Aga Khan University, Nairobi: The team at AKU have worked with health facilities in Kilifi county to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Kenya. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica: The team at CISM have worked with health facilities in Manhica district to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Mozambique. This activity is due to start in December 2018. University of Oxford; The team at OU have developed software that uses ultra sound video loops to automatically measure the trans-cerebellar diameter in the fetal brain to ascertain the gestational age of the fetus. This software will be tested in the PRECISE study so the application can be validated for use in clinical settings to inform clinical care in pregnancy, St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL have contributed to a funding application to MRC PSMB (submitted SEptember 2018) to develop a platform for placental histology work in Kenya, at AKU. We will be informed of the funding decision in Spring 2019. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Colleagues at LSHTM have informed the data collection fields in the PRECISE data set from a neonatal and paediatric perspective and are co-leading the funding application for cohort follow up of infants and mothers to 36 months of age: PRECISE DYAD. World Health Organisation: Dialogue around agenda and policy setting with colleagues at the WHO will be ongoing throughout the life of the project. There are no specific outcomes to report at this early stage. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: The team at MRCG have worked with health facilities in Farafenni region to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in The Gambia. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE and have started a systematic review of the literature around environmental and geographical factors affecting pregnancy and placental disease in sub-Saharan Africa. This review will be published in 2019 and will inform the development of the health geography work package within PRECISE. University of British Columbia: The team of computer programmers leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE will have completed the databases ready for data and sample collection to begin in November 2018. Additionally the Qualitative Researchers in this team have worked in partnership with the PRECISE sites to develop the community engagement frameworks that will be used for sensitization in sites ahead of data collection starting. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Further funding applications with NIPH are planned to utilise the PRECISE database in other settings. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network. Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Start Year 2017
 
Description PRECISE Network 
Organisation University of Oxford
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution KCL has secured funding for and is hosting the PRECISE Network; Coordinating and managing the development of interdisciplinary research partnerships to support innovative work in Women and Children's Global Health. This includes establishing global interdisciplinary networks, training of staff, knowledge exchange and peer support.
Collaborator Contribution Aga Khan University, Nairobi: AKU is our institutional partner in Kenya, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Kilifi county. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica:CISM is our institutional partner in Mozambique, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Manhica district. University of Oxford; We are working with the engineering and fetal medicine departments at Oxford to develop a low cost device that can accurately date gestation for improved care pathways in pregnancy. St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL are leading the PRECISE work on aetiology and mechanisms of placental disease in partnership with researchers in Kenya and Mozambique. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Additionally, we are working with colleagues at LSHTM on questions relating to quality and respectful care in maternal and newborn health. World Health Organisation: The WHO is a global policy partner, many of the PRECISE co-Investigators are directly and indirectly involved with agenda and policy setting discussions at the WHO. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: MRCG is our institutional partner in The Gambia, leading the data and sample collection of 3000 women in the Farafenni region. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE. University of British Columbia: PRECISE is working closely with the team that ran the PREEMPT study to maximise learning and knowledge exchange between these programmes of work. UBC hosts the team of computer programmers who are leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Impact Aga Khan University, Nairobi: The team at AKU have worked with health facilities in Kilifi county to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Kenya. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica: The team at CISM have worked with health facilities in Manhica district to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Mozambique. This activity is due to start in December 2018. University of Oxford; The team at OU have developed software that uses ultra sound video loops to automatically measure the trans-cerebellar diameter in the fetal brain to ascertain the gestational age of the fetus. This software will be tested in the PRECISE study so the application can be validated for use in clinical settings to inform clinical care in pregnancy, St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL have contributed to a funding application to MRC PSMB (submitted SEptember 2018) to develop a platform for placental histology work in Kenya, at AKU. We will be informed of the funding decision in Spring 2019. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Colleagues at LSHTM have informed the data collection fields in the PRECISE data set from a neonatal and paediatric perspective and are co-leading the funding application for cohort follow up of infants and mothers to 36 months of age: PRECISE DYAD. World Health Organisation: Dialogue around agenda and policy setting with colleagues at the WHO will be ongoing throughout the life of the project. There are no specific outcomes to report at this early stage. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: The team at MRCG have worked with health facilities in Farafenni region to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in The Gambia. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE and have started a systematic review of the literature around environmental and geographical factors affecting pregnancy and placental disease in sub-Saharan Africa. This review will be published in 2019 and will inform the development of the health geography work package within PRECISE. University of British Columbia: The team of computer programmers leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE will have completed the databases ready for data and sample collection to begin in November 2018. Additionally the Qualitative Researchers in this team have worked in partnership with the PRECISE sites to develop the community engagement frameworks that will be used for sensitization in sites ahead of data collection starting. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Further funding applications with NIPH are planned to utilise the PRECISE database in other settings. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network. Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Start Year 2017
 
Description PRECISE Network 
Organisation World Health Organization (WHO)
Country Global 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution KCL has secured funding for and is hosting the PRECISE Network; Coordinating and managing the development of interdisciplinary research partnerships to support innovative work in Women and Children's Global Health. This includes establishing global interdisciplinary networks, training of staff, knowledge exchange and peer support.
Collaborator Contribution Aga Khan University, Nairobi: AKU is our institutional partner in Kenya, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Kilifi county. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica:CISM is our institutional partner in Mozambique, leading the data and sample collection of 4000 women in Manhica district. University of Oxford; We are working with the engineering and fetal medicine departments at Oxford to develop a low cost device that can accurately date gestation for improved care pathways in pregnancy. St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL are leading the PRECISE work on aetiology and mechanisms of placental disease in partnership with researchers in Kenya and Mozambique. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Additionally, we are working with colleagues at LSHTM on questions relating to quality and respectful care in maternal and newborn health. World Health Organisation: The WHO is a global policy partner, many of the PRECISE co-Investigators are directly and indirectly involved with agenda and policy setting discussions at the WHO. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: MRCG is our institutional partner in The Gambia, leading the data and sample collection of 3000 women in the Farafenni region. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE. University of British Columbia: PRECISE is working closely with the team that ran the PREEMPT study to maximise learning and knowledge exchange between these programmes of work. UBC hosts the team of computer programmers who are leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Impact Aga Khan University, Nairobi: The team at AKU have worked with health facilities in Kilifi county to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Kenya. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Centro de Investgacao de Saude de Manhica: The team at CISM have worked with health facilities in Manhica district to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in Mozambique. This activity is due to start in December 2018. University of Oxford; The team at OU have developed software that uses ultra sound video loops to automatically measure the trans-cerebellar diameter in the fetal brain to ascertain the gestational age of the fetus. This software will be tested in the PRECISE study so the application can be validated for use in clinical settings to inform clinical care in pregnancy, St George's University of London: Colleagues in the placental biology team at SGUL have contributed to a funding application to MRC PSMB (submitted SEptember 2018) to develop a platform for placental histology work in Kenya, at AKU. We will be informed of the funding decision in Spring 2019. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Experts in global newborn and infant care at LSHTM are informing the development of research questions relating to stillbirth and paediatric follow up of infants in the PRECISE cohort. Colleagues at LSHTM have informed the data collection fields in the PRECISE data set from a neonatal and paediatric perspective and are co-leading the funding application for cohort follow up of infants and mothers to 36 months of age: PRECISE DYAD. World Health Organisation: Dialogue around agenda and policy setting with colleagues at the WHO will be ongoing throughout the life of the project. There are no specific outcomes to report at this early stage. MRC Unit The Gambia at LSHTM: The team at MRCG have worked with health facilities in Farafenni region to develop the clinical and laboratory infrastructure to start data and sample collection for the PRECISE cohort in The Gambia. This activity is due to start in November 2018. Midlands State University, Zimbabwe: Colleagues at MSU are leading the health geography work stream of PRECISE and have started a systematic review of the literature around environmental and geographical factors affecting pregnancy and placental disease in sub-Saharan Africa. This review will be published in 2019 and will inform the development of the health geography work package within PRECISE. University of British Columbia: The team of computer programmers leading the development of the DHIS2 and BAOBAB LIMS databases for PRECISE will have completed the databases ready for data and sample collection to begin in November 2018. Additionally the Qualitative Researchers in this team have worked in partnership with the PRECISE sites to develop the community engagement frameworks that will be used for sensitization in sites ahead of data collection starting. South African National Bioinformatics Institute (SANBI): SANBI owns the BAOBAB LIMS software and has partnered with PRECISE as we develop a LIMS systems specific to the needs of the PRECISE biobank, based on the BAOBAB platform. Norwegian Institute of Public Health: NIPH hosts the e-registries initiative who lead on the DHIS2 database. PRECISE is working closely with this team to develop the PRECISE data collection platform hosted on DHIS2. Further funding applications with NIPH are planned to utilise the PRECISE database in other settings. Africa Research Excellence Fund: We have partnered with AREF to develop a Leadership Development Programme for rising star researchers in the PRECISE Network. Crick Africa Network:The Leadership Development Programme run by AREF will include African researchers involved in the CAN and PRECISE projects, this will ensure a pan-African cohort of researchers learning and working together for peer support and network building.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Launch event for PRECISE African Leadership Development Programme hosted by the Deputy British High Commissioner for South Africa and UK Science and Innovation Network 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Launch of the Towards Leadership Researcher and Leadership Development Programme in partnership with three Networks funded through the UK Global Challenges Research Fund. The Crick African Network, The PRECISE Network, The RECAP Network. The aim of the AREF Towards Leadership programme is to support the research capacity strengthening strategies of the three partner Networks. Together we are investing in talented African scientists in Sub-Saharan Africa, enhancing their global health research and leadership potential.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://precisenetwork.org/research_themes/research-leadership-development/
 
Description Meeting with Kilifi County Director of Health 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Early engagement activity to ensure buy-in and engagement with health policy makers in Kenya; Co-identify evidence gaps for policy-making; Enabling support for working in local health facilities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Meeting with representatives from the Clinton Health Access Iniative (CHAI) in Mozambique 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Engaging with Non-governmental Organisation stakeholders operating in Mozambique to identify opportunities for partnerships and synergies between activities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://clintonhealthaccess.org/
 
Description Meeting with the Director of Health Services, The Gambia 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Early engagement activity to ensure buy-in and engagement with health policy makers in The Gambia; Co-identify evidence gaps for policy-making; Enabling support for working in local health facilities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016,2017
 
Description PRECISE Project launch meeting with Kilifi County Ministry of Health, Kenya 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The Principal Investigators for PRECISE from the UK and Kenya met with the Kilifi County Ministry of Health to launch the PRECISE Network data collection in Kilifi county and ensure early engagement of policy makers in the region.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019