HydrOlogical cYcle Understanding vIa Process-bAsed GlObal Detection, Attribution and prediction (Horyuji PAGODA)

Lead Research Organisation: University of Reading
Department Name: Meteorology

Abstract

PAGODA will focus on the global dimensions of changes in the water cycle in the atmosphere, land, and oceans. The overarching aim is to increase confidence in projections of the changing water cycle on global-to-regional scales through a process-based detection, attribution and prediction. The scientific scope prioritises themes 2,1,3,4 in the AO, adopting a focus on climate processes to extend our understanding of the causes of water source/sink uncertainty at the regional scale, which is where GCMs show huge variations concerning projected changes in precipitation, evaporation, and other water related variables. This model uncertainty is closely linked to shifts in large-scale circulation patterns and surface feedback processes, which differ between models. Furthermore, even where models agree with each other (for example, the suggested trend towards wetter winters and drier summers in Europe, connected to storm tracks and land surface processes), consistency with the real world cannot be taken for granted. The importance of quantitative comparisons between models and observations cannot be overstated: there is opportunity and urgent need for research to understand the processes that are driving changes in the water cycle, on spatial scales that range from global to microscopic, and to establish whether apparent discrepancies are attributable to observational uncertainties, to errors in the specification of forcings, or to model limitations. PAGODA will achieve its scientific objectives by confronting models with observations and reconciling observations, which possess inherent uncertainty and heterogeneity, with robust chains of physical mechanisms - employing model analysis and experiments in an integral way. Detection and attribution is applied throughout, in an iterative fashion, to merge the understanding from observations and models consistently, in order to isolate processes and identify causality. PAGODA is designed to focus specifically on the processes that govern global-to-regional scale changes in the water cycle, particularly on decadal timescales (the timescale of anthropogenic climate change). It addresses processes in the atmosphere, land and oceans, and brings together experts in climate observations, climate models, and detection and attribution. It seeks to exploit important new opportunities for research progress, including new observational data sets (e.g. ocean salinity reanalysis, TRMM and SSMIS satellite products, long precipitation records), new models (HadGEM3 & new capabilities for high resolution simulations), and the new CMIP5 model inter-comparison and to develop new methodologies for process-based detection, attribution and prediction.

Organisations

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description PAGODA's overarching aim is to make more reliable projections of the changing water cycle on decadal and global-toregional scales, through a process-based detection, attribution and prediction. Specific aims are:
A. Assess and quantify how the water cycle is changing on global-to-regional scales and decadal timescales.
B. Evaluate, against observations at a process level, the representation of variability and changes in the water cycle in existing climate models.
C. Identify the processes in the atmosphere, land and oceans that are responsible for any divergence with observations and amongst existing climate models in hindcast and forecast changes in the water cycle.
D. Provide robust guidance to users about possible future changes in the water cycle, based on the evaluated reliability of processes in climate models.
Findings.
PAGODA has continued to analyse the processes driving changes in the water cycle, with the overarching aims of identifying anthropogenic effects, and improving projections. Substantial progress has been made in understanding the effect of aerosol interactions on regional precipitation, which has huge socio-political consequences if proved robust. Work is underway 1) to detect anthropogenic aerosol changes on regional scales, 2) to inform both decision makers and scientific community on the science advancements in detection and attribution of rainfall, 3) to identify the effect of plant processes on a warming world and 4) to understand the effect of high resolution on simulating process-based fingerprints of the atmosphere.
Buwen Dong/ Rowan Sutton (WP2):
PAGODA aerosol partners in Reading have investigated
• 1) the processes by which local and nonlocal aerosols drive variability in the water cycle over East Asia in HadGEM3-ES. Results show that Asian emissions affect the East Asian Summer monsoon (EASM) directly, and that emissions from the European region impact EASM through the downstream advection of European emissions induced cooling and drying.
• 2) the role of changes in SST and radiative forcings on the recovery of Sahel rainfall since the mid-1990s using HadGEM3 atmospheric component. Results indicate that the recovery signals in the model are predominantly from direct impact of the changes in anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHG) and aerosols while the changes in SST and sea ice have a little impact on precipitation change.
• 3) the role of changes in SST and sea ice, anthropogenic greenhouse gas and aerosols in the 2013 hot and dry summer in Western Europe using HadGEM3 atmospheric component. Results suggest that North Atlantic sea surface temperatures were likely a factor in its large contrast with the 2012 wet western European summer.
Laura Wilcox/ Eleanor Highwood (WP2 in collaboration with WP4):
• 1) Identified spatial regions where various water cycle metrics in CMIP5 models are particularly sensitive to aerosol changes. Continued work on understanding the different sensitivities to aerosol that we see in climate models. Initiated collaboration with the Met Office and the University of Leeds on this work.
• 2) Ellie and Laura contributed to Buwen's Sahel rainfall paper, which is currently in revision, and Laura provided aerosol input to Gabi's synthesis paper (BAMS) and Debbie's submitted paper on monsoon changes. Laura is currently working with Debbie to analyse water cycle variables in regions that we have identified as being particularly sensitive to aerosol changes. Debbie will do some detection and attribution analysis in these regions, which will be included in a Reading led paper.
Emily Black (WP2):
• 1) Idealized simulations designed to investigate the contributions of leaf-level CO2 increase, whole atmosphere CO2 increase and SST warming to anthropogenic climate change have been carried out. These show that while the effect of SST is the strongest forcing for surface air temperature, the effect of CO2 at the leaf level significantly perturbs the hydrological cycle. These results are being written up for publication.

Marie-Estelle Demory/ Pier Luigi Vidale (WP2 in collaboration with JPL):
• 1) Atmospheric rivers (ARs): Results using the HadGEM3-A UPSCALE simulations show that a resolution such as N96 (135 km at 50N) is sufficient to capture ARs over the West coast of the UK. Increasing resolution further does not appear to influence the frequency and intensity of ARs over that region. Atmospheric rivers are a special type of eddy transport of moisture, associated with a detached and lingering conveyor belt originally embedded in an extra-tropical cyclone. This finding is to be contrasted with previous findings, using HadGEM1-A, which showed that eddy transport of moisture increases with resolution (in the range 135-25km) at mid-latitude. In parallel, some analyses have been conducted using daily precipitation over California. Observations show that over California 5 days of winter precipitation provide about half of the annual precipitation amount, and these days are associated with ARs that bring heavy precipitation over California. HadGEM3-A shows good skill in this respect. Increasing resolution further improves the spatial distribution of high-impact precipitation events, albeit not the frequency/intensity of these events. This result reinforces the conclusion that atmospheric model resolution in the range 135-25km is not crucial for representing atmospheric rivers in HadGEM3-A and is consistent with other results found using the CAM model (personal communication). Further model inter-comparisons would, however, be necessary to systematically assess the role of resolution on the simulation of atmospheric rivers.
• 2) Validation of the global hydrological cycle using GRACE gravity data: This study investigates the use of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data to validate the global hydrological cycle as simulated by an atmospheric GCM. Until the advent of GRACE, no other observational data were available for such a robust assessment. By comparing the decade-long record of Earth's gravity field variations measured by GRACE with the terrestrial water storage simulated by GCMs, we can compare the amplitude of the variability in water storage at inter-annual to decadal time scales, over global to regional scales. This is an innovative approach to assess GCMs and to understand the role of the processes underlying changes in the water cycle, particularly during El Nino Southern Oscillation events. HadGEM3-A, at all resolutions, is able to capture the teleconnections between a strong ENSO (e.g. 2010 Nino - 2011 Nina) and the variability in terrestrial water storage. Like GRACE, we see in the model an increase in global terrestrial water storage during La Nina 2011 and a depletion during El Nino 2010. The spatial variability is also robustly reproduced. This work is done in collaboration with Carmen Boening at JPL.
• 3) Global hydrological cycle. We have found that how we represent the transports of water between the ocean and the land is crucially important for our trust in climate projections. Lower resolution (low definition climate models) rely too much on physical parameterisation (the way we represent physical processes that the models cannot explicitly simulate) and too little on atmospheric dynamics. The higher resolution models are able to more credibly represent how much it rains and evaporates over the oceans and the land, respectively, as well as transport the water vapour required to sustain precipitation (rain and snow) over land.
We have also found with our models that current estimates of terrestrial precipitation are very likely underestimating rain (and snow) in regions where terrain is very rugged (steep mountains, where it is difficult to measure) and that observations of infrared radiation emitted to space agree with this finding.
Eleanor Blyth (WP3):
• 1) Developed a new method to evaluate global evaporation using an analytical model as a way to quantify the information coming from the meteorological data
• 2) Analysed global evaporation within different climate zones. Performance of the model varies depending on the main driver and main processes involved.
• 3) Received high-quality evaporation flux data from Alice Holt. This may be good enough quality to apply the interception-diagnosis model (all other data analysed is not good enough quality)
• 4) Collated flux data for the UK and used to evaluate JULES model in UK

Gabi Hegerl/ Debbie Polson (WP4):
• 1) Publications submitted and finished that were begun under PAGODA funding; sent to nature climate change where it was sent out to review but reviewers didn't understand the novelty, then sent to GRL.

Beena Balan Sarojini/ Peter Stott/ Emily Black (WP5):
• 1) A synopsis on a perspective article on detection and attribution of regional rainfall is considered for Nature Climate Change. The article is to be submitted next month. Initiated discussions with Met Office Knowledge Integration team to inform relevant government departments on policy-relevant PAGODA output. An analysis of the effect of observational coverage on future simulations of precipitation over selected regions is planned.
Exploitation Route The papers we have been publishing will inform the rest of the academic community. We are also continuing our investigations with national (core) funding and by writing new research proposals.
Sectors Agriculture, Food and Drink,Education,Environment,Financial Services, and Management Consultancy

URL http://climate.ncas.ac.uk/pagoda/
 
Description PAGODA outputs have been used in our work with the insurance industry, in particular to study storm risk and how this affects potential losses in the sector. PAGODA science has been used in teaching at national (NCAS Climate Modelling) and international (E2SCMS) Summer Schools.
First Year Of Impact 2013
Sector Education,Financial Services, and Management Consultancy
Impact Types Cultural,Economic

 
Description Contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 5th Assessment
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in advisory committee
Impact The IPCC fifth assessment provides a clear and up to date view of the current state of scientific knowledge relevant to climate change. The report to which PAGODA contributed will form the basis of climate change policy for the next five years.
URL http://www.ipcc.ch/
 
Description COPERNICUS
Amount £370,000 (GBP)
Organisation European Commission 
Sector Public
Country European Union (EU)
Start 01/2016 
End 12/2018
 
Description Horizon 2020
Amount € 15,000,000 (EUR)
Organisation European Commission 
Sector Public
Country European Union (EU)
Start 11/2015 
End 10/2019
 
Description ENES-2 / IS-ENES2 / ESIWACE 
Organisation Catalan Institute of Climate Sciences (IC3)
Country Spain 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The collaboration via the various European Network activities have funded a post-doctoral researcher here at Reading. Moreover, the collaboration has enabled a secretariat in Paris that helped organise and run three European Earth System Modelling Summer Schools, which were held in 2012, 2014 and 2016.
Collaborator Contribution Partners contributed development time for the School materials, notes, etc. as well as a substantial amount of supercomputing time for running and analysing the Summer School modelling experiments. Further, each partner contributed 5-6 of post-doctoral demonstrators who came to the School for the duration (10 days each edition) and circa 20 lecturers, who came to the School for one day each.
Impact A number of new modelling environment tools have been developed by the collaboration, which are shared by the partners with their home institutions (research and operational centres). Further particulars on the ENES/ESIWACE web sites. For the UK, and this grant in particular, a modified ocean-atmosphere coupled (OASIS) has enabled us to exploit parallelism on Archer and the Met Office supercomputer. This is an extremely valuable contribution, as previously we were unable to perform large simulations in coupled mode, as the coupler did not scale. With regards to the Schools specifically, we have developed joint notes, scripts, etc., which guide the students in performing and analysing experiments.
Start Year 2012
 
Description ENES-2 / IS-ENES2 / ESIWACE 
Organisation German Climate Computing Center
Country Germany 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The collaboration via the various European Network activities have funded a post-doctoral researcher here at Reading. Moreover, the collaboration has enabled a secretariat in Paris that helped organise and run three European Earth System Modelling Summer Schools, which were held in 2012, 2014 and 2016.
Collaborator Contribution Partners contributed development time for the School materials, notes, etc. as well as a substantial amount of supercomputing time for running and analysing the Summer School modelling experiments. Further, each partner contributed 5-6 of post-doctoral demonstrators who came to the School for the duration (10 days each edition) and circa 20 lecturers, who came to the School for one day each.
Impact A number of new modelling environment tools have been developed by the collaboration, which are shared by the partners with their home institutions (research and operational centres). Further particulars on the ENES/ESIWACE web sites. For the UK, and this grant in particular, a modified ocean-atmosphere coupled (OASIS) has enabled us to exploit parallelism on Archer and the Met Office supercomputer. This is an extremely valuable contribution, as previously we were unable to perform large simulations in coupled mode, as the coupler did not scale. With regards to the Schools specifically, we have developed joint notes, scripts, etc., which guide the students in performing and analysing experiments.
Start Year 2012
 
Description ENES-2 / IS-ENES2 / ESIWACE 
Organisation Institut Pierre-Simon Laplace
Country France 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The collaboration via the various European Network activities have funded a post-doctoral researcher here at Reading. Moreover, the collaboration has enabled a secretariat in Paris that helped organise and run three European Earth System Modelling Summer Schools, which were held in 2012, 2014 and 2016.
Collaborator Contribution Partners contributed development time for the School materials, notes, etc. as well as a substantial amount of supercomputing time for running and analysing the Summer School modelling experiments. Further, each partner contributed 5-6 of post-doctoral demonstrators who came to the School for the duration (10 days each edition) and circa 20 lecturers, who came to the School for one day each.
Impact A number of new modelling environment tools have been developed by the collaboration, which are shared by the partners with their home institutions (research and operational centres). Further particulars on the ENES/ESIWACE web sites. For the UK, and this grant in particular, a modified ocean-atmosphere coupled (OASIS) has enabled us to exploit parallelism on Archer and the Met Office supercomputer. This is an extremely valuable contribution, as previously we were unable to perform large simulations in coupled mode, as the coupler did not scale. With regards to the Schools specifically, we have developed joint notes, scripts, etc., which guide the students in performing and analysing experiments.
Start Year 2012
 
Description ENES-2 / IS-ENES2 / ESIWACE 
Organisation Max Planck Society
Department Max Planck Institute for Meterology
Country Germany 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The collaboration via the various European Network activities have funded a post-doctoral researcher here at Reading. Moreover, the collaboration has enabled a secretariat in Paris that helped organise and run three European Earth System Modelling Summer Schools, which were held in 2012, 2014 and 2016.
Collaborator Contribution Partners contributed development time for the School materials, notes, etc. as well as a substantial amount of supercomputing time for running and analysing the Summer School modelling experiments. Further, each partner contributed 5-6 of post-doctoral demonstrators who came to the School for the duration (10 days each edition) and circa 20 lecturers, who came to the School for one day each.
Impact A number of new modelling environment tools have been developed by the collaboration, which are shared by the partners with their home institutions (research and operational centres). Further particulars on the ENES/ESIWACE web sites. For the UK, and this grant in particular, a modified ocean-atmosphere coupled (OASIS) has enabled us to exploit parallelism on Archer and the Met Office supercomputer. This is an extremely valuable contribution, as previously we were unable to perform large simulations in coupled mode, as the coupler did not scale. With regards to the Schools specifically, we have developed joint notes, scripts, etc., which guide the students in performing and analysing experiments.
Start Year 2012
 
Description PRACE-UPSCALE 
Organisation Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe (PRACE)
Country Belgium 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We ported the Hadley Centre Global Climate model we co-developed under the JWCRP umbrella to the HLRS Cray supercomputer in Stuttgart (Germany).
Collaborator Contribution PRACE provided the funding (worth 6 million Euros) to pay for the High-Performance Computing needed to support our project UPSCALE
Impact Over 20 peer-reviewed publications, and more are upcoming.
Start Year 2012
 
Description PRIMAVERA/HighResMIP 
Organisation Alfred-Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research
Country Germany 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution PI for PRIMAVERA, additionally acting as one of the main partners and as Scientific Coordinator
Collaborator Contribution Contributing models and data to PRIMAVERA and HighResMIP (as part of CMIP6)
Impact Collaboration just started, but a few papers already submitted, particularly the HighResMIP protocol.
Start Year 2015
 
Description PRIMAVERA/HighResMIP 
Organisation CERFACS
Country France 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution PI for PRIMAVERA, additionally acting as one of the main partners and as Scientific Coordinator
Collaborator Contribution Contributing models and data to PRIMAVERA and HighResMIP (as part of CMIP6)
Impact Collaboration just started, but a few papers already submitted, particularly the HighResMIP protocol.
Start Year 2015
 
Description PRIMAVERA/HighResMIP 
Organisation Catalan Institute of Climate Sciences (IC3)
Country Spain 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution PI for PRIMAVERA, additionally acting as one of the main partners and as Scientific Coordinator
Collaborator Contribution Contributing models and data to PRIMAVERA and HighResMIP (as part of CMIP6)
Impact Collaboration just started, but a few papers already submitted, particularly the HighResMIP protocol.
Start Year 2015
 
Description PRIMAVERA/HighResMIP 
Organisation Euro-Mediterranean Center on Climate Change (CMCC)
Country Italy 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution PI for PRIMAVERA, additionally acting as one of the main partners and as Scientific Coordinator
Collaborator Contribution Contributing models and data to PRIMAVERA and HighResMIP (as part of CMIP6)
Impact Collaboration just started, but a few papers already submitted, particularly the HighResMIP protocol.
Start Year 2015
 
Description PRIMAVERA/HighResMIP 
Organisation European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting ECMWF
Country European Union (EU) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution PI for PRIMAVERA, additionally acting as one of the main partners and as Scientific Coordinator
Collaborator Contribution Contributing models and data to PRIMAVERA and HighResMIP (as part of CMIP6)
Impact Collaboration just started, but a few papers already submitted, particularly the HighResMIP protocol.
Start Year 2015
 
Description PRIMAVERA/HighResMIP 
Organisation Institut Pierre-Simon Laplace
Country France 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution PI for PRIMAVERA, additionally acting as one of the main partners and as Scientific Coordinator
Collaborator Contribution Contributing models and data to PRIMAVERA and HighResMIP (as part of CMIP6)
Impact Collaboration just started, but a few papers already submitted, particularly the HighResMIP protocol.
Start Year 2015
 
Description PRIMAVERA/HighResMIP 
Organisation Max Planck Society
Department Max Planck Institute for Meterology
Country Germany 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution PI for PRIMAVERA, additionally acting as one of the main partners and as Scientific Coordinator
Collaborator Contribution Contributing models and data to PRIMAVERA and HighResMIP (as part of CMIP6)
Impact Collaboration just started, but a few papers already submitted, particularly the HighResMIP protocol.
Start Year 2015
 
Description PRIMAVERA/HighResMIP 
Organisation Meteorological Office UK
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution PI for PRIMAVERA, additionally acting as one of the main partners and as Scientific Coordinator
Collaborator Contribution Contributing models and data to PRIMAVERA and HighResMIP (as part of CMIP6)
Impact Collaboration just started, but a few papers already submitted, particularly the HighResMIP protocol.
Start Year 2015
 
Description PRIMAVERA/HighResMIP 
Organisation National Oceanography Centre
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution PI for PRIMAVERA, additionally acting as one of the main partners and as Scientific Coordinator
Collaborator Contribution Contributing models and data to PRIMAVERA and HighResMIP (as part of CMIP6)
Impact Collaboration just started, but a few papers already submitted, particularly the HighResMIP protocol.
Start Year 2015
 
Description PRIMAVERA/HighResMIP 
Organisation Rossby Centre
Country Sweden 
Sector Learned Society 
PI Contribution PI for PRIMAVERA, additionally acting as one of the main partners and as Scientific Coordinator
Collaborator Contribution Contributing models and data to PRIMAVERA and HighResMIP (as part of CMIP6)
Impact Collaboration just started, but a few papers already submitted, particularly the HighResMIP protocol.
Start Year 2015
 
Description PRIMAVERA/HighResMIP 
Organisation Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute
Country Netherlands 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution PI for PRIMAVERA, additionally acting as one of the main partners and as Scientific Coordinator
Collaborator Contribution Contributing models and data to PRIMAVERA and HighResMIP (as part of CMIP6)
Impact Collaboration just started, but a few papers already submitted, particularly the HighResMIP protocol.
Start Year 2015
 
Description PRIMAVERA/HighResMIP 
Organisation Stockholm University
Country Sweden 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution PI for PRIMAVERA, additionally acting as one of the main partners and as Scientific Coordinator
Collaborator Contribution Contributing models and data to PRIMAVERA and HighResMIP (as part of CMIP6)
Impact Collaboration just started, but a few papers already submitted, particularly the HighResMIP protocol.
Start Year 2015
 
Description PRIMAVERA/HighResMIP 
Organisation University of Oxford
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution PI for PRIMAVERA, additionally acting as one of the main partners and as Scientific Coordinator
Collaborator Contribution Contributing models and data to PRIMAVERA and HighResMIP (as part of CMIP6)
Impact Collaboration just started, but a few papers already submitted, particularly the HighResMIP protocol.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Partnership on high-resolution climate modelling 
Organisation Meteorological Office UK
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Co-development of high-resolution global climate models has enabled us to: a) win several grants, nationally and internationally, each worth from hundreds of thousands of pounds to millions of pounds. b) win supercomputing time at supra-national level (see PRACE entry) c) win industry support valued in hundreds of thousands of pounds
Collaborator Contribution Co-development of high-resolution global climate models has enabled us to: a) win several grants, nationally and internationally, each worth from hundreds of thousands of pounds to millions of pounds. b) win supercomputing time at supra-national level (see PRACE entry) c) win industry support valued in hundreds of thousands of pounds
Impact Over 60 peer-reviewed papers.
 
Description US CLIVAR Hurricane Working Group 
Organisation Columbia University
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We formed a working group to study hurricanes and typhoons in a range of high-resolution global climate models. This required accessing a number of high-profile simulations for common analysis, sharing tools, but also generating a number of new simulations to study the robustness of the climate change response of hurricanes in the climate system. A number of joint publications have emerged in a special issue of the Journal of Climate.
Collaborator Contribution Each partner contributed simulation data, analysis tools and PDRA time. A few partners provided supercomputing time. Columbia provided storage space for joint analysis.
Impact A special issue of the Journal of Climate was published in 2015. We are co-authors in three of those papers. A synthesis paper (Walsh et al.) appeared in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. The collaboration is multi-disciplinary, in that some of the papers address societal issues, particularly around the area of predictability and civil protection.
Start Year 2013
 
Description US CLIVAR Hurricane Working Group 
Organisation Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology
Country Japan 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We formed a working group to study hurricanes and typhoons in a range of high-resolution global climate models. This required accessing a number of high-profile simulations for common analysis, sharing tools, but also generating a number of new simulations to study the robustness of the climate change response of hurricanes in the climate system. A number of joint publications have emerged in a special issue of the Journal of Climate.
Collaborator Contribution Each partner contributed simulation data, analysis tools and PDRA time. A few partners provided supercomputing time. Columbia provided storage space for joint analysis.
Impact A special issue of the Journal of Climate was published in 2015. We are co-authors in three of those papers. A synthesis paper (Walsh et al.) appeared in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. The collaboration is multi-disciplinary, in that some of the papers address societal issues, particularly around the area of predictability and civil protection.
Start Year 2013
 
Description US CLIVAR Hurricane Working Group 
Organisation Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We formed a working group to study hurricanes and typhoons in a range of high-resolution global climate models. This required accessing a number of high-profile simulations for common analysis, sharing tools, but also generating a number of new simulations to study the robustness of the climate change response of hurricanes in the climate system. A number of joint publications have emerged in a special issue of the Journal of Climate.
Collaborator Contribution Each partner contributed simulation data, analysis tools and PDRA time. A few partners provided supercomputing time. Columbia provided storage space for joint analysis.
Impact A special issue of the Journal of Climate was published in 2015. We are co-authors in three of those papers. A synthesis paper (Walsh et al.) appeared in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. The collaboration is multi-disciplinary, in that some of the papers address societal issues, particularly around the area of predictability and civil protection.
Start Year 2013
 
Description US CLIVAR Hurricane Working Group 
Organisation Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We formed a working group to study hurricanes and typhoons in a range of high-resolution global climate models. This required accessing a number of high-profile simulations for common analysis, sharing tools, but also generating a number of new simulations to study the robustness of the climate change response of hurricanes in the climate system. A number of joint publications have emerged in a special issue of the Journal of Climate.
Collaborator Contribution Each partner contributed simulation data, analysis tools and PDRA time. A few partners provided supercomputing time. Columbia provided storage space for joint analysis.
Impact A special issue of the Journal of Climate was published in 2015. We are co-authors in three of those papers. A synthesis paper (Walsh et al.) appeared in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. The collaboration is multi-disciplinary, in that some of the papers address societal issues, particularly around the area of predictability and civil protection.
Start Year 2013
 
Description US CLIVAR Hurricane Working Group 
Organisation Meteorological Office UK
Department Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research
PI Contribution We formed a working group to study hurricanes and typhoons in a range of high-resolution global climate models. This required accessing a number of high-profile simulations for common analysis, sharing tools, but also generating a number of new simulations to study the robustness of the climate change response of hurricanes in the climate system. A number of joint publications have emerged in a special issue of the Journal of Climate.
Collaborator Contribution Each partner contributed simulation data, analysis tools and PDRA time. A few partners provided supercomputing time. Columbia provided storage space for joint analysis.
Impact A special issue of the Journal of Climate was published in 2015. We are co-authors in three of those papers. A synthesis paper (Walsh et al.) appeared in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. The collaboration is multi-disciplinary, in that some of the papers address societal issues, particularly around the area of predictability and civil protection.
Start Year 2013
 
Description US CLIVAR Hurricane Working Group 
Organisation NCAR National Center for Atmospheric Research
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We formed a working group to study hurricanes and typhoons in a range of high-resolution global climate models. This required accessing a number of high-profile simulations for common analysis, sharing tools, but also generating a number of new simulations to study the robustness of the climate change response of hurricanes in the climate system. A number of joint publications have emerged in a special issue of the Journal of Climate.
Collaborator Contribution Each partner contributed simulation data, analysis tools and PDRA time. A few partners provided supercomputing time. Columbia provided storage space for joint analysis.
Impact A special issue of the Journal of Climate was published in 2015. We are co-authors in three of those papers. A synthesis paper (Walsh et al.) appeared in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. The collaboration is multi-disciplinary, in that some of the papers address societal issues, particularly around the area of predictability and civil protection.
Start Year 2013
 
Description US CLIVAR Hurricane Working Group 
Organisation National Institute for Geophysics and Volcanology (INGV)
Country Italy 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We formed a working group to study hurricanes and typhoons in a range of high-resolution global climate models. This required accessing a number of high-profile simulations for common analysis, sharing tools, but also generating a number of new simulations to study the robustness of the climate change response of hurricanes in the climate system. A number of joint publications have emerged in a special issue of the Journal of Climate.
Collaborator Contribution Each partner contributed simulation data, analysis tools and PDRA time. A few partners provided supercomputing time. Columbia provided storage space for joint analysis.
Impact A special issue of the Journal of Climate was published in 2015. We are co-authors in three of those papers. A synthesis paper (Walsh et al.) appeared in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. The collaboration is multi-disciplinary, in that some of the papers address societal issues, particularly around the area of predictability and civil protection.
Start Year 2013
 
Description US CLIVAR Hurricane Working Group 
Organisation National Oceanic And Atmospheric Administration
Department Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL)
Country United States 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We formed a working group to study hurricanes and typhoons in a range of high-resolution global climate models. This required accessing a number of high-profile simulations for common analysis, sharing tools, but also generating a number of new simulations to study the robustness of the climate change response of hurricanes in the climate system. A number of joint publications have emerged in a special issue of the Journal of Climate.
Collaborator Contribution Each partner contributed simulation data, analysis tools and PDRA time. A few partners provided supercomputing time. Columbia provided storage space for joint analysis.
Impact A special issue of the Journal of Climate was published in 2015. We are co-authors in three of those papers. A synthesis paper (Walsh et al.) appeared in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. The collaboration is multi-disciplinary, in that some of the papers address societal issues, particularly around the area of predictability and civil protection.
Start Year 2013
 
Description US CLIVAR Hurricane Working Group 
Organisation University of Melbourne
Country Australia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We formed a working group to study hurricanes and typhoons in a range of high-resolution global climate models. This required accessing a number of high-profile simulations for common analysis, sharing tools, but also generating a number of new simulations to study the robustness of the climate change response of hurricanes in the climate system. A number of joint publications have emerged in a special issue of the Journal of Climate.
Collaborator Contribution Each partner contributed simulation data, analysis tools and PDRA time. A few partners provided supercomputing time. Columbia provided storage space for joint analysis.
Impact A special issue of the Journal of Climate was published in 2015. We are co-authors in three of those papers. A synthesis paper (Walsh et al.) appeared in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. The collaboration is multi-disciplinary, in that some of the papers address societal issues, particularly around the area of predictability and civil protection.
Start Year 2013
 
Description E2SCMS Summer School 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact This is an Earth System Modelling School that combines national experiences in a number of European countries, via our ENES/ENES2 network of experts.
The School offers post-graduate students the opportunity to learn about and work with three state-of-the-art Earth System Models and teaches the students to work together in experimental design and analysis, finally coming together in a mini-IPCC conference where their results are presented and discussed.
A strong element of the School is community building, and many of the students do stay connected while developing their careers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2010,2012,2014
URL https://verc.enes.org/community/schools/3rd-e2scms
 
Description NCAS Climate Modelling Summer School 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The NCAS Climate Modelling Summer School seeks to transmit all knowledge and expertise formed while developing advanced models of the Earth System to the new generation of scientists. The School brings together senior and early career scientists, who are at the core of new technological and scientific advances in this area, with students who may want to start a career in this area. This is done hands-on, working on state-of-the-art models, during two-week laboratory sessions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2007,2009,2011,2013,2015
URL https://www.ncas.ac.uk/index.php/en/climate-modelling-summer-school