iCOAST: Integrated COASTal sediment systems

Lead Research Organisation: University of Southampton
Department Name: Faculty of Engineering & the Environment

Abstract

Prediction of changing coastal morphology over timescales of decades raises scientific challenges to which there are not yet widely applicable solutions. Yet improved predictions are essential in order to quantify the risk of coastal erosion, which is significant in its own right and also one of the main mediators of coastal flood risk. Whilst 'bottom-up' process-based models provide valuable evidence about hydrodynamic, sediment transport and morphodynamic processes in the short term, their predictive accuracy over scales of decades is for the time being fundamentally limited. Meanwhile, behavioural systems models, that focus on the main processes and feedback mechanisms that regulate coastal form have been shown to have predictive capability at the mesoscale (10-100 years and 10-100 km). However, their application has been limited to a rather narrow sub-set of coastal forms.
The iCoast project is based upon a hierarchical systems concept which combines (i) the beneficial features of process-based models, (ii) a new generation of coastal behavioural systems models, and (iii) an extended approach to coastal systems mapping, which can be used to systematise and formalise different sources of knowledge about coastal behaviour. All the software developed within iCoast will be open source and OpenMI compliant.
The research is focussed upon four deliverables that have been identified as major challenges in the NERC Natural Hazards Theme:
Deliverable 1 will be an overall systems framework. The successful approach to coastal systems mapping developed by French et al. will be extended and applied to all of the England and Wales, making use of a new systems mapping tool. These new coastal systems maps can both supersede the coastal cells and sub-cells currently used in shoreline management planning and provide an evidence-based framework for more quantitative modelling. Therein, hydrodynamic and sediment transport coastal area models will be implemented at a broad spatial scale in order to provide evidence of wave and tidal forcings and sediment pathways. The systems framework will be implemented in open source software tools and coupled with methods for uncertainty analysis.
Deliverable 2 will provide a new generation of behavioural geomorphic modules, which can be linked to enable simulation of coupled coastal-estuary-offshore landform behaviour at a meso-scale. Existing reduced complexity behavioural modules, several of which are held in-house within the iCoast consortium (SCAPE, ASMITA, various versions of 1-line beach models) will be reviewed and development and incremental improvement opportunities will be identified. They will be researched intensively by a team with unique experience of this type of model development. The scope of data-based modules that can exploit the growing datasets from coastal observatories will also be extended. The models will be integrated within a systems framework in order to study emergent properties and explore key sensitivities.
Deliverable 3 will entail application and validation of two distinct coastal regions: the Suffolk Coast (Sub-Cell 3c) and Liverpool Bay (Sub-Cells 11a/11b), exploring the sensitivities of these coastal regions to changes in sediment supply resulting from sea-level rise, climate change and coastal management scenarios. This will yield the results needed for high impact publication and the demonstrations that are essential to build confidence in new approaches being transferred into practice.
Deliverable 4 will facilitate knowledge transfer of the new methods through a range of dissemination mechanisms, including tutorials, manuals and knowledge transfer workshops. Our open source modelling strategy will initiate a community modelling approach in the coastal research community, at the same time as maximising access by practitioners to the knowledge generated at a time when requirements for coastal adaptation urgently require new predictive capability.

Planned Impact

The beneficiaries from the research fall into two main categories:
1. The worldwide coastal research community, who recognise the difficult problem of mesoscale coastal prediction, and hence will be eager to take up new methodologies. This is evidenced by the rapid uptake of the SCAPE model, which has now been applied in New Zealand and the Great Lakes as well as at several sites in the UK.
2. Coastal practitioners in the UK and worldwide, urgently need new mesoscale predictions of coastal change in order to manage the risks of coastal erosion and coastal flooding. These coastal risks are profoundly influenced by the long term behaviour of coastal sediment systems, but existing predictive approaches are severely limited, especially in conditions of long term change. Coastal practitioners include those in government and its agencies (e.g. the Environment Agency) and those in local authorities with responsibility for coastal management and adaptation. Whilst the focus of the research is upon UK coasts, the leading UK coastal consultants (e.g. Halcrow, HR Wallingford, Royal Haskoning) have considerable international businesses, so the UK is expected to benefit through the exploitation of iCoast science by these organisations in their international businesses.
Ultimately, coastal communities will benefit from more sustainable coastal management that is based upon dependable predictions of coastal change. This will help to reduce the risks from flooding and coastal erosion and help to ensure that the costs of coastal management do not become unmanageable in future, even in the context of a changing climate. Improved and evidence-based coastal management will also help to sustain coastal ecosystems, which are threatened by sea level rise and coastal squeeze and protected under the Habitats and Birds Directive.
The benefits from the research will derive from the developed methods for enhancing understanding and predicting processes of coastal change. Enhanced understanding will be delivered in particular via the new tools for systems mapping, which have already proved to be a worthwhile approach to formalising knowledge of coastal processes but which will be considerably extended in the course of the iCoast research. The process of developing behavioural geomorphic models will yield new insights into the controls upon coastal change and the ways in which coasts may be modified by changed environmental forcings. The coastal area modelling will yield new insights into the complex processes of sea bed sediment transport.
Of most practical benefit will be the new predictive tools that are developed in the iCoast project. These will take a number of different forms, including coastal area models, data-based methods and behavioural geomorphic models. They will all be developed with a focus upon predicting the variables of most relevance to coastal managers, along with well justified uncertainty estimates. The application of the tools from iCOAST will directly contribute to future revisions of the Environment Agency's Long-Term Investment Strategy and the UK Government's strategic goals with respect to the adaptation to, and mitigation of, climate change. It will also help with other needs such as the Water Framework Directive and other legislation.
There is a realistic prospect that innovations in the iCoast project will be rapidly taken up in practice. There is an urgent need for better predictive models to analyse coastal risks and justify coastal adaptation strategies. Strong links with the practitioner community and well developed knowledge transfer mechanisms mean that outputs can be transferred into practice as soon as they are demonstrated and validated. These innovations need not wait till the end of the project to be taken up in practice.
The cohort of researchers employed in the iCoast project will develop scarce skills and systems perspectives which are in short supply in both the research and practitioner communit

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description The iCOASST Project has demonstrated that improved decadal to centennial coastal geomorphic simulations are possible using new and improved models, both in isolation and in combination. This has been achieved by linking a range of components within a new conceptual framework. This framework comprises (1) qualitative understanding, most especially a new Coastal and Estuarine System Mapping (CESM) method, which formalise our understanding the geomorphic system components and their relationships and integrates open coast and estuary within a unifying framework; (2) coastal area models of the shallow seabed, which are used to qualify and quantify sediment fluxes and exchanges with the coast at broad spatial scales; (3) landform behavioural models to quantitatively predict coastal and estuarine morphological change over decadal to centennial timescales; and (4) model coupling at run time using OpenMI. CESM was developed and demonstrated within iCOASST and software developed that will allow this method to be applied by others. Existing coastal area models were developed and extended, and a range of numerical experiments were conducted for the iCOASST project. In terms of the landform behavioural models, iCOASST used existing models of the open coast (Unilinea) and estuaries (ASMITA), developed existing open coast models of shore platforms and finite beaches (SCAPE+), and produced completely new models of tidal inlets (MESO_i) and estuaries (ESTEEM).This gave a selection of models to link together into compositions and run together for demonstration sites from Sefton to Blackpool in NW England (using Unilinea and ASMITA) and the Deben Estuary and environs in Suffolk (using SCAPE+, MESO_i and ESTEEM).

Using the case studies and our new methods we have advocated and pursued a participatory modelling approach to the alignment of science and stakeholder perceptions of coastal morphological change. We held several meetings with stakeholders from each study site. In the earliest meetings we introduced the project and captured stakeholder perceptions of the management problems and issues affecting the part of the coast for which they are responsible. Insights gained from the stakeholders led to some changes in how we approached the problem, and we were able to feed these insights into our model development. By demonstrating our interest in their day-to-day management issues, and appreciation of their knowledge, we were able to achieve buy-in from stakeholders and have invaluable discussions on how results from the iCOASST project could contribute to practical, long-term coastal management in the UK.

The coupled model compositions both showed interesting results that would not have been apparent in stand-alone models. For example, if managed realignment (removal of coastal defences) along the Ribble Estuary (NW England) is too rapid this will create such a demand for sediment that impacts the adjoining open coast. Our model compositions thus allowed us to consider the wider coast in a holistic manner, and would allow coastal managers to determine unintended impacts of their management actions. In Suffolk (E England), it became apparent that there are small net littoral drifts on the open coast and that the Deben estuary inlet morphodynamics in particular mainly represents recycling of existing sediment. Coupling between the Deben estuary and the adjacent open coast is mainly via changes in the estuary tidal volume, which in turn influences the size of the inlet. We also experimented with tighter integration of multiple component models as an alternative to an external model coupling interface (OpenMI). To this end, a new Coastal ME platform has been developed to prototype stage and this integrates model approaches in a common data framework.
Exploitation Route This work is being taken forward in two ways. A dedicated web site on the Channel Coastal Observatory (http://www.channelcoast.org/) has archived all the results and the open source models for download and is receiving significant interest. In addition, the Environment Agency are funding an additional piece of work in 2016/17 to write a manual on the iCOASST methods and the wider issue of predicting decadal and centennial geomorphic evolution. There will also be a demonstration case study using the iCOASST models to a flood risk analysis which will show how these tools can inform strategic flood risk assessment. The results from the Environment Agency work will be added to the CCO web site as appropriate. Beyond these planned activities, the CESM approach could be applied to the entire coast of England and Wales and more widely as with small modifications, the approach is transferable globally. For example, it has been referenced in UNFCCC Guidance on coastal impact assessment for climate change. We have also been in discussion with owners of long-life coastal infrastructure about applying the iCOASST methods to coasts around their frontages. The development of component iCOASST models (MESO_i, ESTEEM, SCAPE+) and the CoastalME platform is also continuing beyond the life of the project.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Construction,Energy,Environment,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Transport,Other

URL http://www.channelcoast.org/iCOASST/introduction/
 
Description The models, data and results are being publicly archived on a web portal within the Channel Coastal Observatory (CCO) (http://www.channelcoast.org/). The CCO is the national repository for coastal data in England and is the main source of information for coastal engineering and management, including coastal morphodynamic data. Hence it is an effective dissemination approach which is familiar to the coastal endusers we target. The CCO has been an embedded stakeholder from the beginning of the project. Information about iCOASST and the models is available on the iCOASST portal for download and use. In addition, input and output data files are available to allow users to identify the type and format of data required. This allows new users to replicate the work of the iCOASST modellers. To further encourage effective dissemination, the models are licenced under the General Public Licence, which promotes open access. The data files are made available using the Open Government Licence. The web site went live in Easter 2016, and has been subsequently updated as new information emerged, including results developed after the award closed. This dissemination route was planned from the beginning of the project and was included in our proposal. The web site is being actively used. As of March 2019 an update shows that this web site has received more than 100,000 unique visits, which averages more than 3,000 visits per month. There have also been 729 downloads of software and data products -- with 46% being by academics, 33% being by consultants. Recent traffic remains high. The Environment Agency (EA) have funded additional work on the uptake of iCOASST results. The outputs include an end-user manual on the iCOASST methods and the wider issue of predicting decadal and centennial geomorphic evolution of our coasts and estuaries. The results have been added to the CCO web site as they become available. Having the EA as an embedded stakeholder in the iCOASST project worked very well and this model is highly recommended to NERC and other research councils where appropriate. Other results will be added as available. Dr. Sally Brown had a placement with the National Trust building on the iCOASST research and including applying Coastal and Estuarine Systems Mapping to Poole Harbour - the results are on the CCO web site. iCOASST was mentioned in DEFRA's The National Adaptation Programme and the Third Strategy for Climate Adaptation Reporting published in 2018.
First Year Of Impact 2016
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Environment
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Economic,Policy & public services

 
Description BLUECoast has been invited to help develop the coastal erosion EA Guidelines
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Research and models used in BLUECoast will be used to help advise on future coastal developments
 
Description Citation in DEFRA (18 July 2018) "The National Adaptation Programme and the Third Strategy for Climate Adaptation Reporting" (on page 48) ISBN 978-1-5286-0758-2
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
Impact Direct quote "A number of research projects delivered under the EA's 2013 framework for Coastal Research, Development and Dissemination have improved our understanding of coastal flood and erosion risk and are developing tools to support coastal management (for example the guide to morphological modelling developed in the iCOASST project)."
URL https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/7272...
 
Description Joint EA/Defra Flood and Coastal Erosion Risk Management R&D programme
Amount £120,000 (GBP)
Funding ID SC090036 
Organisation Environment Agency 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2016 
End 04/2018
 
Description NERC Innovation Fellowship
Amount £28,830 (GBP)
Funding ID NE/R00689X/1 
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2017 
End 04/2018
 
Title iCOASST Web Portal on the CCO website 
Description We are widely disseminating the results and tools of iCOASST to the national and international research and practitioner community using a dedicated web site. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2016 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact While the iCOASST Project is finished, we continue to work on dissemination of the results and products. We created a dissemination web site hosted at the Channel Coastal Observatory (CCO) to reach target UK coastal practioners (see http://www.channelcoast.org/iCOASST/introduction/). Based on statistics to February 2018, this site has received more than 220,000 visits. Based on CCO experience this is a high level of traffic. The open source models produced within iCOASST have also been downloaded over 400 times, with the Soft Cliff And Platform Evolution (SCAPE+) model being most popular with 80 downloads. About 40% of the downloads are by consultants and one-third are academics, with 28 countries involved. We are continuing to develop the web site content as opportunities allow. As of March 2019 an update shows that this web site has received more than 100,000 unique visits, which averages more than 3,000 visits per month. There have also been 729 downloads of software and data products -- with 46% being by academics, 33% being by consultants. Recent traffic remains high. 
URL http://www.channelcoast.org/iCOASST/introduction/
 
Title CoastalME: A multi-landform numerical framework for modelling meso scale coastal morphodynamics 
Description CoastalME is a modelling framework that provides a general sediment accounting raster grid dynamically linked with simple geometrical shapes Geometrical shapes are interconnected by the alongshore sediment transport 
Type Of Material Computer model/algorithm 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact CoastalME will be made available through the CCO archive. 
 
Title ESTEEM 
Description ESTEEM (Estuary SpaTial landscapE Evolution Model). ESTEEM is primarily raster-based and is designed to take advantage of lidar-based digital elevation models (DEMs); spatial resolution can be has high as 5m and the model is designed to resolve morphological change at a tide-averaged scale with a typical output timestep of 1 yr. The DEM is processed to identify discrete landform objects (subtidal channel, tidal flat, saltmarsh etc.), which are then simulated appropriately via one of the approaches highlighted above. A key aspect of the model architecture is the use of a composite internal data model that embeds vector 1D representation of tidal channel networks and engineering structures in the bathymetric and topographic DEM raster. Flood and coastal defence structures can be modelled with realistic 'fragility curves' and their constraint on the morphological evolution of the major landform types can be explicitly simulated. ESTEEM is being developed under an open source licence (GPL) as a community model that incorporates compatibility with the OpenMI external coupling standard. This makes it suitable for deployment in conjunction with similarly OpenMI-compliant open coast model codes to simulate coupled estuary-coast morphological change at regional scales. However, it is also well-suited to standalone simulation of specific estuaries. 
Type Of Material Computer model/algorithm 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact None yet, but the source code for a beta version is soon to be made available via the Channel Coast Observatory (CCO; www.channelcoast.org) on a GPL arrangement. Further development beyond the prototype will be actively undertaken at UCL beyond project end. 
URL http://www.channelcoast.org
 
Title MESO_i 
Description MESO_i (Model for the EStuary - Open coast interface) simulates the morphodynamic behaviour at the interface of estuarine environments and open coasts. The model has been developed and applied to the inlet and associated ebb-tidal delta shoals at the mouth of the Deben estuary. 
Type Of Material Computer model/algorithm 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact MESO_i will be publically archived on a web portal within the Channel Coastal Observatory. Information about iCOASST and MESO_i will be made available on the iCOASST portal for download and use. In addition, input and output data files are in the process of being added, to allow users to identify the type and format of data required. This will allow new users to replicate the work of the iCOASST modellers. To further encourage effective dissemination, the models will be licenced under the General Public Licence, which promotes open access. The data files will be made available using the Open Government Licence. 
 
Title SCAPE+ 
Description SCAPE (Soft Cliff And Platform Erosion) is a modelling tool that can be applied to cliff/platform coasts, with (or without) a beach. It represents processes, but does so in abstract and behavioural terms and is typically used to simulate change over timeframes of decades to centuries. It is also used to model the short-term rapid responses of cliffs to the removal of coast protection. iCOASST has supported the development of the regional SCAPE code (Q3DR) into SCAPE+. The new code has been rationalised and extended to include new processes and greater detail. It has also been made Open and OpenMI compatible. The rationalisation process has included the extraction of embedded parameters into a setup file, to make SCAPE+ models more readily adaptable and various assumptions more explicit. An important part of the rationalisation of the code was the removal of routines that were either experimental, strongly site specific, or too time consuming to make appropriately robust. 
Type Of Material Computer model/algorithm 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Information about iCOASST and the models will be made available on the iCOASST portal for download and use. In addition, input and output data files are in the process of being added, to allow users to identify the type and format of data required. This will allow new users to replicate the work of the iCOASST modellers. To further encourage effective dissemination, the models will be licenced under the General Public Licence, which promotes open access. The data files will be made available using the Open Government Licence. 
 
Description iCOASST Adapt - Belmont Forum Proposal 
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council
Department Belmont Forum
Country Global 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution An International consortium was put together to produce a bid to the Belmont Forum Coastal Vulnerabilty call.
Start Year 2012
 
Title CESMapper (Coastal and Estuarine System Mapper) 
Description CESMapper is an open-source QGIS plugin to provide Coastal and Estuarine System Mapping (CESM) functionality within a geospatial framework. CESMapper is coded in python and can be downloaded from the GitHub repository at the URL below. The software is still under development and full functionality beyond that in the initial beta release will be added progressively with further updates to the GitHub repository. CESMapper allows the Coastal and Estuarine System Mapping (CESM) approach to conceptualising the configuration and connectivity of coupled coast-estuary-inner shelf landform and sediment systems to be implemented within an open-source GIS environment (QGIS). The CESM approach is described more fully in: French, J.R., Burningham, H., Thornhill, G., Whitehouse, R., Nicholls, R.J. 2016. Conceptualizing and mapping coupled estuary, coast and inner shelf sediment systems. Geomorphology 256: 17-35. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.geomorph.2015.10.006 [open access] 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2016 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact None yet - still initial beta release 
URL https://github.com/UCL-CERU/CESMapper
 
Title Liverpool Bay composition 
Description The Liverpool Bay composition is a set of linked model components consisting of two instances of the open coast longshore drift model, UnaLinea (which accepts gains or losses of sediment from/to offshore, calculated from regional area models) and one instance of the estuary model ASMITA (which has been modified to tale inputs and outputs of littoral drift). The model components have 2-way links, so sediment can pass to or from the estuary to either stretch of coastline. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2014 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact The model allows the stretch of coastline from Formby Point (Sefton) to Blackpool (Fylde) to be modelled in a consistent way, capturing interactions between the open coast (to north and south) and the Ribble Estuary (in the centre). 
URL http://www.channelcoast.org/iCOASST/liverpoolbay/
 
Title Open Source Version of ASMITA 
Description Aggregated Scale Morphological Interaction between Tidal basin and Adjacent coast (ASMITA) is an aggregated, behavioural model that schematises an estuary into landforms: here channel, flats and a delta, each of which is specified by its plan area and water (or in some cases sediment) volume. THis product is an OpenMI wrapped version of ASMITA, edited to allow the ebb delta to exchange sediment with a beach model. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2016 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact The development of this software has allowed the Liverpool Bay composition to be developed and applied. The Liverpool Bay comsposition is a set of linked models that exchange data during run-time. It consists of two instances of UnaLinea (a model of beach plan-shape evolution) one instance of ASMITA and the results from the coastal area model POLCOMS. 
URL http://www.channelcoast.org/iCOASST/ASMITA
 
Title Open Source version of UnaLinea 
Description UnaLinea is a simplified, regional-scale model of the longshore transport of sand along beaches, caused by waves, and the resultant changes to the position of the shoreline. It has been made OpenSource and has been made compliant with the FluidEarth 2 implementation of the OpenMI 2.0 standard for data exchange during run-time. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2014 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact The open-source OpenMI compliant version of UnaLinea has been included in the LiverpoolBay64 composition of model components that exchange data at run-time, thereby allowing for 2-way interactions between open coast and estuaries. 
URL https://www.channelcoast.org/iCOASST/UNALINEA/
 
Description 1st Stakeholder Newsletter 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Contents include:

Introduction to iCOASST

Coastal Systems Mapping

Integrated Environmental Modelling

Modelling Decadal Coastal Morphology

Stakeholder Workshops

Field Visits

More enquires about iCOASST from stakeholders, and deeper engagement from stakeholders
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Bangor University School of Ocean Sciences Endeavour society seminar: UK storm impacts and current research 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The talk increased awareness of storm impacts prompting discussion.

An MSc student emailed following the presentation to find out about PhD opportunities in Liverpool.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Cell 11 Regional Monitoring Strategy 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Discussion generated about how to involve research into shoreline management.

There will be a meeting to progress an idea for a knowledge transfer partnership.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Coastal Sediments Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Presentation on Residual circulation modelling at the national UK scale to identify possible sediment pathways to inform decadal coastal geomorphic evolution models; generated questions and discussion afterwards.

It promoted the outputs from the iCoasst project to the international community.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Coasts Tower Hamlets CPD 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Presentation of coastal issues, including the iCOASST project (dissemination of newsletters and papers) at 1-day CPD event for school teachers in Tower Hamlets
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Conference presentation: Coastal Area Modelling to Support Coastal Morphological Prediction 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact There was discussion of the research and questions after the talk.

There was interest in how the models presented could be used in new applications.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description ECSA 2018 Conference: Perth ('Hybrid approach to simulating 100-year changes in estuary morphology and flood risk') 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Hybrid approach to simulating 100-year changes in estuary morphology and flood risk - conference presentation at the ECSA 2019 Conference in Perth, Australia.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description End users meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Practical outputs would include the continued development of the EA guidance documentation. Initial documents have being developed from the iCoasst project with a team at HR Wallingford. Should be available end of 2017. Request to share 1 page model descriptions (Action). EA can share the state of the nation data (SWAN modelling & wave transformations in development with HR Wallingford). These have been provided to Andres and can be share within the project for model boundary conditions / comparison (Action). HR are working on documenting what models are available for coastal management. An approach to build and progress model guidance is required. Information to update the iCoasst documentation would be valuable in a few years.
The EA are using CShore, case study applications to demonstrate its capability will be of interest. Clear routes to work with WP 2.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Flooding 2015: Risks and Resilience Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Gained new insight into adaptive management for flood risk.

Awareness of consultants working in similar areas to strengthen knowledge exchange.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Horizon 2020 projects: portal interview 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Interview with Horizon 2020 projects portal editor to print an article on 'Coping with coastal change'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.horizon2020publications.com/H9/#
 
Description Hybrid approach to predicting 100-year changes in storm surge flood risk due to the interplay of coastal oceanographic forcing, estuary morphological change, and management interventions. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Oral presentation at the 14th Asia-Oceania Geosciences Society conference, Singapore, 6-11 August 2017. Large attendance (> 100) at session and a lot of good feedback afterwards.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Liverpool Bay Stakeholder Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Integrating Coastal Sediment Systems (the iCOASST project -- http://www.icoasst.net/) is funded by NERC, with the Environment Agency as an embedded stakeholder, to improve our capability to predict long-term and regional scale morphodynamic change on the open coasts and in the estuaries of the UK to support erosion and flood risk management. A approach has been developed that includes:
• The development and application of Coastal and Estuarine System Maps, which identify landforms and link them by their sediment exchanges and their influences on other landforms;
• The application of detailed, process-based coastal area models to compute hydrodynamics, sediment transport and the resulting net sediment fluxes; and
• The development and application of coupled systems (or compositions) of landform-scale models of coastal evolution that interact by exchanging data at run-time.
This meeting described the approach and its application to the coastline from Formby Point to Blackpool, including the Ribble Estuary. Emphasis was placed on the results from the linked models in a composition that includes beach models of the Formby and Sefton coasts, an estuary model of the Ribble and sediment fluxes from the POLCOMS coastal area model of Liverpool Bay.
The Formby to Blackpool composition has been run from 1904 - 2115, with 1904 to 1990 used for calibration and 1990 to 2115 used for simulating a range of scenarios. The climate variables modelled were:
• Sea level rise scenarios including the continuation of the historical trend, a range of UKCP '09 scenarios and EA upper end and H++ scenarios;
• Wave climate scenarios including increases in wave height and changes in wave direction; and
• Different natural rates of onshore feed of sand from Liverpool Bay to the coast.
The coastal management options modelled included:
• Sand winning (removal) at the coast;
• Managed realignment in the Ribble; and
• A sandmotor or sandscaping mega-beach nourishment at the north of Blackpool.
A selection of these results were presented and discussed. We then outlined the stages in a follow-on project, funded by the Environment Agency, to embed the results from iCOASST into practice. The techniques, results and implications for coastal management in the region and beyond were then discussed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Monitoring of Planform Changes and Computation of Erosion/Accretion of Bishkhali Estuary Using Satellite Image, F. Nihal, M. Sakib,M. W. Elahi, T. Ahmed,A. Haque, M. M. Rahman, M. A. T. Omar, International Conference on Climate Change and Water Security, MIST, 27 December 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Conference talk and paper
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description NW coast practitioner's workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk generated questions about coastal research. A collaboration was formed with the Pembroke Coastal Group leading to a successful CASE partner PhD studentship within the Liverpool-Manchester DTP. The student starts September 2016.

Awareness of coastal impacts research was increased.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Nottingham University Life in Changing Environments Research Priority Area Seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Seminar on Uncertainties & tipping points associated with coastal flood hazard. Discussion & questions about coastal research followed. New networks were developed with departments within Nottingham University.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description One day meeting - Project summary 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Further work on the models developed during the project has been undertaken in-house by the Environment Agency.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.icoasst.net/Outputs/conferences/conference_2016/
 
Description Post Graduate student workshop presentation: Waves, Surge & Coastal Vulnerability 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact There was discussion about the research afterwards.

There was interest in the models used in recent research projects to see how they could be used in collaborations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Presentation at Environment Agency conference "Flood and Coast" 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation on "Understanding geomorphic change on the coast over the next 100 years - the iCOASST project" to the Environment Agency's Flood and Coast Conference, aimed at professionals involved with flood and coastal erosion risk management in the UK.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Presentation at Environment Agency's Flood and Coast conference, 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation to Environment Agency's Flood and Coast Conference, 2018. Title of presentation is iCOASST: using morphological modelling to guide decision-making at the coast. Presentation given to audience of professionals engaged in flood and coastal erosion risk management. This presentation summarised the outcomes of the most recent work undertaken as part of the dissemination phase of the iCOASST project including:
(1) An evaluation (using pilot site modelling work developed for the Suffolk coastline)of whether, by using outputs from the iCOASST reduced complexity models of coastal morphology as inputs to the State of the Nation flood risk models, an improved assessment of future flood risk (taking account of long-term coastal morphological change, including change resulting from sea level rise and management interventions) could be achieved; and
(2) the guidance document developed for coastal managers to help them better understand the value and use of morphological modelling in supporting decision making at the coast.
The pilot site modelling work delivers important knowledge for future coastal FRA and model sensitivity testing; the guidance provides a unique, one-stop shop for coastal managers in explaining key coastal processes, their drivers, and the basic principles underpinning morphological modelling. It also provides a simple decision support tool that facilitates an evaluation of model applicability for a range of site characteristics.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Presentation to British Society for Geomorphology Annual Meeting, 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation: iCOASST: Maximising the value of coastal geomorphological research for end-users, given to British Society for Geomorphology annual meeting. This presentation outlined what was delivered by the project (http://www.channelcoast.org/iCOASST/introduction/), and where some of the iCOASST tools are now being further developed in current research (e.g. BLUECOAST supported by the Environment Agency.
The presentation will then describe outcomes of an iCOASST follow-on project - 'Embedding iCOASST into practice' (that is being undertaken by HR Wallingford and funded by the Environment Agency, Defra and Welsh Government through the joint Flood and Coastal Erosion Risk Management (FCERM) Research and Development programme). This work has focussed on three key areas:
• evaluating the usability of the iCOASST tools for end users,
• using the iCOASST pilot site (where geomorphological models were coupled) to explore potential improvements to future coastal risk assessments by using predictions of morphological change in the Environment Agency's National Flood Risk Assessment (NaFRA) methodology; and
• drafting an end-user focused guide to support coastal managers' and engineers' understanding of coastal processes, coastal models and how available tools can be used to best support decision-making at the coast.

The presentation discussed the importance of considering end-user needs throughout the research process (based on lessons learned from iCOASST), and the simple model checklists created both as a development and evaluation tool to ensure consistency and usability of new tools.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation: IAHR 2015, Nicholls, R 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Robert Nicholls gave an oral presentation on Improving decadal coastal geomorphic predictions at IAHR 2015 in The Hague.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Presentation: IIASA Systems Analysis 2015, Payo, A 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Andres Payo Garcia presented poster at IIASA 2015 on A Multi-landform Numerical Framework for Modelling Large Scale Coastal Morphodynamics.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://sa2015.iiasa.ac.at/posters/entry/1/198/
 
Description Presentation: iCOASST Final Conference, A. Payo Garcia 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Andres Payo Garcia presented on Coastal ME: A Multi-Landform Numerical Framework for Modelling Large Scale Coastal Morphodynamics at the iCOASST Final Conference.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.icoasst.net/Outputs/conferences/conference_2016/
 
Description Presentation: iCOASST Final Conference, B. Van Maanen 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Barend Van Maanen of the iCOASST project presented on Insights from the Suffolk Coastal Composition at the iCOASST Final Conference.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.icoasst.net/Outputs/conferences/conference_2016/
 
Description Presentation: iCOASST Final Conference, M. Walkden 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Mike Walkden presented on Mesoscale open coast models at the iCOASST Final Conference 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.icoasst.net/Outputs/conferences/conference_2016/
 
Description Presentation: iCOASST Final Conference, R. Nicholls 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Robert Nicholls, PI of the iCOASST project presented an overview of the iCOASST project at the iCOASST Final Conference
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Presentation: iCOASST Final Conference, T Mason 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Travis Mason presented on Coastal Monitoring in the UK, and the iCOASST legacy at the iCOASST Final Conference
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.icoasst.net/Outputs/conferences/conference_2016/
 
Description Representing and Modelling Coastal and Estuarine Morphology on a Regional Scale for Coastal Management 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation at 'Restore America's Estuaries' (RAE) annual meeting on December 14, 2016 (https://www.estuaries.org/summit-2016-proceedings). RAE is a non-profit organisation dedicated to restoring coastal habitats in 11 estuaries and 16 states across USA. Our presentation to their annual summit informed participants about the work undertaken in iCOASST project on the Liverpool Bay case study. The presentation was well received and we are now developing lines of research into coastal geomorphology and storm impact with the US Army Corps of Engineers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.estuaries.org/summit-2016-proceedings
 
Description Seminar at University of Cantabria, Santander, Spain 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact 50 academics, students and practioners heard about the iCOASST Project and its outcomes
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Seminar: Extreme Events & Coastal Vulnerability. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Discussion afterwards about possible PhD projects.

Invited to join the Marine Knowledge Exchange Network at UEA.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Southampton Stakeholder Workshop (Sept 2013) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Southampton Stakeholder Workshop 13th Sept 2013. Attended by Environment Agency, Chair of SE Coastal Group, ABPmer, CCO & independent consultants. An introduction to iCOASST was given and participants introduced their work to iCOASST. Coastal Systems Mapping was demonstrated for the lcoal region.

The Chair of Coastal Groups (Bryan Curtis) was very positive and volunteered to advocate iCOASST to all Coastal Groups. Offers of help to validate CSM in South from Tim Kermode (consultant). Channel Coast Observatory learnt more about the outputs of the
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Suffolk Coastal Forum Meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation keynote/invited speaker
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Suffolk Coastal Forum and East Anglian Coastal Group invited iCOASST to present at a meeting special meeting of the two groups on 26th June 2013

iCOASST invited members of Suffolk coastal Forum to sit on their Advisory Board
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Suffolk Pilot Site Workshop: Flood Risk Modelling & Coastal State Indicators 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The workshop had the following objectives:
1. To present the results of HR Wallingford's recent modelling to look at the potential impact of coastal morphological change on coastal flood risk at the Suffolk pilot site;
2. To facilitate the development a suite of critical Coastal State Indicators for the Suffolk pilot site that could enhance coastal management decision making.

Presentations were made and the discussion centred on:
- Defining pilot site coastal 'problems' and management objectives;
- Defining current monitoring programmes and measurements (indicators) currently used for decision-making
- Brainstorming a wider range of indicators
- Discussing and challenging indicators inferred by modelling
- Discussing practicality and usability of potential indicators (including reporting requirements).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Suffolk Stakeholder Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation Keynote/Invited Speaker
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact An iCOASST project stakeholder workshop was held in Lowestoft, Suffolk on 22nd March 2013 to (i) present the project to them, (ii) demonstrate and gain early feedback on the Coastal Systems Mapping that is being developed by University College London in the project and (iii) discuss with them what they would like to see coming from the project (in terms of the nature and presentation of the results).

Engagement with this group has continued, with partners UCL attending a subsequent workshop.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Suffolk Stakeholder Workshop (Lowestoft, March 2013) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Stakeholder meeting held in Lowestoft 22nd March in connection with Suffolk coast case study. Stakeholders attending included representatives from the Environment Agency, Suffolk and Waveney DCs, NFU, RSPB EDF and various local groups

Stakeholders were introduced to the iCOASST project; the Coastal Systems Mapping methodology explained and an application to the Suffolk Coastline presented; key issues for the future of the Suffolk Coast were identified. Discussions covered:

(1) the acc
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Suffolk Stakeholder Workshop - Woodbridge, June 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Participants were introduced to the Coastal and Estuarine System Mapping work which had been undertaken. They were also which Coastal State Indicators they were interested in, which could be modelled in the Suffolk Coastal Composition.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description The iCOASST project final conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The iCOASST final conference was a two-day long workshop held at the Institution of Civil Engineers (London) which included representatives of the Environment Agency, NGOs, local government and academia. The final results from the project were summarised in 12 presentations (three from HR Wallingford) with a further 9 presentations from outside the project, which mainly offerend an international perspective. Plans for further collaborations were enhanced and information on our methods was spread to academics, practitioners and policy makers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.icoasst.net/news/?action=story&id=44
 
Description Workshop with the National Trust, Purbeck on Coastal and Estuarine System Mapping and its application to Poole Harbour 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Coastal and Estuarine System Mapping has been applied to Poole Harbour as a demonstration project with the National Trust as part of the NERC Innovation Fellowship. This event was a validation event attended by University of Southampton, Bournemouth University, National Trust and Environment Agency. It will be followed up with engagement with Poole Borough and Poole Harbour Commissioners and the final data set will be archived on the iCOASST pages on the Channel Coastal Observatory web site.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description iCOASST 2013 International Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation workshop facilitator
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The first iCOASST International Workshop was held at the Holiday Inn Southampton for 15-17th October 2013. It brought together the iCOASST research team with 13 international experts from Australia, USA, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands and the UK. It enabled the ambitious goals and early deliverables of the iCOASST project to be discussed and reflected upon in a constructive yet critical manner. The Workshop included a field trip to Bournemouth and Chesil beaches where many participants had their first experience of shingle beaches.

Out of this workshop a special issue of the Geomorphology journal was set up with session reviews and other papers, due for publication in early 2015
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://www.icoasst.net/Outputs/conferences/conference_2013/
 
Description iCOASST 2nd Newsletter (Spring 2014) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The newsletter updated stakeholders on how the different research areas of the iCOASST project joined together, as well as how Coastal Systems Mapping had evolved. It sparked more enquires about the project and support for our methods

Stakeholders were kept informed of project outputs before the second round of stakeholder workshops. This was vital activity that resulted in further engagement and invitations to speak at other coastal forum and environment agency events
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description iCOASST 3rd Stakeholder Newsletter (Autumn 2014) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The newsletter shared information on model development and requested feeback if stakeholders wanted.

Only released last week so too early to define impacts
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description iCOASST Autumn 2014 Stakeholder Newsletter 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Autumn 2014 Stakeholder newsletter updated stakeholders on the Liverpool Bay scenario, ESTEEM model, Object Framework, Exchange model and SCAPE+. The newsletter updated stakeholders from a range of organisations including the Environment Agency, English Heritage, Natural England, RSPB, EDF Energy, as well as multiple local authorities. Several recipients were keen to join stakeholder workshops and attend the Final Conference.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.icoasst.net/Outputs/Publications/
 
Description iCOASST Final Conference, Jan 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The iCOASST Final Conference on Decadal Coastal Simulation: UK and International Experience and Prognosis, took place from 21-22 January 2016. The final results of the iCOASST project were disseminated to around 100 attendees, composed of academics, as well as professional practitioners ands industry. Organisations which attended included Atkins, Natural England, Crown Estate, Royal Haskoning, EDF Energy, as well as Havant and Teignbridge Councils.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.icoasst.net/Outputs/conferences/conference_2016/
 
Description iCOASST Introductory Brochure 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Brochure has increased enquiries about the project
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description iCOASST Spring 2014 Stakeholder Newsletter 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The iCOASST Spring 2014 stakeholder newsletter contained articles on conceptual coastline compositions, coastal area modelling, data driven modelling, raster behavioural approach and the International Conference. The newsletter updated stakeholders from a range of organisations including the Environment Agency, English Heritage, Natural England, RSPB, EDF Energy, as well as multiple local authorities. Several recipients were keen to join stakeholder workshops and attend the Final Conference.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.icoasst.net/Outputs/Publications/
 
Description iCOASST Spring 2015 Stakeholder Newsletter 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Spring 2015 iCOASST stakeholder newsletter updated stakeholders on the estuary-inlet open coast model compositions, coastal state indicators, reduced complexity modelling, data driven modelling, and stakeholder engagement. The newsletter updated stakeholders from a range of organisations including the Environment Agency, English Heritage, Natural England, RSPB, EDF Energy, as well as multiple local authorities. Several recipients were keen to join stakeholder workshops and attend the Final Conference.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.icoasst.net/Outputs/Publications/
 
Description iCOASST Stakeholder Workshop - Liverpool Bay (July 2013) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact First Stakeholder Workshop in case study site of Liverpool Bay Stakeholder July 4th 2013. Attended by Sefton Council, Environment Agency, Peel Ports, Natural England, NW Coastal Forum, consultants & NR Wales. iCOASST project was introduced and stakeholders introduced their work. Coastal Systems Mapping (WP1.2) was demonstrated for the region and feedback gained.

All parties were receptive to the project. Significant data for Liverpool Bay was extracted from Sefton Council following the meeting. The NW Coastal Forum volunteered to send iCOASST outputs around their network.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description iCOASST Stakeholder workshop, Crosby 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Extensive discussions highlighted a series of key issues, including finding the right level of detail to answer management questions, defining landforms and including different sources of materials in a Coastal & Estuarine System Map, including dunes, explaining the Integrating Coastal Sediment Systems (iCOASST) tiered approach, dealing with uncertainty, accounting for sediment extraction, managing expectations about what issues iCOASST can help with, defining how coastal management decisions are made and what coastal state indicators could be used in this process.

We have been sent further datasets by participants.
We have arranged to return to the area to hold another workshop towards the end of the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description iCOASST Strategic Advisory Board Meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The first meeting of the iCOASST Strategic Advisory Board (SAB)

Meeting included Chair, Andrew Watkinson (LWEC), Wendy Brooks (EA), Tim Collins (Natural England), Chris Vincent (UEA), Tony Dolphin (CEFAS), Colin Taylor (EDF Energy), Ken Pye (K.Pye Associates Ltd)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description iCOASST Strategic Advisory Board Meeting Jan 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The iCOASST project held a meeting with it's Strategic Advisory Board, which exists to oversee and provide a steer on the project. Representatives from Environment Agency, Natural England, EDF, CEFAS and Suffolk Coastal Council were present in order to give their views. Due to this Meeting, several representatives indicated they wished to be involved with refining messages to the user community and to help engage the community in each study site.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description iCOASST Strategic Advisory Board Meeting May 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The iCOASST Consortium met with its Strategic Advisory Board in May 2014 to update them on the project and to receive feedback. The SAB is made up of representatives from academia, public bodies and industry. As a result of this SAB meeting, several members of the SAB committee offered to host stakeholder meetings in each study site. Ken Pye in the Ribble and Bill Parker in Suffolk.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description iCOASST Stratgeic Advisory Board (SAB) Meeting, Southampton (22 May 2014) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact iCOASST presented their findings to the iCOASST SAB who provided critical feedback to the project

The majority of the feedback centred around how to disseminate the technical iCOASST models to a wider audience to ensure the best possible take up of iCOASST research, methodologies and outputs.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description iCOASST Winter 2016 Stakeholder Newsletter 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The winter 2016 iCOASST Stakeholder Newsletter updated stakeholders on the iCOASST project, embedding iCOASST into practice, the Coastal Sediments conference and archiving of the iCOASST results. The newsletter updated stakeholders from a range of organisations including the Environment Agency, English Heritage, Natural England, RSPB, EDF Energy, as well as multiple local authorities. Several recipients were keen to join stakeholder workshops and attend the Final Conference.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.icoasst.net/Outputs/Publications/