Sustainable poverty alleviation from coastal ecosystem services (SPACES): Investigating elasticities, feedbacks and tradeoffs

Lead Research Organisation: University of Stockholm
Department Name: Stockholm Resilience Centre

Abstract

This project aims to better understand the links between ecosystem services (ES) and wellbeing in order to design and implement more effective interventions for poverty alleviation. We do this in the context of coastal, social-ecological systems in two poor African countries; Kenya and Mozambique.
Despite recent policy and scientific interest in ES, there remain important knowledge gaps regarding how ecosystems actually contribute to wellbeing, and thus poverty alleviation. Following the ESPA framework, distinguishing ecological processes, 'final ES', 'capital inputs', 'goods' and 'values', this project is concerned with how these elements are interrelated to produce ES benefits, and focuses specifically on how these benefits are distributed to (potentially) benefit the poor, enhancing their wellbeing. We thus address the ESPA goal of understanding and promoting ways in which benefits to the poorest can be increased and more people can meet their basic needs, but we also identify conflicted tradeoffs, i.e. those which result in serious harm to either the ecosystem or poor people and which need urgent attention.
Several fundamental questions are currently debated in international scientific and policy fora, relating to four major global trends which are likely to affect abilities of poor people to access ES benefits: (1) devolution of governance power and its impacts on local governance of ecosystems and production of ES, (2) unprecedented rates and scales of environmental change, particularly climate change, which are creating new vulnerabilities, opportunities and constraints, 'shifting baselines', and demanding radical changes in behaviour to cope, (3) market integration now reaches the most remote corners of the developing world, changing relationships between people and resources and motivations for natural resource management, (4) societal changes, including demographic, population, urbanisation and globalisation of culture, forge new relationships with ES and further decouple people from direct dependency on particular resources. Study sites have been chosen so as to gather empirical evidence to help answer key questions about how these four drivers of change affect abilities of poor people to benefit from ES.
We aim for direct impact on the wellbeing of poor inhabitants of the rapidly transforming coastal areas in Mozambique and Kenya, where research will take place, while also providing indirect impact to coastal poor in other developing countries through our international impact strategy. Benefits from research findings will also accrue to multiple stakeholders at various levels.

Local government, NGOs and civil society groups - through engagement with project activities, e.g. participation in workshops and exposure to new types of analysis and systems thinking.

Donor organizations and development agencies - through research providing evidence to inform strategies to support sector development (e.g. fisheries, coastal planning and tourism development) and methods to understand and evaluate impacts of different development interventions - e.g. through tradeoff analysis and evaluation of the elasticities between ecosystem services and wellbeing.

International scientific community - through dissemination of findings via conferences, scientific publications (open access), and from conceptual and theoretical development and new understandings of the multiple linkages between ecosystem services and wellbeing. Regional African scientists will benefit specifically through open courses offered within the scope of the project, and through dissemination of results at regional venues.
Our strategies to deliver impact and benefits include (1) identifying 'windows of opportunity' within the context of ongoing coastal development processes to improve flows of benefits from ecosystems services to poor people, and (2) identifying and seeking to actively mitigate 'conflicted' tradeoffs in Kenya and Mozambique.

Planned Impact

The project will benefit a number of different groups of people; both within the timeframe of the project and beyond (see Pathways to Impact).

*Poor people in East Africa are the ultimate beneficiaries of this research. We aim for direct impact on the wellbeing of poor inhabitants of the rapidly transforming coastal areas in Mozambique and Kenya, where research will take place, while also providing indirect impact to coastal poor in other developing countries through our international impact strategy.

*Local government, NGOs and civil society groups will benefit from the research findings and through engagement with project activities, e.g. through participation in workshops and exposure to new types of analysis and systems thinking.

*Donor organizations and development agencies will benefit as research provides evidence to inform strategies to support sector development (e.g. fisheries, coastal planning and tourism development) and methods to understand and evaluate impacts of different development interventions - e.g. through tradeoff analysis and evaluation of the elasticities between ecosystem services and wellbeing.

*International scientific community will benefit through dissemination of findings via conferences and scientific publications (all open access). New understandings and rigorous analysis of the multiple linkages between ecosystem services and wellbeing will inform conceptual and theoretical development in fields of international development, ecosystem services, environmental change and resilience, vulnerability and adaptation. We test novel and innovative methodologies, and extend conventional wellbeing and ecosystem analysis. Ultimately this will contribute to understanding the environmentalist paradox through new empirical and conceptual analysis. Regional African scientists will benefit through open courses offered within the scope of the project, and through dissemination of results at regional venues such as the biannual WIOMSA conference (see academic beneficiaries).

This project adopts two strategies to deliver local and regional level impact on poverty alleviation for the coastal poor in Kenya and Mozambique:

(1) we identify 'windows of opportunity' within the context of ongoing coastal development processes to improve flows of benefits from ecosystems services to poor people. This strategy draws on existing knowledge of coastal Kenya and Mozambique and new data produced by the project on ecosystem flows and access mechanisms. In particular, the project will have substantial impact in the areas of fisheries development and coastal tourism, both areas already identified as major (but poorly understood) opportunities for poverty alleviation.

(2) we identify and seek to actively mitigate 'conflicted' tradeoffs in Kenya and Mozambique. Conflicted tradeoffs are those which result in serious harm to either the ecosystem or poor people and which need urgent attention- indeed by doing so, poverty alleviation impact is likely to be significant. Previous ESPA research (PMOWTICK and Coastal Situation Analysis) has highlighted several conflicted tradeoffs between agendas of coastal development, poverty alleviation and ecosystem sustainability, and has advanced an innovative participatory modeling tool (a key PMOWTICK output) which explicitly identifies tradeoffs. We use this tool to further address evidence gaps and deliver it to key stakeholders in both regions, to enable decision-makers to tackle tradeoffs and deliberate options for resolving them, using the best scientific data available on ecosystem services flows and wellbeing outcomes.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Title Community dialogue art theatre 
Description A play based on each site key finding was developed and presented to the community during the the community dialogue. The theater was an effective tool to communicate the findings more the illiterate and semi illiterate members of the community. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact Theatre Arts was rated the best in disseminating research findings. Most of the participants preferred theatre arts for the simple reason that it presented real life situations based on the findings in an innovative and creative manner. The use of local examples and scenarios in the play(s) made it easier for the participants to identify with the various themes of the study that were shared during the community dialogues and displayed in the various scenes of play(s). 
 
Title Videos explaining the project and discussing the novel approach and findings 
Description Two videos: 7 minute video describing the P-Mowtick research approach and findings. www.youtube.com/watch?v=i7lYNaTX_V4 13 minute video describing the P-Mowtick research approach and findings. www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kln_T0l7jFo 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact Over 500 views in total as of March 2016 
URL http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i7lYNaTX_V4
 
Description 1. The contribution of an ecosystem service to wellbeing is not necessarily related to the condition of the ecosystem. When comparing across sites in Kenya and Mozambique, a high quality ecosystem does not predict more contribution to wellbeing than a low quality ecosystem. For example, people who get the most money from reef fish are fishing in quite degraded sites with good access to market, while those who are fishing in the most pristine but remote sites like Vamizi get less financial benefits. Access to ecosystem services is more important for wellbeing in the short term than quality of the ecosystem.

2. Ecosystem services support wellbeing diverse monetary and non-monetary ways. Wellbeing benefits from direct uses (such as eating fish), money gained from ES-based livelihoods as well from practices of engaging with an ecosystem service. For example, using fish for school lunch supports education, selling fish for income contributes to economic security and cooking fish together fosters relationships (Chaigneau et al. in prep).

3. Who is poor depends on how poverty is measured. In coastal Kenya, the people higher incomes are not always more likely to meet their basic needs, live in a better quality house or be more satisfied with their lives. For example, fishers generally have higher incomes than non-fishers, but did not have better food security, sanitation or satisfaction with life (Schulte-Herbruggen et al. in prep).

4. There is no overall pattern of association between benefitting from an ecosystem service and being poor in any particular dimension. Rather this depends on the ES, the site and the type of poverty evaluated (Daw et al. in prep)

5. Ecosystem services are highly gendered. Access to, perceptions of and values of ecosystem services differ between men and women (Fortnam et al. in review). Women's benefits from ecosystem services are constrained by societal norms as well as practical considerations such as access to transport.

6. The financial benefits from fisheries in Kenyan sites are unequally distributed. Fishers capture most the profit generated, but it is shared amongst a large number of them. Meanwhile only a few individual large scale male traders in Vanga capture a large proportion of profits. Female traders capture the smallest share per head compared to male traders and fishers (Crona et al, in prep)

7. Increasing fishing families' wellbeing may not require higher catches. It is important to look at how the money is distributed along the value chain and to look at how the money is being used.

8. Smaller-scale tourism operators who focussed on domestic tourists were more resilient to a slump in international visitors to Kenya (Sandbrook et al. in prep)

9. Potential for coral reefs to grow in Mombasa and near Pemba are unlikely to keep up with projected sea-level rise. This is unlikely to have an impact in the short term, but will bring effects in the long term i.e. in 50 years' time.

10. Mangroves in rural Mozambican sites were more degraded than the mangroves in the peri-urban site, contrary to expectations (Macamao et al, 2018).

11. Seagrass ecosystems are very important for fisheries. ~70% of catch composition in the nearshore fisheries studied in Kenya are made up seagrass dependent species. (Wabnitz et al)

12. The interaction of social and ecological factors mean that the impacts from recent El Niño event in Kenya although not seen as significant regionally, had diverse impacts on particular groups by amplifying existing vulnerabilities. (Fortnam et al, in review)
Exploitation Route SPACES findings have being shared to the key stakeholder including the government agencies, NGOs, the county government, researchers etc. though one on one meetings, conferences, workshops. The findings can be used to inform local, national and international policy around development, poverty alleviation and environmental management. some of the use which were specifically mentioned during the 1-1 meetings with stakeholders include: 1. For Programming and advocacy
2. To inform the development of county integrated Development plan(CIDP)
3. For Fundraising - Scientific evidence during proposal writing.
4. In the designing, planning and implementing of projects e.g. Social economic project. The research have identified gaps which require interventions.
5. As a Reference point: - on SPACES sites, unmet basic need, status of ecosystem
6. Information on the unused ecosystem services e.g. Dye production. Value addition could be done
7. Can be used to understand the contribution of specific ecosystem services to basic need
Sectors Agriculture, Food and Drink,Communities and Social Services/Policy,Environment,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Government, Democracy and Justice

URL http://www.espa-spaces.org
 
Description SPACES impacts can be divided in three main themes: 1. Deepening and disseminating knowledge of how ecosystems contribute to wellbeing SPACES research has highlighted and demonstrated key aspects of ecosystem and wellbeing relationships. These have been disseminated within Kenya and Mozambique through the various workshops and dialogues and internationally through a wide range of presentations at scientific conferences and workshops. Some of the key impactful messages that were strongly evidenced by SPACES data and communicated in these fora include: 1. Income poverty is not the only kind of poverty 2. Ecosystem services contribute to different aspects of wellbeing - not just money 3. Benefits are shared unequally - women are often disadvantaged. 4. Thinking of links to different types of poverty can generate good ideas for interventions It is hard to rigorously evidence this impact but evidence from SPACES research users collected during an independent DFID review provided evidence that SPACES helped to reframe environmental management discussions to be about multidimensional wellbeing which has opened up spaces for new thinking and new management approaches. Several academic publications from SPACES are still in press or in preparation and will serve to further disseminate key findings to a broader international audience. 2. Brokering between science, communities and other institutions SPACES workshops and dialogues and follow up meetings have linked our research team with community members, government agencies, donors and NGOs and provided a focussed space to discuss the relationship between ES and poverty. This has built relationships, trust and has improved the capacity of community members to understand and engage with research. In some cases it has also linked potential donors (e.g. Kenya Youth Enterprise Development Fund) to community members. New academic collaborations have also been forged, for example between historians, anthropologists and ecologists within Universidade Eduardo Mondlane, Mozambique. 3. Supporting the implementation of specific projects and initiatives Particular initiatives include the development of a project impact note for carbon financing in Vanga, Kenya, applications for a community forest association in Tzunza, Kenya
First Year Of Impact 2017
Sector Agriculture, Food and Drink,Environment,Government, Democracy and Justice
Impact Types Policy & public services

 
Description Development of Carbon Offset project supported through SPACES will be inaugurated in March 2019
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
Impact In Vanga, there is a high quality mangrove forest that provides several ecosystem services directly to the community. Soon the forest will provide services to people living in other parts of the world as well. Vanga has been chosen as the site to launch a community led carbon offset project. SPACES researchers have collected baseline data on the mangrove forest quality and socio-economic data from the community. Another, ESPA funded project, CESEA, has also collected data in Vanga. The data collected from these two projects were combined to form the Project Idea Note (PIN), for Upscaling Mikoko Pamoja in Vanga.
URL http://www.espa-spaces.org/impact-story-upscaling-a-successful-carbon-offset-project-in-vanga/
 
Description assessing the vulnerability of mangroves in the Querimbas National Park to Climate Change and draft a management plan
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description mangrove restoration plan for the coastal city of Quelimane, central Mozambique
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description review of the draft national mangrove management strategy
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Additional funding stream to supplement existing grant
Amount £125,000 (GBP)
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2015 
End 12/2015
 
Description ESPA Insights into Resilience and Wellbeing: Research Frontiers for Sustainable Development
Amount £182,480 (GBP)
Funding ID NE/P008321/1 
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2017 
End 02/2018
 
Description Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation
Amount £13,704 (GBP)
Funding ID NE/M007502/1 
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2015 
End 12/2015
 
Description Forumteater för förståelse av relationella processer för klimatanpassning i Kenya och Moçambique
Amount 5,483,982 kr (SEK)
Funding ID 2018-05792 
Organisation Swedish Research Council 
Sector Public
Country Switzerland
Start 06/2019 
End 05/2022
 
Description Fostering community-level solutions based on SPACES research and community-level deliberations
Amount 605,000 kr (SEK)
Organisation Southern African Program on Ecosystem Change and Society (SAPECS) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country South Africa
Start 12/2016 
End 08/2017
 
Description Marine Research Grant for Research in Home Country (MARG1)
Amount $6,000 (USD)
Organisation Western Indian Ocean Marine Science Association 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country Tanzania, United Republic of
Start 01/2016 
End 12/2016
 
Description Nature's contribution to poverty alleviation, human wellbeing and the SDGs (Nature4SDGs)
Amount £323,845 (GBP)
Funding ID NE/S012850/1 
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2019 
End 02/2021
 
Description Opportunities and trade-offs between the SDGs for food, welfare and the environment in deltas.
Amount £323,461 (GBP)
Funding ID NE/S012478/1 
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2019 
End 02/2021
 
Description Sharing the SPACES knowledge assets: Screening policies and interventions for diverse impacts on wellbeing
Amount £50,000 (GBP)
Funding ID IAF-2017-18-005 
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2017 
End 02/2018
 
Description SwedBio additional funds for stakeholder dialogues
Amount 386,000 kr (SEK)
Organisation Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency 
Sector Public
Country Global
Start 09/2015 
End 11/2015
 
Title SPACES DATA EXPLORER 
Description This is online and offline modelthat can be used to explore SPACES data on: basic human needs, access to ecosystem services, ecosystem services contribution to wellbeing and the state of the ecosystem. The data for this tool was collected in 2014 in 8 coastal communities in Kenya and Mozambique. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Many environmental management and development interventions are planned in the region which could be informed by the data SPACES has collected. The tool makes the data easily accessible and usable for actors who plan interventions 
URL http://www.espa-spaces.org/resources/spaces-data-explorer/
 
Description Adhoc group on wellbeing and ecosystem services 
Organisation Rhodes University
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Theories developed within SPACES contributed to a conceptual framework that was developed and published by this group
Collaborator Contribution contributing to the conceptual framework and its publication
Impact Masterson et al (In Press) Revisiting the relationships between human well-being and ecosystems in dynamic social-ecological systems: Implications for stewardship and development. Global Sustainability.
Start Year 2017
 
Description PECS 
Organisation Programme on Ecosystem Change and Society (PECS)
Country Sweden 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Program on Ecosystem Change and Society (PECS), is a Future Earth core-project (jointly sponsored by ICSU and UNESCO). PECS aims to integrate research on the stewardship of social-ecological systems, the services they generate, and the relationships among natural capital, human wellbeing, livelihoods, inequality and poverty. (http://www.pecs-science.org). PECS involves an international network of projects and researchers conducting transdisciplinary work on social-ecologial systems, SPACES is one such project. SPACES team members have attended 3 international PECS science meetings, the PECS conference in 2016 and have embarked on a number of PECS initiatives, including a review of participatory scenario practises, a survey of transdisciplinary research practise and submission of a paper to a PECS sponsored special issue in Ecology and Society.
Collaborator Contribution PECS researchers have helped to develop and disseminate SPACES research through networks with individual researchers, publicity on the PECS website and through funding to attend PECS workshops.
Impact Oteros-Rozas, Elisa, et al. "Participatory scenario planning in place-based social-ecological research: insights and experiences from 23 case studies." Ecology and Society 20.4 (2015). Fischer, Joern, et al. "Advancing sustainability through mainstreaming a social-ecological systems perspective." Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 14 (2015): 144-149. Forthcoming paper 'Elasticity in ecosystem services: Exploring the variable relationship between ecosystems and human wellbeing' in the Ecology and Society Journal Special Feature: Programme on Ecosystem Change and Society (PECS): Knowledge for Sustainable Stewardship of Social-ecological Systems
Start Year 2013
 
Description Seeds of Good Anthropocenes 
Organisation Southern African Program on Ecosystem Change and Society (SAPECS)
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The project "Seeds of a Good Anthropocene" (http://goodanthropocenes.net) forms part of the initiative "Bright Spots - Seeds of a Good Anthropocene," a FutureEarth funded project in its first phase (2014-2016). The African part of this initiative is being led by SAPECS/CST. Through the network of stakeholders engaged by SPACES research and impact activities in Kenya and Mozambique, the project was able to conduct additional participatory research alongside our stakeholder workshops, thus exposing a greater number of stakeholders to the 'Seeds' project and extending the geographical range of stakeholder engagements being conducted under the seeds initiative in Africa (previously only in South Africa).
Collaborator Contribution SPACES workshop planning benefitted from expertise and novel tools for stakeholder engagement which contributed to the planning and executions of our second round of stakeholder workshops.
Impact Entries into the Seeds of a Good Anthropocene database (see http://goodanthropocenes.net). Project reports from the two workshops (see Engagement activities)
Start Year 2015
 
Description Seeds of Good Anthropocenes 
Organisation University of Stellenbosch
Department Centre for Complex Systems in Transition (CST)
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The project "Seeds of a Good Anthropocene" (http://goodanthropocenes.net) forms part of the initiative "Bright Spots - Seeds of a Good Anthropocene," a FutureEarth funded project in its first phase (2014-2016). The African part of this initiative is being led by SAPECS/CST. Through the network of stakeholders engaged by SPACES research and impact activities in Kenya and Mozambique, the project was able to conduct additional participatory research alongside our stakeholder workshops, thus exposing a greater number of stakeholders to the 'Seeds' project and extending the geographical range of stakeholder engagements being conducted under the seeds initiative in Africa (previously only in South Africa).
Collaborator Contribution SPACES workshop planning benefitted from expertise and novel tools for stakeholder engagement which contributed to the planning and executions of our second round of stakeholder workshops.
Impact Entries into the Seeds of a Good Anthropocene database (see http://goodanthropocenes.net). Project reports from the two workshops (see Engagement activities)
Start Year 2015
 
Description CCP workshop (Cabo Delgado) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact The workshop aimed to facilitate exchanges and learning between CCPs in Cabo Delgado. It was co-organised by UniLurio, FCSH-UNL, AMA and SPACES. The workshop is part of the SPACES activity cluster "Act6c - Supporting evolving local governance" and aimed facilitate exchanges and learning between CCPs in Cabo Delgado. The workshop involved representatives from 9 CCPs, AMA, a local NGO that has been supporting CCPs, and Quirimbas National Park.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/community-fishing-councils-ccp-workshop-pemba-s%C3%A9rgio-rosendo
 
Description Caroline to ESPA final workshop in Nairobi 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact As one of ESPA's final major events, this conference brought together policymakers, practitioners and researchers to reflect on how new approaches to managing Africa's ecosystems could help empower vulberable communities, improve wellbeing and progress sustainable development.

Through a process of presentations and group discussions, participants helped to shape a 'call to action' declaration for African decision makers, connecting key insights from across the whole 8-year ESPA programme to some of Africa's most pertinent social and environmental issues.

2 talks based on this research:
Caroline Abunge - Ecosystems, wellbeing and poverty: Evidence from ESPA work in coastal Kenya
Salomao Bandeira - Reflecting on socio-ecological research on interactions with impact partners
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.espa.ac.uk/event/espa-results-action-africa
 
Description Community dialogue in coastal Kenya and Cabo Delgado, Mozambique. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact The feedback had three strategic objectives
- Courtesy - to say thanks for cooperation and share the research
- Validation - to see if community agree with or can explain our findings
- Impact - find ways that our research can empower actors or stimulate new discussions/proposals/initiatives etc.
During feedback meeting SPACES findings developed into materials suitable for inclusive community dialogues, taking account of local language and context was presented to the combined specific groups. Thereafter, Focus groups with specific groups were organized based gender and by livelihood activity to ensure that every participant participate whereby group work/discussion followed by group presentation and open discussion were employed. During the focus groups the participants identified areas of interest which they would like SPACES to provide more information.
Currently we are planning to conduct community dialogues starting from April, 2017 with the objective of disseminating results to the community and co-create findings and potential solutions, that will then be shared with impact partners and local and regional initiatives in coastal Kenya and Cabo Delgado, Mozambique.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016,2017
 
Description ESPA fisheries synthesis group 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact ESPA convened a meeting of a fisheries working group to provide develop synthesis and communications from the ESPA work on fisheries. To date, only one meeting has ocurred but further meetings and some communication outputs aimed at international and national policy communities are planned.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description ESPA-IPBES workshop on "Assessing the links between Nature's Contributions to People and a Good Quality of Life" 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The objective of the workshop was to bring together experts from ESPA and IPBES to: 1) transfer knowledge from ESPA to IPBES regarding ways to analyse human wellbeing in the context of the ES framework; 2) discuss how such knowledge can be best put into use in IPBES assessments given the IPBES conceptual framework, e.g., focusing on the links between "nature's contributions to people" (NCP) and a good quality of life (GQL); 3) identify knowledge gaps, opportunities and challenges in the analysis and assessment of NCP-GQL. The workshop resulted in a policy brief which became an official document of the Medellin IPBES 2018 plenary.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.ipbes.net/system/tdf/ipbes-6-inf-34.pdf?file=1&type=node&id=17053
 
Description Multistakeholder Workshop 1 - Developing a systems understanding 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A two-day stakeholder workshop "Looking to the future - Linking poverty alleviation and sustainable coastal ecosystems" in both Pemba, Mozambique and in Diani, Kenay. Attendees included experts in poverty alleviation and sustainable resource management from government, community organisations, non-governmental organisations and conservation and education sectors. The workshop engaged these stakeholders to collaboratively explore linkages between coastal ecosystems and poverty alleviation in the current social-ecological system and in likely future systems. Collaborative exercises made use of system diagrams and exploratory narrative scenarios. Learning outcomes from the workshop were also assessed through interviews and questionnaires and observations before during and after the workshop.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.espa-spaces.org/resources/publications/
 
Description Multistakeholder Workshop 2 - Exploring scenarios and policy responses 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A three-day workshop with the title "Using the future to make better decisions in the present" was held in Diani, Kenya and Pemba Mozambique.

The workshop gathered experts in poverty alleviation and sustainable resource management from government, community organizations, non-governmental organizations and conservation and education sectors in coastal Kenya along with representatives of coastal communities.

The workshop aimed to: 1) Engage stakeholders in the findings from the SPACES project. 2) Explore how human well-being and ecosystem health might change in different future scenarios. 3) Identify interventions for poverty alleviation and sustainable ecosystem management and explore how they would work under different scenarios and 4) Identify existing initiatives ("seeds") that could change the course of scenarios.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.espa-spaces.org/resources/publications/
 
Description Stakeholders' meetings 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact One on one meetings were held with key stakeholders/impact actors in three counties within Kenyan coast (Kwale, Mombasa and Kilifi) most of those visited were relevant government institutions and Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and a few from the private sector. During these meetings, discussions were based on key SPACES research findings and outputs from community dialogue activities to enable them interrogate and implement SPACES findings and recommendations from community feedback activities respectively. The exercise also enabled the targeted groups to find areas of common interest, generate ideas for future engagements with the communities and different stakeholders and communicators to influence policy and decision makers on key aspects of SPACES research findings and community dialogue recommendations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018
URL http://www.espa-spaces.org/
 
Description Swedbio-funded community dialogues 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Fostering community-level solutions based on SPACES research and community-level deliberations. With additional funding from SwedBio and ESPA the SPACES team engaged in in-depth and interactive dialogues with several local communities. In Kenya the dialogues also inspired a play developed by a local community theater group. The dialogues generated suggestions for action such as capacity building on alternative livelihoods and access to financial services.
See http://www.espa-spaces.org/uncovering-the-amazing-behind-the-scenes-achievements-by-tzunza-community-to-build-on-spaces-knowledge-and-dialogues/ for an assessment of impact.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.espa-spaces.org/community-dialogue-reports/
 
Description regional workshop on mangrove carbon from Zambezi river delta 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact a regional workshop on mangrove carbon from Zambezi river delta and related aspects of REDD+ in the western Indian ocean (8 and 9 April 2015). The workshop involved national and regional stakeholders. Also dealt with issues related with community involvement
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description stakeholders' meeting (Kwale county 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact stakeholders' meeting (2015) held with participants sourced from the County government of Kwale, government agencies and NGOs, local community, community leaders, and private sector interested in the conservation and management of mangrove forests within and adjacent to Vanga, Jimbo and Majoreni. The objective was to introduce the concept of mangrove Payment for Ecosystem Services to a wide stakeholder, to map community activities within and adjacent mangroves of Vanga, and; to seek community buy-in on the proposed mangrove carbon project for Vanga.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015