South West Partnership for Environment and Economic Prosperity (SWEEP)

Lead Research Organisation: University of Exeter
Department Name: Politics

Abstract

SWEEP brings together a unique blend of academics, businesses and policymakers to place 'natural capital' - those elements of nature producing value for people - at the heart of regional decision-making and business processes in the South West (SW). Focussing on the Heart of the South West and Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP) regions, SWEEP will radically transform the extent to which NERC science drives sustainable economic growth, improves policy, decision-making and resilience, delivers value for money and enhances health and wellbeing.

The UK Government has placed sustainable use of natural capital at the centre of its 25 Year Environment Plan (25YEP). With 800km of spectacular coastline and over a quarter of land within National Parks/Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, the SW is rich in natural capital. It is particularly reliant on these natural assets and the ecosystem services deriving from them to power economic growth, attracting more domestic tourists and with higher employment in direct natural capital usage (e.g. agriculture, fisheries) than any other UK region. However, there is also more potential for natural capital-led economic growth; productivity is low, with Gross Value Added 20% below national average and the lowest mean incomes nationally. Heavy reliance on natural capital also brings economic vulnerability and challenges from increasing occurrences of storms, flooding, degradation and pollution that damage that capital and limit economic growth.

SWEEP and its business and policy partners have co-designed a work programme utilising NERC-funded research to develop an integrated, cross-sectoral, 'whole system' approach to natural capital-led growth. The region's natural assets are inextricably linked, so traditional decision-making focussing on one sector at a time can result in unintended negative consequences for others. For example agricultural subsidies can lead to. contaminants from land bordering rivers lowering downstream water quality, affecting aquaculture, fisheries, tourism and health. SWEEP will address these problems, realising the benefits of integrated, whole system decision making through five interwoven 'Impact Themes', aiming to: 1) co-build tools to help business and government understand both the economic and environmental consequences of decisions; and 2) co-develop new business opportunities and natural capital markets giving both private and public sector organisations the means and incentive to improve nature's services, reducing their costs and risk exposure and improving their benefits.

With partners we have developed an initial set of 'Impact Cases', each addressing one or more Impact Themes, which will commence at the outset for rapid delivery of impact. They include development of new tools for natural hazard prediction and evaluation of economic/social benefits of enhancing natural capital. Careful integration across these Cases will demonstrate how the SW's high dependence on its natural environment can provide unprecedented opportunities to deliver transformative economic benefits.

The SWEEP consortium brings together a uniquely strong mix of environmental scientists, economists, social and health scientists. A team of 'Impact Fellows' will be embedded with partners to deliver the Impact Cases and scope new SWEEP activities. Partners will be integral to design, management and delivery, ensuring that all activities are aligned with user needs and fully integrated, maximising return on NERC's investment. Further value comes from alignment with the new 'Pioneers', which will be exemplars for the Government's 25YEP. Of only five 'Pioneers' nationally, two will be in the SW, providing the only integrated terrestrial-marine testbed for the 25 YEP. By working with the business and policy institutions involved in the Pioneers, SWEEP will act as a national flagship for environment-led regional growth.

Planned Impact

Many businesses and public sector organisations in the South West have a clear appreciation of the importance of the region's natural capital, in terms of regional socio-economic prosperity and well-being; both directly as derived business benefit, but also indirectly in terms of quality of life and well-being. Developing tools, processes and systems that support better accountability and valuation of the region's natural capital has been identified by many as a key requirement in bringing natural capital to the heart of public and private sector decision making.

SWEEP's five interlinked Impact Themes seek to create new business opportunities from better understanding of environmental processes, new natural capital markets to benefit the private and public sectors, and tools that can support and empower decision makers to better understand the environmental consequences of the decisions they make. Our 'systems-based' approach seeks to create new opportunities for the public and private sectors in delivering multifunctional outcomes that benefit both the economy and the environment.

In co-developing this proposal, SWEEP has engaged a wide range of public and private sector partners and will extend this process over the next five years. As a direct result of business engagement with the co-design process, SWEEP has already raised £11M of support from its partners, and will influence £225M of investment and resource asset value over the first three years of the Programme; a sum which is expected to rise to around £375M over the entire ESIP funding period. This depth of engagement will provide an excellent basis for developing a self-sustaining consortium which will transfer impact to beneficiaries nationally and provide a world-leading exemplar for placing science at the heart of natural capital-led growth.

Although SWEEP's Impact Themes will operate across a wide range of sectors, three broad groups of beneficiaries can be identified: businesses and business-support organisations; policymakers, regulators and advisory groups; and third sector groups including charities, environmental and community groups. We have engaged a wide set of organisations from each of these groups which we expect to work with over the course of the Programme (see Beneficiaries section for details).

Work under Impact Theme 1 will benefit all sectors listed above, reducing risks and associated damage costs from natural hazards such as inland flooding and coastal storm surges; and boosting the health and tourism benefits of greenspace. Impact Theme 2 improves the efficiency and impact of public spending, which in turn generates employment, economic and environmental benefits both to wider society and the business community. Impact Theme 3 benefits the water industry and customers in terms of lower treatment and supply costs and provides both private and public sectors bodies with new markets for delivering improvements to natural capital. Impact Theme 4 provides tools for guiding decision-making across the marine, farming and urban planning sectors to reverse environmental degradation, stimulate growth and improve wellbeing. Finally, Impact Theme 5 adds value to all previous collaborations by collating advances from all other Impact Themes and combining these to realise the benefits of integrated natural capital thinking and decision making across the private, public and third sectors.

Organisations

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description SWEEP has shown how the natural capital approach of bringing the value of nature into investment within government and the private sector can deliver higher economic gains which also conserving the environment.
Exploitation Route Many businesses can save themselves money from the natural capital approach. This applies across multiple business sectors
Sectors Agriculture, Food and Drink,Energy,Environment,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Government, Democracy and Justice,Transport

URL https://sweep.ac.uk/
 
Description The South West Partnership for Environment & Economic Prosperity (SWEEP) is a new initiative that will help deliver economic and community benefits to the South West, whilst also protecting and enhancing the area's natural resources. It will receive £5 million from NERC's Regional Impact from Science of the Environment programme for 5 years, and will bring academic experts, businesses and policy makers together to solve some of the challenges involved in managing, utilising and improving the natural environment. SWEEP is a collaboration of University of Exeter, the University of Plymouth and Plymouth Marine Laboratory - working together with a large group of highly engaged business, policy and community partners. SWEEP is currently working closely with over 40 partners on a portfolio of impact projects, of which our work with SWW has been the most impactful to date
First Year Of Impact 2017
Sector Agriculture, Food and Drink,Environment,Government, Democracy and Justice
Impact Types Societal,Economic,Policy & public services

 
Description Application of Natural Capital to Decision Making in the Marine
Amount £150,000 (GBP)
Organisation Department For Environment, Food And Rural Affairs (DEFRA) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2018 
End 09/2019
 
Description Catchment-scale processes contributing to transmission of antibiotic resistance in bathing waters
Amount £376,131 (GBP)
Funding ID NE/R013748/1 
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2018 
End 06/2021
 
Description Coastal REsistance: Alerts and Monitoring Technologies (CreamT)
Amount £177,672 (GBP)
Funding ID NE/V002589/1 
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2020 
End 08/2022
 
Description Funding for Marine Pioneer Natural Capital Plan
Amount £99,000 (GBP)
Organisation Government of the UK 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2019 
End 09/2020
 
Description Geodatabase for the N Devon Marine Pioneer to support the development of a Natural Capital Decision Support Tool
Amount £15,000 (GBP)
Organisation Natural England 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description Green Minds: Setting social perceptions baselines for Plymouth Sound National Marine Park and evaluation of the city's green and blue infrastructure.
Amount £500,000 (GBP)
Organisation European Commission 
Department European Regional Development Fund (ERDF)
Sector Public
Country Belgium
Start 09/2019 
End 09/2020
 
Description Industrial Innovatoin Fellowship
Amount £376,131 (GBP)
Funding ID NE/R013748/1 
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2018 
End 06/2021
 
Description Natural Environment Valuation Online (NEVO)
Amount £86,906 (GBP)
Organisation Department For Environment, Food And Rural Affairs (DEFRA) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2017 
End 11/2017
 
Description Natural capital decision making tool
Amount £380,000 (GBP)
Organisation Department For Environment, Food And Rural Affairs (DEFRA) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2017 
End 05/2018
 
Description The development of an ecosystem service assessment as a component of the WWF led UK SEAS programme sustainable finance workstream
Amount £30,000 (GBP)
Organisation World Wide Fund for Nature 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country Switzerland
Start  
 
Description Woodland Valuation Tool
Amount £18,267 (GBP)
Organisation Forestry Commission 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 12/2017 
End 03/2018
 
Description SWEEP001: Co-creating Operational and Strategic Modelling Systems to Reduce Economic and Societal Impacts of Coastal Hazards in SW England 
Organisation Environment Agency
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution This activity will develop, in partnership with the Environment Agency, Met Office, Royal National Lifeboat Institution, National Trust and coastal councils (through the Coastal Advisory Groups), Operational and Strategic Modelling Systems of Coastal Hazards for the SW of England. These modelling systems represent practical tools for end-users that are based on inshore wave forecasts on a spatial resolution (1-km) currently not available on a UK-wide scale, and, collectively, will effect a step change in the management of the SW coastal resource system, saving money and potentially lives. Specific tools will be co-developed with the Environment Agency (coastal flood risk; also involvement of coastal councils), Royal National Lifeboat Institution (beach hazards) and National Trust (erosional hotspots), all of which will allow partners to more accurately predict the impact of coastal hazards and so enable significantly more effective targeting of resources. Development of other applications will be explored through engagement with other potential partners (e.g., Magic Seaweed, Network Rail, Natural England, partners from the insurance and marine renewable energy sector). Engagement with present and future partners will take place within the context of a Partner Engagement Plan (PEP), consisting of phased meetings and workshops with potential partners as the modelling systems are being developed. It is the intention that by the end of this current proposal (Phases 1 & 2), a number of subsequent impacts cases will commence resulting from these new engagements.
Collaborator Contribution This activity will develop, in partnership with the Environment Agency, Met Office, Royal National Lifeboat Institution, National Trust and coastal councils (through the Coastal Advisory Groups), Operational and Strategic Modelling Systems of Coastal Hazards for the SW of England. These modelling systems represent practical tools for end-users that are based on inshore wave forecasts on a spatial resolution (1-km) currently not available on a UK-wide scale, and, collectively, will effect a step change in the management of the SW coastal resource system, saving money and potentially lives. Specific tools will be co-developed with the Environment Agency (coastal flood risk; also involvement of coastal councils), Royal National Lifeboat Institution (beach hazards) and National Trust (erosional hotspots), all of which will allow partners to more accurately predict the impact of coastal hazards and so enable significantly more effective targeting of resources. Development of other applications will be explored through engagement with other potential partners (e.g., Magic Seaweed, Network Rail, Natural England, partners from the insurance and marine renewable energy sector). Engagement with present and future partners will take place within the context of a Partner Engagement Plan (PEP), consisting of phased meetings and workshops with potential partners as the modelling systems are being developed. It is the intention that by the end of this current proposal (Phases 1 & 2), a number of subsequent impacts cases will commence resulting from these new engagements.
Impact 1) Operational Wave and Water Level (OWWL) model ? Description: Development of a detailed (1-km resolution) operational (i.e. real-time) model of waves and water levels in SW England, using the Delft-3D hydrodynamic model, that can be run from a single desktop PC. Development of automation routines to download Met Office forcing data, set up the model, and generate outputs from the model results each day. The model was validated against wave buoy and tide gauge data around SW England, replicating observed hydrodynamics with a high level of accuracy. ? Outcomes: The model provides the core data required for the bespoke coastal hazards forecasts (see other outputs below). The forecasted wave and water level data are presented daily on the Channel Coastal Observatory website (http://www.channelcoast.org/ccoresources/sweep/), which is the primary portal used by coastal engineers and decision makers to access data. ? Expected outcomes: the model and forecasts will continue to operate until at least 2022. The EA are currently starting a 3-year project to develop a national scale overtopping forecast, largely based on OWWL (see impact statement from Nick Ely), and it is expected that after 2022 OWWL may already be superseded by this national forecast. The knowledge and impact are therefore expected to be embedded at the national scale by 2027. 2) Bespoke wave overtopping forecast for the EA ? Description: Automated generation of PDFs with details of where and when peak wave overtopping hazards will occur in the region. These are automatically emailed to subscribers in advance of a storm. Automated generation of social media output (twitter), showing regional-scale hazards. ? Outcomes: There are currently 70 email subscribers, including 19 EA flood warning officers, and 478 followers on Twitter. The forecast PDFs have been used by the EA in the SW since 2018 to inform their operations prior to and during storms. The twitter feed is re-tweeted to the wider public by the EA's national Coastal Modelling & Forecasting Manager, Nick Ely (1,289 Twitter followers), as well as 'CoastSafe' a regional emergency services partnership (2,789 Twitter followers). One video and real-time warning of overtopping hazard tweeted by the 001 team had over 19,000 views. ? Expected outcomes: The overtopping forecast will continue to operate until at least 2022. The EA are currently procuring a nation-wide coastal overtopping forecast system, using the OWWL forecast as the basis for their new system. 3) A 30 page technical note on the SWEEP OWWL model ? Description: detailing the methods used in the SWEEP-OWWL coastal flood forecast system (outputs 1&2) as well as forecasting recommendations, this was shared with the EA Coastal Modelling & Forecasting senior team, led by at Keith Nursey, to support better understanding and use of the forecasts. ? Outcomes: EA review of coastal modelling - in 2019 the EA undertook a review of coastal modelling methods, to inform their future modelling strategy. Upon their request, a technical report was provided in January 2019 describing the OWWL wave overtopping forecast system in detail, including the methods and formulae used to generate the warnings. Forecast data was also provided at a number of locations, and compared by the EA to a range of alternative modelling methods. ? Expected outcomes: The forecasting strategy document was used by them to 'identify future opportunities and projects to improve real-time coastal forecasting and potentially access a funding pot of 20 million pounds' from central government (Nick Ely, see impact section) 4) Additional outcome - adapting the OWWL model and forecasting methodology to meet the needs of other beneficiaries (final reports still to come) ? Description: The core OWWL wave and water level model is now being used to drive a number of other applications around the SW and Welsh coastline including an extension of the OWWL model and forecast for South Wales, a bespoke aquaculture forecast in Lyme Bay for Offshore Shellfish, a hazards forecast at Crantock Beach for RNLI, a hydrodynamic forecast for the Isles of Scilly and a marine renewable energy forecast in Pembrokeshire, Wales, for Bombora Wave Energy. See 4A - 4E below for more details. 4A) Bespoke marine conditions forecast for Offshore Shellfish Ltd ? Description: Working with Offshore Shellfish Ltd (OS; https://offshoreshellfish.com/) in Lyme Bay (set to be the UK's largest offshore, rope cultured mussel farm), the SWEEP team have been using OWWL since January 2020 to deliver a daily forecast showing 3-day ahead sea conditions in Lyme Bay. ? Outcomes: This significantly improved upon existing available forecasts and is already supporting more effective 'go/no-go' decisions for the aquaculture operations team, and is now enabling them to decide in advance what at-sea operations will be possible on a given day. ? Expected outcomes: The aquaculture forecast will continue to operate until at least 2022. The pilot system is being used as a basis for a £20k funding proposal from Plymouth University's R+D innovation fund to develop a more widely applicable aquaculture forecast system to allow Offshore Shellfish and other aquaculture farms to improve the safety and efficacy of at-sea operations.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP001: Co-creating Operational and Strategic Modelling Systems to Reduce Economic and Societal Impacts of Coastal Hazards in SW England 
Organisation Meteorological Office UK
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This activity will develop, in partnership with the Environment Agency, Met Office, Royal National Lifeboat Institution, National Trust and coastal councils (through the Coastal Advisory Groups), Operational and Strategic Modelling Systems of Coastal Hazards for the SW of England. These modelling systems represent practical tools for end-users that are based on inshore wave forecasts on a spatial resolution (1-km) currently not available on a UK-wide scale, and, collectively, will effect a step change in the management of the SW coastal resource system, saving money and potentially lives. Specific tools will be co-developed with the Environment Agency (coastal flood risk; also involvement of coastal councils), Royal National Lifeboat Institution (beach hazards) and National Trust (erosional hotspots), all of which will allow partners to more accurately predict the impact of coastal hazards and so enable significantly more effective targeting of resources. Development of other applications will be explored through engagement with other potential partners (e.g., Magic Seaweed, Network Rail, Natural England, partners from the insurance and marine renewable energy sector). Engagement with present and future partners will take place within the context of a Partner Engagement Plan (PEP), consisting of phased meetings and workshops with potential partners as the modelling systems are being developed. It is the intention that by the end of this current proposal (Phases 1 & 2), a number of subsequent impacts cases will commence resulting from these new engagements.
Collaborator Contribution This activity will develop, in partnership with the Environment Agency, Met Office, Royal National Lifeboat Institution, National Trust and coastal councils (through the Coastal Advisory Groups), Operational and Strategic Modelling Systems of Coastal Hazards for the SW of England. These modelling systems represent practical tools for end-users that are based on inshore wave forecasts on a spatial resolution (1-km) currently not available on a UK-wide scale, and, collectively, will effect a step change in the management of the SW coastal resource system, saving money and potentially lives. Specific tools will be co-developed with the Environment Agency (coastal flood risk; also involvement of coastal councils), Royal National Lifeboat Institution (beach hazards) and National Trust (erosional hotspots), all of which will allow partners to more accurately predict the impact of coastal hazards and so enable significantly more effective targeting of resources. Development of other applications will be explored through engagement with other potential partners (e.g., Magic Seaweed, Network Rail, Natural England, partners from the insurance and marine renewable energy sector). Engagement with present and future partners will take place within the context of a Partner Engagement Plan (PEP), consisting of phased meetings and workshops with potential partners as the modelling systems are being developed. It is the intention that by the end of this current proposal (Phases 1 & 2), a number of subsequent impacts cases will commence resulting from these new engagements.
Impact 1) Operational Wave and Water Level (OWWL) model ? Description: Development of a detailed (1-km resolution) operational (i.e. real-time) model of waves and water levels in SW England, using the Delft-3D hydrodynamic model, that can be run from a single desktop PC. Development of automation routines to download Met Office forcing data, set up the model, and generate outputs from the model results each day. The model was validated against wave buoy and tide gauge data around SW England, replicating observed hydrodynamics with a high level of accuracy. ? Outcomes: The model provides the core data required for the bespoke coastal hazards forecasts (see other outputs below). The forecasted wave and water level data are presented daily on the Channel Coastal Observatory website (http://www.channelcoast.org/ccoresources/sweep/), which is the primary portal used by coastal engineers and decision makers to access data. ? Expected outcomes: the model and forecasts will continue to operate until at least 2022. The EA are currently starting a 3-year project to develop a national scale overtopping forecast, largely based on OWWL (see impact statement from Nick Ely), and it is expected that after 2022 OWWL may already be superseded by this national forecast. The knowledge and impact are therefore expected to be embedded at the national scale by 2027. 2) Bespoke wave overtopping forecast for the EA ? Description: Automated generation of PDFs with details of where and when peak wave overtopping hazards will occur in the region. These are automatically emailed to subscribers in advance of a storm. Automated generation of social media output (twitter), showing regional-scale hazards. ? Outcomes: There are currently 70 email subscribers, including 19 EA flood warning officers, and 478 followers on Twitter. The forecast PDFs have been used by the EA in the SW since 2018 to inform their operations prior to and during storms. The twitter feed is re-tweeted to the wider public by the EA's national Coastal Modelling & Forecasting Manager, Nick Ely (1,289 Twitter followers), as well as 'CoastSafe' a regional emergency services partnership (2,789 Twitter followers). One video and real-time warning of overtopping hazard tweeted by the 001 team had over 19,000 views. ? Expected outcomes: The overtopping forecast will continue to operate until at least 2022. The EA are currently procuring a nation-wide coastal overtopping forecast system, using the OWWL forecast as the basis for their new system. 3) A 30 page technical note on the SWEEP OWWL model ? Description: detailing the methods used in the SWEEP-OWWL coastal flood forecast system (outputs 1&2) as well as forecasting recommendations, this was shared with the EA Coastal Modelling & Forecasting senior team, led by at Keith Nursey, to support better understanding and use of the forecasts. ? Outcomes: EA review of coastal modelling - in 2019 the EA undertook a review of coastal modelling methods, to inform their future modelling strategy. Upon their request, a technical report was provided in January 2019 describing the OWWL wave overtopping forecast system in detail, including the methods and formulae used to generate the warnings. Forecast data was also provided at a number of locations, and compared by the EA to a range of alternative modelling methods. ? Expected outcomes: The forecasting strategy document was used by them to 'identify future opportunities and projects to improve real-time coastal forecasting and potentially access a funding pot of 20 million pounds' from central government (Nick Ely, see impact section) 4) Additional outcome - adapting the OWWL model and forecasting methodology to meet the needs of other beneficiaries (final reports still to come) ? Description: The core OWWL wave and water level model is now being used to drive a number of other applications around the SW and Welsh coastline including an extension of the OWWL model and forecast for South Wales, a bespoke aquaculture forecast in Lyme Bay for Offshore Shellfish, a hazards forecast at Crantock Beach for RNLI, a hydrodynamic forecast for the Isles of Scilly and a marine renewable energy forecast in Pembrokeshire, Wales, for Bombora Wave Energy. See 4A - 4E below for more details. 4A) Bespoke marine conditions forecast for Offshore Shellfish Ltd ? Description: Working with Offshore Shellfish Ltd (OS; https://offshoreshellfish.com/) in Lyme Bay (set to be the UK's largest offshore, rope cultured mussel farm), the SWEEP team have been using OWWL since January 2020 to deliver a daily forecast showing 3-day ahead sea conditions in Lyme Bay. ? Outcomes: This significantly improved upon existing available forecasts and is already supporting more effective 'go/no-go' decisions for the aquaculture operations team, and is now enabling them to decide in advance what at-sea operations will be possible on a given day. ? Expected outcomes: The aquaculture forecast will continue to operate until at least 2022. The pilot system is being used as a basis for a £20k funding proposal from Plymouth University's R+D innovation fund to develop a more widely applicable aquaculture forecast system to allow Offshore Shellfish and other aquaculture farms to improve the safety and efficacy of at-sea operations.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP001: Co-creating Operational and Strategic Modelling Systems to Reduce Economic and Societal Impacts of Coastal Hazards in SW England 
Organisation National Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This activity will develop, in partnership with the Environment Agency, Met Office, Royal National Lifeboat Institution, National Trust and coastal councils (through the Coastal Advisory Groups), Operational and Strategic Modelling Systems of Coastal Hazards for the SW of England. These modelling systems represent practical tools for end-users that are based on inshore wave forecasts on a spatial resolution (1-km) currently not available on a UK-wide scale, and, collectively, will effect a step change in the management of the SW coastal resource system, saving money and potentially lives. Specific tools will be co-developed with the Environment Agency (coastal flood risk; also involvement of coastal councils), Royal National Lifeboat Institution (beach hazards) and National Trust (erosional hotspots), all of which will allow partners to more accurately predict the impact of coastal hazards and so enable significantly more effective targeting of resources. Development of other applications will be explored through engagement with other potential partners (e.g., Magic Seaweed, Network Rail, Natural England, partners from the insurance and marine renewable energy sector). Engagement with present and future partners will take place within the context of a Partner Engagement Plan (PEP), consisting of phased meetings and workshops with potential partners as the modelling systems are being developed. It is the intention that by the end of this current proposal (Phases 1 & 2), a number of subsequent impacts cases will commence resulting from these new engagements.
Collaborator Contribution This activity will develop, in partnership with the Environment Agency, Met Office, Royal National Lifeboat Institution, National Trust and coastal councils (through the Coastal Advisory Groups), Operational and Strategic Modelling Systems of Coastal Hazards for the SW of England. These modelling systems represent practical tools for end-users that are based on inshore wave forecasts on a spatial resolution (1-km) currently not available on a UK-wide scale, and, collectively, will effect a step change in the management of the SW coastal resource system, saving money and potentially lives. Specific tools will be co-developed with the Environment Agency (coastal flood risk; also involvement of coastal councils), Royal National Lifeboat Institution (beach hazards) and National Trust (erosional hotspots), all of which will allow partners to more accurately predict the impact of coastal hazards and so enable significantly more effective targeting of resources. Development of other applications will be explored through engagement with other potential partners (e.g., Magic Seaweed, Network Rail, Natural England, partners from the insurance and marine renewable energy sector). Engagement with present and future partners will take place within the context of a Partner Engagement Plan (PEP), consisting of phased meetings and workshops with potential partners as the modelling systems are being developed. It is the intention that by the end of this current proposal (Phases 1 & 2), a number of subsequent impacts cases will commence resulting from these new engagements.
Impact 1) Operational Wave and Water Level (OWWL) model ? Description: Development of a detailed (1-km resolution) operational (i.e. real-time) model of waves and water levels in SW England, using the Delft-3D hydrodynamic model, that can be run from a single desktop PC. Development of automation routines to download Met Office forcing data, set up the model, and generate outputs from the model results each day. The model was validated against wave buoy and tide gauge data around SW England, replicating observed hydrodynamics with a high level of accuracy. ? Outcomes: The model provides the core data required for the bespoke coastal hazards forecasts (see other outputs below). The forecasted wave and water level data are presented daily on the Channel Coastal Observatory website (http://www.channelcoast.org/ccoresources/sweep/), which is the primary portal used by coastal engineers and decision makers to access data. ? Expected outcomes: the model and forecasts will continue to operate until at least 2022. The EA are currently starting a 3-year project to develop a national scale overtopping forecast, largely based on OWWL (see impact statement from Nick Ely), and it is expected that after 2022 OWWL may already be superseded by this national forecast. The knowledge and impact are therefore expected to be embedded at the national scale by 2027. 2) Bespoke wave overtopping forecast for the EA ? Description: Automated generation of PDFs with details of where and when peak wave overtopping hazards will occur in the region. These are automatically emailed to subscribers in advance of a storm. Automated generation of social media output (twitter), showing regional-scale hazards. ? Outcomes: There are currently 70 email subscribers, including 19 EA flood warning officers, and 478 followers on Twitter. The forecast PDFs have been used by the EA in the SW since 2018 to inform their operations prior to and during storms. The twitter feed is re-tweeted to the wider public by the EA's national Coastal Modelling & Forecasting Manager, Nick Ely (1,289 Twitter followers), as well as 'CoastSafe' a regional emergency services partnership (2,789 Twitter followers). One video and real-time warning of overtopping hazard tweeted by the 001 team had over 19,000 views. ? Expected outcomes: The overtopping forecast will continue to operate until at least 2022. The EA are currently procuring a nation-wide coastal overtopping forecast system, using the OWWL forecast as the basis for their new system. 3) A 30 page technical note on the SWEEP OWWL model ? Description: detailing the methods used in the SWEEP-OWWL coastal flood forecast system (outputs 1&2) as well as forecasting recommendations, this was shared with the EA Coastal Modelling & Forecasting senior team, led by at Keith Nursey, to support better understanding and use of the forecasts. ? Outcomes: EA review of coastal modelling - in 2019 the EA undertook a review of coastal modelling methods, to inform their future modelling strategy. Upon their request, a technical report was provided in January 2019 describing the OWWL wave overtopping forecast system in detail, including the methods and formulae used to generate the warnings. Forecast data was also provided at a number of locations, and compared by the EA to a range of alternative modelling methods. ? Expected outcomes: The forecasting strategy document was used by them to 'identify future opportunities and projects to improve real-time coastal forecasting and potentially access a funding pot of 20 million pounds' from central government (Nick Ely, see impact section) 4) Additional outcome - adapting the OWWL model and forecasting methodology to meet the needs of other beneficiaries (final reports still to come) ? Description: The core OWWL wave and water level model is now being used to drive a number of other applications around the SW and Welsh coastline including an extension of the OWWL model and forecast for South Wales, a bespoke aquaculture forecast in Lyme Bay for Offshore Shellfish, a hazards forecast at Crantock Beach for RNLI, a hydrodynamic forecast for the Isles of Scilly and a marine renewable energy forecast in Pembrokeshire, Wales, for Bombora Wave Energy. See 4A - 4E below for more details. 4A) Bespoke marine conditions forecast for Offshore Shellfish Ltd ? Description: Working with Offshore Shellfish Ltd (OS; https://offshoreshellfish.com/) in Lyme Bay (set to be the UK's largest offshore, rope cultured mussel farm), the SWEEP team have been using OWWL since January 2020 to deliver a daily forecast showing 3-day ahead sea conditions in Lyme Bay. ? Outcomes: This significantly improved upon existing available forecasts and is already supporting more effective 'go/no-go' decisions for the aquaculture operations team, and is now enabling them to decide in advance what at-sea operations will be possible on a given day. ? Expected outcomes: The aquaculture forecast will continue to operate until at least 2022. The pilot system is being used as a basis for a £20k funding proposal from Plymouth University's R+D innovation fund to develop a more widely applicable aquaculture forecast system to allow Offshore Shellfish and other aquaculture farms to improve the safety and efficacy of at-sea operations.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP001: Co-creating Operational and Strategic Modelling Systems to Reduce Economic and Societal Impacts of Coastal Hazards in SW England 
Organisation Natural England
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This activity will develop, in partnership with the Environment Agency, Met Office, Royal National Lifeboat Institution, National Trust and coastal councils (through the Coastal Advisory Groups), Operational and Strategic Modelling Systems of Coastal Hazards for the SW of England. These modelling systems represent practical tools for end-users that are based on inshore wave forecasts on a spatial resolution (1-km) currently not available on a UK-wide scale, and, collectively, will effect a step change in the management of the SW coastal resource system, saving money and potentially lives. Specific tools will be co-developed with the Environment Agency (coastal flood risk; also involvement of coastal councils), Royal National Lifeboat Institution (beach hazards) and National Trust (erosional hotspots), all of which will allow partners to more accurately predict the impact of coastal hazards and so enable significantly more effective targeting of resources. Development of other applications will be explored through engagement with other potential partners (e.g., Magic Seaweed, Network Rail, Natural England, partners from the insurance and marine renewable energy sector). Engagement with present and future partners will take place within the context of a Partner Engagement Plan (PEP), consisting of phased meetings and workshops with potential partners as the modelling systems are being developed. It is the intention that by the end of this current proposal (Phases 1 & 2), a number of subsequent impacts cases will commence resulting from these new engagements.
Collaborator Contribution This activity will develop, in partnership with the Environment Agency, Met Office, Royal National Lifeboat Institution, National Trust and coastal councils (through the Coastal Advisory Groups), Operational and Strategic Modelling Systems of Coastal Hazards for the SW of England. These modelling systems represent practical tools for end-users that are based on inshore wave forecasts on a spatial resolution (1-km) currently not available on a UK-wide scale, and, collectively, will effect a step change in the management of the SW coastal resource system, saving money and potentially lives. Specific tools will be co-developed with the Environment Agency (coastal flood risk; also involvement of coastal councils), Royal National Lifeboat Institution (beach hazards) and National Trust (erosional hotspots), all of which will allow partners to more accurately predict the impact of coastal hazards and so enable significantly more effective targeting of resources. Development of other applications will be explored through engagement with other potential partners (e.g., Magic Seaweed, Network Rail, Natural England, partners from the insurance and marine renewable energy sector). Engagement with present and future partners will take place within the context of a Partner Engagement Plan (PEP), consisting of phased meetings and workshops with potential partners as the modelling systems are being developed. It is the intention that by the end of this current proposal (Phases 1 & 2), a number of subsequent impacts cases will commence resulting from these new engagements.
Impact 1) Operational Wave and Water Level (OWWL) model ? Description: Development of a detailed (1-km resolution) operational (i.e. real-time) model of waves and water levels in SW England, using the Delft-3D hydrodynamic model, that can be run from a single desktop PC. Development of automation routines to download Met Office forcing data, set up the model, and generate outputs from the model results each day. The model was validated against wave buoy and tide gauge data around SW England, replicating observed hydrodynamics with a high level of accuracy. ? Outcomes: The model provides the core data required for the bespoke coastal hazards forecasts (see other outputs below). The forecasted wave and water level data are presented daily on the Channel Coastal Observatory website (http://www.channelcoast.org/ccoresources/sweep/), which is the primary portal used by coastal engineers and decision makers to access data. ? Expected outcomes: the model and forecasts will continue to operate until at least 2022. The EA are currently starting a 3-year project to develop a national scale overtopping forecast, largely based on OWWL (see impact statement from Nick Ely), and it is expected that after 2022 OWWL may already be superseded by this national forecast. The knowledge and impact are therefore expected to be embedded at the national scale by 2027. 2) Bespoke wave overtopping forecast for the EA ? Description: Automated generation of PDFs with details of where and when peak wave overtopping hazards will occur in the region. These are automatically emailed to subscribers in advance of a storm. Automated generation of social media output (twitter), showing regional-scale hazards. ? Outcomes: There are currently 70 email subscribers, including 19 EA flood warning officers, and 478 followers on Twitter. The forecast PDFs have been used by the EA in the SW since 2018 to inform their operations prior to and during storms. The twitter feed is re-tweeted to the wider public by the EA's national Coastal Modelling & Forecasting Manager, Nick Ely (1,289 Twitter followers), as well as 'CoastSafe' a regional emergency services partnership (2,789 Twitter followers). One video and real-time warning of overtopping hazard tweeted by the 001 team had over 19,000 views. ? Expected outcomes: The overtopping forecast will continue to operate until at least 2022. The EA are currently procuring a nation-wide coastal overtopping forecast system, using the OWWL forecast as the basis for their new system. 3) A 30 page technical note on the SWEEP OWWL model ? Description: detailing the methods used in the SWEEP-OWWL coastal flood forecast system (outputs 1&2) as well as forecasting recommendations, this was shared with the EA Coastal Modelling & Forecasting senior team, led by at Keith Nursey, to support better understanding and use of the forecasts. ? Outcomes: EA review of coastal modelling - in 2019 the EA undertook a review of coastal modelling methods, to inform their future modelling strategy. Upon their request, a technical report was provided in January 2019 describing the OWWL wave overtopping forecast system in detail, including the methods and formulae used to generate the warnings. Forecast data was also provided at a number of locations, and compared by the EA to a range of alternative modelling methods. ? Expected outcomes: The forecasting strategy document was used by them to 'identify future opportunities and projects to improve real-time coastal forecasting and potentially access a funding pot of 20 million pounds' from central government (Nick Ely, see impact section) 4) Additional outcome - adapting the OWWL model and forecasting methodology to meet the needs of other beneficiaries (final reports still to come) ? Description: The core OWWL wave and water level model is now being used to drive a number of other applications around the SW and Welsh coastline including an extension of the OWWL model and forecast for South Wales, a bespoke aquaculture forecast in Lyme Bay for Offshore Shellfish, a hazards forecast at Crantock Beach for RNLI, a hydrodynamic forecast for the Isles of Scilly and a marine renewable energy forecast in Pembrokeshire, Wales, for Bombora Wave Energy. See 4A - 4E below for more details. 4A) Bespoke marine conditions forecast for Offshore Shellfish Ltd ? Description: Working with Offshore Shellfish Ltd (OS; https://offshoreshellfish.com/) in Lyme Bay (set to be the UK's largest offshore, rope cultured mussel farm), the SWEEP team have been using OWWL since January 2020 to deliver a daily forecast showing 3-day ahead sea conditions in Lyme Bay. ? Outcomes: This significantly improved upon existing available forecasts and is already supporting more effective 'go/no-go' decisions for the aquaculture operations team, and is now enabling them to decide in advance what at-sea operations will be possible on a given day. ? Expected outcomes: The aquaculture forecast will continue to operate until at least 2022. The pilot system is being used as a basis for a £20k funding proposal from Plymouth University's R+D innovation fund to develop a more widely applicable aquaculture forecast system to allow Offshore Shellfish and other aquaculture farms to improve the safety and efficacy of at-sea operations.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP001: Co-creating Operational and Strategic Modelling Systems to Reduce Economic and Societal Impacts of Coastal Hazards in SW England 
Organisation Network Rail Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution This activity will develop, in partnership with the Environment Agency, Met Office, Royal National Lifeboat Institution, National Trust and coastal councils (through the Coastal Advisory Groups), Operational and Strategic Modelling Systems of Coastal Hazards for the SW of England. These modelling systems represent practical tools for end-users that are based on inshore wave forecasts on a spatial resolution (1-km) currently not available on a UK-wide scale, and, collectively, will effect a step change in the management of the SW coastal resource system, saving money and potentially lives. Specific tools will be co-developed with the Environment Agency (coastal flood risk; also involvement of coastal councils), Royal National Lifeboat Institution (beach hazards) and National Trust (erosional hotspots), all of which will allow partners to more accurately predict the impact of coastal hazards and so enable significantly more effective targeting of resources. Development of other applications will be explored through engagement with other potential partners (e.g., Magic Seaweed, Network Rail, Natural England, partners from the insurance and marine renewable energy sector). Engagement with present and future partners will take place within the context of a Partner Engagement Plan (PEP), consisting of phased meetings and workshops with potential partners as the modelling systems are being developed. It is the intention that by the end of this current proposal (Phases 1 & 2), a number of subsequent impacts cases will commence resulting from these new engagements.
Collaborator Contribution This activity will develop, in partnership with the Environment Agency, Met Office, Royal National Lifeboat Institution, National Trust and coastal councils (through the Coastal Advisory Groups), Operational and Strategic Modelling Systems of Coastal Hazards for the SW of England. These modelling systems represent practical tools for end-users that are based on inshore wave forecasts on a spatial resolution (1-km) currently not available on a UK-wide scale, and, collectively, will effect a step change in the management of the SW coastal resource system, saving money and potentially lives. Specific tools will be co-developed with the Environment Agency (coastal flood risk; also involvement of coastal councils), Royal National Lifeboat Institution (beach hazards) and National Trust (erosional hotspots), all of which will allow partners to more accurately predict the impact of coastal hazards and so enable significantly more effective targeting of resources. Development of other applications will be explored through engagement with other potential partners (e.g., Magic Seaweed, Network Rail, Natural England, partners from the insurance and marine renewable energy sector). Engagement with present and future partners will take place within the context of a Partner Engagement Plan (PEP), consisting of phased meetings and workshops with potential partners as the modelling systems are being developed. It is the intention that by the end of this current proposal (Phases 1 & 2), a number of subsequent impacts cases will commence resulting from these new engagements.
Impact 1) Operational Wave and Water Level (OWWL) model ? Description: Development of a detailed (1-km resolution) operational (i.e. real-time) model of waves and water levels in SW England, using the Delft-3D hydrodynamic model, that can be run from a single desktop PC. Development of automation routines to download Met Office forcing data, set up the model, and generate outputs from the model results each day. The model was validated against wave buoy and tide gauge data around SW England, replicating observed hydrodynamics with a high level of accuracy. ? Outcomes: The model provides the core data required for the bespoke coastal hazards forecasts (see other outputs below). The forecasted wave and water level data are presented daily on the Channel Coastal Observatory website (http://www.channelcoast.org/ccoresources/sweep/), which is the primary portal used by coastal engineers and decision makers to access data. ? Expected outcomes: the model and forecasts will continue to operate until at least 2022. The EA are currently starting a 3-year project to develop a national scale overtopping forecast, largely based on OWWL (see impact statement from Nick Ely), and it is expected that after 2022 OWWL may already be superseded by this national forecast. The knowledge and impact are therefore expected to be embedded at the national scale by 2027. 2) Bespoke wave overtopping forecast for the EA ? Description: Automated generation of PDFs with details of where and when peak wave overtopping hazards will occur in the region. These are automatically emailed to subscribers in advance of a storm. Automated generation of social media output (twitter), showing regional-scale hazards. ? Outcomes: There are currently 70 email subscribers, including 19 EA flood warning officers, and 478 followers on Twitter. The forecast PDFs have been used by the EA in the SW since 2018 to inform their operations prior to and during storms. The twitter feed is re-tweeted to the wider public by the EA's national Coastal Modelling & Forecasting Manager, Nick Ely (1,289 Twitter followers), as well as 'CoastSafe' a regional emergency services partnership (2,789 Twitter followers). One video and real-time warning of overtopping hazard tweeted by the 001 team had over 19,000 views. ? Expected outcomes: The overtopping forecast will continue to operate until at least 2022. The EA are currently procuring a nation-wide coastal overtopping forecast system, using the OWWL forecast as the basis for their new system. 3) A 30 page technical note on the SWEEP OWWL model ? Description: detailing the methods used in the SWEEP-OWWL coastal flood forecast system (outputs 1&2) as well as forecasting recommendations, this was shared with the EA Coastal Modelling & Forecasting senior team, led by at Keith Nursey, to support better understanding and use of the forecasts. ? Outcomes: EA review of coastal modelling - in 2019 the EA undertook a review of coastal modelling methods, to inform their future modelling strategy. Upon their request, a technical report was provided in January 2019 describing the OWWL wave overtopping forecast system in detail, including the methods and formulae used to generate the warnings. Forecast data was also provided at a number of locations, and compared by the EA to a range of alternative modelling methods. ? Expected outcomes: The forecasting strategy document was used by them to 'identify future opportunities and projects to improve real-time coastal forecasting and potentially access a funding pot of 20 million pounds' from central government (Nick Ely, see impact section) 4) Additional outcome - adapting the OWWL model and forecasting methodology to meet the needs of other beneficiaries (final reports still to come) ? Description: The core OWWL wave and water level model is now being used to drive a number of other applications around the SW and Welsh coastline including an extension of the OWWL model and forecast for South Wales, a bespoke aquaculture forecast in Lyme Bay for Offshore Shellfish, a hazards forecast at Crantock Beach for RNLI, a hydrodynamic forecast for the Isles of Scilly and a marine renewable energy forecast in Pembrokeshire, Wales, for Bombora Wave Energy. See 4A - 4E below for more details. 4A) Bespoke marine conditions forecast for Offshore Shellfish Ltd ? Description: Working with Offshore Shellfish Ltd (OS; https://offshoreshellfish.com/) in Lyme Bay (set to be the UK's largest offshore, rope cultured mussel farm), the SWEEP team have been using OWWL since January 2020 to deliver a daily forecast showing 3-day ahead sea conditions in Lyme Bay. ? Outcomes: This significantly improved upon existing available forecasts and is already supporting more effective 'go/no-go' decisions for the aquaculture operations team, and is now enabling them to decide in advance what at-sea operations will be possible on a given day. ? Expected outcomes: The aquaculture forecast will continue to operate until at least 2022. The pilot system is being used as a basis for a £20k funding proposal from Plymouth University's R+D innovation fund to develop a more widely applicable aquaculture forecast system to allow Offshore Shellfish and other aquaculture farms to improve the safety and efficacy of at-sea operations.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP001: Co-creating Operational and Strategic Modelling Systems to Reduce Economic and Societal Impacts of Coastal Hazards in SW England 
Organisation North Devon Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution This activity will develop, in partnership with the Environment Agency, Met Office, Royal National Lifeboat Institution, National Trust and coastal councils (through the Coastal Advisory Groups), Operational and Strategic Modelling Systems of Coastal Hazards for the SW of England. These modelling systems represent practical tools for end-users that are based on inshore wave forecasts on a spatial resolution (1-km) currently not available on a UK-wide scale, and, collectively, will effect a step change in the management of the SW coastal resource system, saving money and potentially lives. Specific tools will be co-developed with the Environment Agency (coastal flood risk; also involvement of coastal councils), Royal National Lifeboat Institution (beach hazards) and National Trust (erosional hotspots), all of which will allow partners to more accurately predict the impact of coastal hazards and so enable significantly more effective targeting of resources. Development of other applications will be explored through engagement with other potential partners (e.g., Magic Seaweed, Network Rail, Natural England, partners from the insurance and marine renewable energy sector). Engagement with present and future partners will take place within the context of a Partner Engagement Plan (PEP), consisting of phased meetings and workshops with potential partners as the modelling systems are being developed. It is the intention that by the end of this current proposal (Phases 1 & 2), a number of subsequent impacts cases will commence resulting from these new engagements.
Collaborator Contribution This activity will develop, in partnership with the Environment Agency, Met Office, Royal National Lifeboat Institution, National Trust and coastal councils (through the Coastal Advisory Groups), Operational and Strategic Modelling Systems of Coastal Hazards for the SW of England. These modelling systems represent practical tools for end-users that are based on inshore wave forecasts on a spatial resolution (1-km) currently not available on a UK-wide scale, and, collectively, will effect a step change in the management of the SW coastal resource system, saving money and potentially lives. Specific tools will be co-developed with the Environment Agency (coastal flood risk; also involvement of coastal councils), Royal National Lifeboat Institution (beach hazards) and National Trust (erosional hotspots), all of which will allow partners to more accurately predict the impact of coastal hazards and so enable significantly more effective targeting of resources. Development of other applications will be explored through engagement with other potential partners (e.g., Magic Seaweed, Network Rail, Natural England, partners from the insurance and marine renewable energy sector). Engagement with present and future partners will take place within the context of a Partner Engagement Plan (PEP), consisting of phased meetings and workshops with potential partners as the modelling systems are being developed. It is the intention that by the end of this current proposal (Phases 1 & 2), a number of subsequent impacts cases will commence resulting from these new engagements.
Impact 1) Operational Wave and Water Level (OWWL) model ? Description: Development of a detailed (1-km resolution) operational (i.e. real-time) model of waves and water levels in SW England, using the Delft-3D hydrodynamic model, that can be run from a single desktop PC. Development of automation routines to download Met Office forcing data, set up the model, and generate outputs from the model results each day. The model was validated against wave buoy and tide gauge data around SW England, replicating observed hydrodynamics with a high level of accuracy. ? Outcomes: The model provides the core data required for the bespoke coastal hazards forecasts (see other outputs below). The forecasted wave and water level data are presented daily on the Channel Coastal Observatory website (http://www.channelcoast.org/ccoresources/sweep/), which is the primary portal used by coastal engineers and decision makers to access data. ? Expected outcomes: the model and forecasts will continue to operate until at least 2022. The EA are currently starting a 3-year project to develop a national scale overtopping forecast, largely based on OWWL (see impact statement from Nick Ely), and it is expected that after 2022 OWWL may already be superseded by this national forecast. The knowledge and impact are therefore expected to be embedded at the national scale by 2027. 2) Bespoke wave overtopping forecast for the EA ? Description: Automated generation of PDFs with details of where and when peak wave overtopping hazards will occur in the region. These are automatically emailed to subscribers in advance of a storm. Automated generation of social media output (twitter), showing regional-scale hazards. ? Outcomes: There are currently 70 email subscribers, including 19 EA flood warning officers, and 478 followers on Twitter. The forecast PDFs have been used by the EA in the SW since 2018 to inform their operations prior to and during storms. The twitter feed is re-tweeted to the wider public by the EA's national Coastal Modelling & Forecasting Manager, Nick Ely (1,289 Twitter followers), as well as 'CoastSafe' a regional emergency services partnership (2,789 Twitter followers). One video and real-time warning of overtopping hazard tweeted by the 001 team had over 19,000 views. ? Expected outcomes: The overtopping forecast will continue to operate until at least 2022. The EA are currently procuring a nation-wide coastal overtopping forecast system, using the OWWL forecast as the basis for their new system. 3) A 30 page technical note on the SWEEP OWWL model ? Description: detailing the methods used in the SWEEP-OWWL coastal flood forecast system (outputs 1&2) as well as forecasting recommendations, this was shared with the EA Coastal Modelling & Forecasting senior team, led by at Keith Nursey, to support better understanding and use of the forecasts. ? Outcomes: EA review of coastal modelling - in 2019 the EA undertook a review of coastal modelling methods, to inform their future modelling strategy. Upon their request, a technical report was provided in January 2019 describing the OWWL wave overtopping forecast system in detail, including the methods and formulae used to generate the warnings. Forecast data was also provided at a number of locations, and compared by the EA to a range of alternative modelling methods. ? Expected outcomes: The forecasting strategy document was used by them to 'identify future opportunities and projects to improve real-time coastal forecasting and potentially access a funding pot of 20 million pounds' from central government (Nick Ely, see impact section) 4) Additional outcome - adapting the OWWL model and forecasting methodology to meet the needs of other beneficiaries (final reports still to come) ? Description: The core OWWL wave and water level model is now being used to drive a number of other applications around the SW and Welsh coastline including an extension of the OWWL model and forecast for South Wales, a bespoke aquaculture forecast in Lyme Bay for Offshore Shellfish, a hazards forecast at Crantock Beach for RNLI, a hydrodynamic forecast for the Isles of Scilly and a marine renewable energy forecast in Pembrokeshire, Wales, for Bombora Wave Energy. See 4A - 4E below for more details. 4A) Bespoke marine conditions forecast for Offshore Shellfish Ltd ? Description: Working with Offshore Shellfish Ltd (OS; https://offshoreshellfish.com/) in Lyme Bay (set to be the UK's largest offshore, rope cultured mussel farm), the SWEEP team have been using OWWL since January 2020 to deliver a daily forecast showing 3-day ahead sea conditions in Lyme Bay. ? Outcomes: This significantly improved upon existing available forecasts and is already supporting more effective 'go/no-go' decisions for the aquaculture operations team, and is now enabling them to decide in advance what at-sea operations will be possible on a given day. ? Expected outcomes: The aquaculture forecast will continue to operate until at least 2022. The pilot system is being used as a basis for a £20k funding proposal from Plymouth University's R+D innovation fund to develop a more widely applicable aquaculture forecast system to allow Offshore Shellfish and other aquaculture farms to improve the safety and efficacy of at-sea operations.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP001: Co-creating Operational and Strategic Modelling Systems to Reduce Economic and Societal Impacts of Coastal Hazards in SW England 
Organisation Royal National Lifeboat Institution
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This activity will develop, in partnership with the Environment Agency, Met Office, Royal National Lifeboat Institution, National Trust and coastal councils (through the Coastal Advisory Groups), Operational and Strategic Modelling Systems of Coastal Hazards for the SW of England. These modelling systems represent practical tools for end-users that are based on inshore wave forecasts on a spatial resolution (1-km) currently not available on a UK-wide scale, and, collectively, will effect a step change in the management of the SW coastal resource system, saving money and potentially lives. Specific tools will be co-developed with the Environment Agency (coastal flood risk; also involvement of coastal councils), Royal National Lifeboat Institution (beach hazards) and National Trust (erosional hotspots), all of which will allow partners to more accurately predict the impact of coastal hazards and so enable significantly more effective targeting of resources. Development of other applications will be explored through engagement with other potential partners (e.g., Magic Seaweed, Network Rail, Natural England, partners from the insurance and marine renewable energy sector). Engagement with present and future partners will take place within the context of a Partner Engagement Plan (PEP), consisting of phased meetings and workshops with potential partners as the modelling systems are being developed. It is the intention that by the end of this current proposal (Phases 1 & 2), a number of subsequent impacts cases will commence resulting from these new engagements.
Collaborator Contribution This activity will develop, in partnership with the Environment Agency, Met Office, Royal National Lifeboat Institution, National Trust and coastal councils (through the Coastal Advisory Groups), Operational and Strategic Modelling Systems of Coastal Hazards for the SW of England. These modelling systems represent practical tools for end-users that are based on inshore wave forecasts on a spatial resolution (1-km) currently not available on a UK-wide scale, and, collectively, will effect a step change in the management of the SW coastal resource system, saving money and potentially lives. Specific tools will be co-developed with the Environment Agency (coastal flood risk; also involvement of coastal councils), Royal National Lifeboat Institution (beach hazards) and National Trust (erosional hotspots), all of which will allow partners to more accurately predict the impact of coastal hazards and so enable significantly more effective targeting of resources. Development of other applications will be explored through engagement with other potential partners (e.g., Magic Seaweed, Network Rail, Natural England, partners from the insurance and marine renewable energy sector). Engagement with present and future partners will take place within the context of a Partner Engagement Plan (PEP), consisting of phased meetings and workshops with potential partners as the modelling systems are being developed. It is the intention that by the end of this current proposal (Phases 1 & 2), a number of subsequent impacts cases will commence resulting from these new engagements.
Impact 1) Operational Wave and Water Level (OWWL) model ? Description: Development of a detailed (1-km resolution) operational (i.e. real-time) model of waves and water levels in SW England, using the Delft-3D hydrodynamic model, that can be run from a single desktop PC. Development of automation routines to download Met Office forcing data, set up the model, and generate outputs from the model results each day. The model was validated against wave buoy and tide gauge data around SW England, replicating observed hydrodynamics with a high level of accuracy. ? Outcomes: The model provides the core data required for the bespoke coastal hazards forecasts (see other outputs below). The forecasted wave and water level data are presented daily on the Channel Coastal Observatory website (http://www.channelcoast.org/ccoresources/sweep/), which is the primary portal used by coastal engineers and decision makers to access data. ? Expected outcomes: the model and forecasts will continue to operate until at least 2022. The EA are currently starting a 3-year project to develop a national scale overtopping forecast, largely based on OWWL (see impact statement from Nick Ely), and it is expected that after 2022 OWWL may already be superseded by this national forecast. The knowledge and impact are therefore expected to be embedded at the national scale by 2027. 2) Bespoke wave overtopping forecast for the EA ? Description: Automated generation of PDFs with details of where and when peak wave overtopping hazards will occur in the region. These are automatically emailed to subscribers in advance of a storm. Automated generation of social media output (twitter), showing regional-scale hazards. ? Outcomes: There are currently 70 email subscribers, including 19 EA flood warning officers, and 478 followers on Twitter. The forecast PDFs have been used by the EA in the SW since 2018 to inform their operations prior to and during storms. The twitter feed is re-tweeted to the wider public by the EA's national Coastal Modelling & Forecasting Manager, Nick Ely (1,289 Twitter followers), as well as 'CoastSafe' a regional emergency services partnership (2,789 Twitter followers). One video and real-time warning of overtopping hazard tweeted by the 001 team had over 19,000 views. ? Expected outcomes: The overtopping forecast will continue to operate until at least 2022. The EA are currently procuring a nation-wide coastal overtopping forecast system, using the OWWL forecast as the basis for their new system. 3) A 30 page technical note on the SWEEP OWWL model ? Description: detailing the methods used in the SWEEP-OWWL coastal flood forecast system (outputs 1&2) as well as forecasting recommendations, this was shared with the EA Coastal Modelling & Forecasting senior team, led by at Keith Nursey, to support better understanding and use of the forecasts. ? Outcomes: EA review of coastal modelling - in 2019 the EA undertook a review of coastal modelling methods, to inform their future modelling strategy. Upon their request, a technical report was provided in January 2019 describing the OWWL wave overtopping forecast system in detail, including the methods and formulae used to generate the warnings. Forecast data was also provided at a number of locations, and compared by the EA to a range of alternative modelling methods. ? Expected outcomes: The forecasting strategy document was used by them to 'identify future opportunities and projects to improve real-time coastal forecasting and potentially access a funding pot of 20 million pounds' from central government (Nick Ely, see impact section) 4) Additional outcome - adapting the OWWL model and forecasting methodology to meet the needs of other beneficiaries (final reports still to come) ? Description: The core OWWL wave and water level model is now being used to drive a number of other applications around the SW and Welsh coastline including an extension of the OWWL model and forecast for South Wales, a bespoke aquaculture forecast in Lyme Bay for Offshore Shellfish, a hazards forecast at Crantock Beach for RNLI, a hydrodynamic forecast for the Isles of Scilly and a marine renewable energy forecast in Pembrokeshire, Wales, for Bombora Wave Energy. See 4A - 4E below for more details. 4A) Bespoke marine conditions forecast for Offshore Shellfish Ltd ? Description: Working with Offshore Shellfish Ltd (OS; https://offshoreshellfish.com/) in Lyme Bay (set to be the UK's largest offshore, rope cultured mussel farm), the SWEEP team have been using OWWL since January 2020 to deliver a daily forecast showing 3-day ahead sea conditions in Lyme Bay. ? Outcomes: This significantly improved upon existing available forecasts and is already supporting more effective 'go/no-go' decisions for the aquaculture operations team, and is now enabling them to decide in advance what at-sea operations will be possible on a given day. ? Expected outcomes: The aquaculture forecast will continue to operate until at least 2022. The pilot system is being used as a basis for a £20k funding proposal from Plymouth University's R+D innovation fund to develop a more widely applicable aquaculture forecast system to allow Offshore Shellfish and other aquaculture farms to improve the safety and efficacy of at-sea operations.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP001: Co-creating Operational and Strategic Modelling Systems to Reduce Economic and Societal Impacts of Coastal Hazards in SW England 
Organisation Torridge District Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution This activity will develop, in partnership with the Environment Agency, Met Office, Royal National Lifeboat Institution, National Trust and coastal councils (through the Coastal Advisory Groups), Operational and Strategic Modelling Systems of Coastal Hazards for the SW of England. These modelling systems represent practical tools for end-users that are based on inshore wave forecasts on a spatial resolution (1-km) currently not available on a UK-wide scale, and, collectively, will effect a step change in the management of the SW coastal resource system, saving money and potentially lives. Specific tools will be co-developed with the Environment Agency (coastal flood risk; also involvement of coastal councils), Royal National Lifeboat Institution (beach hazards) and National Trust (erosional hotspots), all of which will allow partners to more accurately predict the impact of coastal hazards and so enable significantly more effective targeting of resources. Development of other applications will be explored through engagement with other potential partners (e.g., Magic Seaweed, Network Rail, Natural England, partners from the insurance and marine renewable energy sector). Engagement with present and future partners will take place within the context of a Partner Engagement Plan (PEP), consisting of phased meetings and workshops with potential partners as the modelling systems are being developed. It is the intention that by the end of this current proposal (Phases 1 & 2), a number of subsequent impacts cases will commence resulting from these new engagements.
Collaborator Contribution This activity will develop, in partnership with the Environment Agency, Met Office, Royal National Lifeboat Institution, National Trust and coastal councils (through the Coastal Advisory Groups), Operational and Strategic Modelling Systems of Coastal Hazards for the SW of England. These modelling systems represent practical tools for end-users that are based on inshore wave forecasts on a spatial resolution (1-km) currently not available on a UK-wide scale, and, collectively, will effect a step change in the management of the SW coastal resource system, saving money and potentially lives. Specific tools will be co-developed with the Environment Agency (coastal flood risk; also involvement of coastal councils), Royal National Lifeboat Institution (beach hazards) and National Trust (erosional hotspots), all of which will allow partners to more accurately predict the impact of coastal hazards and so enable significantly more effective targeting of resources. Development of other applications will be explored through engagement with other potential partners (e.g., Magic Seaweed, Network Rail, Natural England, partners from the insurance and marine renewable energy sector). Engagement with present and future partners will take place within the context of a Partner Engagement Plan (PEP), consisting of phased meetings and workshops with potential partners as the modelling systems are being developed. It is the intention that by the end of this current proposal (Phases 1 & 2), a number of subsequent impacts cases will commence resulting from these new engagements.
Impact 1) Operational Wave and Water Level (OWWL) model ? Description: Development of a detailed (1-km resolution) operational (i.e. real-time) model of waves and water levels in SW England, using the Delft-3D hydrodynamic model, that can be run from a single desktop PC. Development of automation routines to download Met Office forcing data, set up the model, and generate outputs from the model results each day. The model was validated against wave buoy and tide gauge data around SW England, replicating observed hydrodynamics with a high level of accuracy. ? Outcomes: The model provides the core data required for the bespoke coastal hazards forecasts (see other outputs below). The forecasted wave and water level data are presented daily on the Channel Coastal Observatory website (http://www.channelcoast.org/ccoresources/sweep/), which is the primary portal used by coastal engineers and decision makers to access data. ? Expected outcomes: the model and forecasts will continue to operate until at least 2022. The EA are currently starting a 3-year project to develop a national scale overtopping forecast, largely based on OWWL (see impact statement from Nick Ely), and it is expected that after 2022 OWWL may already be superseded by this national forecast. The knowledge and impact are therefore expected to be embedded at the national scale by 2027. 2) Bespoke wave overtopping forecast for the EA ? Description: Automated generation of PDFs with details of where and when peak wave overtopping hazards will occur in the region. These are automatically emailed to subscribers in advance of a storm. Automated generation of social media output (twitter), showing regional-scale hazards. ? Outcomes: There are currently 70 email subscribers, including 19 EA flood warning officers, and 478 followers on Twitter. The forecast PDFs have been used by the EA in the SW since 2018 to inform their operations prior to and during storms. The twitter feed is re-tweeted to the wider public by the EA's national Coastal Modelling & Forecasting Manager, Nick Ely (1,289 Twitter followers), as well as 'CoastSafe' a regional emergency services partnership (2,789 Twitter followers). One video and real-time warning of overtopping hazard tweeted by the 001 team had over 19,000 views. ? Expected outcomes: The overtopping forecast will continue to operate until at least 2022. The EA are currently procuring a nation-wide coastal overtopping forecast system, using the OWWL forecast as the basis for their new system. 3) A 30 page technical note on the SWEEP OWWL model ? Description: detailing the methods used in the SWEEP-OWWL coastal flood forecast system (outputs 1&2) as well as forecasting recommendations, this was shared with the EA Coastal Modelling & Forecasting senior team, led by at Keith Nursey, to support better understanding and use of the forecasts. ? Outcomes: EA review of coastal modelling - in 2019 the EA undertook a review of coastal modelling methods, to inform their future modelling strategy. Upon their request, a technical report was provided in January 2019 describing the OWWL wave overtopping forecast system in detail, including the methods and formulae used to generate the warnings. Forecast data was also provided at a number of locations, and compared by the EA to a range of alternative modelling methods. ? Expected outcomes: The forecasting strategy document was used by them to 'identify future opportunities and projects to improve real-time coastal forecasting and potentially access a funding pot of 20 million pounds' from central government (Nick Ely, see impact section) 4) Additional outcome - adapting the OWWL model and forecasting methodology to meet the needs of other beneficiaries (final reports still to come) ? Description: The core OWWL wave and water level model is now being used to drive a number of other applications around the SW and Welsh coastline including an extension of the OWWL model and forecast for South Wales, a bespoke aquaculture forecast in Lyme Bay for Offshore Shellfish, a hazards forecast at Crantock Beach for RNLI, a hydrodynamic forecast for the Isles of Scilly and a marine renewable energy forecast in Pembrokeshire, Wales, for Bombora Wave Energy. See 4A - 4E below for more details. 4A) Bespoke marine conditions forecast for Offshore Shellfish Ltd ? Description: Working with Offshore Shellfish Ltd (OS; https://offshoreshellfish.com/) in Lyme Bay (set to be the UK's largest offshore, rope cultured mussel farm), the SWEEP team have been using OWWL since January 2020 to deliver a daily forecast showing 3-day ahead sea conditions in Lyme Bay. ? Outcomes: This significantly improved upon existing available forecasts and is already supporting more effective 'go/no-go' decisions for the aquaculture operations team, and is now enabling them to decide in advance what at-sea operations will be possible on a given day. ? Expected outcomes: The aquaculture forecast will continue to operate until at least 2022. The pilot system is being used as a basis for a £20k funding proposal from Plymouth University's R+D innovation fund to develop a more widely applicable aquaculture forecast system to allow Offshore Shellfish and other aquaculture farms to improve the safety and efficacy of at-sea operations.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP001b: yme Bay shellfishery forecast 
Organisation Offshore Shellfish
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Provide a detailed forecast of sea conditions in Lyme Bay to allow Offshore Shellfish Ltd. to make informed operational decisions that may provide cost savings and help safeguard their crews while working at sea.
Collaborator Contribution Provide a detailed forecast of sea conditions in Lyme Bay to allow Offshore Shellfish Ltd. to make informed operational decisions that may provide cost savings and help safeguard their crews while working at sea.
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2020
 
Description SWEEP001c: Extending OWWL forecast to South Wales 
Organisation Wales Coastal Monitoring Centre (WCMC)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Provide wave, water level, and overtopping forecasts for the South Wales coastline, to inform management of coastal flooding and enhance coastal resilience
Collaborator Contribution Provide wave, water level, and overtopping forecasts for the South Wales coastline, to inform management of coastal flooding and enhance coastal resilience
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2020
 
Description SWEEP002: Delivering natural capital assessment tools for the marine economy in the South West 
Organisation Cornwall Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan, and the wider requirements of statutory nature conservation bodies, regulators (such as the MMO's marine planning and licensing functions) and local authorities (e.g. implementation of Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy and the Plymouth Sound National Marine Park).
Collaborator Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan, and the wider requirements of statutory nature conservation bodies, regulators (such as the MMO's marine planning and licensing functions) and local authorities (e.g. implementation of Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy and the Plymouth Sound National Marine Park).
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP002: Delivering natural capital assessment tools for the marine economy in the South West 
Organisation Department For Environment, Food And Rural Affairs (DEFRA)
Department Marine Management Organisation (MMO)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan, and the wider requirements of statutory nature conservation bodies, regulators (such as the MMO's marine planning and licensing functions) and local authorities (e.g. implementation of Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy and the Plymouth Sound National Marine Park).
Collaborator Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan, and the wider requirements of statutory nature conservation bodies, regulators (such as the MMO's marine planning and licensing functions) and local authorities (e.g. implementation of Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy and the Plymouth Sound National Marine Park).
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP002: Delivering natural capital assessment tools for the marine economy in the South West 
Organisation Department For Environment, Food And Rural Affairs (DEFRA)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan, and the wider requirements of statutory nature conservation bodies, regulators (such as the MMO's marine planning and licensing functions) and local authorities (e.g. implementation of Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy and the Plymouth Sound National Marine Park).
Collaborator Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan, and the wider requirements of statutory nature conservation bodies, regulators (such as the MMO's marine planning and licensing functions) and local authorities (e.g. implementation of Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy and the Plymouth Sound National Marine Park).
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP002: Delivering natural capital assessment tools for the marine economy in the South West 
Organisation Devon & Severn Inshore Fisheries & Conservation Authority
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan, and the wider requirements of statutory nature conservation bodies, regulators (such as the MMO's marine planning and licensing functions) and local authorities (e.g. implementation of Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy and the Plymouth Sound National Marine Park).
Collaborator Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan, and the wider requirements of statutory nature conservation bodies, regulators (such as the MMO's marine planning and licensing functions) and local authorities (e.g. implementation of Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy and the Plymouth Sound National Marine Park).
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP002: Delivering natural capital assessment tools for the marine economy in the South West 
Organisation Natural England
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan, and the wider requirements of statutory nature conservation bodies, regulators (such as the MMO's marine planning and licensing functions) and local authorities (e.g. implementation of Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy and the Plymouth Sound National Marine Park).
Collaborator Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan, and the wider requirements of statutory nature conservation bodies, regulators (such as the MMO's marine planning and licensing functions) and local authorities (e.g. implementation of Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy and the Plymouth Sound National Marine Park).
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP002: Delivering natural capital assessment tools for the marine economy in the South West 
Organisation North Devon Biosphere Foundation
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan, and the wider requirements of statutory nature conservation bodies, regulators (such as the MMO's marine planning and licensing functions) and local authorities (e.g. implementation of Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy and the Plymouth Sound National Marine Park).
Collaborator Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan, and the wider requirements of statutory nature conservation bodies, regulators (such as the MMO's marine planning and licensing functions) and local authorities (e.g. implementation of Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy and the Plymouth Sound National Marine Park).
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP002: Delivering natural capital assessment tools for the marine economy in the South West 
Organisation Plymouth City Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan, and the wider requirements of statutory nature conservation bodies, regulators (such as the MMO's marine planning and licensing functions) and local authorities (e.g. implementation of Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy and the Plymouth Sound National Marine Park).
Collaborator Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan, and the wider requirements of statutory nature conservation bodies, regulators (such as the MMO's marine planning and licensing functions) and local authorities (e.g. implementation of Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy and the Plymouth Sound National Marine Park).
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP002: Delivering natural capital assessment tools for the marine economy in the South West 
Organisation World Wide Fund for Nature
Country Switzerland 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan, and the wider requirements of statutory nature conservation bodies, regulators (such as the MMO's marine planning and licensing functions) and local authorities (e.g. implementation of Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy and the Plymouth Sound National Marine Park).
Collaborator Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan, and the wider requirements of statutory nature conservation bodies, regulators (such as the MMO's marine planning and licensing functions) and local authorities (e.g. implementation of Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy and the Plymouth Sound National Marine Park).
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP002: Natural Capital Assessment Tools for the North Devon Marine Pioneer (Phase 1) 
Organisation Department For Environment, Food And Rural Affairs (DEFRA)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan.
Collaborator Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan.
Impact Output 1. Hooper, T. 2017a. A Long Term Vision for the North Devon Marine Pioneer Programme. Workshop Report. March 2017 Output 2. Hooper, T. 2017b. Natural Capital and Local Decision Making. Workshop Report. November 2017. Output 3. SW Marine Natural Capital Conference 2017 - Post Conference Report Output 4. A Geodatabase for North Devon Output 5. Summary fact sheet for the Geodatabase Output 6. North Devon Watersports Survey Output 7. Ashley, M., S. E. Rees and A. Cameron (2018). North Devon Marine Pioneer Part 1: State of the art report of the links between the ecosystem and ecosystem services in the North Devon Marine Pioneer. A SWEEP/ WWF-UK report. Univeristy of Plymouth pp.103. Output 8. Factsheet - North Devon Ecosystem Services: what are the key benefits the marine environment provides to people and what are the risks and opportuntities Output 9. North Devon Biosphere Reserve - Communication materials (will be added tio impact store once finalised) Output 10. Rees 2019. A Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register Workshop. North Devon Marine Pioneer. Marine Working Group Meeting September 2018. Workshop report pp. 17 Output 11. Hooper et al 2018 - Building on the vision for the North Devon Marine Pioneer programme - Workshop Report Output 12. Rees, S. E., M. Ashley and A. Cameron (2019). North Devon Marine Pioneer Report 2: A Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register A SWEEP/WWF-UK report by research staff the Marine Institute at the University of Plymouth Output 13 Marine Pioneer Natural Capital Plan Workshop on the 7th March. Delivery of content for the workshop. Presentation and Barriers and Enablers workshop. Output 14. Hooper, T. and Austen, M. (2019) Application of the Natural Capital Approach to Sustainability Appraisal. Draft Discussion Document. March 2019. Output 15. Hooper, T., Ashley, M., Börger, T., Langmead, O., Marcone, O., Rees, S., Rendon, O., Beaumont, N., Attrill, M. and Austen, M. 2019. Application of the natural capital approach to the marine environment to aid decision-making. Phase 1 Final Report. Report prepared for the Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs (project code ME5115). Output 16. The Natural Capital Approach. What is it, and how does it fit into decision-making for coastal and marine areas? Non-technical summary of Defra Report, Output 15. Output 17. Perception of Natural Capital Approaches Report: Stakeholder Survey Analysis to Understand Changes in Perception and Engagement with Natural Capital Approaches for SWEEP Marine projects 002 and 014 Phase 1Output Descriptions The report of the first stakeholder workshop (Output 1) defined the assets, challenges and opportunities within North Devon's marine area, and the core values and goals that should be reflected in the management of it. North Devon's natural environment is highly valued and the fishing industry has a high cultural value. The need to maintain and improve sustainable fishing practices is also widely recognised. Understanding and managing the linkages between the land and sea was an important theme, particularly related to improving water quality and developing strategies for climate change mitigation. Challenges in communication, coordination and integration across activities were recognised, although existing partnerships, a long history of collaborative working, as well as the existing network of community groups and willingness of the local community to engage in voluntary activities, were considered to be significant assets. There was a strong desire amongst workshop participants to see more local decision making and the development of regional fisheries management plans. Repeated reference was also made to the world class research base, and the opportunities provided by research programmes that were developing around the Pioneer. The second stakeholder workshop report (Output 2) summarised priorities for incorporating natural capital into local decision making, which were primarily that the strategic (rather than project) scale was most appropriate, particularly in the context of Local Plans and through the Sustainability Appraisal process. The need for a clear statement about local natural capital priorities was noted, including the aspiration for this to be a net gain policy, and spatial maps of the extent, condition, and risks to natural capital assets and ecosystem services was considered an essential foundation. The first South West Marine Natural Capital Conference 2017 (Output 3) was organised and hosted by the Devon Maritime Forum with North Devon Marine Pioneer (North Devon Biosphere Reserve), the SWEEP project, and the UK SEAS project (WWF). The conference provided an opportunity for leading practitioners, businesses and interested stakeholders to learn more about natural capital, the Natural Capital Approach, and the region's marine and coastal assets, as well as finding out how they could get involved with the three partnership projects that are currently commencing in the region; the South West Partnership for Environment and Economic Prosperity (SWEEP), the North Devon Marine Pioneer, and WWF - UK SEAS project. SWEEP delivered two targeted workshops at this event. The North Devon Marine Pioneer Geodatabase funded by NE (Output 4) underpins the knowledge of the links between ecosystem and ecosystem services in the North Devon Marine Pioneer. The data within the geodatabase was used to develop the North Devon Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register. The data from the geodatabase has been used to provide visual support for communication with stakeholders at key events (see activities listed in previous section Marine Pioneer Stakeholder Engagement and Consultation and Output 5). The GIS analysist (Andy Cameron) provided a web-based workshop for interested stakeholders to build capacity in the use of and access to the geodatabase, seek feedback and identify potential additional data sources. The North Devon Biosphere reserve. As part of this work key data gaps were filled (Output 6). SWEEP developed the framework for the application of the Natural Capital approach in the marine environment that specifically supports the WWF led UK SEAS programme sustainable finance work stream and the delivery of the Pioneer programme in North Devon. Output 7 demonstates the pathways between ecology, ecosystem services and benefits that influence human wellbeing; How stakeholders are linked (directly or indirectly) to natural capital and; relevant indicators, data sources and potential means for valuing ecosystem service benefits (monetary and non-monetary). WWF have developed a further summary report (Output 8) to convey key messages from the report to stakeholders. The North Devon Biosphere Reserve have developed communications materials based on Output 9. SWEEP Impact Fellows co-designed and led a Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register Workshop to develop a local dimension of a natural capital asset risk register (Output 10) The main outcome of this workshop was that the participants of the North Devon MWG discussed the local risk to the asset-benefit relationship within the context of the North Devon Marine Pioneer. This provided a local perspective on risk for comparison with national policy targets. Output 12 represents a follow-on from Ashley, Rees et al (2018) (Output 7) to further test the framework for the application of the Natural Capital Approach in the Marine Pioneer. Included is a natural capital asset register that documents the extent and condition of the natural capital assets; the stocks and flows of ecosystem services in the North Devon Marine Pioneer; A risk register to identify threats to natural capital in the North Devon Marine Pioneer; and recommendations on key natural capital assets on which future management opportunities could be focused to achieve the greatest gains (Output 12). Output 13 - On the 7th March SWEEP Impact Fellows led a workshop for the marine Pioneer Steering Group to present the Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register and to identify the barriers and enablers to the delivery of the Marine Natural Capital Plan The Sustainability Appraisal Discussion Document (Output 14) provides suggestions for straightforward and practical ways in which the ongoing, statutory Sustainability Appraisal for the South West Marine Plan could adopt a natural capital approach. This is the first stage of a process that will continue into Phase 2, including follow-up with the MMO and consultants contracted to carry out the Sustainability Appraisal. Outcomes Achieved So Far Within the Marine Pioneer a range of 'Demonstration Projects' have been identified and are currently being progressed by the project partners and integrating SWEEP Phase 1ouputs. These are: • Completion of a natural capital decision support tool with values and risk register. Led by SWEEP. • Completion of geodatabase Led by SWEEP • Marine Natural Capital Plan - Led by North Devon Council/Biosphere Reserve and Funded by European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF). Using SWEEP Phase I outputs to develop a high level area integrated Marine Natural Capital Plan. • Better management of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) - Led by WWF-UK SEAS. WWF are using SWEEP Phase I outputs to develop management plans for Marine Protected Areas in North Devon that help nature and people to thrive. Includes the development of an innovative financing plan for MPAs. • Fisheries partnership projects. Led by the Blue Marine Foundation and the Devon and Severn Inshore Fisheries and Conservation (D&S IFCA) to establish fisheries, scientist and managers partnerships. A sustainable management and improvement plan for North Devon Fisheries including fisheries assessment, identification of new income sources, governance structure, and marketing plan. Opportunities for regional management, research and marketing identified. • Investment plan for coastal habitat and biodiversity restoration- - Led by North Devon Council/Biosphere Reserve to develop an investment plan for coastal habitat and biodiversity restoration, including innovative financing, feasibility studies • Joint work with the landscape pioneer on governance across the land - sea interface
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP002: Natural Capital Assessment Tools for the North Devon Marine Pioneer (Phase 1) 
Organisation Devon & Severn Inshore Fisheries & Conservation Authority
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan.
Collaborator Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan.
Impact Output 1. Hooper, T. 2017a. A Long Term Vision for the North Devon Marine Pioneer Programme. Workshop Report. March 2017 Output 2. Hooper, T. 2017b. Natural Capital and Local Decision Making. Workshop Report. November 2017. Output 3. SW Marine Natural Capital Conference 2017 - Post Conference Report Output 4. A Geodatabase for North Devon Output 5. Summary fact sheet for the Geodatabase Output 6. North Devon Watersports Survey Output 7. Ashley, M., S. E. Rees and A. Cameron (2018). North Devon Marine Pioneer Part 1: State of the art report of the links between the ecosystem and ecosystem services in the North Devon Marine Pioneer. A SWEEP/ WWF-UK report. Univeristy of Plymouth pp.103. Output 8. Factsheet - North Devon Ecosystem Services: what are the key benefits the marine environment provides to people and what are the risks and opportuntities Output 9. North Devon Biosphere Reserve - Communication materials (will be added tio impact store once finalised) Output 10. Rees 2019. A Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register Workshop. North Devon Marine Pioneer. Marine Working Group Meeting September 2018. Workshop report pp. 17 Output 11. Hooper et al 2018 - Building on the vision for the North Devon Marine Pioneer programme - Workshop Report Output 12. Rees, S. E., M. Ashley and A. Cameron (2019). North Devon Marine Pioneer Report 2: A Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register A SWEEP/WWF-UK report by research staff the Marine Institute at the University of Plymouth Output 13 Marine Pioneer Natural Capital Plan Workshop on the 7th March. Delivery of content for the workshop. Presentation and Barriers and Enablers workshop. Output 14. Hooper, T. and Austen, M. (2019) Application of the Natural Capital Approach to Sustainability Appraisal. Draft Discussion Document. March 2019. Output 15. Hooper, T., Ashley, M., Börger, T., Langmead, O., Marcone, O., Rees, S., Rendon, O., Beaumont, N., Attrill, M. and Austen, M. 2019. Application of the natural capital approach to the marine environment to aid decision-making. Phase 1 Final Report. Report prepared for the Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs (project code ME5115). Output 16. The Natural Capital Approach. What is it, and how does it fit into decision-making for coastal and marine areas? Non-technical summary of Defra Report, Output 15. Output 17. Perception of Natural Capital Approaches Report: Stakeholder Survey Analysis to Understand Changes in Perception and Engagement with Natural Capital Approaches for SWEEP Marine projects 002 and 014 Phase 1Output Descriptions The report of the first stakeholder workshop (Output 1) defined the assets, challenges and opportunities within North Devon's marine area, and the core values and goals that should be reflected in the management of it. North Devon's natural environment is highly valued and the fishing industry has a high cultural value. The need to maintain and improve sustainable fishing practices is also widely recognised. Understanding and managing the linkages between the land and sea was an important theme, particularly related to improving water quality and developing strategies for climate change mitigation. Challenges in communication, coordination and integration across activities were recognised, although existing partnerships, a long history of collaborative working, as well as the existing network of community groups and willingness of the local community to engage in voluntary activities, were considered to be significant assets. There was a strong desire amongst workshop participants to see more local decision making and the development of regional fisheries management plans. Repeated reference was also made to the world class research base, and the opportunities provided by research programmes that were developing around the Pioneer. The second stakeholder workshop report (Output 2) summarised priorities for incorporating natural capital into local decision making, which were primarily that the strategic (rather than project) scale was most appropriate, particularly in the context of Local Plans and through the Sustainability Appraisal process. The need for a clear statement about local natural capital priorities was noted, including the aspiration for this to be a net gain policy, and spatial maps of the extent, condition, and risks to natural capital assets and ecosystem services was considered an essential foundation. The first South West Marine Natural Capital Conference 2017 (Output 3) was organised and hosted by the Devon Maritime Forum with North Devon Marine Pioneer (North Devon Biosphere Reserve), the SWEEP project, and the UK SEAS project (WWF). The conference provided an opportunity for leading practitioners, businesses and interested stakeholders to learn more about natural capital, the Natural Capital Approach, and the region's marine and coastal assets, as well as finding out how they could get involved with the three partnership projects that are currently commencing in the region; the South West Partnership for Environment and Economic Prosperity (SWEEP), the North Devon Marine Pioneer, and WWF - UK SEAS project. SWEEP delivered two targeted workshops at this event. The North Devon Marine Pioneer Geodatabase funded by NE (Output 4) underpins the knowledge of the links between ecosystem and ecosystem services in the North Devon Marine Pioneer. The data within the geodatabase was used to develop the North Devon Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register. The data from the geodatabase has been used to provide visual support for communication with stakeholders at key events (see activities listed in previous section Marine Pioneer Stakeholder Engagement and Consultation and Output 5). The GIS analysist (Andy Cameron) provided a web-based workshop for interested stakeholders to build capacity in the use of and access to the geodatabase, seek feedback and identify potential additional data sources. The North Devon Biosphere reserve. As part of this work key data gaps were filled (Output 6). SWEEP developed the framework for the application of the Natural Capital approach in the marine environment that specifically supports the WWF led UK SEAS programme sustainable finance work stream and the delivery of the Pioneer programme in North Devon. Output 7 demonstates the pathways between ecology, ecosystem services and benefits that influence human wellbeing; How stakeholders are linked (directly or indirectly) to natural capital and; relevant indicators, data sources and potential means for valuing ecosystem service benefits (monetary and non-monetary). WWF have developed a further summary report (Output 8) to convey key messages from the report to stakeholders. The North Devon Biosphere Reserve have developed communications materials based on Output 9. SWEEP Impact Fellows co-designed and led a Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register Workshop to develop a local dimension of a natural capital asset risk register (Output 10) The main outcome of this workshop was that the participants of the North Devon MWG discussed the local risk to the asset-benefit relationship within the context of the North Devon Marine Pioneer. This provided a local perspective on risk for comparison with national policy targets. Output 12 represents a follow-on from Ashley, Rees et al (2018) (Output 7) to further test the framework for the application of the Natural Capital Approach in the Marine Pioneer. Included is a natural capital asset register that documents the extent and condition of the natural capital assets; the stocks and flows of ecosystem services in the North Devon Marine Pioneer; A risk register to identify threats to natural capital in the North Devon Marine Pioneer; and recommendations on key natural capital assets on which future management opportunities could be focused to achieve the greatest gains (Output 12). Output 13 - On the 7th March SWEEP Impact Fellows led a workshop for the marine Pioneer Steering Group to present the Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register and to identify the barriers and enablers to the delivery of the Marine Natural Capital Plan The Sustainability Appraisal Discussion Document (Output 14) provides suggestions for straightforward and practical ways in which the ongoing, statutory Sustainability Appraisal for the South West Marine Plan could adopt a natural capital approach. This is the first stage of a process that will continue into Phase 2, including follow-up with the MMO and consultants contracted to carry out the Sustainability Appraisal. Outcomes Achieved So Far Within the Marine Pioneer a range of 'Demonstration Projects' have been identified and are currently being progressed by the project partners and integrating SWEEP Phase 1ouputs. These are: • Completion of a natural capital decision support tool with values and risk register. Led by SWEEP. • Completion of geodatabase Led by SWEEP • Marine Natural Capital Plan - Led by North Devon Council/Biosphere Reserve and Funded by European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF). Using SWEEP Phase I outputs to develop a high level area integrated Marine Natural Capital Plan. • Better management of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) - Led by WWF-UK SEAS. WWF are using SWEEP Phase I outputs to develop management plans for Marine Protected Areas in North Devon that help nature and people to thrive. Includes the development of an innovative financing plan for MPAs. • Fisheries partnership projects. Led by the Blue Marine Foundation and the Devon and Severn Inshore Fisheries and Conservation (D&S IFCA) to establish fisheries, scientist and managers partnerships. A sustainable management and improvement plan for North Devon Fisheries including fisheries assessment, identification of new income sources, governance structure, and marketing plan. Opportunities for regional management, research and marketing identified. • Investment plan for coastal habitat and biodiversity restoration- - Led by North Devon Council/Biosphere Reserve to develop an investment plan for coastal habitat and biodiversity restoration, including innovative financing, feasibility studies • Joint work with the landscape pioneer on governance across the land - sea interface
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP002: Natural Capital Assessment Tools for the North Devon Marine Pioneer (Phase 1) 
Organisation Natural England
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan.
Collaborator Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan.
Impact Output 1. Hooper, T. 2017a. A Long Term Vision for the North Devon Marine Pioneer Programme. Workshop Report. March 2017 Output 2. Hooper, T. 2017b. Natural Capital and Local Decision Making. Workshop Report. November 2017. Output 3. SW Marine Natural Capital Conference 2017 - Post Conference Report Output 4. A Geodatabase for North Devon Output 5. Summary fact sheet for the Geodatabase Output 6. North Devon Watersports Survey Output 7. Ashley, M., S. E. Rees and A. Cameron (2018). North Devon Marine Pioneer Part 1: State of the art report of the links between the ecosystem and ecosystem services in the North Devon Marine Pioneer. A SWEEP/ WWF-UK report. Univeristy of Plymouth pp.103. Output 8. Factsheet - North Devon Ecosystem Services: what are the key benefits the marine environment provides to people and what are the risks and opportuntities Output 9. North Devon Biosphere Reserve - Communication materials (will be added tio impact store once finalised) Output 10. Rees 2019. A Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register Workshop. North Devon Marine Pioneer. Marine Working Group Meeting September 2018. Workshop report pp. 17 Output 11. Hooper et al 2018 - Building on the vision for the North Devon Marine Pioneer programme - Workshop Report Output 12. Rees, S. E., M. Ashley and A. Cameron (2019). North Devon Marine Pioneer Report 2: A Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register A SWEEP/WWF-UK report by research staff the Marine Institute at the University of Plymouth Output 13 Marine Pioneer Natural Capital Plan Workshop on the 7th March. Delivery of content for the workshop. Presentation and Barriers and Enablers workshop. Output 14. Hooper, T. and Austen, M. (2019) Application of the Natural Capital Approach to Sustainability Appraisal. Draft Discussion Document. March 2019. Output 15. Hooper, T., Ashley, M., Börger, T., Langmead, O., Marcone, O., Rees, S., Rendon, O., Beaumont, N., Attrill, M. and Austen, M. 2019. Application of the natural capital approach to the marine environment to aid decision-making. Phase 1 Final Report. Report prepared for the Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs (project code ME5115). Output 16. The Natural Capital Approach. What is it, and how does it fit into decision-making for coastal and marine areas? Non-technical summary of Defra Report, Output 15. Output 17. Perception of Natural Capital Approaches Report: Stakeholder Survey Analysis to Understand Changes in Perception and Engagement with Natural Capital Approaches for SWEEP Marine projects 002 and 014 Phase 1Output Descriptions The report of the first stakeholder workshop (Output 1) defined the assets, challenges and opportunities within North Devon's marine area, and the core values and goals that should be reflected in the management of it. North Devon's natural environment is highly valued and the fishing industry has a high cultural value. The need to maintain and improve sustainable fishing practices is also widely recognised. Understanding and managing the linkages between the land and sea was an important theme, particularly related to improving water quality and developing strategies for climate change mitigation. Challenges in communication, coordination and integration across activities were recognised, although existing partnerships, a long history of collaborative working, as well as the existing network of community groups and willingness of the local community to engage in voluntary activities, were considered to be significant assets. There was a strong desire amongst workshop participants to see more local decision making and the development of regional fisheries management plans. Repeated reference was also made to the world class research base, and the opportunities provided by research programmes that were developing around the Pioneer. The second stakeholder workshop report (Output 2) summarised priorities for incorporating natural capital into local decision making, which were primarily that the strategic (rather than project) scale was most appropriate, particularly in the context of Local Plans and through the Sustainability Appraisal process. The need for a clear statement about local natural capital priorities was noted, including the aspiration for this to be a net gain policy, and spatial maps of the extent, condition, and risks to natural capital assets and ecosystem services was considered an essential foundation. The first South West Marine Natural Capital Conference 2017 (Output 3) was organised and hosted by the Devon Maritime Forum with North Devon Marine Pioneer (North Devon Biosphere Reserve), the SWEEP project, and the UK SEAS project (WWF). The conference provided an opportunity for leading practitioners, businesses and interested stakeholders to learn more about natural capital, the Natural Capital Approach, and the region's marine and coastal assets, as well as finding out how they could get involved with the three partnership projects that are currently commencing in the region; the South West Partnership for Environment and Economic Prosperity (SWEEP), the North Devon Marine Pioneer, and WWF - UK SEAS project. SWEEP delivered two targeted workshops at this event. The North Devon Marine Pioneer Geodatabase funded by NE (Output 4) underpins the knowledge of the links between ecosystem and ecosystem services in the North Devon Marine Pioneer. The data within the geodatabase was used to develop the North Devon Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register. The data from the geodatabase has been used to provide visual support for communication with stakeholders at key events (see activities listed in previous section Marine Pioneer Stakeholder Engagement and Consultation and Output 5). The GIS analysist (Andy Cameron) provided a web-based workshop for interested stakeholders to build capacity in the use of and access to the geodatabase, seek feedback and identify potential additional data sources. The North Devon Biosphere reserve. As part of this work key data gaps were filled (Output 6). SWEEP developed the framework for the application of the Natural Capital approach in the marine environment that specifically supports the WWF led UK SEAS programme sustainable finance work stream and the delivery of the Pioneer programme in North Devon. Output 7 demonstates the pathways between ecology, ecosystem services and benefits that influence human wellbeing; How stakeholders are linked (directly or indirectly) to natural capital and; relevant indicators, data sources and potential means for valuing ecosystem service benefits (monetary and non-monetary). WWF have developed a further summary report (Output 8) to convey key messages from the report to stakeholders. The North Devon Biosphere Reserve have developed communications materials based on Output 9. SWEEP Impact Fellows co-designed and led a Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register Workshop to develop a local dimension of a natural capital asset risk register (Output 10) The main outcome of this workshop was that the participants of the North Devon MWG discussed the local risk to the asset-benefit relationship within the context of the North Devon Marine Pioneer. This provided a local perspective on risk for comparison with national policy targets. Output 12 represents a follow-on from Ashley, Rees et al (2018) (Output 7) to further test the framework for the application of the Natural Capital Approach in the Marine Pioneer. Included is a natural capital asset register that documents the extent and condition of the natural capital assets; the stocks and flows of ecosystem services in the North Devon Marine Pioneer; A risk register to identify threats to natural capital in the North Devon Marine Pioneer; and recommendations on key natural capital assets on which future management opportunities could be focused to achieve the greatest gains (Output 12). Output 13 - On the 7th March SWEEP Impact Fellows led a workshop for the marine Pioneer Steering Group to present the Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register and to identify the barriers and enablers to the delivery of the Marine Natural Capital Plan The Sustainability Appraisal Discussion Document (Output 14) provides suggestions for straightforward and practical ways in which the ongoing, statutory Sustainability Appraisal for the South West Marine Plan could adopt a natural capital approach. This is the first stage of a process that will continue into Phase 2, including follow-up with the MMO and consultants contracted to carry out the Sustainability Appraisal. Outcomes Achieved So Far Within the Marine Pioneer a range of 'Demonstration Projects' have been identified and are currently being progressed by the project partners and integrating SWEEP Phase 1ouputs. These are: • Completion of a natural capital decision support tool with values and risk register. Led by SWEEP. • Completion of geodatabase Led by SWEEP • Marine Natural Capital Plan - Led by North Devon Council/Biosphere Reserve and Funded by European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF). Using SWEEP Phase I outputs to develop a high level area integrated Marine Natural Capital Plan. • Better management of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) - Led by WWF-UK SEAS. WWF are using SWEEP Phase I outputs to develop management plans for Marine Protected Areas in North Devon that help nature and people to thrive. Includes the development of an innovative financing plan for MPAs. • Fisheries partnership projects. Led by the Blue Marine Foundation and the Devon and Severn Inshore Fisheries and Conservation (D&S IFCA) to establish fisheries, scientist and managers partnerships. A sustainable management and improvement plan for North Devon Fisheries including fisheries assessment, identification of new income sources, governance structure, and marketing plan. Opportunities for regional management, research and marketing identified. • Investment plan for coastal habitat and biodiversity restoration- - Led by North Devon Council/Biosphere Reserve to develop an investment plan for coastal habitat and biodiversity restoration, including innovative financing, feasibility studies • Joint work with the landscape pioneer on governance across the land - sea interface
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP002: Natural Capital Assessment Tools for the North Devon Marine Pioneer (Phase 1) 
Organisation North Devon Biosphere Foundation
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan.
Collaborator Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan.
Impact Output 1. Hooper, T. 2017a. A Long Term Vision for the North Devon Marine Pioneer Programme. Workshop Report. March 2017 Output 2. Hooper, T. 2017b. Natural Capital and Local Decision Making. Workshop Report. November 2017. Output 3. SW Marine Natural Capital Conference 2017 - Post Conference Report Output 4. A Geodatabase for North Devon Output 5. Summary fact sheet for the Geodatabase Output 6. North Devon Watersports Survey Output 7. Ashley, M., S. E. Rees and A. Cameron (2018). North Devon Marine Pioneer Part 1: State of the art report of the links between the ecosystem and ecosystem services in the North Devon Marine Pioneer. A SWEEP/ WWF-UK report. Univeristy of Plymouth pp.103. Output 8. Factsheet - North Devon Ecosystem Services: what are the key benefits the marine environment provides to people and what are the risks and opportuntities Output 9. North Devon Biosphere Reserve - Communication materials (will be added tio impact store once finalised) Output 10. Rees 2019. A Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register Workshop. North Devon Marine Pioneer. Marine Working Group Meeting September 2018. Workshop report pp. 17 Output 11. Hooper et al 2018 - Building on the vision for the North Devon Marine Pioneer programme - Workshop Report Output 12. Rees, S. E., M. Ashley and A. Cameron (2019). North Devon Marine Pioneer Report 2: A Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register A SWEEP/WWF-UK report by research staff the Marine Institute at the University of Plymouth Output 13 Marine Pioneer Natural Capital Plan Workshop on the 7th March. Delivery of content for the workshop. Presentation and Barriers and Enablers workshop. Output 14. Hooper, T. and Austen, M. (2019) Application of the Natural Capital Approach to Sustainability Appraisal. Draft Discussion Document. March 2019. Output 15. Hooper, T., Ashley, M., Börger, T., Langmead, O., Marcone, O., Rees, S., Rendon, O., Beaumont, N., Attrill, M. and Austen, M. 2019. Application of the natural capital approach to the marine environment to aid decision-making. Phase 1 Final Report. Report prepared for the Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs (project code ME5115). Output 16. The Natural Capital Approach. What is it, and how does it fit into decision-making for coastal and marine areas? Non-technical summary of Defra Report, Output 15. Output 17. Perception of Natural Capital Approaches Report: Stakeholder Survey Analysis to Understand Changes in Perception and Engagement with Natural Capital Approaches for SWEEP Marine projects 002 and 014 Phase 1Output Descriptions The report of the first stakeholder workshop (Output 1) defined the assets, challenges and opportunities within North Devon's marine area, and the core values and goals that should be reflected in the management of it. North Devon's natural environment is highly valued and the fishing industry has a high cultural value. The need to maintain and improve sustainable fishing practices is also widely recognised. Understanding and managing the linkages between the land and sea was an important theme, particularly related to improving water quality and developing strategies for climate change mitigation. Challenges in communication, coordination and integration across activities were recognised, although existing partnerships, a long history of collaborative working, as well as the existing network of community groups and willingness of the local community to engage in voluntary activities, were considered to be significant assets. There was a strong desire amongst workshop participants to see more local decision making and the development of regional fisheries management plans. Repeated reference was also made to the world class research base, and the opportunities provided by research programmes that were developing around the Pioneer. The second stakeholder workshop report (Output 2) summarised priorities for incorporating natural capital into local decision making, which were primarily that the strategic (rather than project) scale was most appropriate, particularly in the context of Local Plans and through the Sustainability Appraisal process. The need for a clear statement about local natural capital priorities was noted, including the aspiration for this to be a net gain policy, and spatial maps of the extent, condition, and risks to natural capital assets and ecosystem services was considered an essential foundation. The first South West Marine Natural Capital Conference 2017 (Output 3) was organised and hosted by the Devon Maritime Forum with North Devon Marine Pioneer (North Devon Biosphere Reserve), the SWEEP project, and the UK SEAS project (WWF). The conference provided an opportunity for leading practitioners, businesses and interested stakeholders to learn more about natural capital, the Natural Capital Approach, and the region's marine and coastal assets, as well as finding out how they could get involved with the three partnership projects that are currently commencing in the region; the South West Partnership for Environment and Economic Prosperity (SWEEP), the North Devon Marine Pioneer, and WWF - UK SEAS project. SWEEP delivered two targeted workshops at this event. The North Devon Marine Pioneer Geodatabase funded by NE (Output 4) underpins the knowledge of the links between ecosystem and ecosystem services in the North Devon Marine Pioneer. The data within the geodatabase was used to develop the North Devon Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register. The data from the geodatabase has been used to provide visual support for communication with stakeholders at key events (see activities listed in previous section Marine Pioneer Stakeholder Engagement and Consultation and Output 5). The GIS analysist (Andy Cameron) provided a web-based workshop for interested stakeholders to build capacity in the use of and access to the geodatabase, seek feedback and identify potential additional data sources. The North Devon Biosphere reserve. As part of this work key data gaps were filled (Output 6). SWEEP developed the framework for the application of the Natural Capital approach in the marine environment that specifically supports the WWF led UK SEAS programme sustainable finance work stream and the delivery of the Pioneer programme in North Devon. Output 7 demonstates the pathways between ecology, ecosystem services and benefits that influence human wellbeing; How stakeholders are linked (directly or indirectly) to natural capital and; relevant indicators, data sources and potential means for valuing ecosystem service benefits (monetary and non-monetary). WWF have developed a further summary report (Output 8) to convey key messages from the report to stakeholders. The North Devon Biosphere Reserve have developed communications materials based on Output 9. SWEEP Impact Fellows co-designed and led a Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register Workshop to develop a local dimension of a natural capital asset risk register (Output 10) The main outcome of this workshop was that the participants of the North Devon MWG discussed the local risk to the asset-benefit relationship within the context of the North Devon Marine Pioneer. This provided a local perspective on risk for comparison with national policy targets. Output 12 represents a follow-on from Ashley, Rees et al (2018) (Output 7) to further test the framework for the application of the Natural Capital Approach in the Marine Pioneer. Included is a natural capital asset register that documents the extent and condition of the natural capital assets; the stocks and flows of ecosystem services in the North Devon Marine Pioneer; A risk register to identify threats to natural capital in the North Devon Marine Pioneer; and recommendations on key natural capital assets on which future management opportunities could be focused to achieve the greatest gains (Output 12). Output 13 - On the 7th March SWEEP Impact Fellows led a workshop for the marine Pioneer Steering Group to present the Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register and to identify the barriers and enablers to the delivery of the Marine Natural Capital Plan The Sustainability Appraisal Discussion Document (Output 14) provides suggestions for straightforward and practical ways in which the ongoing, statutory Sustainability Appraisal for the South West Marine Plan could adopt a natural capital approach. This is the first stage of a process that will continue into Phase 2, including follow-up with the MMO and consultants contracted to carry out the Sustainability Appraisal. Outcomes Achieved So Far Within the Marine Pioneer a range of 'Demonstration Projects' have been identified and are currently being progressed by the project partners and integrating SWEEP Phase 1ouputs. These are: • Completion of a natural capital decision support tool with values and risk register. Led by SWEEP. • Completion of geodatabase Led by SWEEP • Marine Natural Capital Plan - Led by North Devon Council/Biosphere Reserve and Funded by European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF). Using SWEEP Phase I outputs to develop a high level area integrated Marine Natural Capital Plan. • Better management of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) - Led by WWF-UK SEAS. WWF are using SWEEP Phase I outputs to develop management plans for Marine Protected Areas in North Devon that help nature and people to thrive. Includes the development of an innovative financing plan for MPAs. • Fisheries partnership projects. Led by the Blue Marine Foundation and the Devon and Severn Inshore Fisheries and Conservation (D&S IFCA) to establish fisheries, scientist and managers partnerships. A sustainable management and improvement plan for North Devon Fisheries including fisheries assessment, identification of new income sources, governance structure, and marketing plan. Opportunities for regional management, research and marketing identified. • Investment plan for coastal habitat and biodiversity restoration- - Led by North Devon Council/Biosphere Reserve to develop an investment plan for coastal habitat and biodiversity restoration, including innovative financing, feasibility studies • Joint work with the landscape pioneer on governance across the land - sea interface
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP002: Natural Capital Assessment Tools for the North Devon Marine Pioneer (Phase 1) 
Organisation World Wide Fund for Nature
Country Switzerland 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan.
Collaborator Contribution The aim of the activity is to develop natural capital assessment tools and approaches (including financing and the design of incentives) for integrated decision-making and environmental progress assessments that will support DEFRA's Marine Pioneer programme and its 25 Year Environment Plan.
Impact Output 1. Hooper, T. 2017a. A Long Term Vision for the North Devon Marine Pioneer Programme. Workshop Report. March 2017 Output 2. Hooper, T. 2017b. Natural Capital and Local Decision Making. Workshop Report. November 2017. Output 3. SW Marine Natural Capital Conference 2017 - Post Conference Report Output 4. A Geodatabase for North Devon Output 5. Summary fact sheet for the Geodatabase Output 6. North Devon Watersports Survey Output 7. Ashley, M., S. E. Rees and A. Cameron (2018). North Devon Marine Pioneer Part 1: State of the art report of the links between the ecosystem and ecosystem services in the North Devon Marine Pioneer. A SWEEP/ WWF-UK report. Univeristy of Plymouth pp.103. Output 8. Factsheet - North Devon Ecosystem Services: what are the key benefits the marine environment provides to people and what are the risks and opportuntities Output 9. North Devon Biosphere Reserve - Communication materials (will be added tio impact store once finalised) Output 10. Rees 2019. A Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register Workshop. North Devon Marine Pioneer. Marine Working Group Meeting September 2018. Workshop report pp. 17 Output 11. Hooper et al 2018 - Building on the vision for the North Devon Marine Pioneer programme - Workshop Report Output 12. Rees, S. E., M. Ashley and A. Cameron (2019). North Devon Marine Pioneer Report 2: A Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register A SWEEP/WWF-UK report by research staff the Marine Institute at the University of Plymouth Output 13 Marine Pioneer Natural Capital Plan Workshop on the 7th March. Delivery of content for the workshop. Presentation and Barriers and Enablers workshop. Output 14. Hooper, T. and Austen, M. (2019) Application of the Natural Capital Approach to Sustainability Appraisal. Draft Discussion Document. March 2019. Output 15. Hooper, T., Ashley, M., Börger, T., Langmead, O., Marcone, O., Rees, S., Rendon, O., Beaumont, N., Attrill, M. and Austen, M. 2019. Application of the natural capital approach to the marine environment to aid decision-making. Phase 1 Final Report. Report prepared for the Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs (project code ME5115). Output 16. The Natural Capital Approach. What is it, and how does it fit into decision-making for coastal and marine areas? Non-technical summary of Defra Report, Output 15. Output 17. Perception of Natural Capital Approaches Report: Stakeholder Survey Analysis to Understand Changes in Perception and Engagement with Natural Capital Approaches for SWEEP Marine projects 002 and 014 Phase 1Output Descriptions The report of the first stakeholder workshop (Output 1) defined the assets, challenges and opportunities within North Devon's marine area, and the core values and goals that should be reflected in the management of it. North Devon's natural environment is highly valued and the fishing industry has a high cultural value. The need to maintain and improve sustainable fishing practices is also widely recognised. Understanding and managing the linkages between the land and sea was an important theme, particularly related to improving water quality and developing strategies for climate change mitigation. Challenges in communication, coordination and integration across activities were recognised, although existing partnerships, a long history of collaborative working, as well as the existing network of community groups and willingness of the local community to engage in voluntary activities, were considered to be significant assets. There was a strong desire amongst workshop participants to see more local decision making and the development of regional fisheries management plans. Repeated reference was also made to the world class research base, and the opportunities provided by research programmes that were developing around the Pioneer. The second stakeholder workshop report (Output 2) summarised priorities for incorporating natural capital into local decision making, which were primarily that the strategic (rather than project) scale was most appropriate, particularly in the context of Local Plans and through the Sustainability Appraisal process. The need for a clear statement about local natural capital priorities was noted, including the aspiration for this to be a net gain policy, and spatial maps of the extent, condition, and risks to natural capital assets and ecosystem services was considered an essential foundation. The first South West Marine Natural Capital Conference 2017 (Output 3) was organised and hosted by the Devon Maritime Forum with North Devon Marine Pioneer (North Devon Biosphere Reserve), the SWEEP project, and the UK SEAS project (WWF). The conference provided an opportunity for leading practitioners, businesses and interested stakeholders to learn more about natural capital, the Natural Capital Approach, and the region's marine and coastal assets, as well as finding out how they could get involved with the three partnership projects that are currently commencing in the region; the South West Partnership for Environment and Economic Prosperity (SWEEP), the North Devon Marine Pioneer, and WWF - UK SEAS project. SWEEP delivered two targeted workshops at this event. The North Devon Marine Pioneer Geodatabase funded by NE (Output 4) underpins the knowledge of the links between ecosystem and ecosystem services in the North Devon Marine Pioneer. The data within the geodatabase was used to develop the North Devon Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register. The data from the geodatabase has been used to provide visual support for communication with stakeholders at key events (see activities listed in previous section Marine Pioneer Stakeholder Engagement and Consultation and Output 5). The GIS analysist (Andy Cameron) provided a web-based workshop for interested stakeholders to build capacity in the use of and access to the geodatabase, seek feedback and identify potential additional data sources. The North Devon Biosphere reserve. As part of this work key data gaps were filled (Output 6). SWEEP developed the framework for the application of the Natural Capital approach in the marine environment that specifically supports the WWF led UK SEAS programme sustainable finance work stream and the delivery of the Pioneer programme in North Devon. Output 7 demonstates the pathways between ecology, ecosystem services and benefits that influence human wellbeing; How stakeholders are linked (directly or indirectly) to natural capital and; relevant indicators, data sources and potential means for valuing ecosystem service benefits (monetary and non-monetary). WWF have developed a further summary report (Output 8) to convey key messages from the report to stakeholders. The North Devon Biosphere Reserve have developed communications materials based on Output 9. SWEEP Impact Fellows co-designed and led a Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register Workshop to develop a local dimension of a natural capital asset risk register (Output 10) The main outcome of this workshop was that the participants of the North Devon MWG discussed the local risk to the asset-benefit relationship within the context of the North Devon Marine Pioneer. This provided a local perspective on risk for comparison with national policy targets. Output 12 represents a follow-on from Ashley, Rees et al (2018) (Output 7) to further test the framework for the application of the Natural Capital Approach in the Marine Pioneer. Included is a natural capital asset register that documents the extent and condition of the natural capital assets; the stocks and flows of ecosystem services in the North Devon Marine Pioneer; A risk register to identify threats to natural capital in the North Devon Marine Pioneer; and recommendations on key natural capital assets on which future management opportunities could be focused to achieve the greatest gains (Output 12). Output 13 - On the 7th March SWEEP Impact Fellows led a workshop for the marine Pioneer Steering Group to present the Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register and to identify the barriers and enablers to the delivery of the Marine Natural Capital Plan The Sustainability Appraisal Discussion Document (Output 14) provides suggestions for straightforward and practical ways in which the ongoing, statutory Sustainability Appraisal for the South West Marine Plan could adopt a natural capital approach. This is the first stage of a process that will continue into Phase 2, including follow-up with the MMO and consultants contracted to carry out the Sustainability Appraisal. Outcomes Achieved So Far Within the Marine Pioneer a range of 'Demonstration Projects' have been identified and are currently being progressed by the project partners and integrating SWEEP Phase 1ouputs. These are: • Completion of a natural capital decision support tool with values and risk register. Led by SWEEP. • Completion of geodatabase Led by SWEEP • Marine Natural Capital Plan - Led by North Devon Council/Biosphere Reserve and Funded by European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF). Using SWEEP Phase I outputs to develop a high level area integrated Marine Natural Capital Plan. • Better management of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) - Led by WWF-UK SEAS. WWF are using SWEEP Phase I outputs to develop management plans for Marine Protected Areas in North Devon that help nature and people to thrive. Includes the development of an innovative financing plan for MPAs. • Fisheries partnership projects. Led by the Blue Marine Foundation and the Devon and Severn Inshore Fisheries and Conservation (D&S IFCA) to establish fisheries, scientist and managers partnerships. A sustainable management and improvement plan for North Devon Fisheries including fisheries assessment, identification of new income sources, governance structure, and marketing plan. Opportunities for regional management, research and marketing identified. • Investment plan for coastal habitat and biodiversity restoration- - Led by North Devon Council/Biosphere Reserve to develop an investment plan for coastal habitat and biodiversity restoration, including innovative financing, feasibility studies • Joint work with the landscape pioneer on governance across the land - sea interface
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP003: Realising the potential for operational leak detection using landscape modelling and drone thermal imaging 
Organisation South West Water Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution To develop intelligent geospatial approaches to optimise the detection of leaks from submerged aqueducts and water mains pipes. Working in collaboration with colleagues in South-West water, we will pioneer a new research-led operational approach for targeting drone-based thermal imaging surveys in areas where leak detection has a high success rate, as determined by geospatial modelling using NERC Tellus LiDAR and other remote sensing data from operational satellite missions.
Collaborator Contribution Staff time, technical expertise, data and licensing.
Impact this project has produced several discrete outputs, which are described in this section. Firstly, the analysis undertaken has derived over 20 candidate anomalies (areas where leakage from water supply network is likely) supplied to SWW in March 2019 (figure 2). These locations are identified from the targeting methodology employed over specific parts of the network of concern to SWW. The results illustrate that using a combination of remote sensing tools we can locate and investigate surface anomalies that may be significant leaks from the mains water infrastructure. These techniques also allow the identification of features that are not clearly visible on the ground or able to be hydrologically understood in isolation from the surrounding landscape. In future work, further detailed analysis of the available remote sensing datasets in this way, should improve the targeting of future thermal imaging surveys and result in the detection of similar anomalies across larger extents. Figure 2 Secondly, we have produced a case study and report detailing the investigation of a specific anomaly near the village of Tregony in Cornwall. This case study forms the key output from the numerous drone flights undertaken and an example of the output data from this investigation is included in figure 3. These data describe the output from the spatial filtering and thresholding described in figure 1. The anomaly identified in this case study is now under ground investigation and more information is available in the separate case study document. Figure 3, A: close up of NDVI data covering the identified anomaly at the Tregony site. B: thermal image of the same extent. C: processed data including blue highlights of the wettest locations. The red arrow shows the location of the surface water subsequently confirmed at this location. Specific limitations of this technology. This project has also identified limitations to this workflow, which constitute an important output for the future implementation of these technologies by SWW or other water companies. These limitations or considerations are listed below and split between the targeting aspects of the project, and the operational drone flights component. Targeting of leak detection activities. • This method requires frequent updating of broadscale aerial photography, or targeted flights of higher resolution aerial photography. • Users need sufficient experience to understand the principles of water flow at the surface and subsurface through complex natural and anthropogenically dominated landscape systems. • Related factors such as the season and antecedent rainfall will affect the usefulness of any data collected. Drone flight surveys of detected anomalies • Operator knowledge and experience is critical to the successful collection of data using drone technologies. • Restricted areas in which flight is permissible affect the areas available for survey. • There are specific and restricted conditions (weather and soil conditions) under which thermal imaging may prove useful. • Significantly varying ground cover in space (i.e. field to field) and in time (i.e. seasonally) limit the application of the technology and/or may require expert interpretation. • Requirements for detailed data post-processing are likely to vary based on the above. Therefore, a user experienced enough to adjust parametrisation specific to the site, ground cover and conditions would be required. • Requirement for any further data interpretation to be undertaken by an individual trained in thermal imaging science.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP004: Natural Capital Approaches in Dartmoor and Exmoor National Parks (DNPA and ENPA) 
Organisation Dartmoor National Park Authority
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution To deliver environmental, economic and social benefits in Dartmoor and Exmoor National Parks through the use of natural capital approaches
Collaborator Contribution Advice, commentary, and recommendations for data and model development.
Impact Recreation Futures Outputs - Projections of housing developments and population growth around Dartmoor (written evidence) - Spatial and temporal projections of future changes in visitation and footfall across the National park (model results, GIS maps and written evidence) - Evidence on the wellbeing benefits (willingness to pay) and health benefits obtained by local population from recreation on Dartmoor - Written advice on the potential impacts of (increased) recreation on key wildlife and footpath erosion - GIS maps on the areas at risk of footpath erosion, areas of key wildlife, areas of future recreation hotspots, and areas of conflict between wildlife and recreation - Recommendations on mitigating the impacts of increased recreation on wildlife - Extensive final report on all the above Outcomes - Outputs above used within DNPA to inform thinking and decision/policy-making around recreation futures, benefits of recreation, impacts on the National Park and potential mitigation measures (achieved) - Outputs used by DNPA to support negotiations with Local Authorities and Housing Developers to leverage future funding to the Park in support of the supply of recreational facilities to residents of newly constructed housing in the region (on-going) - Wider use of these findings by other organisations: to date (by 06/08/19), the full report has been downloaded from the SWEEP website 59 times, and the extended summary 27 times (not available online elsewhere). (achieved/ongoing) - Recommendations provided to Dartmoor Access Forum through results presentation are informing discussions regarding access strategies (achieved) - Wider education on welfare valuation and impacts of increased footfall; through presentations to various audiences (achieved) Natural Capital Accounting Outputs - A review of existing Natural Capital Accounting methodologies by environmentally-facing organisations - An Excel framework for producing National Park Natural Capital Accounts - Natural Capital Accounts for Dartmoor and Exmoor National Parks - Case studies testing account sensitivities and limitations, as well as potential improvements on the standard practice - Recommendations for producing improved Natural Capital Accounts at an organisational scale - A comprehensive report containing information on the Natural Capital Approach, the developed accounting methodology, results and case studies, including a detailed discussion on the aims and ambitions and usefulness of the delivered Natural Capital Accounts. Outcomes - Project findings used to test Natural Capital Accounting as a management tool for NPAs (achieved) - Project findings used to inform improved reporting for State of the Park reports (anticipated by end of SWEEP) - Project findings used to inform future needs regarding management decision-making tools (achieved) - Project used to feed back to government regarding usefulness and limitations of Natural Capital Accounting for NPAs and other environmental organisations (anticipated by end of SWEEP)
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP004: Natural Capital Approaches in Dartmoor and Exmoor National Parks (DNPA and ENPA) 
Organisation Exmoor National Park Authority
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution To deliver environmental, economic and social benefits in Dartmoor and Exmoor National Parks through the use of natural capital approaches
Collaborator Contribution Advice, commentary, and recommendations for data and model development.
Impact Recreation Futures Outputs - Projections of housing developments and population growth around Dartmoor (written evidence) - Spatial and temporal projections of future changes in visitation and footfall across the National park (model results, GIS maps and written evidence) - Evidence on the wellbeing benefits (willingness to pay) and health benefits obtained by local population from recreation on Dartmoor - Written advice on the potential impacts of (increased) recreation on key wildlife and footpath erosion - GIS maps on the areas at risk of footpath erosion, areas of key wildlife, areas of future recreation hotspots, and areas of conflict between wildlife and recreation - Recommendations on mitigating the impacts of increased recreation on wildlife - Extensive final report on all the above Outcomes - Outputs above used within DNPA to inform thinking and decision/policy-making around recreation futures, benefits of recreation, impacts on the National Park and potential mitigation measures (achieved) - Outputs used by DNPA to support negotiations with Local Authorities and Housing Developers to leverage future funding to the Park in support of the supply of recreational facilities to residents of newly constructed housing in the region (on-going) - Wider use of these findings by other organisations: to date (by 06/08/19), the full report has been downloaded from the SWEEP website 59 times, and the extended summary 27 times (not available online elsewhere). (achieved/ongoing) - Recommendations provided to Dartmoor Access Forum through results presentation are informing discussions regarding access strategies (achieved) - Wider education on welfare valuation and impacts of increased footfall; through presentations to various audiences (achieved) Natural Capital Accounting Outputs - A review of existing Natural Capital Accounting methodologies by environmentally-facing organisations - An Excel framework for producing National Park Natural Capital Accounts - Natural Capital Accounts for Dartmoor and Exmoor National Parks - Case studies testing account sensitivities and limitations, as well as potential improvements on the standard practice - Recommendations for producing improved Natural Capital Accounts at an organisational scale - A comprehensive report containing information on the Natural Capital Approach, the developed accounting methodology, results and case studies, including a detailed discussion on the aims and ambitions and usefulness of the delivered Natural Capital Accounts. Outcomes - Project findings used to test Natural Capital Accounting as a management tool for NPAs (achieved) - Project findings used to inform improved reporting for State of the Park reports (anticipated by end of SWEEP) - Project findings used to inform future needs regarding management decision-making tools (achieved) - Project used to feed back to government regarding usefulness and limitations of Natural Capital Accounting for NPAs and other environmental organisations (anticipated by end of SWEEP)
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP005a: Farming Futures 
Organisation National Farmers Union
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The overarching aim of this project is to find which groups of farmers are more or less likely to apply for future environmental schemes and how they perceive issues around them. The project will engage with farmers in the North Devon Biosphere to discuss the potential future NELMS schemes, their willingness to be involved, barriers, and how they think 'public money for public goods' could be achieved.
Collaborator Contribution Advice; steering; identification of resources, data and other partners. Priority setting and work planning.
Impact Outputs 1. A North Devon farmer typology database was created to help inform the Proposal for North Devon Landscape Pioneer 'Land Management Trial'. The Defra-funded trial is due to run for 15 months from Oct 2019 to Dec 2020. 2. A report was prepared for Natural England detailing the results of the discussions with farmers, summarising key findings and advice for the Pioneer. The report includes guidance on how to approach farmers, their understanding of Natural Capital, how likely they are to diversify, how interested they are in new schemes, who they would want advice from, etc. 3. A more accessible report was produced for farmers summarising the key findings. Outcomes 1. The farm typology developed during the engagement work was used by Natural England to develop the the North Devon Landscape Pioneer 'Land Management Trial'. It enabled them to better understand and work with farmers within the Biosphere. 2. Natural England was advised to adjust the trial design and farm-approach in the following ways, as a result of the farmer survey findings: e.g. (1) use established partners on the ground to develop trial; (2) stop running workshops during the summer months (when farmers were busy harvesting); (3) change the language used with farmers to minimise barriers (e.g. not use the term 'Natural Capital'). 3. The engaged (i.e. 'warmed-up') farmers are being targeted by Natural England to take part in the trial. 4. Farmers who engaged with the SWEEP 'process' became better informed and knowledgeable about their natural capital resources and felt more empowered as a result of their engagement with the ideas around the North Devon Landscape Pioneer trial process. 5. In the longer-term, it is anticipated that the results of the North Devon Landscape Pioneer 'Land Management Trial' will help shape development of the national NELMS.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP005a: Farming Futures 
Organisation Natural England
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The overarching aim of this project is to find which groups of farmers are more or less likely to apply for future environmental schemes and how they perceive issues around them. The project will engage with farmers in the North Devon Biosphere to discuss the potential future NELMS schemes, their willingness to be involved, barriers, and how they think 'public money for public goods' could be achieved.
Collaborator Contribution Advice; steering; identification of resources, data and other partners. Priority setting and work planning.
Impact Outputs 1. A North Devon farmer typology database was created to help inform the Proposal for North Devon Landscape Pioneer 'Land Management Trial'. The Defra-funded trial is due to run for 15 months from Oct 2019 to Dec 2020. 2. A report was prepared for Natural England detailing the results of the discussions with farmers, summarising key findings and advice for the Pioneer. The report includes guidance on how to approach farmers, their understanding of Natural Capital, how likely they are to diversify, how interested they are in new schemes, who they would want advice from, etc. 3. A more accessible report was produced for farmers summarising the key findings. Outcomes 1. The farm typology developed during the engagement work was used by Natural England to develop the the North Devon Landscape Pioneer 'Land Management Trial'. It enabled them to better understand and work with farmers within the Biosphere. 2. Natural England was advised to adjust the trial design and farm-approach in the following ways, as a result of the farmer survey findings: e.g. (1) use established partners on the ground to develop trial; (2) stop running workshops during the summer months (when farmers were busy harvesting); (3) change the language used with farmers to minimise barriers (e.g. not use the term 'Natural Capital'). 3. The engaged (i.e. 'warmed-up') farmers are being targeted by Natural England to take part in the trial. 4. Farmers who engaged with the SWEEP 'process' became better informed and knowledgeable about their natural capital resources and felt more empowered as a result of their engagement with the ideas around the North Devon Landscape Pioneer trial process. 5. In the longer-term, it is anticipated that the results of the North Devon Landscape Pioneer 'Land Management Trial' will help shape development of the national NELMS.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP005a: Farming Futures 
Organisation North Devon Biosphere Service
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The overarching aim of this project is to find which groups of farmers are more or less likely to apply for future environmental schemes and how they perceive issues around them. The project will engage with farmers in the North Devon Biosphere to discuss the potential future NELMS schemes, their willingness to be involved, barriers, and how they think 'public money for public goods' could be achieved.
Collaborator Contribution Advice; steering; identification of resources, data and other partners. Priority setting and work planning.
Impact Outputs 1. A North Devon farmer typology database was created to help inform the Proposal for North Devon Landscape Pioneer 'Land Management Trial'. The Defra-funded trial is due to run for 15 months from Oct 2019 to Dec 2020. 2. A report was prepared for Natural England detailing the results of the discussions with farmers, summarising key findings and advice for the Pioneer. The report includes guidance on how to approach farmers, their understanding of Natural Capital, how likely they are to diversify, how interested they are in new schemes, who they would want advice from, etc. 3. A more accessible report was produced for farmers summarising the key findings. Outcomes 1. The farm typology developed during the engagement work was used by Natural England to develop the the North Devon Landscape Pioneer 'Land Management Trial'. It enabled them to better understand and work with farmers within the Biosphere. 2. Natural England was advised to adjust the trial design and farm-approach in the following ways, as a result of the farmer survey findings: e.g. (1) use established partners on the ground to develop trial; (2) stop running workshops during the summer months (when farmers were busy harvesting); (3) change the language used with farmers to minimise barriers (e.g. not use the term 'Natural Capital'). 3. The engaged (i.e. 'warmed-up') farmers are being targeted by Natural England to take part in the trial. 4. Farmers who engaged with the SWEEP 'process' became better informed and knowledgeable about their natural capital resources and felt more empowered as a result of their engagement with the ideas around the North Devon Landscape Pioneer trial process. 5. In the longer-term, it is anticipated that the results of the North Devon Landscape Pioneer 'Land Management Trial' will help shape development of the national NELMS.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP005b: Estuarine Resilience 
Organisation Natural England
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The overarching aim of this project was to generate environmental enhancements, economic benefits and social wellbeing improvements for the North Devon Biosphere and to inform the 25 Year Environment Plan Landscape Pioneer - a Defra initiative to identify innovation and test the natural capital approach within the North Devon Biosphere. The specific aim of this project was to quantify and improve understanding of how to value and fund coastal ecosystem services by using natural capital approaches to assess the nature and value of the ecosystem services generated by saltmarsh re-alignment.
Collaborator Contribution The overarching aim of this project was to generate environmental enhancements, economic benefits and social wellbeing improvements for the North Devon Biosphere and to inform the 25 Year Environment Plan Landscape Pioneer - a Defra initiative to identify innovation and test the natural capital approach within the North Devon Biosphere. The specific aim of this project was to quantify and improve understanding of how to value and fund coastal ecosystem services by using natural capital approaches to assess the nature and value of the ecosystem services generated by saltmarsh re-alignment.
Impact Output 1. Identification of a set of candidate managed re-alignment sites, which are high priorities for re-alignment. A number of steps were required to produce this outcome. First, it required collating and or generating data describing the ecosystem services generated by candidate managed re-alignment areas in the North Devon Biosphere Reserve. This data describes: carbon sequestration benefits; recreational benefits; direct property damage costs; direct re-alignment costs; and potential agricultural production losses. Second, a model was developed to calculate site specific benefits and costs that would be generate by candidate areas in the Biosphere. The model results were analysed to evaluate priority areas for managed re-alignment based on different assumptions regarding flood damage costs to buildings. The final outputs are available as a dataframe describing candidate re-alignment sites, their location, and the streams of economic costs and benefits that would be generated by the ecosystem services provided by the sites if they were converted to saltmarsh. Outcomes: This information provides a suite of management recommendations to inform the future prioritization of managed re-alignment in the North Devon Biosphere Reserve. This figure shows the results of prioritisation of sites in the North Devon Biosphere Reserve for managed re-alignment of saltmarsh across three scenarios varying in their treatment of property damage: 1) ignoring damages, 2) excluding sites with properties from the analysis, and 3) incorporating a basic assessment of property damages. Prioritisation is based on an assessment of candidate sites' costs: opportunity costs to agriculture, property damages and direct costs (scenario 3), and benefits: recreational and carbon sequestration. The site with the highest annual net present value is circled in red and annual net present value reported. Output 2. SWEEP/LEEP working paper A working paper was developed to describe the results of the Output 1. This was a collaborative effort with Andy Bell, Jo Traill-Thomson (although she was not an author, Jo provided input into the analysis), Sian Rees, Timothy Poate, Christopher Stokes, Brett Day, Greg Smith and Ian Bateman. The working paper is available on the LEEP website: https://www.exeter.ac.uk/leep/publications/workingpapers/ Reference: Davis, K. J., A. Binner, A. Bell, B. Day, T. Poate, S. Rees, G. Smith, K. Wilson, and I. Bateman. A Generalizable Integrated Natural Capital Methodology for Targeting Investment in Coastal Defence. LEEP Working Paper. Outcomes: This output provides a fully open access and accessible description of the work undertaken as part of this project. Output 3. Peer-reviewed manuscript A peer-reviewed manuscript: A Generalizable Integrated Natural Capital Methodology for Targeting Investment in Coastal Defence, was developed based on Output 2. This is available: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/21606544.2018.1537197 Reference: Davis, KJ, A Binner, A Bell, B Day, T Poate, S Rees, G Smith, K Wilson & I Bateman. 2018. A generalisable integrated natural capital methodology for targeting investment in coastal defence. Journal of Environmental Economics and Policy, 1-18. DOI 10.1080/21606544.2018.1537197. Outcomes: This paper has been viewed 869 times (05/06/2019). This publication is fully open access and provides a complete description of the work undertaken for this project. It is also easily shareable and can be used to replicate the analysis of the economic costs and benefits provided by the ecosystem services generated by saltmarsh. As such, it provides a blueprint for the application of the Natural Capital Approach. Output 4. Public engagement During the "Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register Workshop", which was one of the Marine Working Group Meetings in September 2018 as part of the North Devon Marine Pioneer, contact details and copies of the working paper were exchanged with organisations interested in replicating the analysis. Interested parties included Chris Wood, who was interested in developing an evidence base for saltmarsh development in Porlock; and Rebecca MacDonald from Somerset Wildlife. Outcome: This provided an opportunity for the study approach and results to generate leveraged or affiliated projects. Outcome 5: Presentations The approach and outcomes of this project were communicated at the following seminars and academic conferences: 1. EnvEcon, 9th March, London, United Kingdom. 2. Twitter Conference for Environmental Decisions, 22nd May 2018. 3. BIOECON XX, 12-14th September, Cambridge, United Kingdom. 4. A Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register Workshop. North Devon Marine Pioneer. Marine Working Group Meeting September 2018. 5. University of Western Australia, Xth October, Australia. 6. University of Queensland, Xth October, Australia. Outcome: These presentations provided an opporutnity to disseminate the methodology and preliminary results of the project. They led to an invitation to participate in a special feature on Natural Capital in the Journal of Environmental Economics & Policy (Output 3). References: • Davis, K. J., A. Binner, A. Bell, B. Day, T. Poate, S. Rees, G. Smith, K. Wilson, and I. Bateman. 2018. A generalisable integrated natural capital methodology for investments in saltmarsh. Envecon 2018. • Davis, K. J., A. Binner, A. Bell, B. Day, T. Poate, S. Rees, G. Smith, K. Wilson, and I. Bateman. 2018. A generalizable integrated natural capital methodology to prioritise investment in saltmarsh enhancement. XX Annual Bioecon Conference, King's College, Cambridge, United Kingdom. Output 6: News and radio report The research methods and results were reported in a number of media outlets in January 2019. These included: • 23 January 2019 - BBC Spotlight • 23 January 2019 - BBC News • 28 January 2019 - Farming Today • 28 January 2019 - BBC Radio 4 Outcome: This output led to the dissemination of information regarding the ecosystem services provided by saltmarsh. Figure 1. Screen shot of BBC Spotlight press coverage of project. Output 7: Tidal gauges and salinity sensors Tidal gauges and salinity sensors were installed at six sites in the North Devon Biosphere Reserve to provide data that could be used to predict whether saltmarsh would form in potential managed re-alignments sites, and the quality of the potential saltmarsh that would form. Outcomes: Data has now been collected and is being processed by A Bell to determine whether the tidal regime would facilitate development of saltmarsh in candidate re-alignment areas. Figure 2. K Hind and C Stokes setting up equipment to geolocate tidal sensors in North Devon. Outcomes expected by the end of SWEEP • Potential for a new managed re-alignment site in the North Devon Biosphere incorporating the recommendations of the project. Long term outcomes • Enhanced provision of ecosystem services from new managed re-alignment of saltmarsh areas in the North Devon Biosphere, relative to managed re-alignment that would be undertaken without this analysis. Additional benefits could be in the following categories: carbon sequestration, recreation, lower costs to agricultural production, and lower property damages caused by re-alignment.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP005b: Estuarine Resilience 
Organisation North Devon Biosphere Foundation
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The overarching aim of this project was to generate environmental enhancements, economic benefits and social wellbeing improvements for the North Devon Biosphere and to inform the 25 Year Environment Plan Landscape Pioneer - a Defra initiative to identify innovation and test the natural capital approach within the North Devon Biosphere. The specific aim of this project was to quantify and improve understanding of how to value and fund coastal ecosystem services by using natural capital approaches to assess the nature and value of the ecosystem services generated by saltmarsh re-alignment.
Collaborator Contribution The overarching aim of this project was to generate environmental enhancements, economic benefits and social wellbeing improvements for the North Devon Biosphere and to inform the 25 Year Environment Plan Landscape Pioneer - a Defra initiative to identify innovation and test the natural capital approach within the North Devon Biosphere. The specific aim of this project was to quantify and improve understanding of how to value and fund coastal ecosystem services by using natural capital approaches to assess the nature and value of the ecosystem services generated by saltmarsh re-alignment.
Impact Output 1. Identification of a set of candidate managed re-alignment sites, which are high priorities for re-alignment. A number of steps were required to produce this outcome. First, it required collating and or generating data describing the ecosystem services generated by candidate managed re-alignment areas in the North Devon Biosphere Reserve. This data describes: carbon sequestration benefits; recreational benefits; direct property damage costs; direct re-alignment costs; and potential agricultural production losses. Second, a model was developed to calculate site specific benefits and costs that would be generate by candidate areas in the Biosphere. The model results were analysed to evaluate priority areas for managed re-alignment based on different assumptions regarding flood damage costs to buildings. The final outputs are available as a dataframe describing candidate re-alignment sites, their location, and the streams of economic costs and benefits that would be generated by the ecosystem services provided by the sites if they were converted to saltmarsh. Outcomes: This information provides a suite of management recommendations to inform the future prioritization of managed re-alignment in the North Devon Biosphere Reserve. This figure shows the results of prioritisation of sites in the North Devon Biosphere Reserve for managed re-alignment of saltmarsh across three scenarios varying in their treatment of property damage: 1) ignoring damages, 2) excluding sites with properties from the analysis, and 3) incorporating a basic assessment of property damages. Prioritisation is based on an assessment of candidate sites' costs: opportunity costs to agriculture, property damages and direct costs (scenario 3), and benefits: recreational and carbon sequestration. The site with the highest annual net present value is circled in red and annual net present value reported. Output 2. SWEEP/LEEP working paper A working paper was developed to describe the results of the Output 1. This was a collaborative effort with Andy Bell, Jo Traill-Thomson (although she was not an author, Jo provided input into the analysis), Sian Rees, Timothy Poate, Christopher Stokes, Brett Day, Greg Smith and Ian Bateman. The working paper is available on the LEEP website: https://www.exeter.ac.uk/leep/publications/workingpapers/ Reference: Davis, K. J., A. Binner, A. Bell, B. Day, T. Poate, S. Rees, G. Smith, K. Wilson, and I. Bateman. A Generalizable Integrated Natural Capital Methodology for Targeting Investment in Coastal Defence. LEEP Working Paper. Outcomes: This output provides a fully open access and accessible description of the work undertaken as part of this project. Output 3. Peer-reviewed manuscript A peer-reviewed manuscript: A Generalizable Integrated Natural Capital Methodology for Targeting Investment in Coastal Defence, was developed based on Output 2. This is available: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/21606544.2018.1537197 Reference: Davis, KJ, A Binner, A Bell, B Day, T Poate, S Rees, G Smith, K Wilson & I Bateman. 2018. A generalisable integrated natural capital methodology for targeting investment in coastal defence. Journal of Environmental Economics and Policy, 1-18. DOI 10.1080/21606544.2018.1537197. Outcomes: This paper has been viewed 869 times (05/06/2019). This publication is fully open access and provides a complete description of the work undertaken for this project. It is also easily shareable and can be used to replicate the analysis of the economic costs and benefits provided by the ecosystem services generated by saltmarsh. As such, it provides a blueprint for the application of the Natural Capital Approach. Output 4. Public engagement During the "Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register Workshop", which was one of the Marine Working Group Meetings in September 2018 as part of the North Devon Marine Pioneer, contact details and copies of the working paper were exchanged with organisations interested in replicating the analysis. Interested parties included Chris Wood, who was interested in developing an evidence base for saltmarsh development in Porlock; and Rebecca MacDonald from Somerset Wildlife. Outcome: This provided an opportunity for the study approach and results to generate leveraged or affiliated projects. Outcome 5: Presentations The approach and outcomes of this project were communicated at the following seminars and academic conferences: 1. EnvEcon, 9th March, London, United Kingdom. 2. Twitter Conference for Environmental Decisions, 22nd May 2018. 3. BIOECON XX, 12-14th September, Cambridge, United Kingdom. 4. A Natural Capital Asset and Risk Register Workshop. North Devon Marine Pioneer. Marine Working Group Meeting September 2018. 5. University of Western Australia, Xth October, Australia. 6. University of Queensland, Xth October, Australia. Outcome: These presentations provided an opporutnity to disseminate the methodology and preliminary results of the project. They led to an invitation to participate in a special feature on Natural Capital in the Journal of Environmental Economics & Policy (Output 3). References: • Davis, K. J., A. Binner, A. Bell, B. Day, T. Poate, S. Rees, G. Smith, K. Wilson, and I. Bateman. 2018. A generalisable integrated natural capital methodology for investments in saltmarsh. Envecon 2018. • Davis, K. J., A. Binner, A. Bell, B. Day, T. Poate, S. Rees, G. Smith, K. Wilson, and I. Bateman. 2018. A generalizable integrated natural capital methodology to prioritise investment in saltmarsh enhancement. XX Annual Bioecon Conference, King's College, Cambridge, United Kingdom. Output 6: News and radio report The research methods and results were reported in a number of media outlets in January 2019. These included: • 23 January 2019 - BBC Spotlight • 23 January 2019 - BBC News • 28 January 2019 - Farming Today • 28 January 2019 - BBC Radio 4 Outcome: This output led to the dissemination of information regarding the ecosystem services provided by saltmarsh. Figure 1. Screen shot of BBC Spotlight press coverage of project. Output 7: Tidal gauges and salinity sensors Tidal gauges and salinity sensors were installed at six sites in the North Devon Biosphere Reserve to provide data that could be used to predict whether saltmarsh would form in potential managed re-alignments sites, and the quality of the potential saltmarsh that would form. Outcomes: Data has now been collected and is being processed by A Bell to determine whether the tidal regime would facilitate development of saltmarsh in candidate re-alignment areas. Figure 2. K Hind and C Stokes setting up equipment to geolocate tidal sensors in North Devon. Outcomes expected by the end of SWEEP • Potential for a new managed re-alignment site in the North Devon Biosphere incorporating the recommendations of the project. Long term outcomes • Enhanced provision of ecosystem services from new managed re-alignment of saltmarsh areas in the North Devon Biosphere, relative to managed re-alignment that would be undertaken without this analysis. Additional benefits could be in the following categories: carbon sequestration, recreation, lower costs to agricultural production, and lower property damages caused by re-alignment.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP006: Sustainable Drainage 
Organisation Devon County Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Develop an innovative methodology and tools that can be used to inform strategic level planning decisions in South West England
Collaborator Contribution Advice, project steering, provision of data and model refinement expertise.
Impact 1) South West England surface water catchment dataset and guidance This output includes GIS mapping representing surface water (overland exceedance) flow paths and catchments for South West England and associated technical guidance. The outputs are used to identify the hydro-dynamics and surface water connectivity of landscapes during catchment screening, as such they are intended as an exploratory tool, to direct and form subsequent steps of surface water management. Outputs are high level and only suitable for application by experienced professional, caution should be made when applying outputs at a local scale or without knowledge of their strengths, limitations and contexts. So far these outputs have been adopted and applied by several project partners, including: WRT, PF, South West Water and Fjordr. WRT and PF have applied them on several projects and case studies (detailed in Activity 4), although, so far, it is unclear whether other partners have applied them on projects. As the outputs are a screening tool, they may be used within organisations for quick screening/ preparing bidding/ collecting appropriate data/ contacting appropriate stakeholders, rather than making their way into published outputs. By the end of SWEEP we anticipate that this output will be embedded in WRT and PF's capabilities and applied on a range of other projects, including Kingsbridge (PF), Burrator Reservoir (WRT) and Connecting the Culm (WRT/ Fjordr). We anticipate that our partners will continue to use the data set beyond this date. Following the Expo, a range of other stakeholders have contacted us to apply these catchments. We will endeavor to continue to make the data available where we are contacted and report this to the SWEEP Impact Officer, as appropriate. 2) Devon SUDS opportunity mapping This output is currently in progress, awaiting final analysis from colleagues at Eawag University. Upon completion the mapping will show SUDS opportunity mapping across the entirety of Devon, highlighting the range and scale of measures which can be applied in the region. The output will work in tandem with Output 1, though providing additional data to support partners preliminary strategic hazard and opportunity screening. Up to the end and beyond SWEEP, we anticipate that this will form a useful component for our SWEEP partners to inform, explore and evidence the decisions they make when considering surface water management decisions. We anticipate that this will translate to consideration and application of a wider range of surface water management measures (which are not always included in 'business as usual' design, as well as supporting partners winning and delivering work. 3) Flood modelling training and embedding research led resources with partners This output has delivered training for our two key partners, WRT and PF. Training has included application of catchment datasets (Output 1), guidance on flood modelling and deployment of research tools and frameworks, including Rapid Scenario Screening, CADDIES-2D and flood damage assessment using the CORFU tool. We delivered this training through hosting several full day workshops, regular in person and virtual meetings and ongoing technical support (detailed in impact store). We were also able to leverage licensing from the CADDIES flood modelling team. Effective training has led to applying skills and knowledge in support of flood management projects around South West England during the SWEEP project, and we anticipate that the positive legacy of this upskilling and embedding new practices will continue up to and beyond the end of SWEEP. It is likely that the partnerships and mentoring established in SWEEP will continue beyond the end of the project. We envisage that these outputs will have the following outcomes: • New approach trialed by project partners to enhance surface water management in SW England • New tools and methods are adopted to support stakeholder analysis of surface water hazards in SW England • New opportunities for surface water management are identified by tool users. • Understand value of SuDS for surface water management in South West England and disseminate potentially leading to further outcomes and impacts.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP006: Sustainable Drainage 
Organisation Devon County Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Develop an innovative methodology and tools that can be used to inform strategic level planning decisions in South West England
Collaborator Contribution Advice, project steering, provision of data and model refinement expertise.
Impact 1) South West England surface water catchment dataset and guidance This output includes GIS mapping representing surface water (overland exceedance) flow paths and catchments for South West England and associated technical guidance. The outputs are used to identify the hydro-dynamics and surface water connectivity of landscapes during catchment screening, as such they are intended as an exploratory tool, to direct and form subsequent steps of surface water management. Outputs are high level and only suitable for application by experienced professional, caution should be made when applying outputs at a local scale or without knowledge of their strengths, limitations and contexts. So far these outputs have been adopted and applied by several project partners, including: WRT, PF, South West Water and Fjordr. WRT and PF have applied them on several projects and case studies (detailed in Activity 4), although, so far, it is unclear whether other partners have applied them on projects. As the outputs are a screening tool, they may be used within organisations for quick screening/ preparing bidding/ collecting appropriate data/ contacting appropriate stakeholders, rather than making their way into published outputs. By the end of SWEEP we anticipate that this output will be embedded in WRT and PF's capabilities and applied on a range of other projects, including Kingsbridge (PF), Burrator Reservoir (WRT) and Connecting the Culm (WRT/ Fjordr). We anticipate that our partners will continue to use the data set beyond this date. Following the Expo, a range of other stakeholders have contacted us to apply these catchments. We will endeavor to continue to make the data available where we are contacted and report this to the SWEEP Impact Officer, as appropriate. 2) Devon SUDS opportunity mapping This output is currently in progress, awaiting final analysis from colleagues at Eawag University. Upon completion the mapping will show SUDS opportunity mapping across the entirety of Devon, highlighting the range and scale of measures which can be applied in the region. The output will work in tandem with Output 1, though providing additional data to support partners preliminary strategic hazard and opportunity screening. Up to the end and beyond SWEEP, we anticipate that this will form a useful component for our SWEEP partners to inform, explore and evidence the decisions they make when considering surface water management decisions. We anticipate that this will translate to consideration and application of a wider range of surface water management measures (which are not always included in 'business as usual' design, as well as supporting partners winning and delivering work. 3) Flood modelling training and embedding research led resources with partners This output has delivered training for our two key partners, WRT and PF. Training has included application of catchment datasets (Output 1), guidance on flood modelling and deployment of research tools and frameworks, including Rapid Scenario Screening, CADDIES-2D and flood damage assessment using the CORFU tool. We delivered this training through hosting several full day workshops, regular in person and virtual meetings and ongoing technical support (detailed in impact store). We were also able to leverage licensing from the CADDIES flood modelling team. Effective training has led to applying skills and knowledge in support of flood management projects around South West England during the SWEEP project, and we anticipate that the positive legacy of this upskilling and embedding new practices will continue up to and beyond the end of SWEEP. It is likely that the partnerships and mentoring established in SWEEP will continue beyond the end of the project. We envisage that these outputs will have the following outcomes: • New approach trialed by project partners to enhance surface water management in SW England • New tools and methods are adopted to support stakeholder analysis of surface water hazards in SW England • New opportunities for surface water management are identified by tool users. • Understand value of SuDS for surface water management in South West England and disseminate potentially leading to further outcomes and impacts.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP006: Sustainable Drainage 
Organisation Jacobs Engineering Group
Country United States 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Develop an innovative methodology and tools that can be used to inform strategic level planning decisions in South West England
Collaborator Contribution Advice, project steering, provision of data and model refinement expertise.
Impact 1) South West England surface water catchment dataset and guidance This output includes GIS mapping representing surface water (overland exceedance) flow paths and catchments for South West England and associated technical guidance. The outputs are used to identify the hydro-dynamics and surface water connectivity of landscapes during catchment screening, as such they are intended as an exploratory tool, to direct and form subsequent steps of surface water management. Outputs are high level and only suitable for application by experienced professional, caution should be made when applying outputs at a local scale or without knowledge of their strengths, limitations and contexts. So far these outputs have been adopted and applied by several project partners, including: WRT, PF, South West Water and Fjordr. WRT and PF have applied them on several projects and case studies (detailed in Activity 4), although, so far, it is unclear whether other partners have applied them on projects. As the outputs are a screening tool, they may be used within organisations for quick screening/ preparing bidding/ collecting appropriate data/ contacting appropriate stakeholders, rather than making their way into published outputs. By the end of SWEEP we anticipate that this output will be embedded in WRT and PF's capabilities and applied on a range of other projects, including Kingsbridge (PF), Burrator Reservoir (WRT) and Connecting the Culm (WRT/ Fjordr). We anticipate that our partners will continue to use the data set beyond this date. Following the Expo, a range of other stakeholders have contacted us to apply these catchments. We will endeavor to continue to make the data available where we are contacted and report this to the SWEEP Impact Officer, as appropriate. 2) Devon SUDS opportunity mapping This output is currently in progress, awaiting final analysis from colleagues at Eawag University. Upon completion the mapping will show SUDS opportunity mapping across the entirety of Devon, highlighting the range and scale of measures which can be applied in the region. The output will work in tandem with Output 1, though providing additional data to support partners preliminary strategic hazard and opportunity screening. Up to the end and beyond SWEEP, we anticipate that this will form a useful component for our SWEEP partners to inform, explore and evidence the decisions they make when considering surface water management decisions. We anticipate that this will translate to consideration and application of a wider range of surface water management measures (which are not always included in 'business as usual' design, as well as supporting partners winning and delivering work. 3) Flood modelling training and embedding research led resources with partners This output has delivered training for our two key partners, WRT and PF. Training has included application of catchment datasets (Output 1), guidance on flood modelling and deployment of research tools and frameworks, including Rapid Scenario Screening, CADDIES-2D and flood damage assessment using the CORFU tool. We delivered this training through hosting several full day workshops, regular in person and virtual meetings and ongoing technical support (detailed in impact store). We were also able to leverage licensing from the CADDIES flood modelling team. Effective training has led to applying skills and knowledge in support of flood management projects around South West England during the SWEEP project, and we anticipate that the positive legacy of this upskilling and embedding new practices will continue up to and beyond the end of SWEEP. It is likely that the partnerships and mentoring established in SWEEP will continue beyond the end of the project. We envisage that these outputs will have the following outcomes: • New approach trialed by project partners to enhance surface water management in SW England • New tools and methods are adopted to support stakeholder analysis of surface water hazards in SW England • New opportunities for surface water management are identified by tool users. • Understand value of SuDS for surface water management in South West England and disseminate potentially leading to further outcomes and impacts.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP006: Sustainable Drainage 
Organisation Pell Frischmann
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Develop an innovative methodology and tools that can be used to inform strategic level planning decisions in South West England
Collaborator Contribution Advice, project steering, provision of data and model refinement expertise.
Impact 1) South West England surface water catchment dataset and guidance This output includes GIS mapping representing surface water (overland exceedance) flow paths and catchments for South West England and associated technical guidance. The outputs are used to identify the hydro-dynamics and surface water connectivity of landscapes during catchment screening, as such they are intended as an exploratory tool, to direct and form subsequent steps of surface water management. Outputs are high level and only suitable for application by experienced professional, caution should be made when applying outputs at a local scale or without knowledge of their strengths, limitations and contexts. So far these outputs have been adopted and applied by several project partners, including: WRT, PF, South West Water and Fjordr. WRT and PF have applied them on several projects and case studies (detailed in Activity 4), although, so far, it is unclear whether other partners have applied them on projects. As the outputs are a screening tool, they may be used within organisations for quick screening/ preparing bidding/ collecting appropriate data/ contacting appropriate stakeholders, rather than making their way into published outputs. By the end of SWEEP we anticipate that this output will be embedded in WRT and PF's capabilities and applied on a range of other projects, including Kingsbridge (PF), Burrator Reservoir (WRT) and Connecting the Culm (WRT/ Fjordr). We anticipate that our partners will continue to use the data set beyond this date. Following the Expo, a range of other stakeholders have contacted us to apply these catchments. We will endeavor to continue to make the data available where we are contacted and report this to the SWEEP Impact Officer, as appropriate. 2) Devon SUDS opportunity mapping This output is currently in progress, awaiting final analysis from colleagues at Eawag University. Upon completion the mapping will show SUDS opportunity mapping across the entirety of Devon, highlighting the range and scale of measures which can be applied in the region. The output will work in tandem with Output 1, though providing additional data to support partners preliminary strategic hazard and opportunity screening. Up to the end and beyond SWEEP, we anticipate that this will form a useful component for our SWEEP partners to inform, explore and evidence the decisions they make when considering surface water management decisions. We anticipate that this will translate to consideration and application of a wider range of surface water management measures (which are not always included in 'business as usual' design, as well as supporting partners winning and delivering work. 3) Flood modelling training and embedding research led resources with partners This output has delivered training for our two key partners, WRT and PF. Training has included application of catchment datasets (Output 1), guidance on flood modelling and deployment of research tools and frameworks, including Rapid Scenario Screening, CADDIES-2D and flood damage assessment using the CORFU tool. We delivered this training through hosting several full day workshops, regular in person and virtual meetings and ongoing technical support (detailed in impact store). We were also able to leverage licensing from the CADDIES flood modelling team. Effective training has led to applying skills and knowledge in support of flood management projects around South West England during the SWEEP project, and we anticipate that the positive legacy of this upskilling and embedding new practices will continue up to and beyond the end of SWEEP. It is likely that the partnerships and mentoring established in SWEEP will continue beyond the end of the project. We envisage that these outputs will have the following outcomes: • New approach trialed by project partners to enhance surface water management in SW England • New tools and methods are adopted to support stakeholder analysis of surface water hazards in SW England • New opportunities for surface water management are identified by tool users. • Understand value of SuDS for surface water management in South West England and disseminate potentially leading to further outcomes and impacts.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP006: Sustainable Drainage 
Organisation Welsh Water
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Develop an innovative methodology and tools that can be used to inform strategic level planning decisions in South West England
Collaborator Contribution Advice, project steering, provision of data and model refinement expertise.
Impact 1) South West England surface water catchment dataset and guidance This output includes GIS mapping representing surface water (overland exceedance) flow paths and catchments for South West England and associated technical guidance. The outputs are used to identify the hydro-dynamics and surface water connectivity of landscapes during catchment screening, as such they are intended as an exploratory tool, to direct and form subsequent steps of surface water management. Outputs are high level and only suitable for application by experienced professional, caution should be made when applying outputs at a local scale or without knowledge of their strengths, limitations and contexts. So far these outputs have been adopted and applied by several project partners, including: WRT, PF, South West Water and Fjordr. WRT and PF have applied them on several projects and case studies (detailed in Activity 4), although, so far, it is unclear whether other partners have applied them on projects. As the outputs are a screening tool, they may be used within organisations for quick screening/ preparing bidding/ collecting appropriate data/ contacting appropriate stakeholders, rather than making their way into published outputs. By the end of SWEEP we anticipate that this output will be embedded in WRT and PF's capabilities and applied on a range of other projects, including Kingsbridge (PF), Burrator Reservoir (WRT) and Connecting the Culm (WRT/ Fjordr). We anticipate that our partners will continue to use the data set beyond this date. Following the Expo, a range of other stakeholders have contacted us to apply these catchments. We will endeavor to continue to make the data available where we are contacted and report this to the SWEEP Impact Officer, as appropriate. 2) Devon SUDS opportunity mapping This output is currently in progress, awaiting final analysis from colleagues at Eawag University. Upon completion the mapping will show SUDS opportunity mapping across the entirety of Devon, highlighting the range and scale of measures which can be applied in the region. The output will work in tandem with Output 1, though providing additional data to support partners preliminary strategic hazard and opportunity screening. Up to the end and beyond SWEEP, we anticipate that this will form a useful component for our SWEEP partners to inform, explore and evidence the decisions they make when considering surface water management decisions. We anticipate that this will translate to consideration and application of a wider range of surface water management measures (which are not always included in 'business as usual' design, as well as supporting partners winning and delivering work. 3) Flood modelling training and embedding research led resources with partners This output has delivered training for our two key partners, WRT and PF. Training has included application of catchment datasets (Output 1), guidance on flood modelling and deployment of research tools and frameworks, including Rapid Scenario Screening, CADDIES-2D and flood damage assessment using the CORFU tool. We delivered this training through hosting several full day workshops, regular in person and virtual meetings and ongoing technical support (detailed in impact store). We were also able to leverage licensing from the CADDIES flood modelling team. Effective training has led to applying skills and knowledge in support of flood management projects around South West England during the SWEEP project, and we anticipate that the positive legacy of this upskilling and embedding new practices will continue up to and beyond the end of SWEEP. It is likely that the partnerships and mentoring established in SWEEP will continue beyond the end of the project. We envisage that these outputs will have the following outcomes: • New approach trialed by project partners to enhance surface water management in SW England • New tools and methods are adopted to support stakeholder analysis of surface water hazards in SW England • New opportunities for surface water management are identified by tool users. • Understand value of SuDS for surface water management in South West England and disseminate potentially leading to further outcomes and impacts.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP006: Sustainable Drainage 
Organisation Westcountry Rivers Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Develop an innovative methodology and tools that can be used to inform strategic level planning decisions in South West England
Collaborator Contribution Advice, project steering, provision of data and model refinement expertise.
Impact 1) South West England surface water catchment dataset and guidance This output includes GIS mapping representing surface water (overland exceedance) flow paths and catchments for South West England and associated technical guidance. The outputs are used to identify the hydro-dynamics and surface water connectivity of landscapes during catchment screening, as such they are intended as an exploratory tool, to direct and form subsequent steps of surface water management. Outputs are high level and only suitable for application by experienced professional, caution should be made when applying outputs at a local scale or without knowledge of their strengths, limitations and contexts. So far these outputs have been adopted and applied by several project partners, including: WRT, PF, South West Water and Fjordr. WRT and PF have applied them on several projects and case studies (detailed in Activity 4), although, so far, it is unclear whether other partners have applied them on projects. As the outputs are a screening tool, they may be used within organisations for quick screening/ preparing bidding/ collecting appropriate data/ contacting appropriate stakeholders, rather than making their way into published outputs. By the end of SWEEP we anticipate that this output will be embedded in WRT and PF's capabilities and applied on a range of other projects, including Kingsbridge (PF), Burrator Reservoir (WRT) and Connecting the Culm (WRT/ Fjordr). We anticipate that our partners will continue to use the data set beyond this date. Following the Expo, a range of other stakeholders have contacted us to apply these catchments. We will endeavor to continue to make the data available where we are contacted and report this to the SWEEP Impact Officer, as appropriate. 2) Devon SUDS opportunity mapping This output is currently in progress, awaiting final analysis from colleagues at Eawag University. Upon completion the mapping will show SUDS opportunity mapping across the entirety of Devon, highlighting the range and scale of measures which can be applied in the region. The output will work in tandem with Output 1, though providing additional data to support partners preliminary strategic hazard and opportunity screening. Up to the end and beyond SWEEP, we anticipate that this will form a useful component for our SWEEP partners to inform, explore and evidence the decisions they make when considering surface water management decisions. We anticipate that this will translate to consideration and application of a wider range of surface water management measures (which are not always included in 'business as usual' design, as well as supporting partners winning and delivering work. 3) Flood modelling training and embedding research led resources with partners This output has delivered training for our two key partners, WRT and PF. Training has included application of catchment datasets (Output 1), guidance on flood modelling and deployment of research tools and frameworks, including Rapid Scenario Screening, CADDIES-2D and flood damage assessment using the CORFU tool. We delivered this training through hosting several full day workshops, regular in person and virtual meetings and ongoing technical support (detailed in impact store). We were also able to leverage licensing from the CADDIES flood modelling team. Effective training has led to applying skills and knowledge in support of flood management projects around South West England during the SWEEP project, and we anticipate that the positive legacy of this upskilling and embedding new practices will continue up to and beyond the end of SWEEP. It is likely that the partnerships and mentoring established in SWEEP will continue beyond the end of the project. We envisage that these outputs will have the following outcomes: • New approach trialed by project partners to enhance surface water management in SW England • New tools and methods are adopted to support stakeholder analysis of surface water hazards in SW England • New opportunities for surface water management are identified by tool users. • Understand value of SuDS for surface water management in South West England and disseminate potentially leading to further outcomes and impacts.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP007/008: Managing Green Space and Horticulture for Pollinators and People 
Organisation Buglife
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution To implement a co-ordinated approach to grassland management across Cornwall to increase natural capital and ecosystem service provision for the benefit of people, crops and wildlife with associated reductions in cost.
Collaborator Contribution To implement a co-ordinated approach to grassland management across Cornwall to increase natural capital and ecosystem service provision for the benefit of people, crops and wildlife with associated reductions in cost.
Impact Audit of pollinator projects across Cornwall- Used to best target Country wide B-Lines in collaboration with Buglife- these are 3km wide corridors across a large region linking key habitats up and a tool for engaging land owners and communities in creating more habitats. The Audit is a PDF designed for a general audience so then anyone could use this to gather more information on what projects are happening in Cornwall so then they can get involved. A priority focus areas for pollinators map was created a published in collaboration with Kernow Ecology- www.kernowecology.co.uk/bee%20mapping.html.Outcomes by the end of sweep would be a variety of projects and initiatives in the County with the aim of creating habitat across these B-Lines, this is likely to increase 5 years after SWEEP. The Workshop that we ran with stakeholders to draft these b-lines included representatives from Buglife, Natural England, Duchy of Cornwall Estates, Cornwall Council, Farming and Wildlife Advisory Group, Kernow Ecology (private Business). 19 Bespoke bee-steward pollinator management reports created for a variety of landowners based on their land and interests in pollinator management, included information on economic costs and benefits. At the end of SWEEP the area of land and actions pledged to pollinators would have been allocated and new habitats would have matured.5years after sweep more habitat and actions may have been implemented. 1 Social Survey conducted online with >1000 participants in collaboration with ben Phillips PhD project. Outcomes likely a paper from Ben Phillips on the results and implications of this survey by the end of SWEEP. 2 New Bee-steward model versions for Grassland management and Horticulture. By the end of SWEEP usage of the models is likely to increase. 32 stakeholders were involved in this 1 year project with 25 of these new to the project and not including all the individual private farmers. 67 different individuals were engaged through meetings and workshops accumulating in 235 hours. £4055 worth of other engagement in the form of data and desk space. By the end of SWEEP tan outcome may be that these stakeholders continue to engage in SWEEP and the time they spend in meetings and workshop increase as well as potentially being part of other SWEEP or aligned projects. Additionally in-kind time and 'other' engagement is likely to increase.
Start Year 2018
 
Description SWEEP007/008: Managing Green Space and Horticulture for Pollinators and People 
Organisation Cornwall AONB
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution To implement a co-ordinated approach to grassland management across Cornwall to increase natural capital and ecosystem service provision for the benefit of people, crops and wildlife with associated reductions in cost.
Collaborator Contribution To implement a co-ordinated approach to grassland management across Cornwall to increase natural capital and ecosystem service provision for the benefit of people, crops and wildlife with associated reductions in cost.
Impact Audit of pollinator projects across Cornwall- Used to best target Country wide B-Lines in collaboration with Buglife- these are 3km wide corridors across a large region linking key habitats up and a tool for engaging land owners and communities in creating more habitats. The Audit is a PDF designed for a general audience so then anyone could use this to gather more information on what projects are happening in Cornwall so then they can get involved. A priority focus areas for pollinators map was created a published in collaboration with Kernow Ecology- www.kernowecology.co.uk/bee%20mapping.html.Outcomes by the end of sweep would be a variety of projects and initiatives in the County with the aim of creating habitat across these B-Lines, this is likely to increase 5 years after SWEEP. The Workshop that we ran with stakeholders to draft these b-lines included representatives from Buglife, Natural England, Duchy of Cornwall Estates, Cornwall Council, Farming and Wildlife Advisory Group, Kernow Ecology (private Business). 19 Bespoke bee-steward pollinator management reports created for a variety of landowners based on their land and interests in pollinator management, included information on economic costs and benefits. At the end of SWEEP the area of land and actions pledged to pollinators would have been allocated and new habitats would have matured.5years after sweep more habitat and actions may have been implemented. 1 Social Survey conducted online with >1000 participants in collaboration with ben Phillips PhD project. Outcomes likely a paper from Ben Phillips on the results and implications of this survey by the end of SWEEP. 2 New Bee-steward model versions for Grassland management and Horticulture. By the end of SWEEP usage of the models is likely to increase. 32 stakeholders were involved in this 1 year project with 25 of these new to the project and not including all the individual private farmers. 67 different individuals were engaged through meetings and workshops accumulating in 235 hours. £4055 worth of other engagement in the form of data and desk space. By the end of SWEEP tan outcome may be that these stakeholders continue to engage in SWEEP and the time they spend in meetings and workshop increase as well as potentially being part of other SWEEP or aligned projects. Additionally in-kind time and 'other' engagement is likely to increase.
Start Year 2018
 
Description SWEEP007/008: Managing Green Space and Horticulture for Pollinators and People 
Organisation Cornwall Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution To implement a co-ordinated approach to grassland management across Cornwall to increase natural capital and ecosystem service provision for the benefit of people, crops and wildlife with associated reductions in cost.
Collaborator Contribution To implement a co-ordinated approach to grassland management across Cornwall to increase natural capital and ecosystem service provision for the benefit of people, crops and wildlife with associated reductions in cost.
Impact Audit of pollinator projects across Cornwall- Used to best target Country wide B-Lines in collaboration with Buglife- these are 3km wide corridors across a large region linking key habitats up and a tool for engaging land owners and communities in creating more habitats. The Audit is a PDF designed for a general audience so then anyone could use this to gather more information on what projects are happening in Cornwall so then they can get involved. A priority focus areas for pollinators map was created a published in collaboration with Kernow Ecology- www.kernowecology.co.uk/bee%20mapping.html.Outcomes by the end of sweep would be a variety of projects and initiatives in the County with the aim of creating habitat across these B-Lines, this is likely to increase 5 years after SWEEP. The Workshop that we ran with stakeholders to draft these b-lines included representatives from Buglife, Natural England, Duchy of Cornwall Estates, Cornwall Council, Farming and Wildlife Advisory Group, Kernow Ecology (private Business). 19 Bespoke bee-steward pollinator management reports created for a variety of landowners based on their land and interests in pollinator management, included information on economic costs and benefits. At the end of SWEEP the area of land and actions pledged to pollinators would have been allocated and new habitats would have matured.5years after sweep more habitat and actions may have been implemented. 1 Social Survey conducted online with >1000 participants in collaboration with ben Phillips PhD project. Outcomes likely a paper from Ben Phillips on the results and implications of this survey by the end of SWEEP. 2 New Bee-steward model versions for Grassland management and Horticulture. By the end of SWEEP usage of the models is likely to increase. 32 stakeholders were involved in this 1 year project with 25 of these new to the project and not including all the individual private farmers. 67 different individuals were engaged through meetings and workshops accumulating in 235 hours. £4055 worth of other engagement in the form of data and desk space. By the end of SWEEP tan outcome may be that these stakeholders continue to engage in SWEEP and the time they spend in meetings and workshop increase as well as potentially being part of other SWEEP or aligned projects. Additionally in-kind time and 'other' engagement is likely to increase.
Start Year 2018
 
Description SWEEP007/008: Managing Green Space and Horticulture for Pollinators and People 
Organisation Natural England
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution To implement a co-ordinated approach to grassland management across Cornwall to increase natural capital and ecosystem service provision for the benefit of people, crops and wildlife with associated reductions in cost.
Collaborator Contribution To implement a co-ordinated approach to grassland management across Cornwall to increase natural capital and ecosystem service provision for the benefit of people, crops and wildlife with associated reductions in cost.
Impact Audit of pollinator projects across Cornwall- Used to best target Country wide B-Lines in collaboration with Buglife- these are 3km wide corridors across a large region linking key habitats up and a tool for engaging land owners and communities in creating more habitats. The Audit is a PDF designed for a general audience so then anyone could use this to gather more information on what projects are happening in Cornwall so then they can get involved. A priority focus areas for pollinators map was created a published in collaboration with Kernow Ecology- www.kernowecology.co.uk/bee%20mapping.html.Outcomes by the end of sweep would be a variety of projects and initiatives in the County with the aim of creating habitat across these B-Lines, this is likely to increase 5 years after SWEEP. The Workshop that we ran with stakeholders to draft these b-lines included representatives from Buglife, Natural England, Duchy of Cornwall Estates, Cornwall Council, Farming and Wildlife Advisory Group, Kernow Ecology (private Business). 19 Bespoke bee-steward pollinator management reports created for a variety of landowners based on their land and interests in pollinator management, included information on economic costs and benefits. At the end of SWEEP the area of land and actions pledged to pollinators would have been allocated and new habitats would have matured.5years after sweep more habitat and actions may have been implemented. 1 Social Survey conducted online with >1000 participants in collaboration with ben Phillips PhD project. Outcomes likely a paper from Ben Phillips on the results and implications of this survey by the end of SWEEP. 2 New Bee-steward model versions for Grassland management and Horticulture. By the end of SWEEP usage of the models is likely to increase. 32 stakeholders were involved in this 1 year project with 25 of these new to the project and not including all the individual private farmers. 67 different individuals were engaged through meetings and workshops accumulating in 235 hours. £4055 worth of other engagement in the form of data and desk space. By the end of SWEEP tan outcome may be that these stakeholders continue to engage in SWEEP and the time they spend in meetings and workshop increase as well as potentially being part of other SWEEP or aligned projects. Additionally in-kind time and 'other' engagement is likely to increase.
Start Year 2018
 
Description SWEEP009: A regional based approach for whole catchment management (Phase II) - Developing a geospatial decision support system to characterise change, assess success of interventions for water quality (and quantity) in SW catchments and build evidence for future catchment /environmental land management impact. 
Organisation Cornwall Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution To build and manage a geospatial decision support tool formalising knowledge of catchment management in the South West. The GISbased tool will be regularly updateable and provide a dynamic way to record and visualise delivery of catchment management activities that are delivered in the south west with the aim of improving water quality (and quantity), including measures delivered through Upstream Thinking (UST) and other grant support schemes such as the new Environmental Stewardship and Environmental Land Management schemes. The tool will, in the first instance, collate, organize and process data and information on catchment measures (what, when, where and cost of interventions). A participatory approach will engage multiple stakeholders and through interviews and workshops we will develop a common language for delivery partners to record and report their activities in a transparent and collaborative way. Integration and spatial analysis of these data with water quality monitoring data (continuous and spot samples) and specific biophysical data (e.g. soil condition, WFD ecological and chemical parameters etc.) within the tool will allow characterisation and evaluation of change happening due to interventions and assist partners to measure the effectiveness of the numerous water quality and water quantity mitigation measures being delivered. Longer term, this project aims to develop an on-line user interface allowing partners to interact with the system and both record data and complete simple spatial analysis. Impact Fellows will provide training to project partners in the use of the tool so that they can use it for the identification of management priorities and meaningful opportunities for change. This will also facilitate integration of local and expert knowledge and foster further collaboration between partners allowing efficient targeting of resources. Furthermore, this work will provide evidence for wider project partners to address the question of what levels of cost savings might SWW or other water companies achieve from pursuing increased investment in catchment management. Other challenges faced by catchments in the south west (such as soil degradation, flooding etc.) and a suite of possible solutions to those challenges could also be identified through use of the tool for risk and opportunity mapping.
Collaborator Contribution To build and manage a geospatial decision support tool formalising knowledge of catchment management in the South West. The GISbased tool will be regularly updateable and provide a dynamic way to record and visualise delivery of catchment management activities that are delivered in the south west with the aim of improving water quality (and quantity), including measures delivered through Upstream Thinking (UST) and other grant support schemes such as the new Environmental Stewardship and Environmental Land Management schemes. The tool will, in the first instance, collate, organize and process data and information on catchment measures (what, when, where and cost of interventions). A participatory approach will engage multiple stakeholders and through interviews and workshops we will develop a common language for delivery partners to record and report their activities in a transparent and collaborative way. Integration and spatial analysis of these data with water quality monitoring data (continuous and spot samples) and specific biophysical data (e.g. soil condition, WFD ecological and chemical parameters etc.) within the tool will allow characterisation and evaluation of change happening due to interventions and assist partners to measure the effectiveness of the numerous water quality and water quantity mitigation measures being delivered. Longer term, this project aims to develop an on-line user interface allowing partners to interact with the system and both record data and complete simple spatial analysis. Impact Fellows will provide training to project partners in the use of the tool so that they can use it for the identification of management priorities and meaningful opportunities for change. This will also facilitate integration of local and expert knowledge and foster further collaboration between partners allowing efficient targeting of resources. Furthermore, this work will provide evidence for wider project partners to address the question of what levels of cost savings might SWW or other water companies achieve from pursuing increased investment in catchment management. Other challenges faced by catchments in the south west (such as soil degradation, flooding etc.) and a suite of possible solutions to those challenges could also be identified through use of the tool for risk and opportunity mapping.
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP009: A regional based approach for whole catchment management (Phase II) - Developing a geospatial decision support system to characterise change, assess success of interventions for water quality (and quantity) in SW catchments and build evidence for future catchment /environmental land management impact. 
Organisation Dartmoor National Park Authority
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution To build and manage a geospatial decision support tool formalising knowledge of catchment management in the South West. The GISbased tool will be regularly updateable and provide a dynamic way to record and visualise delivery of catchment management activities that are delivered in the south west with the aim of improving water quality (and quantity), including measures delivered through Upstream Thinking (UST) and other grant support schemes such as the new Environmental Stewardship and Environmental Land Management schemes. The tool will, in the first instance, collate, organize and process data and information on catchment measures (what, when, where and cost of interventions). A participatory approach will engage multiple stakeholders and through interviews and workshops we will develop a common language for delivery partners to record and report their activities in a transparent and collaborative way. Integration and spatial analysis of these data with water quality monitoring data (continuous and spot samples) and specific biophysical data (e.g. soil condition, WFD ecological and chemical parameters etc.) within the tool will allow characterisation and evaluation of change happening due to interventions and assist partners to measure the effectiveness of the numerous water quality and water quantity mitigation measures being delivered. Longer term, this project aims to develop an on-line user interface allowing partners to interact with the system and both record data and complete simple spatial analysis. Impact Fellows will provide training to project partners in the use of the tool so that they can use it for the identification of management priorities and meaningful opportunities for change. This will also facilitate integration of local and expert knowledge and foster further collaboration between partners allowing efficient targeting of resources. Furthermore, this work will provide evidence for wider project partners to address the question of what levels of cost savings might SWW or other water companies achieve from pursuing increased investment in catchment management. Other challenges faced by catchments in the south west (such as soil degradation, flooding etc.) and a suite of possible solutions to those challenges could also be identified through use of the tool for risk and opportunity mapping.
Collaborator Contribution To build and manage a geospatial decision support tool formalising knowledge of catchment management in the South West. The GISbased tool will be regularly updateable and provide a dynamic way to record and visualise delivery of catchment management activities that are delivered in the south west with the aim of improving water quality (and quantity), including measures delivered through Upstream Thinking (UST) and other grant support schemes such as the new Environmental Stewardship and Environmental Land Management schemes. The tool will, in the first instance, collate, organize and process data and information on catchment measures (what, when, where and cost of interventions). A participatory approach will engage multiple stakeholders and through interviews and workshops we will develop a common language for delivery partners to record and report their activities in a transparent and collaborative way. Integration and spatial analysis of these data with water quality monitoring data (continuous and spot samples) and specific biophysical data (e.g. soil condition, WFD ecological and chemical parameters etc.) within the tool will allow characterisation and evaluation of change happening due to interventions and assist partners to measure the effectiveness of the numerous water quality and water quantity mitigation measures being delivered. Longer term, this project aims to develop an on-line user interface allowing partners to interact with the system and both record data and complete simple spatial analysis. Impact Fellows will provide training to project partners in the use of the tool so that they can use it for the identification of management priorities and meaningful opportunities for change. This will also facilitate integration of local and expert knowledge and foster further collaboration between partners allowing efficient targeting of resources. Furthermore, this work will provide evidence for wider project partners to address the question of what levels of cost savings might SWW or other water companies achieve from pursuing increased investment in catchment management. Other challenges faced by catchments in the south west (such as soil degradation, flooding etc.) and a suite of possible solutions to those challenges could also be identified through use of the tool for risk and opportunity mapping.
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP009: A regional based approach for whole catchment management (Phase II) - Developing a geospatial decision support system to characterise change, assess success of interventions for water quality (and quantity) in SW catchments and build evidence for future catchment /environmental land management impact. 
Organisation Devon Wildlife Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution To build and manage a geospatial decision support tool formalising knowledge of catchment management in the South West. The GISbased tool will be regularly updateable and provide a dynamic way to record and visualise delivery of catchment management activities that are delivered in the south west with the aim of improving water quality (and quantity), including measures delivered through Upstream Thinking (UST) and other grant support schemes such as the new Environmental Stewardship and Environmental Land Management schemes. The tool will, in the first instance, collate, organize and process data and information on catchment measures (what, when, where and cost of interventions). A participatory approach will engage multiple stakeholders and through interviews and workshops we will develop a common language for delivery partners to record and report their activities in a transparent and collaborative way. Integration and spatial analysis of these data with water quality monitoring data (continuous and spot samples) and specific biophysical data (e.g. soil condition, WFD ecological and chemical parameters etc.) within the tool will allow characterisation and evaluation of change happening due to interventions and assist partners to measure the effectiveness of the numerous water quality and water quantity mitigation measures being delivered. Longer term, this project aims to develop an on-line user interface allowing partners to interact with the system and both record data and complete simple spatial analysis. Impact Fellows will provide training to project partners in the use of the tool so that they can use it for the identification of management priorities and meaningful opportunities for change. This will also facilitate integration of local and expert knowledge and foster further collaboration between partners allowing efficient targeting of resources. Furthermore, this work will provide evidence for wider project partners to address the question of what levels of cost savings might SWW or other water companies achieve from pursuing increased investment in catchment management. Other challenges faced by catchments in the south west (such as soil degradation, flooding etc.) and a suite of possible solutions to those challenges could also be identified through use of the tool for risk and opportunity mapping.
Collaborator Contribution To build and manage a geospatial decision support tool formalising knowledge of catchment management in the South West. The GISbased tool will be regularly updateable and provide a dynamic way to record and visualise delivery of catchment management activities that are delivered in the south west with the aim of improving water quality (and quantity), including measures delivered through Upstream Thinking (UST) and other grant support schemes such as the new Environmental Stewardship and Environmental Land Management schemes. The tool will, in the first instance, collate, organize and process data and information on catchment measures (what, when, where and cost of interventions). A participatory approach will engage multiple stakeholders and through interviews and workshops we will develop a common language for delivery partners to record and report their activities in a transparent and collaborative way. Integration and spatial analysis of these data with water quality monitoring data (continuous and spot samples) and specific biophysical data (e.g. soil condition, WFD ecological and chemical parameters etc.) within the tool will allow characterisation and evaluation of change happening due to interventions and assist partners to measure the effectiveness of the numerous water quality and water quantity mitigation measures being delivered. Longer term, this project aims to develop an on-line user interface allowing partners to interact with the system and both record data and complete simple spatial analysis. Impact Fellows will provide training to project partners in the use of the tool so that they can use it for the identification of management priorities and meaningful opportunities for change. This will also facilitate integration of local and expert knowledge and foster further collaboration between partners allowing efficient targeting of resources. Furthermore, this work will provide evidence for wider project partners to address the question of what levels of cost savings might SWW or other water companies achieve from pursuing increased investment in catchment management. Other challenges faced by catchments in the south west (such as soil degradation, flooding etc.) and a suite of possible solutions to those challenges could also be identified through use of the tool for risk and opportunity mapping.
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP009: A regional based approach for whole catchment management (Phase II) - Developing a geospatial decision support system to characterise change, assess success of interventions for water quality (and quantity) in SW catchments and build evidence for future catchment /environmental land management impact. 
Organisation Environment Agency
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution To build and manage a geospatial decision support tool formalising knowledge of catchment management in the South West. The GISbased tool will be regularly updateable and provide a dynamic way to record and visualise delivery of catchment management activities that are delivered in the south west with the aim of improving water quality (and quantity), including measures delivered through Upstream Thinking (UST) and other grant support schemes such as the new Environmental Stewardship and Environmental Land Management schemes. The tool will, in the first instance, collate, organize and process data and information on catchment measures (what, when, where and cost of interventions). A participatory approach will engage multiple stakeholders and through interviews and workshops we will develop a common language for delivery partners to record and report their activities in a transparent and collaborative way. Integration and spatial analysis of these data with water quality monitoring data (continuous and spot samples) and specific biophysical data (e.g. soil condition, WFD ecological and chemical parameters etc.) within the tool will allow characterisation and evaluation of change happening due to interventions and assist partners to measure the effectiveness of the numerous water quality and water quantity mitigation measures being delivered. Longer term, this project aims to develop an on-line user interface allowing partners to interact with the system and both record data and complete simple spatial analysis. Impact Fellows will provide training to project partners in the use of the tool so that they can use it for the identification of management priorities and meaningful opportunities for change. This will also facilitate integration of local and expert knowledge and foster further collaboration between partners allowing efficient targeting of resources. Furthermore, this work will provide evidence for wider project partners to address the question of what levels of cost savings might SWW or other water companies achieve from pursuing increased investment in catchment management. Other challenges faced by catchments in the south west (such as soil degradation, flooding etc.) and a suite of possible solutions to those challenges could also be identified through use of the tool for risk and opportunity mapping.
Collaborator Contribution To build and manage a geospatial decision support tool formalising knowledge of catchment management in the South West. The GISbased tool will be regularly updateable and provide a dynamic way to record and visualise delivery of catchment management activities that are delivered in the south west with the aim of improving water quality (and quantity), including measures delivered through Upstream Thinking (UST) and other grant support schemes such as the new Environmental Stewardship and Environmental Land Management schemes. The tool will, in the first instance, collate, organize and process data and information on catchment measures (what, when, where and cost of interventions). A participatory approach will engage multiple stakeholders and through interviews and workshops we will develop a common language for delivery partners to record and report their activities in a transparent and collaborative way. Integration and spatial analysis of these data with water quality monitoring data (continuous and spot samples) and specific biophysical data (e.g. soil condition, WFD ecological and chemical parameters etc.) within the tool will allow characterisation and evaluation of change happening due to interventions and assist partners to measure the effectiveness of the numerous water quality and water quantity mitigation measures being delivered. Longer term, this project aims to develop an on-line user interface allowing partners to interact with the system and both record data and complete simple spatial analysis. Impact Fellows will provide training to project partners in the use of the tool so that they can use it for the identification of management priorities and meaningful opportunities for change. This will also facilitate integration of local and expert knowledge and foster further collaboration between partners allowing efficient targeting of resources. Furthermore, this work will provide evidence for wider project partners to address the question of what levels of cost savings might SWW or other water companies achieve from pursuing increased investment in catchment management. Other challenges faced by catchments in the south west (such as soil degradation, flooding etc.) and a suite of possible solutions to those challenges could also be identified through use of the tool for risk and opportunity mapping.
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP009: A regional based approach for whole catchment management (Phase II) - Developing a geospatial decision support system to characterise change, assess success of interventions for water quality (and quantity) in SW catchments and build evidence for future catchment /environmental land management impact. 
Organisation Exmoor National Park Authority
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution To build and manage a geospatial decision support tool formalising knowledge of catchment management in the South West. The GISbased tool will be regularly updateable and provide a dynamic way to record and visualise delivery of catchment management activities that are delivered in the south west with the aim of improving water quality (and quantity), including measures delivered through Upstream Thinking (UST) and other grant support schemes such as the new Environmental Stewardship and Environmental Land Management schemes. The tool will, in the first instance, collate, organize and process data and information on catchment measures (what, when, where and cost of interventions). A participatory approach will engage multiple stakeholders and through interviews and workshops we will develop a common language for delivery partners to record and report their activities in a transparent and collaborative way. Integration and spatial analysis of these data with water quality monitoring data (continuous and spot samples) and specific biophysical data (e.g. soil condition, WFD ecological and chemical parameters etc.) within the tool will allow characterisation and evaluation of change happening due to interventions and assist partners to measure the effectiveness of the numerous water quality and water quantity mitigation measures being delivered. Longer term, this project aims to develop an on-line user interface allowing partners to interact with the system and both record data and complete simple spatial analysis. Impact Fellows will provide training to project partners in the use of the tool so that they can use it for the identification of management priorities and meaningful opportunities for change. This will also facilitate integration of local and expert knowledge and foster further collaboration between partners allowing efficient targeting of resources. Furthermore, this work will provide evidence for wider project partners to address the question of what levels of cost savings might SWW or other water companies achieve from pursuing increased investment in catchment management. Other challenges faced by catchments in the south west (such as soil degradation, flooding etc.) and a suite of possible solutions to those challenges could also be identified through use of the tool for risk and opportunity mapping.
Collaborator Contribution To build and manage a geospatial decision support tool formalising knowledge of catchment management in the South West. The GISbased tool will be regularly updateable and provide a dynamic way to record and visualise delivery of catchment management activities that are delivered in the south west with the aim of improving water quality (and quantity), including measures delivered through Upstream Thinking (UST) and other grant support schemes such as the new Environmental Stewardship and Environmental Land Management schemes. The tool will, in the first instance, collate, organize and process data and information on catchment measures (what, when, where and cost of interventions). A participatory approach will engage multiple stakeholders and through interviews and workshops we will develop a common language for delivery partners to record and report their activities in a transparent and collaborative way. Integration and spatial analysis of these data with water quality monitoring data (continuous and spot samples) and specific biophysical data (e.g. soil condition, WFD ecological and chemical parameters etc.) within the tool will allow characterisation and evaluation of change happening due to interventions and assist partners to measure the effectiveness of the numerous water quality and water quantity mitigation measures being delivered. Longer term, this project aims to develop an on-line user interface allowing partners to interact with the system and both record data and complete simple spatial analysis. Impact Fellows will provide training to project partners in the use of the tool so that they can use it for the identification of management priorities and meaningful opportunities for change. This will also facilitate integration of local and expert knowledge and foster further collaboration between partners allowing efficient targeting of resources. Furthermore, this work will provide evidence for wider project partners to address the question of what levels of cost savings might SWW or other water companies achieve from pursuing increased investment in catchment management. Other challenges faced by catchments in the south west (such as soil degradation, flooding etc.) and a suite of possible solutions to those challenges could also be identified through use of the tool for risk and opportunity mapping.
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP009: A regional based approach for whole catchment management (Phase II) - Developing a geospatial decision support system to characterise change, assess success of interventions for water quality (and quantity) in SW catchments and build evidence for future catchment /environmental land management impact. 
Organisation Farming & Wildlife Advisory Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution To build and manage a geospatial decision support tool formalising knowledge of catchment management in the South West. The GISbased tool will be regularly updateable and provide a dynamic way to record and visualise delivery of catchment management activities that are delivered in the south west with the aim of improving water quality (and quantity), including measures delivered through Upstream Thinking (UST) and other grant support schemes such as the new Environmental Stewardship and Environmental Land Management schemes. The tool will, in the first instance, collate, organize and process data and information on catchment measures (what, when, where and cost of interventions). A participatory approach will engage multiple stakeholders and through interviews and workshops we will develop a common language for delivery partners to record and report their activities in a transparent and collaborative way. Integration and spatial analysis of these data with water quality monitoring data (continuous and spot samples) and specific biophysical data (e.g. soil condition, WFD ecological and chemical parameters etc.) within the tool will allow characterisation and evaluation of change happening due to interventions and assist partners to measure the effectiveness of the numerous water quality and water quantity mitigation measures being delivered. Longer term, this project aims to develop an on-line user interface allowing partners to interact with the system and both record data and complete simple spatial analysis. Impact Fellows will provide training to project partners in the use of the tool so that they can use it for the identification of management priorities and meaningful opportunities for change. This will also facilitate integration of local and expert knowledge and foster further collaboration between partners allowing efficient targeting of resources. Furthermore, this work will provide evidence for wider project partners to address the question of what levels of cost savings might SWW or other water companies achieve from pursuing increased investment in catchment management. Other challenges faced by catchments in the south west (such as soil degradation, flooding etc.) and a suite of possible solutions to those challenges could also be identified through use of the tool for risk and opportunity mapping.
Collaborator Contribution To build and manage a geospatial decision support tool formalising knowledge of catchment management in the South West. The GISbased tool will be regularly updateable and provide a dynamic way to record and visualise delivery of catchment management activities that are delivered in the south west with the aim of improving water quality (and quantity), including measures delivered through Upstream Thinking (UST) and other grant support schemes such as the new Environmental Stewardship and Environmental Land Management schemes. The tool will, in the first instance, collate, organize and process data and information on catchment measures (what, when, where and cost of interventions). A participatory approach will engage multiple stakeholders and through interviews and workshops we will develop a common language for delivery partners to record and report their activities in a transparent and collaborative way. Integration and spatial analysis of these data with water quality monitoring data (continuous and spot samples) and specific biophysical data (e.g. soil condition, WFD ecological and chemical parameters etc.) within the tool will allow characterisation and evaluation of change happening due to interventions and assist partners to measure the effectiveness of the numerous water quality and water quantity mitigation measures being delivered. Longer term, this project aims to develop an on-line user interface allowing partners to interact with the system and both record data and complete simple spatial analysis. Impact Fellows will provide training to project partners in the use of the tool so that they can use it for the identification of management priorities and meaningful opportunities for change. This will also facilitate integration of local and expert knowledge and foster further collaboration between partners allowing efficient targeting of resources. Furthermore, this work will provide evidence for wider project partners to address the question of what levels of cost savings might SWW or other water companies achieve from pursuing increased investment in catchment management. Other challenges faced by catchments in the south west (such as soil degradation, flooding etc.) and a suite of possible solutions to those challenges could also be identified through use of the tool for risk and opportunity mapping.
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP009: A regional based approach for whole catchment management (Phase II) - Developing a geospatial decision support system to characterise change, assess success of interventions for water quality (and quantity) in SW catchments and build evidence for future catchment /environmental land management impact. 
Organisation Forestry Commission
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution To build and manage a geospatial decision support tool formalising knowledge of catchment management in the South West. The GISbased tool will be regularly updateable and provide a dynamic way to record and visualise delivery of catchment management activities that are delivered in the south west with the aim of improving water quality (and quantity), including measures delivered through Upstream Thinking (UST) and other grant support schemes such as the new Environmental Stewardship and Environmental Land Management schemes. The tool will, in the first instance, collate, organize and process data and information on catchment measures (what, when, where and cost of interventions). A participatory approach will engage multiple stakeholders and through interviews and workshops we will develop a common language for delivery partners to record and report their activities in a transparent and collaborative way. Integration and spatial analysis of these data with water quality monitoring data (continuous and spot samples) and specific biophysical data (e.g. soil condition, WFD ecological and chemical parameters etc.) within the tool will allow characterisation and evaluation of change happening due to interventions and assist partners to measure the effectiveness of the numerous water quality and water quantity mitigation measures being delivered. Longer term, this project aims to develop an on-line user interface allowing partners to interact with the system and both record data and complete simple spatial analysis. Impact Fellows will provide training to project partners in the use of the tool so that they can use it for the identification of management priorities and meaningful opportunities for change. This will also facilitate integration of local and expert knowledge and foster further collaboration between partners allowing efficient targeting of resources. Furthermore, this work will provide evidence for wider project partners to address the question of what levels of cost savings might SWW or other water companies achieve from pursuing increased investment in catchment management. Other challenges faced by catchments in the south west (such as soil degradation, flooding etc.) and a suite of possible solutions to those challenges could also be identified through use of the tool for risk and opportunity mapping.
Collaborator Contribution To build and manage a geospatial decision support tool formalising knowledge of catchment management in the South West. The GISbased tool will be regularly updateable and provide a dynamic way to record and visualise delivery of catchment management activities that are delivered in the south west with the aim of improving water quality (and quantity), including measures delivered through Upstream Thinking (UST) and other grant support schemes such as the new Environmental Stewardship and Environmental Land Management schemes. The tool will, in the first instance, collate, organize and process data and information on catchment measures (what, when, where and cost of interventions). A participatory approach will engage multiple stakeholders and through interviews and workshops we will develop a common language for delivery partners to record and report their activities in a transparent and collaborative way. Integration and spatial analysis of these data with water quality monitoring data (continuous and spot samples) and specific biophysical data (e.g. soil condition, WFD ecological and chemical parameters etc.) within the tool will allow characterisation and evaluation of change happening due to interventions and assist partners to measure the effectiveness of the numerous water quality and water quantity mitigation measures being delivered. Longer term, this project aims to develop an on-line user interface allowing partners to interact with the system and both record data and complete simple spatial analysis. Impact Fellows will provide training to project partners in the use of the tool so that they can use it for the identification of management priorities and meaningful opportunities for change. This will also facilitate integration of local and expert knowledge and foster further collaboration between partners allowing efficient targeting of resources. Furthermore, this work will provide evidence for wider project partners to address the question of what levels of cost savings might SWW or other water companies achieve from pursuing increased investment in catchment management. Other challenges faced by catchments in the south west (such as soil degradation, flooding etc.) and a suite of possible solutions to those challenges could also be identified through use of the tool for risk and opportunity mapping.
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP009: A regional based approach for whole catchment management (Phase II) - Developing a geospatial decision support system to characterise change, assess success of interventions for water quality (and quantity) in SW catchments and build evidence for future catchment /environmental land management impact. 
Organisation National Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution To build and manage a geospatial decision support tool formalising knowledge of catchment management in the South West. The GISbased tool will be regularly updateable and provide a dynamic way to record and visualise delivery of catchment management activities that are delivered in the south west with the aim of improving water quality (and quantity), including measures delivered through Upstream Thinking (UST) and other grant support schemes such as the new Environmental Stewardship and Environmental Land Management schemes. The tool will, in the first instance, collate, organize and process data and information on catchment measures (what, when, where and cost of interventions). A participatory approach will engage multiple stakeholders and through interviews and workshops we will develop a common language for delivery partners to record and report their activities in a transparent and collaborative way. Integration and spatial analysis of these data with water quality monitoring data (continuous and spot samples) and specific biophysical data (e.g. soil condition, WFD ecological and chemical parameters etc.) within the tool will allow characterisation and evaluation of change happening due to interventions and assist partners to measure the effectiveness of the numerous water quality and water quantity mitigation measures being delivered. Longer term, this project aims to develop an on-line user interface allowing partners to interact with the system and both record data and complete simple spatial analysis. Impact Fellows will provide training to project partners in the use of the tool so that they can use it for the identification of management priorities and meaningful opportunities for change. This will also facilitate integration of local and expert knowledge and foster further collaboration between partners allowing efficient targeting of resources. Furthermore, this work will provide evidence for wider project partners to address the question of what levels of cost savings might SWW or other water companies achieve from pursuing increased investment in catchment management. Other challenges faced by catchments in the south west (such as soil degradation, flooding etc.) and a suite of possible solutions to those challenges could also be identified through use of the tool for risk and opportunity mapping.
Collaborator Contribution To build and manage a geospatial decision support tool formalising knowledge of catchment management in the South West. The GISbased tool will be regularly updateable and provide a dynamic way to record and visualise delivery of catchment management activities that are delivered in the south west with the aim of improving water quality (and quantity), including measures delivered through Upstream Thinking (UST) and other grant support schemes such as the new Environmental Stewardship and Environmental Land Management schemes. The tool will, in the first instance, collate, organize and process data and information on catchment measures (what, when, where and cost of interventions). A participatory approach will engage multiple stakeholders and through interviews and workshops we will develop a common language for delivery partners to record and report their activities in a transparent and collaborative way. Integration and spatial analysis of these data with water quality monitoring data (continuous and spot samples) and specific biophysical data (e.g. soil condition, WFD ecological and chemical parameters etc.) within the tool will allow characterisation and evaluation of change happening due to interventions and assist partners to measure the effectiveness of the numerous water quality and water quantity mitigation measures being delivered. Longer term, this project aims to develop an on-line user interface allowing partners to interact with the system and both record data and complete simple spatial analysis. Impact Fellows will provide training to project partners in the use of the tool so that they can use it for the identification of management priorities and meaningful opportunities for change. This will also facilitate integration of local and expert knowledge and foster further collaboration between partners allowing efficient targeting of resources. Furthermore, this work will provide evidence for wider project partners to address the question of what levels of cost savings might SWW or other water companies achieve from pursuing increased investment in catchment management. Other challenges faced by catchments in the south west (such as soil degradation, flooding etc.) and a suite of possible solutions to those challenges could also be identified through use of the tool for risk and opportunity mapping.
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP009: A regional based approach for whole catchment management (Phase II) - Developing a geospatial decision support system to characterise change, assess success of interventions for water quality (and quantity) in SW catchments and build evidence for future catchment /environmental land management impact. 
Organisation Natural England
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution To build and manage a geospatial decision support tool formalising knowledge of catchment management in the South West. The GISbased tool will be regularly updateable and provide a dynamic way to record and visualise delivery of catchment management activities that are delivered in the south west with the aim of improving water quality (and quantity), including measures delivered through Upstream Thinking (UST) and other grant support schemes such as the new Environmental Stewardship and Environmental Land Management schemes. The tool will, in the first instance, collate, organize and process data and information on catchment measures (what, when, where and cost of interventions). A participatory approach will engage multiple stakeholders and through interviews and workshops we will develop a common language for delivery partners to record and report their activities in a transparent and collaborative way. Integration and spatial analysis of these data with water quality monitoring data (continuous and spot samples) and specific biophysical data (e.g. soil condition, WFD ecological and chemical parameters etc.) within the tool will allow characterisation and evaluation of change happening due to interventions and assist partners to measure the effectiveness of the numerous water quality and water quantity mitigation measures being delivered. Longer term, this project aims to develop an on-line user interface allowing partners to interact with the system and both record data and complete simple spatial analysis. Impact Fellows will provide training to project partners in the use of the tool so that they can use it for the identification of management priorities and meaningful opportunities for change. This will also facilitate integration of local and expert knowledge and foster further collaboration between partners allowing efficient targeting of resources. Furthermore, this work will provide evidence for wider project partners to address the question of what levels of cost savings might SWW or other water companies achieve from pursuing increased investment in catchment management. Other challenges faced by catchments in the south west (such as soil degradation, flooding etc.) and a suite of possible solutions to those challenges could also be identified through use of the tool for risk and opportunity mapping.
Collaborator Contribution To build and manage a geospatial decision support tool formalising knowledge of catchment management in the South West. The GISbased tool will be regularly updateable and provide a dynamic way to record and visualise delivery of catchment management activities that are delivered in the south west with the aim of improving water quality (and quantity), including measures delivered through Upstream Thinking (UST) and other grant support schemes such as the new Environmental Stewardship and Environmental Land Management schemes. The tool will, in the first instance, collate, organize and process data and information on catchment measures (what, when, where and cost of interventions). A participatory approach will engage multiple stakeholders and through interviews and workshops we will develop a common language for delivery partners to record and report their activities in a transparent and collaborative way. Integration and spatial analysis of these data with water quality monitoring data (continuous and spot samples) and specific biophysical data (e.g. soil condition, WFD ecological and chemical parameters etc.) within the tool will allow characterisation and evaluation of change happening due to interventions and assist partners to measure the effectiveness of the numerous water quality and water quantity mitigation measures being delivered. Longer term, this project aims to develop an on-line user interface allowing partners to interact with the system and both record data and complete simple spatial analysis. Impact Fellows will provide training to project partners in the use of the tool so that they can use it for the identification of management priorities and meaningful opportunities for change. This will also facilitate integration of local and expert knowledge and foster further collaboration between partners allowing efficient targeting of resources. Furthermore, this work will provide evidence for wider project partners to address the question of what levels of cost savings might SWW or other water companies achieve from pursuing increased investment in catchment management. Other challenges faced by catchments in the south west (such as soil degradation, flooding etc.) and a suite of possible solutions to those challenges could also be identified through use of the tool for risk and opportunity mapping.
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP009: A regional based approach for whole catchment management (Phase II) - Developing a geospatial decision support system to characterise change, assess success of interventions for water quality (and quantity) in SW catchments and build evidence for future catchment /environmental land management impact. 
Organisation South West Lakes Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution To build and manage a geospatial decision support tool formalising knowledge of catchment management in the South West. The GISbased tool will be regularly updateable and provide a dynamic way to record and visualise delivery of catchment management activities that are delivered in the south west with the aim of improving water quality (and quantity), including measures delivered through Upstream Thinking (UST) and other grant support schemes such as the new Environmental Stewardship and Environmental Land Management schemes. The tool will, in the first instance, collate, organize and process data and information on catchment measures (what, when, where and cost of interventions). A participatory approach will engage multiple stakeholders and through interviews and workshops we will develop a common language for delivery partners to record and report their activities in a transparent and collaborative way. Integration and spatial analysis of these data with water quality monitoring data (continuous and spot samples) and specific biophysical data (e.g. soil condition, WFD ecological and chemical parameters etc.) within the tool will allow characterisation and evaluation of change happening due to interventions and assist partners to measure the effectiveness of the numerous water quality and water quantity mitigation measures being delivered. Longer term, this project aims to develop an on-line user interface allowing partners to interact with the system and both record data and complete simple spatial analysis. Impact Fellows will provide training to project partners in the use of the tool so that they can use it for the identification of management priorities and meaningful opportunities for change. This will also facilitate integration of local and expert knowledge and foster further collaboration between partners allowing efficient targeting of resources. Furthermore, this work will provide evidence for wider project partners to address the question of what levels of cost savings might SWW or other water companies achieve from pursuing increased investment in catchment management. Other challenges faced by catchments in the south west (such as soil degradation, flooding etc.) and a suite of possible solutions to those challenges could also be identified through use of the tool for risk and opportunity mapping.
Collaborator Contribution To build and manage a geospatial decision support tool formalising knowledge of catchment management in the South West. The GISbased tool will be regularly updateable and provide a dynamic way to record and visualise delivery of catchment management activities that are delivered in the south west with the aim of improving water quality (and quantity), including measures delivered through Upstream Thinking (UST) and other grant support schemes such as the new Environmental Stewardship and Environmental Land Management schemes. The tool will, in the first instance, collate, organize and process data and information on catchment measures (what, when, where and cost of interventions). A participatory approach will engage multiple stakeholders and through interviews and workshops we will develop a common language for delivery partners to record and report their activities in a transparent and collaborative way. Integration and spatial analysis of these data with water quality monitoring data (continuous and spot samples) and specific biophysical data (e.g. soil condition, WFD ecological and chemical parameters etc.) within the tool will allow characterisation and evaluation of change happening due to interventions and assist partners to measure the effectiveness of the numerous water quality and water quantity mitigation measures being delivered. Longer term, this project aims to develop an on-line user interface allowing partners to interact with the system and both record data and complete simple spatial analysis. Impact Fellows will provide training to project partners in the use of the tool so that they can use it for the identification of management priorities and meaningful opportunities for change. This will also facilitate integration of local and expert knowledge and foster further collaboration between partners allowing efficient targeting of resources. Furthermore, this work will provide evidence for wider project partners to address the question of what levels of cost savings might SWW or other water companies achieve from pursuing increased investment in catchment management. Other challenges faced by catchments in the south west (such as soil degradation, flooding etc.) and a suite of possible solutions to those challenges could also be identified through use of the tool for risk and opportunity mapping.
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP009: A regional based approach for whole catchment management (Phase II) - Developing a geospatial decision support system to characterise change, assess success of interventions for water quality (and quantity) in SW catchments and build evidence for future catchment /environmental land management impact. 
Organisation South West Water Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution To build and manage a geospatial decision support tool formalising knowledge of catchment management in the South West. The GISbased tool will be regularly updateable and provide a dynamic way to record and visualise delivery of catchment management activities that are delivered in the south west with the aim of improving water quality (and quantity), including measures delivered through Upstream Thinking (UST) and other grant support schemes such as the new Environmental Stewardship and Environmental Land Management schemes. The tool will, in the first instance, collate, organize and process data and information on catchment measures (what, when, where and cost of interventions). A participatory approach will engage multiple stakeholders and through interviews and workshops we will develop a common language for delivery partners to record and report their activities in a transparent and collaborative way. Integration and spatial analysis of these data with water quality monitoring data (continuous and spot samples) and specific biophysical data (e.g. soil condition, WFD ecological and chemical parameters etc.) within the tool will allow characterisation and evaluation of change happening due to interventions and assist partners to measure the effectiveness of the numerous water quality and water quantity mitigation measures being delivered. Longer term, this project aims to develop an on-line user interface allowing partners to interact with the system and both record data and complete simple spatial analysis. Impact Fellows will provide training to project partners in the use of the tool so that they can use it for the identification of management priorities and meaningful opportunities for change. This will also facilitate integration of local and expert knowledge and foster further collaboration between partners allowing efficient targeting of resources. Furthermore, this work will provide evidence for wider project partners to address the question of what levels of cost savings might SWW or other water companies achieve from pursuing increased investment in catchment management. Other challenges faced by catchments in the south west (such as soil degradation, flooding etc.) and a suite of possible solutions to those challenges could also be identified through use of the tool for risk and opportunity mapping.
Collaborator Contribution To build and manage a geospatial decision support tool formalising knowledge of catchment management in the South West. The GISbased tool will be regularly updateable and provide a dynamic way to record and visualise delivery of catchment management activities that are delivered in the south west with the aim of improving water quality (and quantity), including measures delivered through Upstream Thinking (UST) and other grant support schemes such as the new Environmental Stewardship and Environmental Land Management schemes. The tool will, in the first instance, collate, organize and process data and information on catchment measures (what, when, where and cost of interventions). A participatory approach will engage multiple stakeholders and through interviews and workshops we will develop a common language for delivery partners to record and report their activities in a transparent and collaborative way. Integration and spatial analysis of these data with water quality monitoring data (continuous and spot samples) and specific biophysical data (e.g. soil condition, WFD ecological and chemical parameters etc.) within the tool will allow characterisation and evaluation of change happening due to interventions and assist partners to measure the effectiveness of the numerous water quality and water quantity mitigation measures being delivered. Longer term, this project aims to develop an on-line user interface allowing partners to interact with the system and both record data and complete simple spatial analysis. Impact Fellows will provide training to project partners in the use of the tool so that they can use it for the identification of management priorities and meaningful opportunities for change. This will also facilitate integration of local and expert knowledge and foster further collaboration between partners allowing efficient targeting of resources. Furthermore, this work will provide evidence for wider project partners to address the question of what levels of cost savings might SWW or other water companies achieve from pursuing increased investment in catchment management. Other challenges faced by catchments in the south west (such as soil degradation, flooding etc.) and a suite of possible solutions to those challenges could also be identified through use of the tool for risk and opportunity mapping.
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP009: A regional based approach for whole catchment management (Phase II) - Developing a geospatial decision support system to characterise change, assess success of interventions for water quality (and quantity) in SW catchments and build evidence for future catchment /environmental land management impact. 
Organisation Westcountry Rivers Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution To build and manage a geospatial decision support tool formalising knowledge of catchment management in the South West. The GISbased tool will be regularly updateable and provide a dynamic way to record and visualise delivery of catchment management activities that are delivered in the south west with the aim of improving water quality (and quantity), including measures delivered through Upstream Thinking (UST) and other grant support schemes such as the new Environmental Stewardship and Environmental Land Management schemes. The tool will, in the first instance, collate, organize and process data and information on catchment measures (what, when, where and cost of interventions). A participatory approach will engage multiple stakeholders and through interviews and workshops we will develop a common language for delivery partners to record and report their activities in a transparent and collaborative way. Integration and spatial analysis of these data with water quality monitoring data (continuous and spot samples) and specific biophysical data (e.g. soil condition, WFD ecological and chemical parameters etc.) within the tool will allow characterisation and evaluation of change happening due to interventions and assist partners to measure the effectiveness of the numerous water quality and water quantity mitigation measures being delivered. Longer term, this project aims to develop an on-line user interface allowing partners to interact with the system and both record data and complete simple spatial analysis. Impact Fellows will provide training to project partners in the use of the tool so that they can use it for the identification of management priorities and meaningful opportunities for change. This will also facilitate integration of local and expert knowledge and foster further collaboration between partners allowing efficient targeting of resources. Furthermore, this work will provide evidence for wider project partners to address the question of what levels of cost savings might SWW or other water companies achieve from pursuing increased investment in catchment management. Other challenges faced by catchments in the south west (such as soil degradation, flooding etc.) and a suite of possible solutions to those challenges could also be identified through use of the tool for risk and opportunity mapping.
Collaborator Contribution To build and manage a geospatial decision support tool formalising knowledge of catchment management in the South West. The GISbased tool will be regularly updateable and provide a dynamic way to record and visualise delivery of catchment management activities that are delivered in the south west with the aim of improving water quality (and quantity), including measures delivered through Upstream Thinking (UST) and other grant support schemes such as the new Environmental Stewardship and Environmental Land Management schemes. The tool will, in the first instance, collate, organize and process data and information on catchment measures (what, when, where and cost of interventions). A participatory approach will engage multiple stakeholders and through interviews and workshops we will develop a common language for delivery partners to record and report their activities in a transparent and collaborative way. Integration and spatial analysis of these data with water quality monitoring data (continuous and spot samples) and specific biophysical data (e.g. soil condition, WFD ecological and chemical parameters etc.) within the tool will allow characterisation and evaluation of change happening due to interventions and assist partners to measure the effectiveness of the numerous water quality and water quantity mitigation measures being delivered. Longer term, this project aims to develop an on-line user interface allowing partners to interact with the system and both record data and complete simple spatial analysis. Impact Fellows will provide training to project partners in the use of the tool so that they can use it for the identification of management priorities and meaningful opportunities for change. This will also facilitate integration of local and expert knowledge and foster further collaboration between partners allowing efficient targeting of resources. Furthermore, this work will provide evidence for wider project partners to address the question of what levels of cost savings might SWW or other water companies achieve from pursuing increased investment in catchment management. Other challenges faced by catchments in the south west (such as soil degradation, flooding etc.) and a suite of possible solutions to those challenges could also be identified through use of the tool for risk and opportunity mapping.
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP009: Building evidence for a regional (whole catchment) based approach for water management (Phase 1) 
Organisation Devon Wildlife Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The primary aims of the project were to develop an integrated and spatially-explicit understanding of catchment scale processes that impact water-based natural capital, economic development and health/wellbeing in the South West. A key objective was to collate and translate existing research and monitoring evidence into a coherent argument from SWW and associated delivery partners to Ofwat for catchment management under PR19.
Collaborator Contribution We have engaged with many of our partners. We have been liaising frequently with SWW to discuss the business plans and obtain feedback/guidance on how to develop these. We have attended other meetings to assist with PR19. For example: Meeting on 20th Dec with South West Water, Westcountry Rivers Trust, Cornwall Wildlife Trust and WRc to formulate a plan for the modelling work to be undertaken by WRc. Meeting on 18th Jan at which many partners were represented (SWW, WRT, DWT, CWT). Outcome: as a group, we devised a plan for how to assist WRc in the modelling they will undertake.SWEEP attended to discuss natural capital accounting (for PR19). Outcome: partners will be supplying information to assist in this. Meeting on 23rd Jan with SWEEP and SWW to discuss how we can provide further case studies to support PR19. Outcome: following this, we created a template to be used by our group to summarise their case studies.
Impact Our key outputs were the Catchment Summary Reports. The ten written reports related to new Drinking Water Catchment Schemes or Investigations and the eleven Business as Usual cases informed and provided evidence for SWW's business case. SWEEP 009 produced a suite of GIS maps and spatial analysis outputs. Examples include: maps of catchment location, designations such as SSSI and priority habitats, SWW assets, in particular with analysis to identify those within designated sites and analysis of current UST coverage. We also completed mapping and analysis of pollution incidents and biodiversity enhancement opportunities. Another important output was the Natural Capital Accounting Ecosystem Services Valuation Tool (Excel spreadsheet) and the associated summary documents of the planned interventions and expected impacts, all of which were provided to SWW. An outcome from this is that SWW integrated a Natural Capital assessment approach into their business planning and, hence, into decision-making for future investments in the South West. This helped them to meet Ofwat's requirements and enhanced the case for planned investments in catchment management. A further outcome of our work is that SWW developed a better understanding of their assets, business challenges and potential catchment-based solutions, and used this knowledge to inform their business planning, prioritisation of investments and management decisions. The mapping, evidence and information that we collated and produced fed directly into the preparation of SWW's business plan. The work drew together research from UoE and other institutions, partner organisations, the EA and NE, to inform and target schemes and interventions. Our work explored the multiple benefits of catchment management and guided the catchment management plans. We also facilitated the transfer of knowledge between SWW and other partner organisations. Our support of UST partners specifically facilitated the preparation of their individual PR19 business case submissions to SWW. A key outcome achieved by the end of this phase is therefore, that our outputs (reports, maps, information) have informed and influenced SWW's catchment management business planning and their PR19 submission to Ofwat. We believe our work helped SWW meet deadlines set by the EA and Ofwat throughout the process and helped them to achieve a detailed and innovative business plan. The business plan that we contributed to demonstrates the business case for catchment-based schemes and adopts a natural capital based approach and as such received approval from Ofwat in 2019. We have therefore supported the case for continued funding of the UST Programme into the next 5 year funding cycle (AMP 7). In addition, we believe that our work contributed to SWW's business plan being given fast-track status by Ofwat. Through the provision of evidence of changes in catchments and developing an understanding of the challenges, SWEEP 009 has assisted with the spatial targeting of future drinking water catchment schemes and has helped to influence natural environment-focused investment in the South West in the order of £24 million. As evidenced through the Natural Capital valuation work, these schemes have the objective of improving natural capital conditions in the South West and increasing the delivery of ecosystem services and goods that are valuable to society. By the end of SWEEP in 2022, the planned investments and interventions will be underway and so an outcome will be that our work supported and directly contributed to these interventions taking place. Finally, following our attendance at a meeting initiating the procurement process for UST projects in AMP7 with SWW and delivery partners, it was requested that SWEEP facilitate a workshop to agree and define reporting definitions for the coming AMP period and in consultation with all partners, develop a new recording method - this forms the basis of the Phase 2 project.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP009: Building evidence for a regional (whole catchment) based approach for water management (Phase 1) 
Organisation Environment Agency
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The primary aims of the project were to develop an integrated and spatially-explicit understanding of catchment scale processes that impact water-based natural capital, economic development and health/wellbeing in the South West. A key objective was to collate and translate existing research and monitoring evidence into a coherent argument from SWW and associated delivery partners to Ofwat for catchment management under PR19.
Collaborator Contribution We have engaged with many of our partners. We have been liaising frequently with SWW to discuss the business plans and obtain feedback/guidance on how to develop these. We have attended other meetings to assist with PR19. For example: Meeting on 20th Dec with South West Water, Westcountry Rivers Trust, Cornwall Wildlife Trust and WRc to formulate a plan for the modelling work to be undertaken by WRc. Meeting on 18th Jan at which many partners were represented (SWW, WRT, DWT, CWT). Outcome: as a group, we devised a plan for how to assist WRc in the modelling they will undertake.SWEEP attended to discuss natural capital accounting (for PR19). Outcome: partners will be supplying information to assist in this. Meeting on 23rd Jan with SWEEP and SWW to discuss how we can provide further case studies to support PR19. Outcome: following this, we created a template to be used by our group to summarise their case studies.
Impact Our key outputs were the Catchment Summary Reports. The ten written reports related to new Drinking Water Catchment Schemes or Investigations and the eleven Business as Usual cases informed and provided evidence for SWW's business case. SWEEP 009 produced a suite of GIS maps and spatial analysis outputs. Examples include: maps of catchment location, designations such as SSSI and priority habitats, SWW assets, in particular with analysis to identify those within designated sites and analysis of current UST coverage. We also completed mapping and analysis of pollution incidents and biodiversity enhancement opportunities. Another important output was the Natural Capital Accounting Ecosystem Services Valuation Tool (Excel spreadsheet) and the associated summary documents of the planned interventions and expected impacts, all of which were provided to SWW. An outcome from this is that SWW integrated a Natural Capital assessment approach into their business planning and, hence, into decision-making for future investments in the South West. This helped them to meet Ofwat's requirements and enhanced the case for planned investments in catchment management. A further outcome of our work is that SWW developed a better understanding of their assets, business challenges and potential catchment-based solutions, and used this knowledge to inform their business planning, prioritisation of investments and management decisions. The mapping, evidence and information that we collated and produced fed directly into the preparation of SWW's business plan. The work drew together research from UoE and other institutions, partner organisations, the EA and NE, to inform and target schemes and interventions. Our work explored the multiple benefits of catchment management and guided the catchment management plans. We also facilitated the transfer of knowledge between SWW and other partner organisations. Our support of UST partners specifically facilitated the preparation of their individual PR19 business case submissions to SWW. A key outcome achieved by the end of this phase is therefore, that our outputs (reports, maps, information) have informed and influenced SWW's catchment management business planning and their PR19 submission to Ofwat. We believe our work helped SWW meet deadlines set by the EA and Ofwat throughout the process and helped them to achieve a detailed and innovative business plan. The business plan that we contributed to demonstrates the business case for catchment-based schemes and adopts a natural capital based approach and as such received approval from Ofwat in 2019. We have therefore supported the case for continued funding of the UST Programme into the next 5 year funding cycle (AMP 7). In addition, we believe that our work contributed to SWW's business plan being given fast-track status by Ofwat. Through the provision of evidence of changes in catchments and developing an understanding of the challenges, SWEEP 009 has assisted with the spatial targeting of future drinking water catchment schemes and has helped to influence natural environment-focused investment in the South West in the order of £24 million. As evidenced through the Natural Capital valuation work, these schemes have the objective of improving natural capital conditions in the South West and increasing the delivery of ecosystem services and goods that are valuable to society. By the end of SWEEP in 2022, the planned investments and interventions will be underway and so an outcome will be that our work supported and directly contributed to these interventions taking place. Finally, following our attendance at a meeting initiating the procurement process for UST projects in AMP7 with SWW and delivery partners, it was requested that SWEEP facilitate a workshop to agree and define reporting definitions for the coming AMP period and in consultation with all partners, develop a new recording method - this forms the basis of the Phase 2 project.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP009: Building evidence for a regional (whole catchment) based approach for water management (Phase 1) 
Organisation Exmoor National Park Authority
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The primary aims of the project were to develop an integrated and spatially-explicit understanding of catchment scale processes that impact water-based natural capital, economic development and health/wellbeing in the South West. A key objective was to collate and translate existing research and monitoring evidence into a coherent argument from SWW and associated delivery partners to Ofwat for catchment management under PR19.
Collaborator Contribution We have engaged with many of our partners. We have been liaising frequently with SWW to discuss the business plans and obtain feedback/guidance on how to develop these. We have attended other meetings to assist with PR19. For example: Meeting on 20th Dec with South West Water, Westcountry Rivers Trust, Cornwall Wildlife Trust and WRc to formulate a plan for the modelling work to be undertaken by WRc. Meeting on 18th Jan at which many partners were represented (SWW, WRT, DWT, CWT). Outcome: as a group, we devised a plan for how to assist WRc in the modelling they will undertake.SWEEP attended to discuss natural capital accounting (for PR19). Outcome: partners will be supplying information to assist in this. Meeting on 23rd Jan with SWEEP and SWW to discuss how we can provide further case studies to support PR19. Outcome: following this, we created a template to be used by our group to summarise their case studies.
Impact Our key outputs were the Catchment Summary Reports. The ten written reports related to new Drinking Water Catchment Schemes or Investigations and the eleven Business as Usual cases informed and provided evidence for SWW's business case. SWEEP 009 produced a suite of GIS maps and spatial analysis outputs. Examples include: maps of catchment location, designations such as SSSI and priority habitats, SWW assets, in particular with analysis to identify those within designated sites and analysis of current UST coverage. We also completed mapping and analysis of pollution incidents and biodiversity enhancement opportunities. Another important output was the Natural Capital Accounting Ecosystem Services Valuation Tool (Excel spreadsheet) and the associated summary documents of the planned interventions and expected impacts, all of which were provided to SWW. An outcome from this is that SWW integrated a Natural Capital assessment approach into their business planning and, hence, into decision-making for future investments in the South West. This helped them to meet Ofwat's requirements and enhanced the case for planned investments in catchment management. A further outcome of our work is that SWW developed a better understanding of their assets, business challenges and potential catchment-based solutions, and used this knowledge to inform their business planning, prioritisation of investments and management decisions. The mapping, evidence and information that we collated and produced fed directly into the preparation of SWW's business plan. The work drew together research from UoE and other institutions, partner organisations, the EA and NE, to inform and target schemes and interventions. Our work explored the multiple benefits of catchment management and guided the catchment management plans. We also facilitated the transfer of knowledge between SWW and other partner organisations. Our support of UST partners specifically facilitated the preparation of their individual PR19 business case submissions to SWW. A key outcome achieved by the end of this phase is therefore, that our outputs (reports, maps, information) have informed and influenced SWW's catchment management business planning and their PR19 submission to Ofwat. We believe our work helped SWW meet deadlines set by the EA and Ofwat throughout the process and helped them to achieve a detailed and innovative business plan. The business plan that we contributed to demonstrates the business case for catchment-based schemes and adopts a natural capital based approach and as such received approval from Ofwat in 2019. We have therefore supported the case for continued funding of the UST Programme into the next 5 year funding cycle (AMP 7). In addition, we believe that our work contributed to SWW's business plan being given fast-track status by Ofwat. Through the provision of evidence of changes in catchments and developing an understanding of the challenges, SWEEP 009 has assisted with the spatial targeting of future drinking water catchment schemes and has helped to influence natural environment-focused investment in the South West in the order of £24 million. As evidenced through the Natural Capital valuation work, these schemes have the objective of improving natural capital conditions in the South West and increasing the delivery of ecosystem services and goods that are valuable to society. By the end of SWEEP in 2022, the planned investments and interventions will be underway and so an outcome will be that our work supported and directly contributed to these interventions taking place. Finally, following our attendance at a meeting initiating the procurement process for UST projects in AMP7 with SWW and delivery partners, it was requested that SWEEP facilitate a workshop to agree and define reporting definitions for the coming AMP period and in consultation with all partners, develop a new recording method - this forms the basis of the Phase 2 project.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP009: Building evidence for a regional (whole catchment) based approach for water management (Phase 1) 
Organisation Farming & Wildlife Advisory Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The primary aims of the project were to develop an integrated and spatially-explicit understanding of catchment scale processes that impact water-based natural capital, economic development and health/wellbeing in the South West. A key objective was to collate and translate existing research and monitoring evidence into a coherent argument from SWW and associated delivery partners to Ofwat for catchment management under PR19.
Collaborator Contribution We have engaged with many of our partners. We have been liaising frequently with SWW to discuss the business plans and obtain feedback/guidance on how to develop these. We have attended other meetings to assist with PR19. For example: Meeting on 20th Dec with South West Water, Westcountry Rivers Trust, Cornwall Wildlife Trust and WRc to formulate a plan for the modelling work to be undertaken by WRc. Meeting on 18th Jan at which many partners were represented (SWW, WRT, DWT, CWT). Outcome: as a group, we devised a plan for how to assist WRc in the modelling they will undertake.SWEEP attended to discuss natural capital accounting (for PR19). Outcome: partners will be supplying information to assist in this. Meeting on 23rd Jan with SWEEP and SWW to discuss how we can provide further case studies to support PR19. Outcome: following this, we created a template to be used by our group to summarise their case studies.
Impact Our key outputs were the Catchment Summary Reports. The ten written reports related to new Drinking Water Catchment Schemes or Investigations and the eleven Business as Usual cases informed and provided evidence for SWW's business case. SWEEP 009 produced a suite of GIS maps and spatial analysis outputs. Examples include: maps of catchment location, designations such as SSSI and priority habitats, SWW assets, in particular with analysis to identify those within designated sites and analysis of current UST coverage. We also completed mapping and analysis of pollution incidents and biodiversity enhancement opportunities. Another important output was the Natural Capital Accounting Ecosystem Services Valuation Tool (Excel spreadsheet) and the associated summary documents of the planned interventions and expected impacts, all of which were provided to SWW. An outcome from this is that SWW integrated a Natural Capital assessment approach into their business planning and, hence, into decision-making for future investments in the South West. This helped them to meet Ofwat's requirements and enhanced the case for planned investments in catchment management. A further outcome of our work is that SWW developed a better understanding of their assets, business challenges and potential catchment-based solutions, and used this knowledge to inform their business planning, prioritisation of investments and management decisions. The mapping, evidence and information that we collated and produced fed directly into the preparation of SWW's business plan. The work drew together research from UoE and other institutions, partner organisations, the EA and NE, to inform and target schemes and interventions. Our work explored the multiple benefits of catchment management and guided the catchment management plans. We also facilitated the transfer of knowledge between SWW and other partner organisations. Our support of UST partners specifically facilitated the preparation of their individual PR19 business case submissions to SWW. A key outcome achieved by the end of this phase is therefore, that our outputs (reports, maps, information) have informed and influenced SWW's catchment management business planning and their PR19 submission to Ofwat. We believe our work helped SWW meet deadlines set by the EA and Ofwat throughout the process and helped them to achieve a detailed and innovative business plan. The business plan that we contributed to demonstrates the business case for catchment-based schemes and adopts a natural capital based approach and as such received approval from Ofwat in 2019. We have therefore supported the case for continued funding of the UST Programme into the next 5 year funding cycle (AMP 7). In addition, we believe that our work contributed to SWW's business plan being given fast-track status by Ofwat. Through the provision of evidence of changes in catchments and developing an understanding of the challenges, SWEEP 009 has assisted with the spatial targeting of future drinking water catchment schemes and has helped to influence natural environment-focused investment in the South West in the order of £24 million. As evidenced through the Natural Capital valuation work, these schemes have the objective of improving natural capital conditions in the South West and increasing the delivery of ecosystem services and goods that are valuable to society. By the end of SWEEP in 2022, the planned investments and interventions will be underway and so an outcome will be that our work supported and directly contributed to these interventions taking place. Finally, following our attendance at a meeting initiating the procurement process for UST projects in AMP7 with SWW and delivery partners, it was requested that SWEEP facilitate a workshop to agree and define reporting definitions for the coming AMP period and in consultation with all partners, develop a new recording method - this forms the basis of the Phase 2 project.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP009: Building evidence for a regional (whole catchment) based approach for water management (Phase 1) 
Organisation National Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The primary aims of the project were to develop an integrated and spatially-explicit understanding of catchment scale processes that impact water-based natural capital, economic development and health/wellbeing in the South West. A key objective was to collate and translate existing research and monitoring evidence into a coherent argument from SWW and associated delivery partners to Ofwat for catchment management under PR19.
Collaborator Contribution We have engaged with many of our partners. We have been liaising frequently with SWW to discuss the business plans and obtain feedback/guidance on how to develop these. We have attended other meetings to assist with PR19. For example: Meeting on 20th Dec with South West Water, Westcountry Rivers Trust, Cornwall Wildlife Trust and WRc to formulate a plan for the modelling work to be undertaken by WRc. Meeting on 18th Jan at which many partners were represented (SWW, WRT, DWT, CWT). Outcome: as a group, we devised a plan for how to assist WRc in the modelling they will undertake.SWEEP attended to discuss natural capital accounting (for PR19). Outcome: partners will be supplying information to assist in this. Meeting on 23rd Jan with SWEEP and SWW to discuss how we can provide further case studies to support PR19. Outcome: following this, we created a template to be used by our group to summarise their case studies.
Impact Our key outputs were the Catchment Summary Reports. The ten written reports related to new Drinking Water Catchment Schemes or Investigations and the eleven Business as Usual cases informed and provided evidence for SWW's business case. SWEEP 009 produced a suite of GIS maps and spatial analysis outputs. Examples include: maps of catchment location, designations such as SSSI and priority habitats, SWW assets, in particular with analysis to identify those within designated sites and analysis of current UST coverage. We also completed mapping and analysis of pollution incidents and biodiversity enhancement opportunities. Another important output was the Natural Capital Accounting Ecosystem Services Valuation Tool (Excel spreadsheet) and the associated summary documents of the planned interventions and expected impacts, all of which were provided to SWW. An outcome from this is that SWW integrated a Natural Capital assessment approach into their business planning and, hence, into decision-making for future investments in the South West. This helped them to meet Ofwat's requirements and enhanced the case for planned investments in catchment management. A further outcome of our work is that SWW developed a better understanding of their assets, business challenges and potential catchment-based solutions, and used this knowledge to inform their business planning, prioritisation of investments and management decisions. The mapping, evidence and information that we collated and produced fed directly into the preparation of SWW's business plan. The work drew together research from UoE and other institutions, partner organisations, the EA and NE, to inform and target schemes and interventions. Our work explored the multiple benefits of catchment management and guided the catchment management plans. We also facilitated the transfer of knowledge between SWW and other partner organisations. Our support of UST partners specifically facilitated the preparation of their individual PR19 business case submissions to SWW. A key outcome achieved by the end of this phase is therefore, that our outputs (reports, maps, information) have informed and influenced SWW's catchment management business planning and their PR19 submission to Ofwat. We believe our work helped SWW meet deadlines set by the EA and Ofwat throughout the process and helped them to achieve a detailed and innovative business plan. The business plan that we contributed to demonstrates the business case for catchment-based schemes and adopts a natural capital based approach and as such received approval from Ofwat in 2019. We have therefore supported the case for continued funding of the UST Programme into the next 5 year funding cycle (AMP 7). In addition, we believe that our work contributed to SWW's business plan being given fast-track status by Ofwat. Through the provision of evidence of changes in catchments and developing an understanding of the challenges, SWEEP 009 has assisted with the spatial targeting of future drinking water catchment schemes and has helped to influence natural environment-focused investment in the South West in the order of £24 million. As evidenced through the Natural Capital valuation work, these schemes have the objective of improving natural capital conditions in the South West and increasing the delivery of ecosystem services and goods that are valuable to society. By the end of SWEEP in 2022, the planned investments and interventions will be underway and so an outcome will be that our work supported and directly contributed to these interventions taking place. Finally, following our attendance at a meeting initiating the procurement process for UST projects in AMP7 with SWW and delivery partners, it was requested that SWEEP facilitate a workshop to agree and define reporting definitions for the coming AMP period and in consultation with all partners, develop a new recording method - this forms the basis of the Phase 2 project.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP009: Building evidence for a regional (whole catchment) based approach for water management (Phase 1) 
Organisation South West Water Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The primary aims of the project were to develop an integrated and spatially-explicit understanding of catchment scale processes that impact water-based natural capital, economic development and health/wellbeing in the South West. A key objective was to collate and translate existing research and monitoring evidence into a coherent argument from SWW and associated delivery partners to Ofwat for catchment management under PR19.
Collaborator Contribution We have engaged with many of our partners. We have been liaising frequently with SWW to discuss the business plans and obtain feedback/guidance on how to develop these. We have attended other meetings to assist with PR19. For example: Meeting on 20th Dec with South West Water, Westcountry Rivers Trust, Cornwall Wildlife Trust and WRc to formulate a plan for the modelling work to be undertaken by WRc. Meeting on 18th Jan at which many partners were represented (SWW, WRT, DWT, CWT). Outcome: as a group, we devised a plan for how to assist WRc in the modelling they will undertake.SWEEP attended to discuss natural capital accounting (for PR19). Outcome: partners will be supplying information to assist in this. Meeting on 23rd Jan with SWEEP and SWW to discuss how we can provide further case studies to support PR19. Outcome: following this, we created a template to be used by our group to summarise their case studies.
Impact Our key outputs were the Catchment Summary Reports. The ten written reports related to new Drinking Water Catchment Schemes or Investigations and the eleven Business as Usual cases informed and provided evidence for SWW's business case. SWEEP 009 produced a suite of GIS maps and spatial analysis outputs. Examples include: maps of catchment location, designations such as SSSI and priority habitats, SWW assets, in particular with analysis to identify those within designated sites and analysis of current UST coverage. We also completed mapping and analysis of pollution incidents and biodiversity enhancement opportunities. Another important output was the Natural Capital Accounting Ecosystem Services Valuation Tool (Excel spreadsheet) and the associated summary documents of the planned interventions and expected impacts, all of which were provided to SWW. An outcome from this is that SWW integrated a Natural Capital assessment approach into their business planning and, hence, into decision-making for future investments in the South West. This helped them to meet Ofwat's requirements and enhanced the case for planned investments in catchment management. A further outcome of our work is that SWW developed a better understanding of their assets, business challenges and potential catchment-based solutions, and used this knowledge to inform their business planning, prioritisation of investments and management decisions. The mapping, evidence and information that we collated and produced fed directly into the preparation of SWW's business plan. The work drew together research from UoE and other institutions, partner organisations, the EA and NE, to inform and target schemes and interventions. Our work explored the multiple benefits of catchment management and guided the catchment management plans. We also facilitated the transfer of knowledge between SWW and other partner organisations. Our support of UST partners specifically facilitated the preparation of their individual PR19 business case submissions to SWW. A key outcome achieved by the end of this phase is therefore, that our outputs (reports, maps, information) have informed and influenced SWW's catchment management business planning and their PR19 submission to Ofwat. We believe our work helped SWW meet deadlines set by the EA and Ofwat throughout the process and helped them to achieve a detailed and innovative business plan. The business plan that we contributed to demonstrates the business case for catchment-based schemes and adopts a natural capital based approach and as such received approval from Ofwat in 2019. We have therefore supported the case for continued funding of the UST Programme into the next 5 year funding cycle (AMP 7). In addition, we believe that our work contributed to SWW's business plan being given fast-track status by Ofwat. Through the provision of evidence of changes in catchments and developing an understanding of the challenges, SWEEP 009 has assisted with the spatial targeting of future drinking water catchment schemes and has helped to influence natural environment-focused investment in the South West in the order of £24 million. As evidenced through the Natural Capital valuation work, these schemes have the objective of improving natural capital conditions in the South West and increasing the delivery of ecosystem services and goods that are valuable to society. By the end of SWEEP in 2022, the planned investments and interventions will be underway and so an outcome will be that our work supported and directly contributed to these interventions taking place. Finally, following our attendance at a meeting initiating the procurement process for UST projects in AMP7 with SWW and delivery partners, it was requested that SWEEP facilitate a workshop to agree and define reporting definitions for the coming AMP period and in consultation with all partners, develop a new recording method - this forms the basis of the Phase 2 project.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP009: Building evidence for a regional (whole catchment) based approach for water management (Phase 1) 
Organisation The Wildlife Trusts
Department Cornwall Wildlife Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The primary aims of the project were to develop an integrated and spatially-explicit understanding of catchment scale processes that impact water-based natural capital, economic development and health/wellbeing in the South West. A key objective was to collate and translate existing research and monitoring evidence into a coherent argument from SWW and associated delivery partners to Ofwat for catchment management under PR19.
Collaborator Contribution We have engaged with many of our partners. We have been liaising frequently with SWW to discuss the business plans and obtain feedback/guidance on how to develop these. We have attended other meetings to assist with PR19. For example: Meeting on 20th Dec with South West Water, Westcountry Rivers Trust, Cornwall Wildlife Trust and WRc to formulate a plan for the modelling work to be undertaken by WRc. Meeting on 18th Jan at which many partners were represented (SWW, WRT, DWT, CWT). Outcome: as a group, we devised a plan for how to assist WRc in the modelling they will undertake.SWEEP attended to discuss natural capital accounting (for PR19). Outcome: partners will be supplying information to assist in this. Meeting on 23rd Jan with SWEEP and SWW to discuss how we can provide further case studies to support PR19. Outcome: following this, we created a template to be used by our group to summarise their case studies.
Impact Our key outputs were the Catchment Summary Reports. The ten written reports related to new Drinking Water Catchment Schemes or Investigations and the eleven Business as Usual cases informed and provided evidence for SWW's business case. SWEEP 009 produced a suite of GIS maps and spatial analysis outputs. Examples include: maps of catchment location, designations such as SSSI and priority habitats, SWW assets, in particular with analysis to identify those within designated sites and analysis of current UST coverage. We also completed mapping and analysis of pollution incidents and biodiversity enhancement opportunities. Another important output was the Natural Capital Accounting Ecosystem Services Valuation Tool (Excel spreadsheet) and the associated summary documents of the planned interventions and expected impacts, all of which were provided to SWW. An outcome from this is that SWW integrated a Natural Capital assessment approach into their business planning and, hence, into decision-making for future investments in the South West. This helped them to meet Ofwat's requirements and enhanced the case for planned investments in catchment management. A further outcome of our work is that SWW developed a better understanding of their assets, business challenges and potential catchment-based solutions, and used this knowledge to inform their business planning, prioritisation of investments and management decisions. The mapping, evidence and information that we collated and produced fed directly into the preparation of SWW's business plan. The work drew together research from UoE and other institutions, partner organisations, the EA and NE, to inform and target schemes and interventions. Our work explored the multiple benefits of catchment management and guided the catchment management plans. We also facilitated the transfer of knowledge between SWW and other partner organisations. Our support of UST partners specifically facilitated the preparation of their individual PR19 business case submissions to SWW. A key outcome achieved by the end of this phase is therefore, that our outputs (reports, maps, information) have informed and influenced SWW's catchment management business planning and their PR19 submission to Ofwat. We believe our work helped SWW meet deadlines set by the EA and Ofwat throughout the process and helped them to achieve a detailed and innovative business plan. The business plan that we contributed to demonstrates the business case for catchment-based schemes and adopts a natural capital based approach and as such received approval from Ofwat in 2019. We have therefore supported the case for continued funding of the UST Programme into the next 5 year funding cycle (AMP 7). In addition, we believe that our work contributed to SWW's business plan being given fast-track status by Ofwat. Through the provision of evidence of changes in catchments and developing an understanding of the challenges, SWEEP 009 has assisted with the spatial targeting of future drinking water catchment schemes and has helped to influence natural environment-focused investment in the South West in the order of £24 million. As evidenced through the Natural Capital valuation work, these schemes have the objective of improving natural capital conditions in the South West and increasing the delivery of ecosystem services and goods that are valuable to society. By the end of SWEEP in 2022, the planned investments and interventions will be underway and so an outcome will be that our work supported and directly contributed to these interventions taking place. Finally, following our attendance at a meeting initiating the procurement process for UST projects in AMP7 with SWW and delivery partners, it was requested that SWEEP facilitate a workshop to agree and define reporting definitions for the coming AMP period and in consultation with all partners, develop a new recording method - this forms the basis of the Phase 2 project.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP009: Building evidence for a regional (whole catchment) based approach for water management (Phase 1) 
Organisation Westcountry Rivers Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The primary aims of the project were to develop an integrated and spatially-explicit understanding of catchment scale processes that impact water-based natural capital, economic development and health/wellbeing in the South West. A key objective was to collate and translate existing research and monitoring evidence into a coherent argument from SWW and associated delivery partners to Ofwat for catchment management under PR19.
Collaborator Contribution We have engaged with many of our partners. We have been liaising frequently with SWW to discuss the business plans and obtain feedback/guidance on how to develop these. We have attended other meetings to assist with PR19. For example: Meeting on 20th Dec with South West Water, Westcountry Rivers Trust, Cornwall Wildlife Trust and WRc to formulate a plan for the modelling work to be undertaken by WRc. Meeting on 18th Jan at which many partners were represented (SWW, WRT, DWT, CWT). Outcome: as a group, we devised a plan for how to assist WRc in the modelling they will undertake.SWEEP attended to discuss natural capital accounting (for PR19). Outcome: partners will be supplying information to assist in this. Meeting on 23rd Jan with SWEEP and SWW to discuss how we can provide further case studies to support PR19. Outcome: following this, we created a template to be used by our group to summarise their case studies.
Impact Our key outputs were the Catchment Summary Reports. The ten written reports related to new Drinking Water Catchment Schemes or Investigations and the eleven Business as Usual cases informed and provided evidence for SWW's business case. SWEEP 009 produced a suite of GIS maps and spatial analysis outputs. Examples include: maps of catchment location, designations such as SSSI and priority habitats, SWW assets, in particular with analysis to identify those within designated sites and analysis of current UST coverage. We also completed mapping and analysis of pollution incidents and biodiversity enhancement opportunities. Another important output was the Natural Capital Accounting Ecosystem Services Valuation Tool (Excel spreadsheet) and the associated summary documents of the planned interventions and expected impacts, all of which were provided to SWW. An outcome from this is that SWW integrated a Natural Capital assessment approach into their business planning and, hence, into decision-making for future investments in the South West. This helped them to meet Ofwat's requirements and enhanced the case for planned investments in catchment management. A further outcome of our work is that SWW developed a better understanding of their assets, business challenges and potential catchment-based solutions, and used this knowledge to inform their business planning, prioritisation of investments and management decisions. The mapping, evidence and information that we collated and produced fed directly into the preparation of SWW's business plan. The work drew together research from UoE and other institutions, partner organisations, the EA and NE, to inform and target schemes and interventions. Our work explored the multiple benefits of catchment management and guided the catchment management plans. We also facilitated the transfer of knowledge between SWW and other partner organisations. Our support of UST partners specifically facilitated the preparation of their individual PR19 business case submissions to SWW. A key outcome achieved by the end of this phase is therefore, that our outputs (reports, maps, information) have informed and influenced SWW's catchment management business planning and their PR19 submission to Ofwat. We believe our work helped SWW meet deadlines set by the EA and Ofwat throughout the process and helped them to achieve a detailed and innovative business plan. The business plan that we contributed to demonstrates the business case for catchment-based schemes and adopts a natural capital based approach and as such received approval from Ofwat in 2019. We have therefore supported the case for continued funding of the UST Programme into the next 5 year funding cycle (AMP 7). In addition, we believe that our work contributed to SWW's business plan being given fast-track status by Ofwat. Through the provision of evidence of changes in catchments and developing an understanding of the challenges, SWEEP 009 has assisted with the spatial targeting of future drinking water catchment schemes and has helped to influence natural environment-focused investment in the South West in the order of £24 million. As evidenced through the Natural Capital valuation work, these schemes have the objective of improving natural capital conditions in the South West and increasing the delivery of ecosystem services and goods that are valuable to society. By the end of SWEEP in 2022, the planned investments and interventions will be underway and so an outcome will be that our work supported and directly contributed to these interventions taking place. Finally, following our attendance at a meeting initiating the procurement process for UST projects in AMP7 with SWW and delivery partners, it was requested that SWEEP facilitate a workshop to agree and define reporting definitions for the coming AMP period and in consultation with all partners, develop a new recording method - this forms the basis of the Phase 2 project.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP010: One Coast: Developing a South West Coastal Corridor for People and Nature 
Organisation National Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The overarching aim of the SWEEP 010 One Coast Project was to support project partners in the development of a South West Coastal Corridor for Nature and People Project (hereafter the One Coast project), by enhancing their understanding of the environmental and economic significance of the coastal corridor and identifying possible financial mechanisms to facilitate investment in the project.
Collaborator Contribution The overarching aim of the SWEEP 010 One Coast Project was to support project partners in the development of a South West Coastal Corridor for Nature and People Project (hereafter the One Coast project), by enhancing their understanding of the environmental and economic significance of the coastal corridor and identifying possible financial mechanisms to facilitate investment in the project.
Impact OUTPUT 1: ONE COAST ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECONOMIC EVIDENCE BASE The One Coast Environmental and Economic Evidence base provides a catalogue of information for project partners on a range of environmental, socio-demographic and economic aspects of the coastal corridor. OUTPUT 2: FINANCING ONE COAST REVIEW The Financing One Coast Review builds on the main findings from the One Coast Evidence Base to highlight the range of possible relevant finance mechanisms which could be used to help fund the One Coast project. A series of recommended or priority investments for project partners are provided. OUTPUT 3: SUITE OF GIS MAPS As part of the development of the One Coast Evidence Base, national and local spatial economic, social and environmental datasets and ecosystem services maps were clipped or adjusted via best-fit methods to the area of the coastal corridor, resulting in a suite of GIS maps linked to the One Coast project. For the purpose of the project, the coastal corridor was defined as the continuous strip of land stretching 1km inland from mean high water for Cornwall.
Start Year 2018
 
Description SWEEP010: One Coast: Developing a South West Coastal Corridor for People and Nature 
Organisation Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The overarching aim of the SWEEP 010 One Coast Project was to support project partners in the development of a South West Coastal Corridor for Nature and People Project (hereafter the One Coast project), by enhancing their understanding of the environmental and economic significance of the coastal corridor and identifying possible financial mechanisms to facilitate investment in the project.
Collaborator Contribution The overarching aim of the SWEEP 010 One Coast Project was to support project partners in the development of a South West Coastal Corridor for Nature and People Project (hereafter the One Coast project), by enhancing their understanding of the environmental and economic significance of the coastal corridor and identifying possible financial mechanisms to facilitate investment in the project.
Impact OUTPUT 1: ONE COAST ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECONOMIC EVIDENCE BASE The One Coast Environmental and Economic Evidence base provides a catalogue of information for project partners on a range of environmental, socio-demographic and economic aspects of the coastal corridor. OUTPUT 2: FINANCING ONE COAST REVIEW The Financing One Coast Review builds on the main findings from the One Coast Evidence Base to highlight the range of possible relevant finance mechanisms which could be used to help fund the One Coast project. A series of recommended or priority investments for project partners are provided. OUTPUT 3: SUITE OF GIS MAPS As part of the development of the One Coast Evidence Base, national and local spatial economic, social and environmental datasets and ecosystem services maps were clipped or adjusted via best-fit methods to the area of the coastal corridor, resulting in a suite of GIS maps linked to the One Coast project. For the purpose of the project, the coastal corridor was defined as the continuous strip of land stretching 1km inland from mean high water for Cornwall.
Start Year 2018
 
Description SWEEP011: Mainstreaming Environmental Growth 
Organisation Cornwall AONB
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution To evaluate and provide tools for the delivery of Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy.
Collaborator Contribution Advice, steering, identification of data and resources, partner and business assist identification.
Impact 1 Development of tools to assist Tevi programme business engagements Key Outputs: • Tevi 'toolkit' providing a guided interview template and scoring system to inform Tevi business assists. • Maps of Tevi assists, Cornwall business sustainability activities and awards. The toolkit seeks to capture the dependency and impact on natural capital of small and medium-sized enterprises, and the opportunities to implement circular economy business practices. The toolkit scoped out the key issues and approaches prior to the start of the Tevi programme. Since development, the toolkit has evolved in response to the changing needs of the multi-year Tevi programme and experiences of delivering business assists. Outputs have helped the highly acclaimed Tevi programme engage with over 350 small and medium-sized enterprises across Cornwall and provide direct support to 255 businesses, helping to drive progress across the five opportunities identified in the Local Industrial Strategy (LIS) for Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly (CIoS). Direct support delivers expert consultation, opportunities for recognition and certification, and realizing 52 sustainable Business projects through £338K of grant funding. Maps of business activities and winners of various sustainability awards are publicly available on the Lagas application. The maps highlight both the distribution of Tevi assists to SMEs and also identify businesses that are actively seeking to improve their use of natural capital and sustainability. 2 Landcover mapping Key outputs: • Methodology to integrate and improve existing landcover maps; • Enhanced landcover map for Cornwall; • Map of changes to vegetated / non-vegetated landcover in Cornwall over the past 40 years using Landsat data. There is no single or authoritative landcover map for Cornwall. Existing landcover maps and data vary in terms of their availability, date of generation, resolution, classifications, reliability and format. MEG developed a method to integrate existing landcover resources (e.g. CEH, NE, FC, Ordnance Survey and others) and enhance these sources with the use of remote sensing data from Sentinel 1 & 2. The resulting high resolution landcover map enabled the delivery of all other MEG mapping outputs. The maps and methodology also formed a key part of the report and GIS package delivered to Cornwall AONB forming part of the evidence base for review of the AONB management plan. Data licensing restrictions prevent the public delivery of the landcover map via Lagas, but the maps have been made via the Lagas account system on request. The landcover map is also expected to inform the development of the 'Local Habitat Map' that forms part of the Local Nature Recovery Strategy for which Cornwall has been selected as a Defra pilot. Its use and/or future development will be subject to clarification of the MOA and the nature of the "national habitat map" that is to be provided by Government. Cornwall Wildlife Trust has the intention to update their existing 2005 landcover map, and in so doing will consider the methods developed by MEG, including the use of Sentinel remote sensing data. It is likely that these methods may be further developed as part of on-going Cornwall Wildlife Trust contract work resulting from the MEG project. More generally, the outputs highlight the potential of freely-available remote sensing data for monitoring land cover and change as well as the central importance of reliable and suitable landcover maps to any strategic mapping of existing natural resources, services or opportunities. 3 Ecosystem service maps Key outputs: • Ecosystem service provision maps, related landscape risk contribution maps and methodologies. Mapping the landscape contribution to different ecosystem services is highly challenging and no definitive methods or approach exists. MEG built on and further developed existing methods to estimate and map relative landscape contributions to: • Flood risk and mitigation; • Soil erosion; • Soil / runoff pollution risk and mitigation to drinking water, aquaculture and bathing water; • Carbon stock and assimilation; • Pollination services. The outputs enabled the inclusion of ecosystem service information as part of the MEG strategic prioritization and opportunity mapping, while also forming part of the evidence base for review of the AONB management plan and the content of the Lagas website. In doing so, MEG has demonstrated the value of ecosystem service mapping to inform the spatial prioritization of existing natural capital resources and habitat creation opportunities. 4 Strategic prioritisation of natural assets and opportunities outputs Key outputs: • Existing assets prioritisation and linking corridor opportunities map; • Habitat opportunity maps for woodland, wetland and heathland opportunities; • Combined habitat creation opportunities map; • Zoning map for use with CC net-gain planning tool; • Draft Nature Recovery Network map. Key outcomes of the mapping outputs, and current or future impacts, include: i. Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy was launched in 2016, and seeks to ensure natural capital and services are more effectively embedded within Cornwall's Council's activities. MEG has helped deliver the strategy's aim of not only protecting existing natural capital, but also of growing these assets, by identifying areas of Cornwall where habitat restoration or creation is most likely to deliver the greatest strategic benefit in terms of key ecosystem services and improved connectivity. ii. Cornwall Nature Recovery Network -MEG maps have been adopted by Cornwall Local Nature Partnership to form a draft NRN map providing a spatial prioritization of existing natural assets, services and key opportunities for service improvement and habitat (re)creation. Cornwall has been selected to be a national Defra pilot for the production of Local Nature Recovery Strategies, which will be a new requirement for public authorities under the Environment Bill. The map and methods are expected to form the basis of the mapping work to be included in this strategy, due for completion in March 2021 and for which the MOA are currently being finalised. iii. Inclusion as part of Cornwall Council net-gain planning tool - All major developments since March 2020 are required to deliver a demonstrable 10% net gain in biodiversity. By defining the strategic areas used in Cornwall Council's biodiversity net gain tool, MEG is helping deliver this net biodiversity gain and also guiding the allocation of off-site compensation where on-site measures are insufficient to deliver. The planning tool will deliver on the Cornwall 2010-2030 local plan which sets out the scale and distribution of new development across Cornwall and includes commitments for a minimum of 52,500 homes, at an average rate of about 2,625 per year, and 704,000 sq. metre of employment floorspace. The MEG outputs as part of the net-gain tool will therefore help assess / allocate c. £6.5billion of housing stock and targeting investment of biodiversity offsetting from developments to areas of greatest strategic benefit. iv. Helping deliver Cornwall's Climate Change Action Plan - this action plan was approved in July 2019 following the Cornwall Climate Emergency declaration in January 2019 by Cornwall Council. The plan identifies the Forest for Cornwall as a flagship natural climate solution project. The project is a ten-year tree planting scheme to increase canopy cover by approximately 8,000 hectares (2% of Cornwall's land area). It will identify potential sites "by using the best available local information currently being developed by Cornwall Council, the University of Exeter and Environmental Records Centre for Cornwall & the Isles of Scilly". MEG woodland opportunity mapping forms the central aspect of this information while the historic woodland and orchard mapping is also informing the initiative. MEG outputs have already been presented and used at several Forest for Cornwall publicity, workshops and events. The delivery of Forest for Cornwall will cost c. £25-30m when all costs are factored in. Additionally bids to Government supported national tree planting schemes are being prepared and the Council is also considering development of 'a voluntary carbon offset scheme' for Cornwall. Other Council activities that have been identified as likely benefitting from MEG opportunity maps include: • Management of the Cornwall County farm estate - consisting of 4,525 hectares split into 104 holding. Cornwall's Climate Change Action Plan (6.25) states an intention to make "Council Farms exemplars in low carbon and regenerative agriculture. Delivered through the new Council Farms Strategy - work is being commissioned to explore the potential for our Farms Estate to contribute to Cornwall's goal of becoming carbon neutral and delivering environmental growth". The action plan highlights how natural climate solutions such as tree planting, hedgerow and wetland management and creation can contribute to carbon sequestration. MEG opportunity maps form a key evidence base for informing the development of this change in management. • Informing Cornwall flood mitigation strategy - MEG outputs can be used as an initial 'screening tool' to help identify catchments and areas where habitat creation, as part of a natural flood mitigation strategy, is most likely to deliver the greatest and most wide-ranging strategic benefit. Such catchments where natural flood mitigation schemes can be made to deliver multiple benefits are most likely to present a good financial case through more detailed economic appraisal. The Carbon Action Plan (6.35) also identifies the importance of natural flood management approaches can be used to increase carbon sequestration and deliver improved catchment management, stating that this 'will be initiated by an opportunity mapping exercise'. v. Improved evidence base for Cornwall Council strategy development and delivery - MEG outputs have demonstrated to senior policy makers how spatial environmental information can inform strategy development and delivery. Key documents of the Local Plan 2010-2030, including the Cornwall Local Plan: Strategic Policies 2010-2030 are complete, but supporting guidance, tools and Neighbourhood Plans continue to be developed and there is the potential for MEG outputs to inform additional supporting information and guidance for the delivery of the plan, including development of neighbourhood plans. MEG outputs also enrich the evidence base available for development of Cornwall's 2030-50 local plan strategy that is likely to be responsible for defining the priorities for the allocation of land for developments of c. £19billion in housing value. 5 Delivery of on-line mapping application - lagas.co.uk/app Key outputs: • On-line demo sites presenting different mapping products • Lagas mapping application (https://lagas.co.uk/app) On-line demo sites were used to demonstrate MEG outputs to project partners and others during project activity. Development of the demo sites also proved invaluable in the drawing up of technical specifications and administrative requirements of the Lagas mapping application that was successfully delivered by Vitamin Cornwall after a competitive bidding process managed by MEG and Tevi. The website has received several industry design awards (cssdesignawards.com and awwwards.com). The Lagas webite brings together geospatial information on the relative value of natural assets and services across Cornwall with additional information including microclimate surfaces and potential crop yields under present and future climate conditions. The site provides a single hub of environmental information for a wide range of business sectors, interests and policies. Use of the application will be monitored by the collection of site statistics as part of the Tevi programme. The site is intended as an evolving resource to make the outputs of the research community more readily available to policy makers, business, and to the general public. Website data and statistics will allow us to continue to monitor use and access. Publicity and training events, introducing Lagas to Cornwall Council staff and other audiences, have included: • Cornwall Council event (28 Sep 2020) with 53 attendees; • Cornwall Council event (29 Sep 2020) we had 74 attendees; • Cornwall Wildlife Trust event (5 October 2020) we had 9 attendees. Public access to spatial information about natural capital and services has often been limited. The technical complexity of many natural capital tools has often restricted their wider use and uptake. Lagas provides an accessible resource to allow the communication and administration of natural capital mapping and related research outputs. It is expected that the cross-organisation Environmental Evidence Group will help inform future development of Lagas and identify additional applications or developments of MEG outputs. As mentioned under 4 (above), Lagas is a key evidence base to inform development of Cornwall's pilot Local Nature Recovery Strategies and is expected to have wider influence on the development and delivery of policy by Cornwall Council: "The Lagas natural capital tool provides invaluable new information that will be used by Cornwall Council staff when making decisions on planning, nature protection and recovery. The work of the Tevi team in delivering this environmental Intelligence platform will positively impact nature protection and regeneration and will encourage environmental growth for years to come". Philippa Hoskin - Partnerships & Policy Lead, Environmental Growth Team, Cornwall Council 6 Historic woodland mapping Key outputs: • Report describing the image and geo-analysis methodology and a supporting GIS package of results. Outputs provided a proof of concept for applying advanced image analysis techniques to generate GIS layers for the whole of Cornwall of historic canopy cover from 1st edition Ordnance Survey maps. The mapping informs about the historic extent and location, of woodland cover and highlight how this has increased in the past 150 years, while orchard cover has dramatically declined. Outputs will inform further activities and work of Cornwall Council's Historic environment team and the Forest for Cornwall initiative. An additional field layer output of the work may also be used to inform development of a digitised tithe map (project led by Kresen Kernow) and may also support mapping of historic hedgerows. There has been much interest from within the council to make the map publicly available. After receipt of the outputs, Historic Environment expressed confidence that: "analysis of the data set will lead to significant improvements in the way we assess and understand how landscape has changed over the last hundred years or so." Francis Shepherd, Historic Environment Record Officer, Cornwall Council. The methodology opens the possibility of applying a similar or derived method to extract additional historic habitat layers including, for example, wetlands, heathland, rough pasture, built-up areas, and hedgerows/field boundaries. 7 Evidence for AONB management plan review Key outputs: • Report to AONB and supporting GIS package The outputs form part of the evidence base used for the review of Cornwall AONB 2016-2021 management plan, by identifying strategic opportunities (within and without the AONB area) for habitat restoration/creation and the relative importance of AONB areas in terms of ecosystem service delivery. The AONB Management Plan is a statutory document and a material consideration in relation to planning. The plan sets out policies through which the landscape quality of the AONB can be conserved and enhanced and how sustainable development can take place. The current plan highlights the need to: • Identify the natural capital within the Cornwall AONB; • Connect habitats at a landscape scale; • Take a strategic, landscape based approach to the management, restoration and re-creation of habitats within and beyond the AONB area. A stated aim is to develop a "Natural Capital Investment Plan" for the AONB, which identifies investment opportunities for the enhancement of ecosystem goods and services, highlights geographic opportunities and demonstrates the value of the protected landscape to inform decision-making. Outputs are also informing work on the Environment Land Management Scheme trial on the Lizard. The maps have been used with landscape character assessment areas to inform discussions with farmers and what their local priorities are and what could be achieved at a landscape scale. The Cornwall AONB Partnership is leading a 'trial' on behalf of Defra that makes use of forward thinking work already carried out by the Partnership to map and describe natural capital and ecosystem services. 8 Fostering wider understanding and debate on the use of natural capital spatial information MEG has contributed to an evolution in strategic decision making among partners and other organisations, particularly in terms of their use of spatial environmental information. Outputs have been presented and discussed at various workshops and cross-agency meetings including at the Cornwall Biodiversity Initiative Nature Recovery Network Mapping and Next Steps (27/11/2019) and at a meeting on ELMs Tests and Trials in Cornwall & discussion about the future (24/07/2020) with Defra officials in attendance. Presentations have generated interest outside of the project's immediate partners, including: • Environment agency expressed interest in the opportunity mapping (and underlying mapping work), as it ties in neatly with their focus on Working with Natural Processes for flood risk reduction. • As part of their contribution to the Tevi programme, Cornwall Wildlife Trust have contracted 7 months work to develop the opportunity mapping method so they can be readily applied to identify opportunities at finer resolutions and for different geographical areas (for example to individual catchments) with all supporting documentation to enhance understanding of the maps and methodology. • Expressions of interest in the maps and methods have been received from several other organisations including Dartmoor National Trust, Devon County Council, Devon and Somerset Wildlife Trusts. • Activities, outputs and lessons learnt from MEG have informed the establishment of the Environmental Growth Evidence Group for Cornwall that seeks to ensure evidence about the environment informs policy development and business activity.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP011: Mainstreaming Environmental Growth 
Organisation Cornwall Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution To evaluate and provide tools for the delivery of Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy.
Collaborator Contribution Advice, steering, identification of data and resources, partner and business assist identification.
Impact 1 Development of tools to assist Tevi programme business engagements Key Outputs: • Tevi 'toolkit' providing a guided interview template and scoring system to inform Tevi business assists. • Maps of Tevi assists, Cornwall business sustainability activities and awards. The toolkit seeks to capture the dependency and impact on natural capital of small and medium-sized enterprises, and the opportunities to implement circular economy business practices. The toolkit scoped out the key issues and approaches prior to the start of the Tevi programme. Since development, the toolkit has evolved in response to the changing needs of the multi-year Tevi programme and experiences of delivering business assists. Outputs have helped the highly acclaimed Tevi programme engage with over 350 small and medium-sized enterprises across Cornwall and provide direct support to 255 businesses, helping to drive progress across the five opportunities identified in the Local Industrial Strategy (LIS) for Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly (CIoS). Direct support delivers expert consultation, opportunities for recognition and certification, and realizing 52 sustainable Business projects through £338K of grant funding. Maps of business activities and winners of various sustainability awards are publicly available on the Lagas application. The maps highlight both the distribution of Tevi assists to SMEs and also identify businesses that are actively seeking to improve their use of natural capital and sustainability. 2 Landcover mapping Key outputs: • Methodology to integrate and improve existing landcover maps; • Enhanced landcover map for Cornwall; • Map of changes to vegetated / non-vegetated landcover in Cornwall over the past 40 years using Landsat data. There is no single or authoritative landcover map for Cornwall. Existing landcover maps and data vary in terms of their availability, date of generation, resolution, classifications, reliability and format. MEG developed a method to integrate existing landcover resources (e.g. CEH, NE, FC, Ordnance Survey and others) and enhance these sources with the use of remote sensing data from Sentinel 1 & 2. The resulting high resolution landcover map enabled the delivery of all other MEG mapping outputs. The maps and methodology also formed a key part of the report and GIS package delivered to Cornwall AONB forming part of the evidence base for review of the AONB management plan. Data licensing restrictions prevent the public delivery of the landcover map via Lagas, but the maps have been made via the Lagas account system on request. The landcover map is also expected to inform the development of the 'Local Habitat Map' that forms part of the Local Nature Recovery Strategy for which Cornwall has been selected as a Defra pilot. Its use and/or future development will be subject to clarification of the MOA and the nature of the "national habitat map" that is to be provided by Government. Cornwall Wildlife Trust has the intention to update their existing 2005 landcover map, and in so doing will consider the methods developed by MEG, including the use of Sentinel remote sensing data. It is likely that these methods may be further developed as part of on-going Cornwall Wildlife Trust contract work resulting from the MEG project. More generally, the outputs highlight the potential of freely-available remote sensing data for monitoring land cover and change as well as the central importance of reliable and suitable landcover maps to any strategic mapping of existing natural resources, services or opportunities. 3 Ecosystem service maps Key outputs: • Ecosystem service provision maps, related landscape risk contribution maps and methodologies. Mapping the landscape contribution to different ecosystem services is highly challenging and no definitive methods or approach exists. MEG built on and further developed existing methods to estimate and map relative landscape contributions to: • Flood risk and mitigation; • Soil erosion; • Soil / runoff pollution risk and mitigation to drinking water, aquaculture and bathing water; • Carbon stock and assimilation; • Pollination services. The outputs enabled the inclusion of ecosystem service information as part of the MEG strategic prioritization and opportunity mapping, while also forming part of the evidence base for review of the AONB management plan and the content of the Lagas website. In doing so, MEG has demonstrated the value of ecosystem service mapping to inform the spatial prioritization of existing natural capital resources and habitat creation opportunities. 4 Strategic prioritisation of natural assets and opportunities outputs Key outputs: • Existing assets prioritisation and linking corridor opportunities map; • Habitat opportunity maps for woodland, wetland and heathland opportunities; • Combined habitat creation opportunities map; • Zoning map for use with CC net-gain planning tool; • Draft Nature Recovery Network map. Key outcomes of the mapping outputs, and current or future impacts, include: i. Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy was launched in 2016, and seeks to ensure natural capital and services are more effectively embedded within Cornwall's Council's activities. MEG has helped deliver the strategy's aim of not only protecting existing natural capital, but also of growing these assets, by identifying areas of Cornwall where habitat restoration or creation is most likely to deliver the greatest strategic benefit in terms of key ecosystem services and improved connectivity. ii. Cornwall Nature Recovery Network -MEG maps have been adopted by Cornwall Local Nature Partnership to form a draft NRN map providing a spatial prioritization of existing natural assets, services and key opportunities for service improvement and habitat (re)creation. Cornwall has been selected to be a national Defra pilot for the production of Local Nature Recovery Strategies, which will be a new requirement for public authorities under the Environment Bill. The map and methods are expected to form the basis of the mapping work to be included in this strategy, due for completion in March 2021 and for which the MOA are currently being finalised. iii. Inclusion as part of Cornwall Council net-gain planning tool - All major developments since March 2020 are required to deliver a demonstrable 10% net gain in biodiversity. By defining the strategic areas used in Cornwall Council's biodiversity net gain tool, MEG is helping deliver this net biodiversity gain and also guiding the allocation of off-site compensation where on-site measures are insufficient to deliver. The planning tool will deliver on the Cornwall 2010-2030 local plan which sets out the scale and distribution of new development across Cornwall and includes commitments for a minimum of 52,500 homes, at an average rate of about 2,625 per year, and 704,000 sq. metre of employment floorspace. The MEG outputs as part of the net-gain tool will therefore help assess / allocate c. £6.5billion of housing stock and targeting investment of biodiversity offsetting from developments to areas of greatest strategic benefit. iv. Helping deliver Cornwall's Climate Change Action Plan - this action plan was approved in July 2019 following the Cornwall Climate Emergency declaration in January 2019 by Cornwall Council. The plan identifies the Forest for Cornwall as a flagship natural climate solution project. The project is a ten-year tree planting scheme to increase canopy cover by approximately 8,000 hectares (2% of Cornwall's land area). It will identify potential sites "by using the best available local information currently being developed by Cornwall Council, the University of Exeter and Environmental Records Centre for Cornwall & the Isles of Scilly". MEG woodland opportunity mapping forms the central aspect of this information while the historic woodland and orchard mapping is also informing the initiative. MEG outputs have already been presented and used at several Forest for Cornwall publicity, workshops and events. The delivery of Forest for Cornwall will cost c. £25-30m when all costs are factored in. Additionally bids to Government supported national tree planting schemes are being prepared and the Council is also considering development of 'a voluntary carbon offset scheme' for Cornwall. Other Council activities that have been identified as likely benefitting from MEG opportunity maps include: • Management of the Cornwall County farm estate - consisting of 4,525 hectares split into 104 holding. Cornwall's Climate Change Action Plan (6.25) states an intention to make "Council Farms exemplars in low carbon and regenerative agriculture. Delivered through the new Council Farms Strategy - work is being commissioned to explore the potential for our Farms Estate to contribute to Cornwall's goal of becoming carbon neutral and delivering environmental growth". The action plan highlights how natural climate solutions such as tree planting, hedgerow and wetland management and creation can contribute to carbon sequestration. MEG opportunity maps form a key evidence base for informing the development of this change in management. • Informing Cornwall flood mitigation strategy - MEG outputs can be used as an initial 'screening tool' to help identify catchments and areas where habitat creation, as part of a natural flood mitigation strategy, is most likely to deliver the greatest and most wide-ranging strategic benefit. Such catchments where natural flood mitigation schemes can be made to deliver multiple benefits are most likely to present a good financial case through more detailed economic appraisal. The Carbon Action Plan (6.35) also identifies the importance of natural flood management approaches can be used to increase carbon sequestration and deliver improved catchment management, stating that this 'will be initiated by an opportunity mapping exercise'. v. Improved evidence base for Cornwall Council strategy development and delivery - MEG outputs have demonstrated to senior policy makers how spatial environmental information can inform strategy development and delivery. Key documents of the Local Plan 2010-2030, including the Cornwall Local Plan: Strategic Policies 2010-2030 are complete, but supporting guidance, tools and Neighbourhood Plans continue to be developed and there is the potential for MEG outputs to inform additional supporting information and guidance for the delivery of the plan, including development of neighbourhood plans. MEG outputs also enrich the evidence base available for development of Cornwall's 2030-50 local plan strategy that is likely to be responsible for defining the priorities for the allocation of land for developments of c. £19billion in housing value. 5 Delivery of on-line mapping application - lagas.co.uk/app Key outputs: • On-line demo sites presenting different mapping products • Lagas mapping application (https://lagas.co.uk/app) On-line demo sites were used to demonstrate MEG outputs to project partners and others during project activity. Development of the demo sites also proved invaluable in the drawing up of technical specifications and administrative requirements of the Lagas mapping application that was successfully delivered by Vitamin Cornwall after a competitive bidding process managed by MEG and Tevi. The website has received several industry design awards (cssdesignawards.com and awwwards.com). The Lagas webite brings together geospatial information on the relative value of natural assets and services across Cornwall with additional information including microclimate surfaces and potential crop yields under present and future climate conditions. The site provides a single hub of environmental information for a wide range of business sectors, interests and policies. Use of the application will be monitored by the collection of site statistics as part of the Tevi programme. The site is intended as an evolving resource to make the outputs of the research community more readily available to policy makers, business, and to the general public. Website data and statistics will allow us to continue to monitor use and access. Publicity and training events, introducing Lagas to Cornwall Council staff and other audiences, have included: • Cornwall Council event (28 Sep 2020) with 53 attendees; • Cornwall Council event (29 Sep 2020) we had 74 attendees; • Cornwall Wildlife Trust event (5 October 2020) we had 9 attendees. Public access to spatial information about natural capital and services has often been limited. The technical complexity of many natural capital tools has often restricted their wider use and uptake. Lagas provides an accessible resource to allow the communication and administration of natural capital mapping and related research outputs. It is expected that the cross-organisation Environmental Evidence Group will help inform future development of Lagas and identify additional applications or developments of MEG outputs. As mentioned under 4 (above), Lagas is a key evidence base to inform development of Cornwall's pilot Local Nature Recovery Strategies and is expected to have wider influence on the development and delivery of policy by Cornwall Council: "The Lagas natural capital tool provides invaluable new information that will be used by Cornwall Council staff when making decisions on planning, nature protection and recovery. The work of the Tevi team in delivering this environmental Intelligence platform will positively impact nature protection and regeneration and will encourage environmental growth for years to come". Philippa Hoskin - Partnerships & Policy Lead, Environmental Growth Team, Cornwall Council 6 Historic woodland mapping Key outputs: • Report describing the image and geo-analysis methodology and a supporting GIS package of results. Outputs provided a proof of concept for applying advanced image analysis techniques to generate GIS layers for the whole of Cornwall of historic canopy cover from 1st edition Ordnance Survey maps. The mapping informs about the historic extent and location, of woodland cover and highlight how this has increased in the past 150 years, while orchard cover has dramatically declined. Outputs will inform further activities and work of Cornwall Council's Historic environment team and the Forest for Cornwall initiative. An additional field layer output of the work may also be used to inform development of a digitised tithe map (project led by Kresen Kernow) and may also support mapping of historic hedgerows. There has been much interest from within the council to make the map publicly available. After receipt of the outputs, Historic Environment expressed confidence that: "analysis of the data set will lead to significant improvements in the way we assess and understand how landscape has changed over the last hundred years or so." Francis Shepherd, Historic Environment Record Officer, Cornwall Council. The methodology opens the possibility of applying a similar or derived method to extract additional historic habitat layers including, for example, wetlands, heathland, rough pasture, built-up areas, and hedgerows/field boundaries. 7 Evidence for AONB management plan review Key outputs: • Report to AONB and supporting GIS package The outputs form part of the evidence base used for the review of Cornwall AONB 2016-2021 management plan, by identifying strategic opportunities (within and without the AONB area) for habitat restoration/creation and the relative importance of AONB areas in terms of ecosystem service delivery. The AONB Management Plan is a statutory document and a material consideration in relation to planning. The plan sets out policies through which the landscape quality of the AONB can be conserved and enhanced and how sustainable development can take place. The current plan highlights the need to: • Identify the natural capital within the Cornwall AONB; • Connect habitats at a landscape scale; • Take a strategic, landscape based approach to the management, restoration and re-creation of habitats within and beyond the AONB area. A stated aim is to develop a "Natural Capital Investment Plan" for the AONB, which identifies investment opportunities for the enhancement of ecosystem goods and services, highlights geographic opportunities and demonstrates the value of the protected landscape to inform decision-making. Outputs are also informing work on the Environment Land Management Scheme trial on the Lizard. The maps have been used with landscape character assessment areas to inform discussions with farmers and what their local priorities are and what could be achieved at a landscape scale. The Cornwall AONB Partnership is leading a 'trial' on behalf of Defra that makes use of forward thinking work already carried out by the Partnership to map and describe natural capital and ecosystem services. 8 Fostering wider understanding and debate on the use of natural capital spatial information MEG has contributed to an evolution in strategic decision making among partners and other organisations, particularly in terms of their use of spatial environmental information. Outputs have been presented and discussed at various workshops and cross-agency meetings including at the Cornwall Biodiversity Initiative Nature Recovery Network Mapping and Next Steps (27/11/2019) and at a meeting on ELMs Tests and Trials in Cornwall & discussion about the future (24/07/2020) with Defra officials in attendance. Presentations have generated interest outside of the project's immediate partners, including: • Environment agency expressed interest in the opportunity mapping (and underlying mapping work), as it ties in neatly with their focus on Working with Natural Processes for flood risk reduction. • As part of their contribution to the Tevi programme, Cornwall Wildlife Trust have contracted 7 months work to develop the opportunity mapping method so they can be readily applied to identify opportunities at finer resolutions and for different geographical areas (for example to individual catchments) with all supporting documentation to enhance understanding of the maps and methodology. • Expressions of interest in the maps and methods have been received from several other organisations including Dartmoor National Trust, Devon County Council, Devon and Somerset Wildlife Trusts. • Activities, outputs and lessons learnt from MEG have informed the establishment of the Environmental Growth Evidence Group for Cornwall that seeks to ensure evidence about the environment informs policy development and business activity.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP011: Mainstreaming Environmental Growth 
Organisation Cornwall Development Company
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution To evaluate and provide tools for the delivery of Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy.
Collaborator Contribution Advice, steering, identification of data and resources, partner and business assist identification.
Impact 1 Development of tools to assist Tevi programme business engagements Key Outputs: • Tevi 'toolkit' providing a guided interview template and scoring system to inform Tevi business assists. • Maps of Tevi assists, Cornwall business sustainability activities and awards. The toolkit seeks to capture the dependency and impact on natural capital of small and medium-sized enterprises, and the opportunities to implement circular economy business practices. The toolkit scoped out the key issues and approaches prior to the start of the Tevi programme. Since development, the toolkit has evolved in response to the changing needs of the multi-year Tevi programme and experiences of delivering business assists. Outputs have helped the highly acclaimed Tevi programme engage with over 350 small and medium-sized enterprises across Cornwall and provide direct support to 255 businesses, helping to drive progress across the five opportunities identified in the Local Industrial Strategy (LIS) for Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly (CIoS). Direct support delivers expert consultation, opportunities for recognition and certification, and realizing 52 sustainable Business projects through £338K of grant funding. Maps of business activities and winners of various sustainability awards are publicly available on the Lagas application. The maps highlight both the distribution of Tevi assists to SMEs and also identify businesses that are actively seeking to improve their use of natural capital and sustainability. 2 Landcover mapping Key outputs: • Methodology to integrate and improve existing landcover maps; • Enhanced landcover map for Cornwall; • Map of changes to vegetated / non-vegetated landcover in Cornwall over the past 40 years using Landsat data. There is no single or authoritative landcover map for Cornwall. Existing landcover maps and data vary in terms of their availability, date of generation, resolution, classifications, reliability and format. MEG developed a method to integrate existing landcover resources (e.g. CEH, NE, FC, Ordnance Survey and others) and enhance these sources with the use of remote sensing data from Sentinel 1 & 2. The resulting high resolution landcover map enabled the delivery of all other MEG mapping outputs. The maps and methodology also formed a key part of the report and GIS package delivered to Cornwall AONB forming part of the evidence base for review of the AONB management plan. Data licensing restrictions prevent the public delivery of the landcover map via Lagas, but the maps have been made via the Lagas account system on request. The landcover map is also expected to inform the development of the 'Local Habitat Map' that forms part of the Local Nature Recovery Strategy for which Cornwall has been selected as a Defra pilot. Its use and/or future development will be subject to clarification of the MOA and the nature of the "national habitat map" that is to be provided by Government. Cornwall Wildlife Trust has the intention to update their existing 2005 landcover map, and in so doing will consider the methods developed by MEG, including the use of Sentinel remote sensing data. It is likely that these methods may be further developed as part of on-going Cornwall Wildlife Trust contract work resulting from the MEG project. More generally, the outputs highlight the potential of freely-available remote sensing data for monitoring land cover and change as well as the central importance of reliable and suitable landcover maps to any strategic mapping of existing natural resources, services or opportunities. 3 Ecosystem service maps Key outputs: • Ecosystem service provision maps, related landscape risk contribution maps and methodologies. Mapping the landscape contribution to different ecosystem services is highly challenging and no definitive methods or approach exists. MEG built on and further developed existing methods to estimate and map relative landscape contributions to: • Flood risk and mitigation; • Soil erosion; • Soil / runoff pollution risk and mitigation to drinking water, aquaculture and bathing water; • Carbon stock and assimilation; • Pollination services. The outputs enabled the inclusion of ecosystem service information as part of the MEG strategic prioritization and opportunity mapping, while also forming part of the evidence base for review of the AONB management plan and the content of the Lagas website. In doing so, MEG has demonstrated the value of ecosystem service mapping to inform the spatial prioritization of existing natural capital resources and habitat creation opportunities. 4 Strategic prioritisation of natural assets and opportunities outputs Key outputs: • Existing assets prioritisation and linking corridor opportunities map; • Habitat opportunity maps for woodland, wetland and heathland opportunities; • Combined habitat creation opportunities map; • Zoning map for use with CC net-gain planning tool; • Draft Nature Recovery Network map. Key outcomes of the mapping outputs, and current or future impacts, include: i. Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy was launched in 2016, and seeks to ensure natural capital and services are more effectively embedded within Cornwall's Council's activities. MEG has helped deliver the strategy's aim of not only protecting existing natural capital, but also of growing these assets, by identifying areas of Cornwall where habitat restoration or creation is most likely to deliver the greatest strategic benefit in terms of key ecosystem services and improved connectivity. ii. Cornwall Nature Recovery Network -MEG maps have been adopted by Cornwall Local Nature Partnership to form a draft NRN map providing a spatial prioritization of existing natural assets, services and key opportunities for service improvement and habitat (re)creation. Cornwall has been selected to be a national Defra pilot for the production of Local Nature Recovery Strategies, which will be a new requirement for public authorities under the Environment Bill. The map and methods are expected to form the basis of the mapping work to be included in this strategy, due for completion in March 2021 and for which the MOA are currently being finalised. iii. Inclusion as part of Cornwall Council net-gain planning tool - All major developments since March 2020 are required to deliver a demonstrable 10% net gain in biodiversity. By defining the strategic areas used in Cornwall Council's biodiversity net gain tool, MEG is helping deliver this net biodiversity gain and also guiding the allocation of off-site compensation where on-site measures are insufficient to deliver. The planning tool will deliver on the Cornwall 2010-2030 local plan which sets out the scale and distribution of new development across Cornwall and includes commitments for a minimum of 52,500 homes, at an average rate of about 2,625 per year, and 704,000 sq. metre of employment floorspace. The MEG outputs as part of the net-gain tool will therefore help assess / allocate c. £6.5billion of housing stock and targeting investment of biodiversity offsetting from developments to areas of greatest strategic benefit. iv. Helping deliver Cornwall's Climate Change Action Plan - this action plan was approved in July 2019 following the Cornwall Climate Emergency declaration in January 2019 by Cornwall Council. The plan identifies the Forest for Cornwall as a flagship natural climate solution project. The project is a ten-year tree planting scheme to increase canopy cover by approximately 8,000 hectares (2% of Cornwall's land area). It will identify potential sites "by using the best available local information currently being developed by Cornwall Council, the University of Exeter and Environmental Records Centre for Cornwall & the Isles of Scilly". MEG woodland opportunity mapping forms the central aspect of this information while the historic woodland and orchard mapping is also informing the initiative. MEG outputs have already been presented and used at several Forest for Cornwall publicity, workshops and events. The delivery of Forest for Cornwall will cost c. £25-30m when all costs are factored in. Additionally bids to Government supported national tree planting schemes are being prepared and the Council is also considering development of 'a voluntary carbon offset scheme' for Cornwall. Other Council activities that have been identified as likely benefitting from MEG opportunity maps include: • Management of the Cornwall County farm estate - consisting of 4,525 hectares split into 104 holding. Cornwall's Climate Change Action Plan (6.25) states an intention to make "Council Farms exemplars in low carbon and regenerative agriculture. Delivered through the new Council Farms Strategy - work is being commissioned to explore the potential for our Farms Estate to contribute to Cornwall's goal of becoming carbon neutral and delivering environmental growth". The action plan highlights how natural climate solutions such as tree planting, hedgerow and wetland management and creation can contribute to carbon sequestration. MEG opportunity maps form a key evidence base for informing the development of this change in management. • Informing Cornwall flood mitigation strategy - MEG outputs can be used as an initial 'screening tool' to help identify catchments and areas where habitat creation, as part of a natural flood mitigation strategy, is most likely to deliver the greatest and most wide-ranging strategic benefit. Such catchments where natural flood mitigation schemes can be made to deliver multiple benefits are most likely to present a good financial case through more detailed economic appraisal. The Carbon Action Plan (6.35) also identifies the importance of natural flood management approaches can be used to increase carbon sequestration and deliver improved catchment management, stating that this 'will be initiated by an opportunity mapping exercise'. v. Improved evidence base for Cornwall Council strategy development and delivery - MEG outputs have demonstrated to senior policy makers how spatial environmental information can inform strategy development and delivery. Key documents of the Local Plan 2010-2030, including the Cornwall Local Plan: Strategic Policies 2010-2030 are complete, but supporting guidance, tools and Neighbourhood Plans continue to be developed and there is the potential for MEG outputs to inform additional supporting information and guidance for the delivery of the plan, including development of neighbourhood plans. MEG outputs also enrich the evidence base available for development of Cornwall's 2030-50 local plan strategy that is likely to be responsible for defining the priorities for the allocation of land for developments of c. £19billion in housing value. 5 Delivery of on-line mapping application - lagas.co.uk/app Key outputs: • On-line demo sites presenting different mapping products • Lagas mapping application (https://lagas.co.uk/app) On-line demo sites were used to demonstrate MEG outputs to project partners and others during project activity. Development of the demo sites also proved invaluable in the drawing up of technical specifications and administrative requirements of the Lagas mapping application that was successfully delivered by Vitamin Cornwall after a competitive bidding process managed by MEG and Tevi. The website has received several industry design awards (cssdesignawards.com and awwwards.com). The Lagas webite brings together geospatial information on the relative value of natural assets and services across Cornwall with additional information including microclimate surfaces and potential crop yields under present and future climate conditions. The site provides a single hub of environmental information for a wide range of business sectors, interests and policies. Use of the application will be monitored by the collection of site statistics as part of the Tevi programme. The site is intended as an evolving resource to make the outputs of the research community more readily available to policy makers, business, and to the general public. Website data and statistics will allow us to continue to monitor use and access. Publicity and training events, introducing Lagas to Cornwall Council staff and other audiences, have included: • Cornwall Council event (28 Sep 2020) with 53 attendees; • Cornwall Council event (29 Sep 2020) we had 74 attendees; • Cornwall Wildlife Trust event (5 October 2020) we had 9 attendees. Public access to spatial information about natural capital and services has often been limited. The technical complexity of many natural capital tools has often restricted their wider use and uptake. Lagas provides an accessible resource to allow the communication and administration of natural capital mapping and related research outputs. It is expected that the cross-organisation Environmental Evidence Group will help inform future development of Lagas and identify additional applications or developments of MEG outputs. As mentioned under 4 (above), Lagas is a key evidence base to inform development of Cornwall's pilot Local Nature Recovery Strategies and is expected to have wider influence on the development and delivery of policy by Cornwall Council: "The Lagas natural capital tool provides invaluable new information that will be used by Cornwall Council staff when making decisions on planning, nature protection and recovery. The work of the Tevi team in delivering this environmental Intelligence platform will positively impact nature protection and regeneration and will encourage environmental growth for years to come". Philippa Hoskin - Partnerships & Policy Lead, Environmental Growth Team, Cornwall Council 6 Historic woodland mapping Key outputs: • Report describing the image and geo-analysis methodology and a supporting GIS package of results. Outputs provided a proof of concept for applying advanced image analysis techniques to generate GIS layers for the whole of Cornwall of historic canopy cover from 1st edition Ordnance Survey maps. The mapping informs about the historic extent and location, of woodland cover and highlight how this has increased in the past 150 years, while orchard cover has dramatically declined. Outputs will inform further activities and work of Cornwall Council's Historic environment team and the Forest for Cornwall initiative. An additional field layer output of the work may also be used to inform development of a digitised tithe map (project led by Kresen Kernow) and may also support mapping of historic hedgerows. There has been much interest from within the council to make the map publicly available. After receipt of the outputs, Historic Environment expressed confidence that: "analysis of the data set will lead to significant improvements in the way we assess and understand how landscape has changed over the last hundred years or so." Francis Shepherd, Historic Environment Record Officer, Cornwall Council. The methodology opens the possibility of applying a similar or derived method to extract additional historic habitat layers including, for example, wetlands, heathland, rough pasture, built-up areas, and hedgerows/field boundaries. 7 Evidence for AONB management plan review Key outputs: • Report to AONB and supporting GIS package The outputs form part of the evidence base used for the review of Cornwall AONB 2016-2021 management plan, by identifying strategic opportunities (within and without the AONB area) for habitat restoration/creation and the relative importance of AONB areas in terms of ecosystem service delivery. The AONB Management Plan is a statutory document and a material consideration in relation to planning. The plan sets out policies through which the landscape quality of the AONB can be conserved and enhanced and how sustainable development can take place. The current plan highlights the need to: • Identify the natural capital within the Cornwall AONB; • Connect habitats at a landscape scale; • Take a strategic, landscape based approach to the management, restoration and re-creation of habitats within and beyond the AONB area. A stated aim is to develop a "Natural Capital Investment Plan" for the AONB, which identifies investment opportunities for the enhancement of ecosystem goods and services, highlights geographic opportunities and demonstrates the value of the protected landscape to inform decision-making. Outputs are also informing work on the Environment Land Management Scheme trial on the Lizard. The maps have been used with landscape character assessment areas to inform discussions with farmers and what their local priorities are and what could be achieved at a landscape scale. The Cornwall AONB Partnership is leading a 'trial' on behalf of Defra that makes use of forward thinking work already carried out by the Partnership to map and describe natural capital and ecosystem services. 8 Fostering wider understanding and debate on the use of natural capital spatial information MEG has contributed to an evolution in strategic decision making among partners and other organisations, particularly in terms of their use of spatial environmental information. Outputs have been presented and discussed at various workshops and cross-agency meetings including at the Cornwall Biodiversity Initiative Nature Recovery Network Mapping and Next Steps (27/11/2019) and at a meeting on ELMs Tests and Trials in Cornwall & discussion about the future (24/07/2020) with Defra officials in attendance. Presentations have generated interest outside of the project's immediate partners, including: • Environment agency expressed interest in the opportunity mapping (and underlying mapping work), as it ties in neatly with their focus on Working with Natural Processes for flood risk reduction. • As part of their contribution to the Tevi programme, Cornwall Wildlife Trust have contracted 7 months work to develop the opportunity mapping method so they can be readily applied to identify opportunities at finer resolutions and for different geographical areas (for example to individual catchments) with all supporting documentation to enhance understanding of the maps and methodology. • Expressions of interest in the maps and methods have been received from several other organisations including Dartmoor National Trust, Devon County Council, Devon and Somerset Wildlife Trusts. • Activities, outputs and lessons learnt from MEG have informed the establishment of the Environmental Growth Evidence Group for Cornwall that seeks to ensure evidence about the environment informs policy development and business activity.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP011: Mainstreaming Environmental Growth 
Organisation Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Local Nature Partnership
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution To evaluate and provide tools for the delivery of Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy.
Collaborator Contribution Advice, steering, identification of data and resources, partner and business assist identification.
Impact 1 Development of tools to assist Tevi programme business engagements Key Outputs: • Tevi 'toolkit' providing a guided interview template and scoring system to inform Tevi business assists. • Maps of Tevi assists, Cornwall business sustainability activities and awards. The toolkit seeks to capture the dependency and impact on natural capital of small and medium-sized enterprises, and the opportunities to implement circular economy business practices. The toolkit scoped out the key issues and approaches prior to the start of the Tevi programme. Since development, the toolkit has evolved in response to the changing needs of the multi-year Tevi programme and experiences of delivering business assists. Outputs have helped the highly acclaimed Tevi programme engage with over 350 small and medium-sized enterprises across Cornwall and provide direct support to 255 businesses, helping to drive progress across the five opportunities identified in the Local Industrial Strategy (LIS) for Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly (CIoS). Direct support delivers expert consultation, opportunities for recognition and certification, and realizing 52 sustainable Business projects through £338K of grant funding. Maps of business activities and winners of various sustainability awards are publicly available on the Lagas application. The maps highlight both the distribution of Tevi assists to SMEs and also identify businesses that are actively seeking to improve their use of natural capital and sustainability. 2 Landcover mapping Key outputs: • Methodology to integrate and improve existing landcover maps; • Enhanced landcover map for Cornwall; • Map of changes to vegetated / non-vegetated landcover in Cornwall over the past 40 years using Landsat data. There is no single or authoritative landcover map for Cornwall. Existing landcover maps and data vary in terms of their availability, date of generation, resolution, classifications, reliability and format. MEG developed a method to integrate existing landcover resources (e.g. CEH, NE, FC, Ordnance Survey and others) and enhance these sources with the use of remote sensing data from Sentinel 1 & 2. The resulting high resolution landcover map enabled the delivery of all other MEG mapping outputs. The maps and methodology also formed a key part of the report and GIS package delivered to Cornwall AONB forming part of the evidence base for review of the AONB management plan. Data licensing restrictions prevent the public delivery of the landcover map via Lagas, but the maps have been made via the Lagas account system on request. The landcover map is also expected to inform the development of the 'Local Habitat Map' that forms part of the Local Nature Recovery Strategy for which Cornwall has been selected as a Defra pilot. Its use and/or future development will be subject to clarification of the MOA and the nature of the "national habitat map" that is to be provided by Government. Cornwall Wildlife Trust has the intention to update their existing 2005 landcover map, and in so doing will consider the methods developed by MEG, including the use of Sentinel remote sensing data. It is likely that these methods may be further developed as part of on-going Cornwall Wildlife Trust contract work resulting from the MEG project. More generally, the outputs highlight the potential of freely-available remote sensing data for monitoring land cover and change as well as the central importance of reliable and suitable landcover maps to any strategic mapping of existing natural resources, services or opportunities. 3 Ecosystem service maps Key outputs: • Ecosystem service provision maps, related landscape risk contribution maps and methodologies. Mapping the landscape contribution to different ecosystem services is highly challenging and no definitive methods or approach exists. MEG built on and further developed existing methods to estimate and map relative landscape contributions to: • Flood risk and mitigation; • Soil erosion; • Soil / runoff pollution risk and mitigation to drinking water, aquaculture and bathing water; • Carbon stock and assimilation; • Pollination services. The outputs enabled the inclusion of ecosystem service information as part of the MEG strategic prioritization and opportunity mapping, while also forming part of the evidence base for review of the AONB management plan and the content of the Lagas website. In doing so, MEG has demonstrated the value of ecosystem service mapping to inform the spatial prioritization of existing natural capital resources and habitat creation opportunities. 4 Strategic prioritisation of natural assets and opportunities outputs Key outputs: • Existing assets prioritisation and linking corridor opportunities map; • Habitat opportunity maps for woodland, wetland and heathland opportunities; • Combined habitat creation opportunities map; • Zoning map for use with CC net-gain planning tool; • Draft Nature Recovery Network map. Key outcomes of the mapping outputs, and current or future impacts, include: i. Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy was launched in 2016, and seeks to ensure natural capital and services are more effectively embedded within Cornwall's Council's activities. MEG has helped deliver the strategy's aim of not only protecting existing natural capital, but also of growing these assets, by identifying areas of Cornwall where habitat restoration or creation is most likely to deliver the greatest strategic benefit in terms of key ecosystem services and improved connectivity. ii. Cornwall Nature Recovery Network -MEG maps have been adopted by Cornwall Local Nature Partnership to form a draft NRN map providing a spatial prioritization of existing natural assets, services and key opportunities for service improvement and habitat (re)creation. Cornwall has been selected to be a national Defra pilot for the production of Local Nature Recovery Strategies, which will be a new requirement for public authorities under the Environment Bill. The map and methods are expected to form the basis of the mapping work to be included in this strategy, due for completion in March 2021 and for which the MOA are currently being finalised. iii. Inclusion as part of Cornwall Council net-gain planning tool - All major developments since March 2020 are required to deliver a demonstrable 10% net gain in biodiversity. By defining the strategic areas used in Cornwall Council's biodiversity net gain tool, MEG is helping deliver this net biodiversity gain and also guiding the allocation of off-site compensation where on-site measures are insufficient to deliver. The planning tool will deliver on the Cornwall 2010-2030 local plan which sets out the scale and distribution of new development across Cornwall and includes commitments for a minimum of 52,500 homes, at an average rate of about 2,625 per year, and 704,000 sq. metre of employment floorspace. The MEG outputs as part of the net-gain tool will therefore help assess / allocate c. £6.5billion of housing stock and targeting investment of biodiversity offsetting from developments to areas of greatest strategic benefit. iv. Helping deliver Cornwall's Climate Change Action Plan - this action plan was approved in July 2019 following the Cornwall Climate Emergency declaration in January 2019 by Cornwall Council. The plan identifies the Forest for Cornwall as a flagship natural climate solution project. The project is a ten-year tree planting scheme to increase canopy cover by approximately 8,000 hectares (2% of Cornwall's land area). It will identify potential sites "by using the best available local information currently being developed by Cornwall Council, the University of Exeter and Environmental Records Centre for Cornwall & the Isles of Scilly". MEG woodland opportunity mapping forms the central aspect of this information while the historic woodland and orchard mapping is also informing the initiative. MEG outputs have already been presented and used at several Forest for Cornwall publicity, workshops and events. The delivery of Forest for Cornwall will cost c. £25-30m when all costs are factored in. Additionally bids to Government supported national tree planting schemes are being prepared and the Council is also considering development of 'a voluntary carbon offset scheme' for Cornwall. Other Council activities that have been identified as likely benefitting from MEG opportunity maps include: • Management of the Cornwall County farm estate - consisting of 4,525 hectares split into 104 holding. Cornwall's Climate Change Action Plan (6.25) states an intention to make "Council Farms exemplars in low carbon and regenerative agriculture. Delivered through the new Council Farms Strategy - work is being commissioned to explore the potential for our Farms Estate to contribute to Cornwall's goal of becoming carbon neutral and delivering environmental growth". The action plan highlights how natural climate solutions such as tree planting, hedgerow and wetland management and creation can contribute to carbon sequestration. MEG opportunity maps form a key evidence base for informing the development of this change in management. • Informing Cornwall flood mitigation strategy - MEG outputs can be used as an initial 'screening tool' to help identify catchments and areas where habitat creation, as part of a natural flood mitigation strategy, is most likely to deliver the greatest and most wide-ranging strategic benefit. Such catchments where natural flood mitigation schemes can be made to deliver multiple benefits are most likely to present a good financial case through more detailed economic appraisal. The Carbon Action Plan (6.35) also identifies the importance of natural flood management approaches can be used to increase carbon sequestration and deliver improved catchment management, stating that this 'will be initiated by an opportunity mapping exercise'. v. Improved evidence base for Cornwall Council strategy development and delivery - MEG outputs have demonstrated to senior policy makers how spatial environmental information can inform strategy development and delivery. Key documents of the Local Plan 2010-2030, including the Cornwall Local Plan: Strategic Policies 2010-2030 are complete, but supporting guidance, tools and Neighbourhood Plans continue to be developed and there is the potential for MEG outputs to inform additional supporting information and guidance for the delivery of the plan, including development of neighbourhood plans. MEG outputs also enrich the evidence base available for development of Cornwall's 2030-50 local plan strategy that is likely to be responsible for defining the priorities for the allocation of land for developments of c. £19billion in housing value. 5 Delivery of on-line mapping application - lagas.co.uk/app Key outputs: • On-line demo sites presenting different mapping products • Lagas mapping application (https://lagas.co.uk/app) On-line demo sites were used to demonstrate MEG outputs to project partners and others during project activity. Development of the demo sites also proved invaluable in the drawing up of technical specifications and administrative requirements of the Lagas mapping application that was successfully delivered by Vitamin Cornwall after a competitive bidding process managed by MEG and Tevi. The website has received several industry design awards (cssdesignawards.com and awwwards.com). The Lagas webite brings together geospatial information on the relative value of natural assets and services across Cornwall with additional information including microclimate surfaces and potential crop yields under present and future climate conditions. The site provides a single hub of environmental information for a wide range of business sectors, interests and policies. Use of the application will be monitored by the collection of site statistics as part of the Tevi programme. The site is intended as an evolving resource to make the outputs of the research community more readily available to policy makers, business, and to the general public. Website data and statistics will allow us to continue to monitor use and access. Publicity and training events, introducing Lagas to Cornwall Council staff and other audiences, have included: • Cornwall Council event (28 Sep 2020) with 53 attendees; • Cornwall Council event (29 Sep 2020) we had 74 attendees; • Cornwall Wildlife Trust event (5 October 2020) we had 9 attendees. Public access to spatial information about natural capital and services has often been limited. The technical complexity of many natural capital tools has often restricted their wider use and uptake. Lagas provides an accessible resource to allow the communication and administration of natural capital mapping and related research outputs. It is expected that the cross-organisation Environmental Evidence Group will help inform future development of Lagas and identify additional applications or developments of MEG outputs. As mentioned under 4 (above), Lagas is a key evidence base to inform development of Cornwall's pilot Local Nature Recovery Strategies and is expected to have wider influence on the development and delivery of policy by Cornwall Council: "The Lagas natural capital tool provides invaluable new information that will be used by Cornwall Council staff when making decisions on planning, nature protection and recovery. The work of the Tevi team in delivering this environmental Intelligence platform will positively impact nature protection and regeneration and will encourage environmental growth for years to come". Philippa Hoskin - Partnerships & Policy Lead, Environmental Growth Team, Cornwall Council 6 Historic woodland mapping Key outputs: • Report describing the image and geo-analysis methodology and a supporting GIS package of results. Outputs provided a proof of concept for applying advanced image analysis techniques to generate GIS layers for the whole of Cornwall of historic canopy cover from 1st edition Ordnance Survey maps. The mapping informs about the historic extent and location, of woodland cover and highlight how this has increased in the past 150 years, while orchard cover has dramatically declined. Outputs will inform further activities and work of Cornwall Council's Historic environment team and the Forest for Cornwall initiative. An additional field layer output of the work may also be used to inform development of a digitised tithe map (project led by Kresen Kernow) and may also support mapping of historic hedgerows. There has been much interest from within the council to make the map publicly available. After receipt of the outputs, Historic Environment expressed confidence that: "analysis of the data set will lead to significant improvements in the way we assess and understand how landscape has changed over the last hundred years or so." Francis Shepherd, Historic Environment Record Officer, Cornwall Council. The methodology opens the possibility of applying a similar or derived method to extract additional historic habitat layers including, for example, wetlands, heathland, rough pasture, built-up areas, and hedgerows/field boundaries. 7 Evidence for AONB management plan review Key outputs: • Report to AONB and supporting GIS package The outputs form part of the evidence base used for the review of Cornwall AONB 2016-2021 management plan, by identifying strategic opportunities (within and without the AONB area) for habitat restoration/creation and the relative importance of AONB areas in terms of ecosystem service delivery. The AONB Management Plan is a statutory document and a material consideration in relation to planning. The plan sets out policies through which the landscape quality of the AONB can be conserved and enhanced and how sustainable development can take place. The current plan highlights the need to: • Identify the natural capital within the Cornwall AONB; • Connect habitats at a landscape scale; • Take a strategic, landscape based approach to the management, restoration and re-creation of habitats within and beyond the AONB area. A stated aim is to develop a "Natural Capital Investment Plan" for the AONB, which identifies investment opportunities for the enhancement of ecosystem goods and services, highlights geographic opportunities and demonstrates the value of the protected landscape to inform decision-making. Outputs are also informing work on the Environment Land Management Scheme trial on the Lizard. The maps have been used with landscape character assessment areas to inform discussions with farmers and what their local priorities are and what could be achieved at a landscape scale. The Cornwall AONB Partnership is leading a 'trial' on behalf of Defra that makes use of forward thinking work already carried out by the Partnership to map and describe natural capital and ecosystem services. 8 Fostering wider understanding and debate on the use of natural capital spatial information MEG has contributed to an evolution in strategic decision making among partners and other organisations, particularly in terms of their use of spatial environmental information. Outputs have been presented and discussed at various workshops and cross-agency meetings including at the Cornwall Biodiversity Initiative Nature Recovery Network Mapping and Next Steps (27/11/2019) and at a meeting on ELMs Tests and Trials in Cornwall & discussion about the future (24/07/2020) with Defra officials in attendance. Presentations have generated interest outside of the project's immediate partners, including: • Environment agency expressed interest in the opportunity mapping (and underlying mapping work), as it ties in neatly with their focus on Working with Natural Processes for flood risk reduction. • As part of their contribution to the Tevi programme, Cornwall Wildlife Trust have contracted 7 months work to develop the opportunity mapping method so they can be readily applied to identify opportunities at finer resolutions and for different geographical areas (for example to individual catchments) with all supporting documentation to enhance understanding of the maps and methodology. • Expressions of interest in the maps and methods have been received from several other organisations including Dartmoor National Trust, Devon County Council, Devon and Somerset Wildlife Trusts. • Activities, outputs and lessons learnt from MEG have informed the establishment of the Environmental Growth Evidence Group for Cornwall that seeks to ensure evidence about the environment informs policy development and business activity.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP011: Mainstreaming Environmental Growth 
Organisation Natural England
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution To evaluate and provide tools for the delivery of Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy.
Collaborator Contribution Advice, steering, identification of data and resources, partner and business assist identification.
Impact 1 Development of tools to assist Tevi programme business engagements Key Outputs: • Tevi 'toolkit' providing a guided interview template and scoring system to inform Tevi business assists. • Maps of Tevi assists, Cornwall business sustainability activities and awards. The toolkit seeks to capture the dependency and impact on natural capital of small and medium-sized enterprises, and the opportunities to implement circular economy business practices. The toolkit scoped out the key issues and approaches prior to the start of the Tevi programme. Since development, the toolkit has evolved in response to the changing needs of the multi-year Tevi programme and experiences of delivering business assists. Outputs have helped the highly acclaimed Tevi programme engage with over 350 small and medium-sized enterprises across Cornwall and provide direct support to 255 businesses, helping to drive progress across the five opportunities identified in the Local Industrial Strategy (LIS) for Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly (CIoS). Direct support delivers expert consultation, opportunities for recognition and certification, and realizing 52 sustainable Business projects through £338K of grant funding. Maps of business activities and winners of various sustainability awards are publicly available on the Lagas application. The maps highlight both the distribution of Tevi assists to SMEs and also identify businesses that are actively seeking to improve their use of natural capital and sustainability. 2 Landcover mapping Key outputs: • Methodology to integrate and improve existing landcover maps; • Enhanced landcover map for Cornwall; • Map of changes to vegetated / non-vegetated landcover in Cornwall over the past 40 years using Landsat data. There is no single or authoritative landcover map for Cornwall. Existing landcover maps and data vary in terms of their availability, date of generation, resolution, classifications, reliability and format. MEG developed a method to integrate existing landcover resources (e.g. CEH, NE, FC, Ordnance Survey and others) and enhance these sources with the use of remote sensing data from Sentinel 1 & 2. The resulting high resolution landcover map enabled the delivery of all other MEG mapping outputs. The maps and methodology also formed a key part of the report and GIS package delivered to Cornwall AONB forming part of the evidence base for review of the AONB management plan. Data licensing restrictions prevent the public delivery of the landcover map via Lagas, but the maps have been made via the Lagas account system on request. The landcover map is also expected to inform the development of the 'Local Habitat Map' that forms part of the Local Nature Recovery Strategy for which Cornwall has been selected as a Defra pilot. Its use and/or future development will be subject to clarification of the MOA and the nature of the "national habitat map" that is to be provided by Government. Cornwall Wildlife Trust has the intention to update their existing 2005 landcover map, and in so doing will consider the methods developed by MEG, including the use of Sentinel remote sensing data. It is likely that these methods may be further developed as part of on-going Cornwall Wildlife Trust contract work resulting from the MEG project. More generally, the outputs highlight the potential of freely-available remote sensing data for monitoring land cover and change as well as the central importance of reliable and suitable landcover maps to any strategic mapping of existing natural resources, services or opportunities. 3 Ecosystem service maps Key outputs: • Ecosystem service provision maps, related landscape risk contribution maps and methodologies. Mapping the landscape contribution to different ecosystem services is highly challenging and no definitive methods or approach exists. MEG built on and further developed existing methods to estimate and map relative landscape contributions to: • Flood risk and mitigation; • Soil erosion; • Soil / runoff pollution risk and mitigation to drinking water, aquaculture and bathing water; • Carbon stock and assimilation; • Pollination services. The outputs enabled the inclusion of ecosystem service information as part of the MEG strategic prioritization and opportunity mapping, while also forming part of the evidence base for review of the AONB management plan and the content of the Lagas website. In doing so, MEG has demonstrated the value of ecosystem service mapping to inform the spatial prioritization of existing natural capital resources and habitat creation opportunities. 4 Strategic prioritisation of natural assets and opportunities outputs Key outputs: • Existing assets prioritisation and linking corridor opportunities map; • Habitat opportunity maps for woodland, wetland and heathland opportunities; • Combined habitat creation opportunities map; • Zoning map for use with CC net-gain planning tool; • Draft Nature Recovery Network map. Key outcomes of the mapping outputs, and current or future impacts, include: i. Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy was launched in 2016, and seeks to ensure natural capital and services are more effectively embedded within Cornwall's Council's activities. MEG has helped deliver the strategy's aim of not only protecting existing natural capital, but also of growing these assets, by identifying areas of Cornwall where habitat restoration or creation is most likely to deliver the greatest strategic benefit in terms of key ecosystem services and improved connectivity. ii. Cornwall Nature Recovery Network -MEG maps have been adopted by Cornwall Local Nature Partnership to form a draft NRN map providing a spatial prioritization of existing natural assets, services and key opportunities for service improvement and habitat (re)creation. Cornwall has been selected to be a national Defra pilot for the production of Local Nature Recovery Strategies, which will be a new requirement for public authorities under the Environment Bill. The map and methods are expected to form the basis of the mapping work to be included in this strategy, due for completion in March 2021 and for which the MOA are currently being finalised. iii. Inclusion as part of Cornwall Council net-gain planning tool - All major developments since March 2020 are required to deliver a demonstrable 10% net gain in biodiversity. By defining the strategic areas used in Cornwall Council's biodiversity net gain tool, MEG is helping deliver this net biodiversity gain and also guiding the allocation of off-site compensation where on-site measures are insufficient to deliver. The planning tool will deliver on the Cornwall 2010-2030 local plan which sets out the scale and distribution of new development across Cornwall and includes commitments for a minimum of 52,500 homes, at an average rate of about 2,625 per year, and 704,000 sq. metre of employment floorspace. The MEG outputs as part of the net-gain tool will therefore help assess / allocate c. £6.5billion of housing stock and targeting investment of biodiversity offsetting from developments to areas of greatest strategic benefit. iv. Helping deliver Cornwall's Climate Change Action Plan - this action plan was approved in July 2019 following the Cornwall Climate Emergency declaration in January 2019 by Cornwall Council. The plan identifies the Forest for Cornwall as a flagship natural climate solution project. The project is a ten-year tree planting scheme to increase canopy cover by approximately 8,000 hectares (2% of Cornwall's land area). It will identify potential sites "by using the best available local information currently being developed by Cornwall Council, the University of Exeter and Environmental Records Centre for Cornwall & the Isles of Scilly". MEG woodland opportunity mapping forms the central aspect of this information while the historic woodland and orchard mapping is also informing the initiative. MEG outputs have already been presented and used at several Forest for Cornwall publicity, workshops and events. The delivery of Forest for Cornwall will cost c. £25-30m when all costs are factored in. Additionally bids to Government supported national tree planting schemes are being prepared and the Council is also considering development of 'a voluntary carbon offset scheme' for Cornwall. Other Council activities that have been identified as likely benefitting from MEG opportunity maps include: • Management of the Cornwall County farm estate - consisting of 4,525 hectares split into 104 holding. Cornwall's Climate Change Action Plan (6.25) states an intention to make "Council Farms exemplars in low carbon and regenerative agriculture. Delivered through the new Council Farms Strategy - work is being commissioned to explore the potential for our Farms Estate to contribute to Cornwall's goal of becoming carbon neutral and delivering environmental growth". The action plan highlights how natural climate solutions such as tree planting, hedgerow and wetland management and creation can contribute to carbon sequestration. MEG opportunity maps form a key evidence base for informing the development of this change in management. • Informing Cornwall flood mitigation strategy - MEG outputs can be used as an initial 'screening tool' to help identify catchments and areas where habitat creation, as part of a natural flood mitigation strategy, is most likely to deliver the greatest and most wide-ranging strategic benefit. Such catchments where natural flood mitigation schemes can be made to deliver multiple benefits are most likely to present a good financial case through more detailed economic appraisal. The Carbon Action Plan (6.35) also identifies the importance of natural flood management approaches can be used to increase carbon sequestration and deliver improved catchment management, stating that this 'will be initiated by an opportunity mapping exercise'. v. Improved evidence base for Cornwall Council strategy development and delivery - MEG outputs have demonstrated to senior policy makers how spatial environmental information can inform strategy development and delivery. Key documents of the Local Plan 2010-2030, including the Cornwall Local Plan: Strategic Policies 2010-2030 are complete, but supporting guidance, tools and Neighbourhood Plans continue to be developed and there is the potential for MEG outputs to inform additional supporting information and guidance for the delivery of the plan, including development of neighbourhood plans. MEG outputs also enrich the evidence base available for development of Cornwall's 2030-50 local plan strategy that is likely to be responsible for defining the priorities for the allocation of land for developments of c. £19billion in housing value. 5 Delivery of on-line mapping application - lagas.co.uk/app Key outputs: • On-line demo sites presenting different mapping products • Lagas mapping application (https://lagas.co.uk/app) On-line demo sites were used to demonstrate MEG outputs to project partners and others during project activity. Development of the demo sites also proved invaluable in the drawing up of technical specifications and administrative requirements of the Lagas mapping application that was successfully delivered by Vitamin Cornwall after a competitive bidding process managed by MEG and Tevi. The website has received several industry design awards (cssdesignawards.com and awwwards.com). The Lagas webite brings together geospatial information on the relative value of natural assets and services across Cornwall with additional information including microclimate surfaces and potential crop yields under present and future climate conditions. The site provides a single hub of environmental information for a wide range of business sectors, interests and policies. Use of the application will be monitored by the collection of site statistics as part of the Tevi programme. The site is intended as an evolving resource to make the outputs of the research community more readily available to policy makers, business, and to the general public. Website data and statistics will allow us to continue to monitor use and access. Publicity and training events, introducing Lagas to Cornwall Council staff and other audiences, have included: • Cornwall Council event (28 Sep 2020) with 53 attendees; • Cornwall Council event (29 Sep 2020) we had 74 attendees; • Cornwall Wildlife Trust event (5 October 2020) we had 9 attendees. Public access to spatial information about natural capital and services has often been limited. The technical complexity of many natural capital tools has often restricted their wider use and uptake. Lagas provides an accessible resource to allow the communication and administration of natural capital mapping and related research outputs. It is expected that the cross-organisation Environmental Evidence Group will help inform future development of Lagas and identify additional applications or developments of MEG outputs. As mentioned under 4 (above), Lagas is a key evidence base to inform development of Cornwall's pilot Local Nature Recovery Strategies and is expected to have wider influence on the development and delivery of policy by Cornwall Council: "The Lagas natural capital tool provides invaluable new information that will be used by Cornwall Council staff when making decisions on planning, nature protection and recovery. The work of the Tevi team in delivering this environmental Intelligence platform will positively impact nature protection and regeneration and will encourage environmental growth for years to come". Philippa Hoskin - Partnerships & Policy Lead, Environmental Growth Team, Cornwall Council 6 Historic woodland mapping Key outputs: • Report describing the image and geo-analysis methodology and a supporting GIS package of results. Outputs provided a proof of concept for applying advanced image analysis techniques to generate GIS layers for the whole of Cornwall of historic canopy cover from 1st edition Ordnance Survey maps. The mapping informs about the historic extent and location, of woodland cover and highlight how this has increased in the past 150 years, while orchard cover has dramatically declined. Outputs will inform further activities and work of Cornwall Council's Historic environment team and the Forest for Cornwall initiative. An additional field layer output of the work may also be used to inform development of a digitised tithe map (project led by Kresen Kernow) and may also support mapping of historic hedgerows. There has been much interest from within the council to make the map publicly available. After receipt of the outputs, Historic Environment expressed confidence that: "analysis of the data set will lead to significant improvements in the way we assess and understand how landscape has changed over the last hundred years or so." Francis Shepherd, Historic Environment Record Officer, Cornwall Council. The methodology opens the possibility of applying a similar or derived method to extract additional historic habitat layers including, for example, wetlands, heathland, rough pasture, built-up areas, and hedgerows/field boundaries. 7 Evidence for AONB management plan review Key outputs: • Report to AONB and supporting GIS package The outputs form part of the evidence base used for the review of Cornwall AONB 2016-2021 management plan, by identifying strategic opportunities (within and without the AONB area) for habitat restoration/creation and the relative importance of AONB areas in terms of ecosystem service delivery. The AONB Management Plan is a statutory document and a material consideration in relation to planning. The plan sets out policies through which the landscape quality of the AONB can be conserved and enhanced and how sustainable development can take place. The current plan highlights the need to: • Identify the natural capital within the Cornwall AONB; • Connect habitats at a landscape scale; • Take a strategic, landscape based approach to the management, restoration and re-creation of habitats within and beyond the AONB area. A stated aim is to develop a "Natural Capital Investment Plan" for the AONB, which identifies investment opportunities for the enhancement of ecosystem goods and services, highlights geographic opportunities and demonstrates the value of the protected landscape to inform decision-making. Outputs are also informing work on the Environment Land Management Scheme trial on the Lizard. The maps have been used with landscape character assessment areas to inform discussions with farmers and what their local priorities are and what could be achieved at a landscape scale. The Cornwall AONB Partnership is leading a 'trial' on behalf of Defra that makes use of forward thinking work already carried out by the Partnership to map and describe natural capital and ecosystem services. 8 Fostering wider understanding and debate on the use of natural capital spatial information MEG has contributed to an evolution in strategic decision making among partners and other organisations, particularly in terms of their use of spatial environmental information. Outputs have been presented and discussed at various workshops and cross-agency meetings including at the Cornwall Biodiversity Initiative Nature Recovery Network Mapping and Next Steps (27/11/2019) and at a meeting on ELMs Tests and Trials in Cornwall & discussion about the future (24/07/2020) with Defra officials in attendance. Presentations have generated interest outside of the project's immediate partners, including: • Environment agency expressed interest in the opportunity mapping (and underlying mapping work), as it ties in neatly with their focus on Working with Natural Processes for flood risk reduction. • As part of their contribution to the Tevi programme, Cornwall Wildlife Trust have contracted 7 months work to develop the opportunity mapping method so they can be readily applied to identify opportunities at finer resolutions and for different geographical areas (for example to individual catchments) with all supporting documentation to enhance understanding of the maps and methodology. • Expressions of interest in the maps and methods have been received from several other organisations including Dartmoor National Trust, Devon County Council, Devon and Somerset Wildlife Trusts. • Activities, outputs and lessons learnt from MEG have informed the establishment of the Environmental Growth Evidence Group for Cornwall that seeks to ensure evidence about the environment informs policy development and business activity.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP011: Mainstreaming Environmental Growth 
Organisation Tevi - Environmental Growth for Business Project
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution To evaluate and provide tools for the delivery of Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy.
Collaborator Contribution Advice, steering, identification of data and resources, partner and business assist identification.
Impact 1 Development of tools to assist Tevi programme business engagements Key Outputs: • Tevi 'toolkit' providing a guided interview template and scoring system to inform Tevi business assists. • Maps of Tevi assists, Cornwall business sustainability activities and awards. The toolkit seeks to capture the dependency and impact on natural capital of small and medium-sized enterprises, and the opportunities to implement circular economy business practices. The toolkit scoped out the key issues and approaches prior to the start of the Tevi programme. Since development, the toolkit has evolved in response to the changing needs of the multi-year Tevi programme and experiences of delivering business assists. Outputs have helped the highly acclaimed Tevi programme engage with over 350 small and medium-sized enterprises across Cornwall and provide direct support to 255 businesses, helping to drive progress across the five opportunities identified in the Local Industrial Strategy (LIS) for Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly (CIoS). Direct support delivers expert consultation, opportunities for recognition and certification, and realizing 52 sustainable Business projects through £338K of grant funding. Maps of business activities and winners of various sustainability awards are publicly available on the Lagas application. The maps highlight both the distribution of Tevi assists to SMEs and also identify businesses that are actively seeking to improve their use of natural capital and sustainability. 2 Landcover mapping Key outputs: • Methodology to integrate and improve existing landcover maps; • Enhanced landcover map for Cornwall; • Map of changes to vegetated / non-vegetated landcover in Cornwall over the past 40 years using Landsat data. There is no single or authoritative landcover map for Cornwall. Existing landcover maps and data vary in terms of their availability, date of generation, resolution, classifications, reliability and format. MEG developed a method to integrate existing landcover resources (e.g. CEH, NE, FC, Ordnance Survey and others) and enhance these sources with the use of remote sensing data from Sentinel 1 & 2. The resulting high resolution landcover map enabled the delivery of all other MEG mapping outputs. The maps and methodology also formed a key part of the report and GIS package delivered to Cornwall AONB forming part of the evidence base for review of the AONB management plan. Data licensing restrictions prevent the public delivery of the landcover map via Lagas, but the maps have been made via the Lagas account system on request. The landcover map is also expected to inform the development of the 'Local Habitat Map' that forms part of the Local Nature Recovery Strategy for which Cornwall has been selected as a Defra pilot. Its use and/or future development will be subject to clarification of the MOA and the nature of the "national habitat map" that is to be provided by Government. Cornwall Wildlife Trust has the intention to update their existing 2005 landcover map, and in so doing will consider the methods developed by MEG, including the use of Sentinel remote sensing data. It is likely that these methods may be further developed as part of on-going Cornwall Wildlife Trust contract work resulting from the MEG project. More generally, the outputs highlight the potential of freely-available remote sensing data for monitoring land cover and change as well as the central importance of reliable and suitable landcover maps to any strategic mapping of existing natural resources, services or opportunities. 3 Ecosystem service maps Key outputs: • Ecosystem service provision maps, related landscape risk contribution maps and methodologies. Mapping the landscape contribution to different ecosystem services is highly challenging and no definitive methods or approach exists. MEG built on and further developed existing methods to estimate and map relative landscape contributions to: • Flood risk and mitigation; • Soil erosion; • Soil / runoff pollution risk and mitigation to drinking water, aquaculture and bathing water; • Carbon stock and assimilation; • Pollination services. The outputs enabled the inclusion of ecosystem service information as part of the MEG strategic prioritization and opportunity mapping, while also forming part of the evidence base for review of the AONB management plan and the content of the Lagas website. In doing so, MEG has demonstrated the value of ecosystem service mapping to inform the spatial prioritization of existing natural capital resources and habitat creation opportunities. 4 Strategic prioritisation of natural assets and opportunities outputs Key outputs: • Existing assets prioritisation and linking corridor opportunities map; • Habitat opportunity maps for woodland, wetland and heathland opportunities; • Combined habitat creation opportunities map; • Zoning map for use with CC net-gain planning tool; • Draft Nature Recovery Network map. Key outcomes of the mapping outputs, and current or future impacts, include: i. Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy was launched in 2016, and seeks to ensure natural capital and services are more effectively embedded within Cornwall's Council's activities. MEG has helped deliver the strategy's aim of not only protecting existing natural capital, but also of growing these assets, by identifying areas of Cornwall where habitat restoration or creation is most likely to deliver the greatest strategic benefit in terms of key ecosystem services and improved connectivity. ii. Cornwall Nature Recovery Network -MEG maps have been adopted by Cornwall Local Nature Partnership to form a draft NRN map providing a spatial prioritization of existing natural assets, services and key opportunities for service improvement and habitat (re)creation. Cornwall has been selected to be a national Defra pilot for the production of Local Nature Recovery Strategies, which will be a new requirement for public authorities under the Environment Bill. The map and methods are expected to form the basis of the mapping work to be included in this strategy, due for completion in March 2021 and for which the MOA are currently being finalised. iii. Inclusion as part of Cornwall Council net-gain planning tool - All major developments since March 2020 are required to deliver a demonstrable 10% net gain in biodiversity. By defining the strategic areas used in Cornwall Council's biodiversity net gain tool, MEG is helping deliver this net biodiversity gain and also guiding the allocation of off-site compensation where on-site measures are insufficient to deliver. The planning tool will deliver on the Cornwall 2010-2030 local plan which sets out the scale and distribution of new development across Cornwall and includes commitments for a minimum of 52,500 homes, at an average rate of about 2,625 per year, and 704,000 sq. metre of employment floorspace. The MEG outputs as part of the net-gain tool will therefore help assess / allocate c. £6.5billion of housing stock and targeting investment of biodiversity offsetting from developments to areas of greatest strategic benefit. iv. Helping deliver Cornwall's Climate Change Action Plan - this action plan was approved in July 2019 following the Cornwall Climate Emergency declaration in January 2019 by Cornwall Council. The plan identifies the Forest for Cornwall as a flagship natural climate solution project. The project is a ten-year tree planting scheme to increase canopy cover by approximately 8,000 hectares (2% of Cornwall's land area). It will identify potential sites "by using the best available local information currently being developed by Cornwall Council, the University of Exeter and Environmental Records Centre for Cornwall & the Isles of Scilly". MEG woodland opportunity mapping forms the central aspect of this information while the historic woodland and orchard mapping is also informing the initiative. MEG outputs have already been presented and used at several Forest for Cornwall publicity, workshops and events. The delivery of Forest for Cornwall will cost c. £25-30m when all costs are factored in. Additionally bids to Government supported national tree planting schemes are being prepared and the Council is also considering development of 'a voluntary carbon offset scheme' for Cornwall. Other Council activities that have been identified as likely benefitting from MEG opportunity maps include: • Management of the Cornwall County farm estate - consisting of 4,525 hectares split into 104 holding. Cornwall's Climate Change Action Plan (6.25) states an intention to make "Council Farms exemplars in low carbon and regenerative agriculture. Delivered through the new Council Farms Strategy - work is being commissioned to explore the potential for our Farms Estate to contribute to Cornwall's goal of becoming carbon neutral and delivering environmental growth". The action plan highlights how natural climate solutions such as tree planting, hedgerow and wetland management and creation can contribute to carbon sequestration. MEG opportunity maps form a key evidence base for informing the development of this change in management. • Informing Cornwall flood mitigation strategy - MEG outputs can be used as an initial 'screening tool' to help identify catchments and areas where habitat creation, as part of a natural flood mitigation strategy, is most likely to deliver the greatest and most wide-ranging strategic benefit. Such catchments where natural flood mitigation schemes can be made to deliver multiple benefits are most likely to present a good financial case through more detailed economic appraisal. The Carbon Action Plan (6.35) also identifies the importance of natural flood management approaches can be used to increase carbon sequestration and deliver improved catchment management, stating that this 'will be initiated by an opportunity mapping exercise'. v. Improved evidence base for Cornwall Council strategy development and delivery - MEG outputs have demonstrated to senior policy makers how spatial environmental information can inform strategy development and delivery. Key documents of the Local Plan 2010-2030, including the Cornwall Local Plan: Strategic Policies 2010-2030 are complete, but supporting guidance, tools and Neighbourhood Plans continue to be developed and there is the potential for MEG outputs to inform additional supporting information and guidance for the delivery of the plan, including development of neighbourhood plans. MEG outputs also enrich the evidence base available for development of Cornwall's 2030-50 local plan strategy that is likely to be responsible for defining the priorities for the allocation of land for developments of c. £19billion in housing value. 5 Delivery of on-line mapping application - lagas.co.uk/app Key outputs: • On-line demo sites presenting different mapping products • Lagas mapping application (https://lagas.co.uk/app) On-line demo sites were used to demonstrate MEG outputs to project partners and others during project activity. Development of the demo sites also proved invaluable in the drawing up of technical specifications and administrative requirements of the Lagas mapping application that was successfully delivered by Vitamin Cornwall after a competitive bidding process managed by MEG and Tevi. The website has received several industry design awards (cssdesignawards.com and awwwards.com). The Lagas webite brings together geospatial information on the relative value of natural assets and services across Cornwall with additional information including microclimate surfaces and potential crop yields under present and future climate conditions. The site provides a single hub of environmental information for a wide range of business sectors, interests and policies. Use of the application will be monitored by the collection of site statistics as part of the Tevi programme. The site is intended as an evolving resource to make the outputs of the research community more readily available to policy makers, business, and to the general public. Website data and statistics will allow us to continue to monitor use and access. Publicity and training events, introducing Lagas to Cornwall Council staff and other audiences, have included: • Cornwall Council event (28 Sep 2020) with 53 attendees; • Cornwall Council event (29 Sep 2020) we had 74 attendees; • Cornwall Wildlife Trust event (5 October 2020) we had 9 attendees. Public access to spatial information about natural capital and services has often been limited. The technical complexity of many natural capital tools has often restricted their wider use and uptake. Lagas provides an accessible resource to allow the communication and administration of natural capital mapping and related research outputs. It is expected that the cross-organisation Environmental Evidence Group will help inform future development of Lagas and identify additional applications or developments of MEG outputs. As mentioned under 4 (above), Lagas is a key evidence base to inform development of Cornwall's pilot Local Nature Recovery Strategies and is expected to have wider influence on the development and delivery of policy by Cornwall Council: "The Lagas natural capital tool provides invaluable new information that will be used by Cornwall Council staff when making decisions on planning, nature protection and recovery. The work of the Tevi team in delivering this environmental Intelligence platform will positively impact nature protection and regeneration and will encourage environmental growth for years to come". Philippa Hoskin - Partnerships & Policy Lead, Environmental Growth Team, Cornwall Council 6 Historic woodland mapping Key outputs: • Report describing the image and geo-analysis methodology and a supporting GIS package of results. Outputs provided a proof of concept for applying advanced image analysis techniques to generate GIS layers for the whole of Cornwall of historic canopy cover from 1st edition Ordnance Survey maps. The mapping informs about the historic extent and location, of woodland cover and highlight how this has increased in the past 150 years, while orchard cover has dramatically declined. Outputs will inform further activities and work of Cornwall Council's Historic environment team and the Forest for Cornwall initiative. An additional field layer output of the work may also be used to inform development of a digitised tithe map (project led by Kresen Kernow) and may also support mapping of historic hedgerows. There has been much interest from within the council to make the map publicly available. After receipt of the outputs, Historic Environment expressed confidence that: "analysis of the data set will lead to significant improvements in the way we assess and understand how landscape has changed over the last hundred years or so." Francis Shepherd, Historic Environment Record Officer, Cornwall Council. The methodology opens the possibility of applying a similar or derived method to extract additional historic habitat layers including, for example, wetlands, heathland, rough pasture, built-up areas, and hedgerows/field boundaries. 7 Evidence for AONB management plan review Key outputs: • Report to AONB and supporting GIS package The outputs form part of the evidence base used for the review of Cornwall AONB 2016-2021 management plan, by identifying strategic opportunities (within and without the AONB area) for habitat restoration/creation and the relative importance of AONB areas in terms of ecosystem service delivery. The AONB Management Plan is a statutory document and a material consideration in relation to planning. The plan sets out policies through which the landscape quality of the AONB can be conserved and enhanced and how sustainable development can take place. The current plan highlights the need to: • Identify the natural capital within the Cornwall AONB; • Connect habitats at a landscape scale; • Take a strategic, landscape based approach to the management, restoration and re-creation of habitats within and beyond the AONB area. A stated aim is to develop a "Natural Capital Investment Plan" for the AONB, which identifies investment opportunities for the enhancement of ecosystem goods and services, highlights geographic opportunities and demonstrates the value of the protected landscape to inform decision-making. Outputs are also informing work on the Environment Land Management Scheme trial on the Lizard. The maps have been used with landscape character assessment areas to inform discussions with farmers and what their local priorities are and what could be achieved at a landscape scale. The Cornwall AONB Partnership is leading a 'trial' on behalf of Defra that makes use of forward thinking work already carried out by the Partnership to map and describe natural capital and ecosystem services. 8 Fostering wider understanding and debate on the use of natural capital spatial information MEG has contributed to an evolution in strategic decision making among partners and other organisations, particularly in terms of their use of spatial environmental information. Outputs have been presented and discussed at various workshops and cross-agency meetings including at the Cornwall Biodiversity Initiative Nature Recovery Network Mapping and Next Steps (27/11/2019) and at a meeting on ELMs Tests and Trials in Cornwall & discussion about the future (24/07/2020) with Defra officials in attendance. Presentations have generated interest outside of the project's immediate partners, including: • Environment agency expressed interest in the opportunity mapping (and underlying mapping work), as it ties in neatly with their focus on Working with Natural Processes for flood risk reduction. • As part of their contribution to the Tevi programme, Cornwall Wildlife Trust have contracted 7 months work to develop the opportunity mapping method so they can be readily applied to identify opportunities at finer resolutions and for different geographical areas (for example to individual catchments) with all supporting documentation to enhance understanding of the maps and methodology. • Expressions of interest in the maps and methods have been received from several other organisations including Dartmoor National Trust, Devon County Council, Devon and Somerset Wildlife Trusts. • Activities, outputs and lessons learnt from MEG have informed the establishment of the Environmental Growth Evidence Group for Cornwall that seeks to ensure evidence about the environment informs policy development and business activity.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP011: Mainstreaming Environmental Growth 
Organisation The Wildlife Trusts
Department Cornwall Wildlife Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution To evaluate and provide tools for the delivery of Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy.
Collaborator Contribution Advice, steering, identification of data and resources, partner and business assist identification.
Impact 1 Development of tools to assist Tevi programme business engagements Key Outputs: • Tevi 'toolkit' providing a guided interview template and scoring system to inform Tevi business assists. • Maps of Tevi assists, Cornwall business sustainability activities and awards. The toolkit seeks to capture the dependency and impact on natural capital of small and medium-sized enterprises, and the opportunities to implement circular economy business practices. The toolkit scoped out the key issues and approaches prior to the start of the Tevi programme. Since development, the toolkit has evolved in response to the changing needs of the multi-year Tevi programme and experiences of delivering business assists. Outputs have helped the highly acclaimed Tevi programme engage with over 350 small and medium-sized enterprises across Cornwall and provide direct support to 255 businesses, helping to drive progress across the five opportunities identified in the Local Industrial Strategy (LIS) for Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly (CIoS). Direct support delivers expert consultation, opportunities for recognition and certification, and realizing 52 sustainable Business projects through £338K of grant funding. Maps of business activities and winners of various sustainability awards are publicly available on the Lagas application. The maps highlight both the distribution of Tevi assists to SMEs and also identify businesses that are actively seeking to improve their use of natural capital and sustainability. 2 Landcover mapping Key outputs: • Methodology to integrate and improve existing landcover maps; • Enhanced landcover map for Cornwall; • Map of changes to vegetated / non-vegetated landcover in Cornwall over the past 40 years using Landsat data. There is no single or authoritative landcover map for Cornwall. Existing landcover maps and data vary in terms of their availability, date of generation, resolution, classifications, reliability and format. MEG developed a method to integrate existing landcover resources (e.g. CEH, NE, FC, Ordnance Survey and others) and enhance these sources with the use of remote sensing data from Sentinel 1 & 2. The resulting high resolution landcover map enabled the delivery of all other MEG mapping outputs. The maps and methodology also formed a key part of the report and GIS package delivered to Cornwall AONB forming part of the evidence base for review of the AONB management plan. Data licensing restrictions prevent the public delivery of the landcover map via Lagas, but the maps have been made via the Lagas account system on request. The landcover map is also expected to inform the development of the 'Local Habitat Map' that forms part of the Local Nature Recovery Strategy for which Cornwall has been selected as a Defra pilot. Its use and/or future development will be subject to clarification of the MOA and the nature of the "national habitat map" that is to be provided by Government. Cornwall Wildlife Trust has the intention to update their existing 2005 landcover map, and in so doing will consider the methods developed by MEG, including the use of Sentinel remote sensing data. It is likely that these methods may be further developed as part of on-going Cornwall Wildlife Trust contract work resulting from the MEG project. More generally, the outputs highlight the potential of freely-available remote sensing data for monitoring land cover and change as well as the central importance of reliable and suitable landcover maps to any strategic mapping of existing natural resources, services or opportunities. 3 Ecosystem service maps Key outputs: • Ecosystem service provision maps, related landscape risk contribution maps and methodologies. Mapping the landscape contribution to different ecosystem services is highly challenging and no definitive methods or approach exists. MEG built on and further developed existing methods to estimate and map relative landscape contributions to: • Flood risk and mitigation; • Soil erosion; • Soil / runoff pollution risk and mitigation to drinking water, aquaculture and bathing water; • Carbon stock and assimilation; • Pollination services. The outputs enabled the inclusion of ecosystem service information as part of the MEG strategic prioritization and opportunity mapping, while also forming part of the evidence base for review of the AONB management plan and the content of the Lagas website. In doing so, MEG has demonstrated the value of ecosystem service mapping to inform the spatial prioritization of existing natural capital resources and habitat creation opportunities. 4 Strategic prioritisation of natural assets and opportunities outputs Key outputs: • Existing assets prioritisation and linking corridor opportunities map; • Habitat opportunity maps for woodland, wetland and heathland opportunities; • Combined habitat creation opportunities map; • Zoning map for use with CC net-gain planning tool; • Draft Nature Recovery Network map. Key outcomes of the mapping outputs, and current or future impacts, include: i. Cornwall's Environmental Growth Strategy was launched in 2016, and seeks to ensure natural capital and services are more effectively embedded within Cornwall's Council's activities. MEG has helped deliver the strategy's aim of not only protecting existing natural capital, but also of growing these assets, by identifying areas of Cornwall where habitat restoration or creation is most likely to deliver the greatest strategic benefit in terms of key ecosystem services and improved connectivity. ii. Cornwall Nature Recovery Network -MEG maps have been adopted by Cornwall Local Nature Partnership to form a draft NRN map providing a spatial prioritization of existing natural assets, services and key opportunities for service improvement and habitat (re)creation. Cornwall has been selected to be a national Defra pilot for the production of Local Nature Recovery Strategies, which will be a new requirement for public authorities under the Environment Bill. The map and methods are expected to form the basis of the mapping work to be included in this strategy, due for completion in March 2021 and for which the MOA are currently being finalised. iii. Inclusion as part of Cornwall Council net-gain planning tool - All major developments since March 2020 are required to deliver a demonstrable 10% net gain in biodiversity. By defining the strategic areas used in Cornwall Council's biodiversity net gain tool, MEG is helping deliver this net biodiversity gain and also guiding the allocation of off-site compensation where on-site measures are insufficient to deliver. The planning tool will deliver on the Cornwall 2010-2030 local plan which sets out the scale and distribution of new development across Cornwall and includes commitments for a minimum of 52,500 homes, at an average rate of about 2,625 per year, and 704,000 sq. metre of employment floorspace. The MEG outputs as part of the net-gain tool will therefore help assess / allocate c. £6.5billion of housing stock and targeting investment of biodiversity offsetting from developments to areas of greatest strategic benefit. iv. Helping deliver Cornwall's Climate Change Action Plan - this action plan was approved in July 2019 following the Cornwall Climate Emergency declaration in January 2019 by Cornwall Council. The plan identifies the Forest for Cornwall as a flagship natural climate solution project. The project is a ten-year tree planting scheme to increase canopy cover by approximately 8,000 hectares (2% of Cornwall's land area). It will identify potential sites "by using the best available local information currently being developed by Cornwall Council, the University of Exeter and Environmental Records Centre for Cornwall & the Isles of Scilly". MEG woodland opportunity mapping forms the central aspect of this information while the historic woodland and orchard mapping is also informing the initiative. MEG outputs have already been presented and used at several Forest for Cornwall publicity, workshops and events. The delivery of Forest for Cornwall will cost c. £25-30m when all costs are factored in. Additionally bids to Government supported national tree planting schemes are being prepared and the Council is also considering development of 'a voluntary carbon offset scheme' for Cornwall. Other Council activities that have been identified as likely benefitting from MEG opportunity maps include: • Management of the Cornwall County farm estate - consisting of 4,525 hectares split into 104 holding. Cornwall's Climate Change Action Plan (6.25) states an intention to make "Council Farms exemplars in low carbon and regenerative agriculture. Delivered through the new Council Farms Strategy - work is being commissioned to explore the potential for our Farms Estate to contribute to Cornwall's goal of becoming carbon neutral and delivering environmental growth". The action plan highlights how natural climate solutions such as tree planting, hedgerow and wetland management and creation can contribute to carbon sequestration. MEG opportunity maps form a key evidence base for informing the development of this change in management. • Informing Cornwall flood mitigation strategy - MEG outputs can be used as an initial 'screening tool' to help identify catchments and areas where habitat creation, as part of a natural flood mitigation strategy, is most likely to deliver the greatest and most wide-ranging strategic benefit. Such catchments where natural flood mitigation schemes can be made to deliver multiple benefits are most likely to present a good financial case through more detailed economic appraisal. The Carbon Action Plan (6.35) also identifies the importance of natural flood management approaches can be used to increase carbon sequestration and deliver improved catchment management, stating that this 'will be initiated by an opportunity mapping exercise'. v. Improved evidence base for Cornwall Council strategy development and delivery - MEG outputs have demonstrated to senior policy makers how spatial environmental information can inform strategy development and delivery. Key documents of the Local Plan 2010-2030, including the Cornwall Local Plan: Strategic Policies 2010-2030 are complete, but supporting guidance, tools and Neighbourhood Plans continue to be developed and there is the potential for MEG outputs to inform additional supporting information and guidance for the delivery of the plan, including development of neighbourhood plans. MEG outputs also enrich the evidence base available for development of Cornwall's 2030-50 local plan strategy that is likely to be responsible for defining the priorities for the allocation of land for developments of c. £19billion in housing value. 5 Delivery of on-line mapping application - lagas.co.uk/app Key outputs: • On-line demo sites presenting different mapping products • Lagas mapping application (https://lagas.co.uk/app) On-line demo sites were used to demonstrate MEG outputs to project partners and others during project activity. Development of the demo sites also proved invaluable in the drawing up of technical specifications and administrative requirements of the Lagas mapping application that was successfully delivered by Vitamin Cornwall after a competitive bidding process managed by MEG and Tevi. The website has received several industry design awards (cssdesignawards.com and awwwards.com). The Lagas webite brings together geospatial information on the relative value of natural assets and services across Cornwall with additional information including microclimate surfaces and potential crop yields under present and future climate conditions. The site provides a single hub of environmental information for a wide range of business sectors, interests and policies. Use of the application will be monitored by the collection of site statistics as part of the Tevi programme. The site is intended as an evolving resource to make the outputs of the research community more readily available to policy makers, business, and to the general public. Website data and statistics will allow us to continue to monitor use and access. Publicity and training events, introducing Lagas to Cornwall Council staff and other audiences, have included: • Cornwall Council event (28 Sep 2020) with 53 attendees; • Cornwall Council event (29 Sep 2020) we had 74 attendees; • Cornwall Wildlife Trust event (5 October 2020) we had 9 attendees. Public access to spatial information about natural capital and services has often been limited. The technical complexity of many natural capital tools has often restricted their wider use and uptake. Lagas provides an accessible resource to allow the communication and administration of natural capital mapping and related research outputs. It is expected that the cross-organisation Environmental Evidence Group will help inform future development of Lagas and identify additional applications or developments of MEG outputs. As mentioned under 4 (above), Lagas is a key evidence base to inform development of Cornwall's pilot Local Nature Recovery Strategies and is expected to have wider influence on the development and delivery of policy by Cornwall Council: "The Lagas natural capital tool provides invaluable new information that will be used by Cornwall Council staff when making decisions on planning, nature protection and recovery. The work of the Tevi team in delivering this environmental Intelligence platform will positively impact nature protection and regeneration and will encourage environmental growth for years to come". Philippa Hoskin - Partnerships & Policy Lead, Environmental Growth Team, Cornwall Council 6 Historic woodland mapping Key outputs: • Report describing the image and geo-analysis methodology and a supporting GIS package of results. Outputs provided a proof of concept for applying advanced image analysis techniques to generate GIS layers for the whole of Cornwall of historic canopy cover from 1st edition Ordnance Survey maps. The mapping informs about the historic extent and location, of woodland cover and highlight how this has increased in the past 150 years, while orchard cover has dramatically declined. Outputs will inform further activities and work of Cornwall Council's Historic environment team and the Forest for Cornwall initiative. An additional field layer output of the work may also be used to inform development of a digitised tithe map (project led by Kresen Kernow) and may also support mapping of historic hedgerows. There has been much interest from within the council to make the map publicly available. After receipt of the outputs, Historic Environment expressed confidence that: "analysis of the data set will lead to significant improvements in the way we assess and understand how landscape has changed over the last hundred years or so." Francis Shepherd, Historic Environment Record Officer, Cornwall Council. The methodology opens the possibility of applying a similar or derived method to extract additional historic habitat layers including, for example, wetlands, heathland, rough pasture, built-up areas, and hedgerows/field boundaries. 7 Evidence for AONB management plan review Key outputs: • Report to AONB and supporting GIS package The outputs form part of the evidence base used for the review of Cornwall AONB 2016-2021 management plan, by identifying strategic opportunities (within and without the AONB area) for habitat restoration/creation and the relative importance of AONB areas in terms of ecosystem service delivery. The AONB Management Plan is a statutory document and a material consideration in relation to planning. The plan sets out policies through which the landscape quality of the AONB can be conserved and enhanced and how sustainable development can take place. The current plan highlights the need to: • Identify the natural capital within the Cornwall AONB; • Connect habitats at a landscape scale; • Take a strategic, landscape based approach to the management, restoration and re-creation of habitats within and beyond the AONB area. A stated aim is to develop a "Natural Capital Investment Plan" for the AONB, which identifies investment opportunities for the enhancement of ecosystem goods and services, highlights geographic opportunities and demonstrates the value of the protected landscape to inform decision-making. Outputs are also informing work on the Environment Land Management Scheme trial on the Lizard. The maps have been used with landscape character assessment areas to inform discussions with farmers and what their local priorities are and what could be achieved at a landscape scale. The Cornwall AONB Partnership is leading a 'trial' on behalf of Defra that makes use of forward thinking work already carried out by the Partnership to map and describe natural capital and ecosystem services. 8 Fostering wider understanding and debate on the use of natural capital spatial information MEG has contributed to an evolution in strategic decision making among partners and other organisations, particularly in terms of their use of spatial environmental information. Outputs have been presented and discussed at various workshops and cross-agency meetings including at the Cornwall Biodiversity Initiative Nature Recovery Network Mapping and Next Steps (27/11/2019) and at a meeting on ELMs Tests and Trials in Cornwall & discussion about the future (24/07/2020) with Defra officials in attendance. Presentations have generated interest outside of the project's immediate partners, including: • Environment agency expressed interest in the opportunity mapping (and underlying mapping work), as it ties in neatly with their focus on Working with Natural Processes for flood risk reduction. • As part of their contribution to the Tevi programme, Cornwall Wildlife Trust have contracted 7 months work to develop the opportunity mapping method so they can be readily applied to identify opportunities at finer resolutions and for different geographical areas (for example to individual catchments) with all supporting documentation to enhance understanding of the maps and methodology. • Expressions of interest in the maps and methods have been received from several other organisations including Dartmoor National Trust, Devon County Council, Devon and Somerset Wildlife Trusts. • Activities, outputs and lessons learnt from MEG have informed the establishment of the Environmental Growth Evidence Group for Cornwall that seeks to ensure evidence about the environment informs policy development and business activity.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP014: Marine Planning 
Organisation Department For Environment, Food And Rural Affairs (DEFRA)
Department Marine Management Organisation (MMO)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution To identify science needs of the South West marine Plans and match available science to them including mapping of existing information, development and implementation of natural capital assessment (using a natural capital accounting tool) and modelling of scenarios under future Plan options.
Collaborator Contribution Identification of priorities for collaboration: Review of MMO evidence requirements and alignment with PML resources (update: this has been done and forwarded to the MMO Jan 2018). A meeting at the MMO Plymouth office took place in February 2018 to discuss areas for development. A series of subsequent focused meetings around specific themes suggested (e.g. evidence for climate change impacts/eutrophication/changes in water quality) in addition to a workshop (to be hosted by PML).
Impact There were two key outputs from this project, delivered in two stages. Together, these submissions represent a contribution to the MMO evidence requirement 'R009: Impacts of climate change at scales applicable to marine planning'. The first was model projection data that indicates how conditions within the marine environment may diverge from those of the present day in response to climate change for the South West Marine Plan area. The second was an associated report: 'Model projections of marine environmental variables' response to climate change within England's South West Marine Plan Areas (MMO 1169).' The report describes how selected physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the south west's marine environment may change within the time frame of the South West Marine Plan, as indicated by the sophisticated modelling techniques applied by PML. Crucially, the report highlights where changes are projected to be significant, and how these changes may impact upon sectors and receptors (e.g. tourism, aquaculture, the incidence of potentially harmful (invasive) species). The report is likely to influence conservation strategies, planning and licencing activities and decision making, and will contribute more broadly to policy formation related to the South West's marine environment and the economic prosperity of coastal communities.
Start Year 2017
 
Description SWEEP017: Use of NEVO to support the development of England's new Environmental Land Management scheme 
Organisation Department For Environment, Food And Rural Affairs (DEFRA)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution This project will see SWEEP working alongside the Environmental Land Management and Future Farming teams in DEFRA in order to provide the methodology and evidence base to help inform the design of a future Environmental Land Management system for England, a system of payments based on the principle that public money should pay for public goods. In addition, the project provides a vehicle whereby outputs from a number of other SWEEP projects can directly influence that design process.
Collaborator Contribution This project will see SWEEP working alongside the Environmental Land Management and Future Farming teams in DEFRA in order to provide the methodology and evidence base to help inform the design of a future Environmental Land Management system for England, a system of payments based on the principle that public money should pay for public goods. In addition, the project provides a vehicle whereby outputs from a number of other SWEEP projects can directly influence that design process.
Impact on-going
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP019: Water quality management underpinning sustainable aquaculture and its expansion in SW England 
Organisation Centre For Environment, Fisheries And Aquaculture Science
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Support the sustainable expansion of aquaculture in SW England through integrated understanding and management of water quality issues.
Collaborator Contribution Support the sustainable expansion of aquaculture in SW England through integrated understanding and management of water quality issues.
Impact Not to date
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP019: Water quality management underpinning sustainable aquaculture and its expansion in SW England 
Organisation Department For Environment, Food And Rural Affairs (DEFRA)
Department Marine Management Organisation (MMO)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Support the sustainable expansion of aquaculture in SW England through integrated understanding and management of water quality issues.
Collaborator Contribution Support the sustainable expansion of aquaculture in SW England through integrated understanding and management of water quality issues.
Impact Not to date
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP019: Water quality management underpinning sustainable aquaculture and its expansion in SW England 
Organisation Environment Agency
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Support the sustainable expansion of aquaculture in SW England through integrated understanding and management of water quality issues.
Collaborator Contribution Support the sustainable expansion of aquaculture in SW England through integrated understanding and management of water quality issues.
Impact Not to date
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP019: Water quality management underpinning sustainable aquaculture and its expansion in SW England 
Organisation North Devon Biosphere Foundation
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Support the sustainable expansion of aquaculture in SW England through integrated understanding and management of water quality issues.
Collaborator Contribution Support the sustainable expansion of aquaculture in SW England through integrated understanding and management of water quality issues.
Impact Not to date
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP019: Water quality management underpinning sustainable aquaculture and its expansion in SW England 
Organisation Offshore Shellfish
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Support the sustainable expansion of aquaculture in SW England through integrated understanding and management of water quality issues.
Collaborator Contribution Support the sustainable expansion of aquaculture in SW England through integrated understanding and management of water quality issues.
Impact Not to date
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP019: Water quality management underpinning sustainable aquaculture and its expansion in SW England 
Organisation Seafish
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Support the sustainable expansion of aquaculture in SW England through integrated understanding and management of water quality issues.
Collaborator Contribution Support the sustainable expansion of aquaculture in SW England through integrated understanding and management of water quality issues.
Impact Not to date
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP019: Water quality management underpinning sustainable aquaculture and its expansion in SW England 
Organisation South West Water Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Support the sustainable expansion of aquaculture in SW England through integrated understanding and management of water quality issues.
Collaborator Contribution Support the sustainable expansion of aquaculture in SW England through integrated understanding and management of water quality issues.
Impact Not to date
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP019: Water quality management underpinning sustainable aquaculture and its expansion in SW England 
Organisation Westcountry Rivers Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Support the sustainable expansion of aquaculture in SW England through integrated understanding and management of water quality issues.
Collaborator Contribution Support the sustainable expansion of aquaculture in SW England through integrated understanding and management of water quality issues.
Impact Not to date
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP020: Informing environmental investment for health and wellbeing 
Organisation Environment Agency
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The aim of this project is to work with partners to translate evidence on interconnections between natural environments and health in order to inform decision making on environmental investment and management for health outcomes.
Collaborator Contribution The aim of this project is to work with partners to translate evidence on interconnections between natural environments and health in order to inform decision making on environmental investment and management for health outcomes.
Impact not yet
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP020: Informing environmental investment for health and wellbeing 
Organisation North Devon Biosphere Foundation
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The aim of this project is to work with partners to translate evidence on interconnections between natural environments and health in order to inform decision making on environmental investment and management for health outcomes.
Collaborator Contribution The aim of this project is to work with partners to translate evidence on interconnections between natural environments and health in order to inform decision making on environmental investment and management for health outcomes.
Impact not yet
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP020: Informing environmental investment for health and wellbeing 
Organisation Plymouth City Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The aim of this project is to work with partners to translate evidence on interconnections between natural environments and health in order to inform decision making on environmental investment and management for health outcomes.
Collaborator Contribution The aim of this project is to work with partners to translate evidence on interconnections between natural environments and health in order to inform decision making on environmental investment and management for health outcomes.
Impact not yet
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP020: Informing environmental investment for health and wellbeing 
Organisation Public Health Dorset
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The aim of this project is to work with partners to translate evidence on interconnections between natural environments and health in order to inform decision making on environmental investment and management for health outcomes.
Collaborator Contribution The aim of this project is to work with partners to translate evidence on interconnections between natural environments and health in order to inform decision making on environmental investment and management for health outcomes.
Impact not yet
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP020: Informing environmental investment for health and wellbeing 
Organisation World Wide Fund for Nature
Country Switzerland 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The aim of this project is to work with partners to translate evidence on interconnections between natural environments and health in order to inform decision making on environmental investment and management for health outcomes.
Collaborator Contribution The aim of this project is to work with partners to translate evidence on interconnections between natural environments and health in order to inform decision making on environmental investment and management for health outcomes.
Impact not yet
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP022: Building policy and legacy opportunities for pollinator management in the SW and beyond 
Organisation Cornwall AONB
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution To collectively build policy and legacy opportunities for Natural Capital based pollinator management in the SW and beyond
Collaborator Contribution To collectively build policy and legacy opportunities for Natural Capital based pollinator management in the SW and beyond
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP022: Building policy and legacy opportunities for pollinator management in the SW and beyond 
Organisation Cornwall Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution To collectively build policy and legacy opportunities for Natural Capital based pollinator management in the SW and beyond
Collaborator Contribution To collectively build policy and legacy opportunities for Natural Capital based pollinator management in the SW and beyond
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP022: Building policy and legacy opportunities for pollinator management in the SW and beyond 
Organisation Farm and Wildlife Advisory Group South West
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution To collectively build policy and legacy opportunities for Natural Capital based pollinator management in the SW and beyond
Collaborator Contribution To collectively build policy and legacy opportunities for Natural Capital based pollinator management in the SW and beyond
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP022: Building policy and legacy opportunities for pollinator management in the SW and beyond 
Organisation National Farmers Union
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution To collectively build policy and legacy opportunities for Natural Capital based pollinator management in the SW and beyond
Collaborator Contribution To collectively build policy and legacy opportunities for Natural Capital based pollinator management in the SW and beyond
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP022: Building policy and legacy opportunities for pollinator management in the SW and beyond 
Organisation National Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution To collectively build policy and legacy opportunities for Natural Capital based pollinator management in the SW and beyond
Collaborator Contribution To collectively build policy and legacy opportunities for Natural Capital based pollinator management in the SW and beyond
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP022: Building policy and legacy opportunities for pollinator management in the SW and beyond 
Organisation Natural England
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution To collectively build policy and legacy opportunities for Natural Capital based pollinator management in the SW and beyond
Collaborator Contribution To collectively build policy and legacy opportunities for Natural Capital based pollinator management in the SW and beyond
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP022: Building policy and legacy opportunities for pollinator management in the SW and beyond 
Organisation South Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution To collectively build policy and legacy opportunities for Natural Capital based pollinator management in the SW and beyond
Collaborator Contribution To collectively build policy and legacy opportunities for Natural Capital based pollinator management in the SW and beyond
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP023: Woodlands to Moorlands: Quantitative Habitat Mapping for the South West 
Organisation Dartmoor National Park Authority
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Developing and embedding novel remote-sensing methods for routinely mapping the extent and condition of woodland, moorlands and key habitats in support of more profitable and sustainable landscape management.
Collaborator Contribution Developing and embedding novel remote-sensing methods for routinely mapping the extent and condition of woodland, moorlands and key habitats in support of more profitable and sustainable landscape management.
Impact NA
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP023: Woodlands to Moorlands: Quantitative Habitat Mapping for the South West 
Organisation Exmoor National Park Authority
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Developing and embedding novel remote-sensing methods for routinely mapping the extent and condition of woodland, moorlands and key habitats in support of more profitable and sustainable landscape management.
Collaborator Contribution Developing and embedding novel remote-sensing methods for routinely mapping the extent and condition of woodland, moorlands and key habitats in support of more profitable and sustainable landscape management.
Impact NA
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP023: Woodlands to Moorlands: Quantitative Habitat Mapping for the South West 
Organisation Forestry Commission
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Developing and embedding novel remote-sensing methods for routinely mapping the extent and condition of woodland, moorlands and key habitats in support of more profitable and sustainable landscape management.
Collaborator Contribution Developing and embedding novel remote-sensing methods for routinely mapping the extent and condition of woodland, moorlands and key habitats in support of more profitable and sustainable landscape management.
Impact NA
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP023: Woodlands to Moorlands: Quantitative Habitat Mapping for the South West 
Organisation North Devon Biosphere Foundation
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Developing and embedding novel remote-sensing methods for routinely mapping the extent and condition of woodland, moorlands and key habitats in support of more profitable and sustainable landscape management.
Collaborator Contribution Developing and embedding novel remote-sensing methods for routinely mapping the extent and condition of woodland, moorlands and key habitats in support of more profitable and sustainable landscape management.
Impact NA
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP024: Coastal Change Management Areas (CCMAs) - Methodology and Adoption 
Organisation Department For Environment, Food And Rural Affairs (DEFRA)
Department Marine Management Organisation (MMO)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution With the aim of supporting Local Planning Authorities in making sustainable development decisions along the south west's coastline, this project worked with two local authorities on the Devon coastline. It aimed to help develop clear repeatable methodologies that can be employed to identify suitable CCMAs for a range of coastline areas e.g. estuarine, cliffs, towns and beaches. As part of the process, two CCMAs will be delivered for the partner local authorities; Taw Torridge Estuary and East Devon coastline.
Collaborator Contribution With the aim of supporting Local Planning Authorities in making sustainable development decisions along the south west's coastline, this project worked with two local authorities on the Devon coastline. It aimed to help develop clear repeatable methodologies that can be employed to identify suitable CCMAs for a range of coastline areas e.g. estuarine, cliffs, towns and beaches. As part of the process, two CCMAs will be delivered for the partner local authorities; Taw Torridge Estuary and East Devon coastline.
Impact 1) WP1: Report on CCMA review ? Description: a comprehensive review of existing CCMA uptake in the UK and internationally, with analysis of the approach and methods adopted to achieve the designations. The report is available via the SWEEP website and pending upload onto to the Natural England website. ? Outcome: this has provided our partners, and others involved in CCMA work, with a comprehensive baseline resource and, as such, has contributed to a better, and wider, understanding of the gaps in current CCMA approaches and uptake. ? Expected outcomes: this provides a valuable baseline and reference to all those working to designate CCMAs and undertaking further CCMA studies, thus enhancing the robustness of their work. Alex Curd, MMO Marine Planning Officer (full testimony in SWEEP Store) '[myself and] my counterparts now have a greater knowledge of the coastal change management in those areas, in other areas, especially from your paper in WP1 that evaluated CCMAs'. 2) WP2: Report on CCMA best practice and approach methodology ? Description: a detailed summary report on the methods developed to define a CCMA area; from raw data to final mapping. Two case studies were used (in the Taw Torridge Estuary and East Devon) as examples to explore the types of data available and the role they play in developing a CCMA. ? Outcome: the report provides a workflow, and straightforward methodology, for defining a CCMA region for a range of coastal types and can be used in the future as datasets are updated. The report, and process of developing it, have enhanced stakeholder's knowledge and understanding about CCMAs. The report is available via SWEEP website and pending upload onto to the Natural England website. ? Expected outcomes: this new, easy to understand and scientifically robust methodology, once officially adopted, will be used further, both by the case study local planning authorities to extend their CCMA mapping work and other authorities around the region, and beyond. Corine Dyke, NE Lead Advisor - (full testimony in Impact Store) [the SWEEP methodology] .. 'will be useful and easy to follow by local planning authorities'. [This will be ] really useful as a toolkit for other local planning authorities it's going to make our job in the future easier if everybody is using a similar approach based on the toolkit - it's going to be easier for us to comment and to be involved in local planning work' 3) WP3: Report on provision of CCMAs to two LPAs in the South West (E Devon / Taw Torridge) ? Description: the report presents a summary on the application of WP2 methodology to the two selected case study areas in Devon. Included are mapped lines that represent current cliff positon and predicted retreat lines over 20, 50 and 100 years, and GIS files for the mapped region. The report it available on the SWEEP website and the GIS files have been provided to the LPAs. The report is also pending upload onto to the Natural England website. ? Outcome: the report provides a clear, concise methodology for designating a CCMA area, The GIS files will enable the LPAs to use the data within any future planning applications. ? Expected outcome: in time, it is anticipated they will be adopted formally through the Local Plans. To date East Devon LPA have formally submitted the CCMA areas to their Strategic Planning Committee for consideration whilst the local plan process is at an earlier stage in Taw Torridge and is yet to be considered. This is discussed more in section 6. Ian Rowland, Torridge District Council (full testimony in SWEEP Impact Store). 'I think certainly the work package two methodology documents are going to be essential - that's the type of information that adds to the credibility of the projects and allows us to really robustly defend those and justify them. I think the maps alone are great but you can't use them without being able to back them up with the methodology work'. 4) Training for the Local Planning Authorities (LPAs) ? Description: in February 2020 and May 2020 the SWEEP team presented and discussed the findings at two partners meetings with East Devon and Taw Torridge LPAs; both of which were attended by Natural England and the Environment Agency. During these sessions, a level of training was delivered to ensure the sufficient transfer of knowledge and skills to local partners. ? Outcome: this has enabled partners to fully understand the SWEEP methodology and mapping lines, communicating confidently about them, both with work colleagues and other external stakeholders. ? Expected outcome: this will help secure commitment to further CCMA work - both in extending the Taw Torridge and East Devon case study lines delivered by this SWEEP project and pushing for wider use and uptake in other regional LPAs, and beyond. Two articles have been/ are being delivered regarding the SWEEP CCMA project to help promote the work on a national level and inform future policy change. 5) Article on CCMAs published in 'The Planner' magazine (January 2021) ? Description: This article was co-written by Dr Tim Poate and Andrew Austen - Lead Officer, Planning Policy at North Devon Council. It tackles the question of how planners can 'hold the line' at a time when climate change is having a corrosive impact on coastlines and the people that live by them, introducing CCMAs as a tool to help with this. ? Outcome: as the official magazine of the Royal Town Planning Institute, this has disseminated the SWEEP work to the planning profession, increasing awareness, knowledge and engagement in the process. 6) Article on CCMAs in preparation for submission to Geography Review (due April 2021) ? Description: Geography Review is an educational geography publication aimed at A-level students. It provides topical articles and case studies on all areas relevant to A-level programs. The article was co-written by Dr Tim Poate, Dr Christopher Stokes, Prof. Gerd Masselink and Josie-Alice Kirby. It provides a succinct overview of CCMAs, why they are needed and how they are developed. ? Outcome: this will help to increase the awareness of coastal erosion issues more generally, and CCMAs specifically, with 16-19 year old geography students - potentially the coastal managers and planners of tomorrow.
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP024: Coastal Change Management Areas (CCMAs) - Methodology and Adoption 
Organisation Devon County Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution With the aim of supporting Local Planning Authorities in making sustainable development decisions along the south west's coastline, this project worked with two local authorities on the Devon coastline. It aimed to help develop clear repeatable methodologies that can be employed to identify suitable CCMAs for a range of coastline areas e.g. estuarine, cliffs, towns and beaches. As part of the process, two CCMAs will be delivered for the partner local authorities; Taw Torridge Estuary and East Devon coastline.
Collaborator Contribution With the aim of supporting Local Planning Authorities in making sustainable development decisions along the south west's coastline, this project worked with two local authorities on the Devon coastline. It aimed to help develop clear repeatable methodologies that can be employed to identify suitable CCMAs for a range of coastline areas e.g. estuarine, cliffs, towns and beaches. As part of the process, two CCMAs will be delivered for the partner local authorities; Taw Torridge Estuary and East Devon coastline.
Impact 1) WP1: Report on CCMA review ? Description: a comprehensive review of existing CCMA uptake in the UK and internationally, with analysis of the approach and methods adopted to achieve the designations. The report is available via the SWEEP website and pending upload onto to the Natural England website. ? Outcome: this has provided our partners, and others involved in CCMA work, with a comprehensive baseline resource and, as such, has contributed to a better, and wider, understanding of the gaps in current CCMA approaches and uptake. ? Expected outcomes: this provides a valuable baseline and reference to all those working to designate CCMAs and undertaking further CCMA studies, thus enhancing the robustness of their work. Alex Curd, MMO Marine Planning Officer (full testimony in SWEEP Store) '[myself and] my counterparts now have a greater knowledge of the coastal change management in those areas, in other areas, especially from your paper in WP1 that evaluated CCMAs'. 2) WP2: Report on CCMA best practice and approach methodology ? Description: a detailed summary report on the methods developed to define a CCMA area; from raw data to final mapping. Two case studies were used (in the Taw Torridge Estuary and East Devon) as examples to explore the types of data available and the role they play in developing a CCMA. ? Outcome: the report provides a workflow, and straightforward methodology, for defining a CCMA region for a range of coastal types and can be used in the future as datasets are updated. The report, and process of developing it, have enhanced stakeholder's knowledge and understanding about CCMAs. The report is available via SWEEP website and pending upload onto to the Natural England website. ? Expected outcomes: this new, easy to understand and scientifically robust methodology, once officially adopted, will be used further, both by the case study local planning authorities to extend their CCMA mapping work and other authorities around the region, and beyond. Corine Dyke, NE Lead Advisor - (full testimony in Impact Store) [the SWEEP methodology] .. 'will be useful and easy to follow by local planning authorities'. [This will be ] really useful as a toolkit for other local planning authorities it's going to make our job in the future easier if everybody is using a similar approach based on the toolkit - it's going to be easier for us to comment and to be involved in local planning work' 3) WP3: Report on provision of CCMAs to two LPAs in the South West (E Devon / Taw Torridge) ? Description: the report presents a summary on the application of WP2 methodology to the two selected case study areas in Devon. Included are mapped lines that represent current cliff positon and predicted retreat lines over 20, 50 and 100 years, and GIS files for the mapped region. The report it available on the SWEEP website and the GIS files have been provided to the LPAs. The report is also pending upload onto to the Natural England website. ? Outcome: the report provides a clear, concise methodology for designating a CCMA area, The GIS files will enable the LPAs to use the data within any future planning applications. ? Expected outcome: in time, it is anticipated they will be adopted formally through the Local Plans. To date East Devon LPA have formally submitted the CCMA areas to their Strategic Planning Committee for consideration whilst the local plan process is at an earlier stage in Taw Torridge and is yet to be considered. This is discussed more in section 6. Ian Rowland, Torridge District Council (full testimony in SWEEP Impact Store). 'I think certainly the work package two methodology documents are going to be essential - that's the type of information that adds to the credibility of the projects and allows us to really robustly defend those and justify them. I think the maps alone are great but you can't use them without being able to back them up with the methodology work'. 4) Training for the Local Planning Authorities (LPAs) ? Description: in February 2020 and May 2020 the SWEEP team presented and discussed the findings at two partners meetings with East Devon and Taw Torridge LPAs; both of which were attended by Natural England and the Environment Agency. During these sessions, a level of training was delivered to ensure the sufficient transfer of knowledge and skills to local partners. ? Outcome: this has enabled partners to fully understand the SWEEP methodology and mapping lines, communicating confidently about them, both with work colleagues and other external stakeholders. ? Expected outcome: this will help secure commitment to further CCMA work - both in extending the Taw Torridge and East Devon case study lines delivered by this SWEEP project and pushing for wider use and uptake in other regional LPAs, and beyond. Two articles have been/ are being delivered regarding the SWEEP CCMA project to help promote the work on a national level and inform future policy change. 5) Article on CCMAs published in 'The Planner' magazine (January 2021) ? Description: This article was co-written by Dr Tim Poate and Andrew Austen - Lead Officer, Planning Policy at North Devon Council. It tackles the question of how planners can 'hold the line' at a time when climate change is having a corrosive impact on coastlines and the people that live by them, introducing CCMAs as a tool to help with this. ? Outcome: as the official magazine of the Royal Town Planning Institute, this has disseminated the SWEEP work to the planning profession, increasing awareness, knowledge and engagement in the process. 6) Article on CCMAs in preparation for submission to Geography Review (due April 2021) ? Description: Geography Review is an educational geography publication aimed at A-level students. It provides topical articles and case studies on all areas relevant to A-level programs. The article was co-written by Dr Tim Poate, Dr Christopher Stokes, Prof. Gerd Masselink and Josie-Alice Kirby. It provides a succinct overview of CCMAs, why they are needed and how they are developed. ? Outcome: this will help to increase the awareness of coastal erosion issues more generally, and CCMAs specifically, with 16-19 year old geography students - potentially the coastal managers and planners of tomorrow.
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP024: Coastal Change Management Areas (CCMAs) - Methodology and Adoption 
Organisation Environment Agency
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution With the aim of supporting Local Planning Authorities in making sustainable development decisions along the south west's coastline, this project worked with two local authorities on the Devon coastline. It aimed to help develop clear repeatable methodologies that can be employed to identify suitable CCMAs for a range of coastline areas e.g. estuarine, cliffs, towns and beaches. As part of the process, two CCMAs will be delivered for the partner local authorities; Taw Torridge Estuary and East Devon coastline.
Collaborator Contribution With the aim of supporting Local Planning Authorities in making sustainable development decisions along the south west's coastline, this project worked with two local authorities on the Devon coastline. It aimed to help develop clear repeatable methodologies that can be employed to identify suitable CCMAs for a range of coastline areas e.g. estuarine, cliffs, towns and beaches. As part of the process, two CCMAs will be delivered for the partner local authorities; Taw Torridge Estuary and East Devon coastline.
Impact 1) WP1: Report on CCMA review ? Description: a comprehensive review of existing CCMA uptake in the UK and internationally, with analysis of the approach and methods adopted to achieve the designations. The report is available via the SWEEP website and pending upload onto to the Natural England website. ? Outcome: this has provided our partners, and others involved in CCMA work, with a comprehensive baseline resource and, as such, has contributed to a better, and wider, understanding of the gaps in current CCMA approaches and uptake. ? Expected outcomes: this provides a valuable baseline and reference to all those working to designate CCMAs and undertaking further CCMA studies, thus enhancing the robustness of their work. Alex Curd, MMO Marine Planning Officer (full testimony in SWEEP Store) '[myself and] my counterparts now have a greater knowledge of the coastal change management in those areas, in other areas, especially from your paper in WP1 that evaluated CCMAs'. 2) WP2: Report on CCMA best practice and approach methodology ? Description: a detailed summary report on the methods developed to define a CCMA area; from raw data to final mapping. Two case studies were used (in the Taw Torridge Estuary and East Devon) as examples to explore the types of data available and the role they play in developing a CCMA. ? Outcome: the report provides a workflow, and straightforward methodology, for defining a CCMA region for a range of coastal types and can be used in the future as datasets are updated. The report, and process of developing it, have enhanced stakeholder's knowledge and understanding about CCMAs. The report is available via SWEEP website and pending upload onto to the Natural England website. ? Expected outcomes: this new, easy to understand and scientifically robust methodology, once officially adopted, will be used further, both by the case study local planning authorities to extend their CCMA mapping work and other authorities around the region, and beyond. Corine Dyke, NE Lead Advisor - (full testimony in Impact Store) [the SWEEP methodology] .. 'will be useful and easy to follow by local planning authorities'. [This will be ] really useful as a toolkit for other local planning authorities it's going to make our job in the future easier if everybody is using a similar approach based on the toolkit - it's going to be easier for us to comment and to be involved in local planning work' 3) WP3: Report on provision of CCMAs to two LPAs in the South West (E Devon / Taw Torridge) ? Description: the report presents a summary on the application of WP2 methodology to the two selected case study areas in Devon. Included are mapped lines that represent current cliff positon and predicted retreat lines over 20, 50 and 100 years, and GIS files for the mapped region. The report it available on the SWEEP website and the GIS files have been provided to the LPAs. The report is also pending upload onto to the Natural England website. ? Outcome: the report provides a clear, concise methodology for designating a CCMA area, The GIS files will enable the LPAs to use the data within any future planning applications. ? Expected outcome: in time, it is anticipated they will be adopted formally through the Local Plans. To date East Devon LPA have formally submitted the CCMA areas to their Strategic Planning Committee for consideration whilst the local plan process is at an earlier stage in Taw Torridge and is yet to be considered. This is discussed more in section 6. Ian Rowland, Torridge District Council (full testimony in SWEEP Impact Store). 'I think certainly the work package two methodology documents are going to be essential - that's the type of information that adds to the credibility of the projects and allows us to really robustly defend those and justify them. I think the maps alone are great but you can't use them without being able to back them up with the methodology work'. 4) Training for the Local Planning Authorities (LPAs) ? Description: in February 2020 and May 2020 the SWEEP team presented and discussed the findings at two partners meetings with East Devon and Taw Torridge LPAs; both of which were attended by Natural England and the Environment Agency. During these sessions, a level of training was delivered to ensure the sufficient transfer of knowledge and skills to local partners. ? Outcome: this has enabled partners to fully understand the SWEEP methodology and mapping lines, communicating confidently about them, both with work colleagues and other external stakeholders. ? Expected outcome: this will help secure commitment to further CCMA work - both in extending the Taw Torridge and East Devon case study lines delivered by this SWEEP project and pushing for wider use and uptake in other regional LPAs, and beyond. Two articles have been/ are being delivered regarding the SWEEP CCMA project to help promote the work on a national level and inform future policy change. 5) Article on CCMAs published in 'The Planner' magazine (January 2021) ? Description: This article was co-written by Dr Tim Poate and Andrew Austen - Lead Officer, Planning Policy at North Devon Council. It tackles the question of how planners can 'hold the line' at a time when climate change is having a corrosive impact on coastlines and the people that live by them, introducing CCMAs as a tool to help with this. ? Outcome: as the official magazine of the Royal Town Planning Institute, this has disseminated the SWEEP work to the planning profession, increasing awareness, knowledge and engagement in the process. 6) Article on CCMAs in preparation for submission to Geography Review (due April 2021) ? Description: Geography Review is an educational geography publication aimed at A-level students. It provides topical articles and case studies on all areas relevant to A-level programs. The article was co-written by Dr Tim Poate, Dr Christopher Stokes, Prof. Gerd Masselink and Josie-Alice Kirby. It provides a succinct overview of CCMAs, why they are needed and how they are developed. ? Outcome: this will help to increase the awareness of coastal erosion issues more generally, and CCMAs specifically, with 16-19 year old geography students - potentially the coastal managers and planners of tomorrow.
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP024: Coastal Change Management Areas (CCMAs) - Methodology and Adoption 
Organisation Natural England
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution With the aim of supporting Local Planning Authorities in making sustainable development decisions along the south west's coastline, this project worked with two local authorities on the Devon coastline. It aimed to help develop clear repeatable methodologies that can be employed to identify suitable CCMAs for a range of coastline areas e.g. estuarine, cliffs, towns and beaches. As part of the process, two CCMAs will be delivered for the partner local authorities; Taw Torridge Estuary and East Devon coastline.
Collaborator Contribution With the aim of supporting Local Planning Authorities in making sustainable development decisions along the south west's coastline, this project worked with two local authorities on the Devon coastline. It aimed to help develop clear repeatable methodologies that can be employed to identify suitable CCMAs for a range of coastline areas e.g. estuarine, cliffs, towns and beaches. As part of the process, two CCMAs will be delivered for the partner local authorities; Taw Torridge Estuary and East Devon coastline.
Impact 1) WP1: Report on CCMA review ? Description: a comprehensive review of existing CCMA uptake in the UK and internationally, with analysis of the approach and methods adopted to achieve the designations. The report is available via the SWEEP website and pending upload onto to the Natural England website. ? Outcome: this has provided our partners, and others involved in CCMA work, with a comprehensive baseline resource and, as such, has contributed to a better, and wider, understanding of the gaps in current CCMA approaches and uptake. ? Expected outcomes: this provides a valuable baseline and reference to all those working to designate CCMAs and undertaking further CCMA studies, thus enhancing the robustness of their work. Alex Curd, MMO Marine Planning Officer (full testimony in SWEEP Store) '[myself and] my counterparts now have a greater knowledge of the coastal change management in those areas, in other areas, especially from your paper in WP1 that evaluated CCMAs'. 2) WP2: Report on CCMA best practice and approach methodology ? Description: a detailed summary report on the methods developed to define a CCMA area; from raw data to final mapping. Two case studies were used (in the Taw Torridge Estuary and East Devon) as examples to explore the types of data available and the role they play in developing a CCMA. ? Outcome: the report provides a workflow, and straightforward methodology, for defining a CCMA region for a range of coastal types and can be used in the future as datasets are updated. The report, and process of developing it, have enhanced stakeholder's knowledge and understanding about CCMAs. The report is available via SWEEP website and pending upload onto to the Natural England website. ? Expected outcomes: this new, easy to understand and scientifically robust methodology, once officially adopted, will be used further, both by the case study local planning authorities to extend their CCMA mapping work and other authorities around the region, and beyond. Corine Dyke, NE Lead Advisor - (full testimony in Impact Store) [the SWEEP methodology] .. 'will be useful and easy to follow by local planning authorities'. [This will be ] really useful as a toolkit for other local planning authorities it's going to make our job in the future easier if everybody is using a similar approach based on the toolkit - it's going to be easier for us to comment and to be involved in local planning work' 3) WP3: Report on provision of CCMAs to two LPAs in the South West (E Devon / Taw Torridge) ? Description: the report presents a summary on the application of WP2 methodology to the two selected case study areas in Devon. Included are mapped lines that represent current cliff positon and predicted retreat lines over 20, 50 and 100 years, and GIS files for the mapped region. The report it available on the SWEEP website and the GIS files have been provided to the LPAs. The report is also pending upload onto to the Natural England website. ? Outcome: the report provides a clear, concise methodology for designating a CCMA area, The GIS files will enable the LPAs to use the data within any future planning applications. ? Expected outcome: in time, it is anticipated they will be adopted formally through the Local Plans. To date East Devon LPA have formally submitted the CCMA areas to their Strategic Planning Committee for consideration whilst the local plan process is at an earlier stage in Taw Torridge and is yet to be considered. This is discussed more in section 6. Ian Rowland, Torridge District Council (full testimony in SWEEP Impact Store). 'I think certainly the work package two methodology documents are going to be essential - that's the type of information that adds to the credibility of the projects and allows us to really robustly defend those and justify them. I think the maps alone are great but you can't use them without being able to back them up with the methodology work'. 4) Training for the Local Planning Authorities (LPAs) ? Description: in February 2020 and May 2020 the SWEEP team presented and discussed the findings at two partners meetings with East Devon and Taw Torridge LPAs; both of which were attended by Natural England and the Environment Agency. During these sessions, a level of training was delivered to ensure the sufficient transfer of knowledge and skills to local partners. ? Outcome: this has enabled partners to fully understand the SWEEP methodology and mapping lines, communicating confidently about them, both with work colleagues and other external stakeholders. ? Expected outcome: this will help secure commitment to further CCMA work - both in extending the Taw Torridge and East Devon case study lines delivered by this SWEEP project and pushing for wider use and uptake in other regional LPAs, and beyond. Two articles have been/ are being delivered regarding the SWEEP CCMA project to help promote the work on a national level and inform future policy change. 5) Article on CCMAs published in 'The Planner' magazine (January 2021) ? Description: This article was co-written by Dr Tim Poate and Andrew Austen - Lead Officer, Planning Policy at North Devon Council. It tackles the question of how planners can 'hold the line' at a time when climate change is having a corrosive impact on coastlines and the people that live by them, introducing CCMAs as a tool to help with this. ? Outcome: as the official magazine of the Royal Town Planning Institute, this has disseminated the SWEEP work to the planning profession, increasing awareness, knowledge and engagement in the process. 6) Article on CCMAs in preparation for submission to Geography Review (due April 2021) ? Description: Geography Review is an educational geography publication aimed at A-level students. It provides topical articles and case studies on all areas relevant to A-level programs. The article was co-written by Dr Tim Poate, Dr Christopher Stokes, Prof. Gerd Masselink and Josie-Alice Kirby. It provides a succinct overview of CCMAs, why they are needed and how they are developed. ? Outcome: this will help to increase the awareness of coastal erosion issues more generally, and CCMAs specifically, with 16-19 year old geography students - potentially the coastal managers and planners of tomorrow.
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP024: Coastal Change Management Areas (CCMAs) - Methodology and Adoption 
Organisation North Devon Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution With the aim of supporting Local Planning Authorities in making sustainable development decisions along the south west's coastline, this project worked with two local authorities on the Devon coastline. It aimed to help develop clear repeatable methodologies that can be employed to identify suitable CCMAs for a range of coastline areas e.g. estuarine, cliffs, towns and beaches. As part of the process, two CCMAs will be delivered for the partner local authorities; Taw Torridge Estuary and East Devon coastline.
Collaborator Contribution With the aim of supporting Local Planning Authorities in making sustainable development decisions along the south west's coastline, this project worked with two local authorities on the Devon coastline. It aimed to help develop clear repeatable methodologies that can be employed to identify suitable CCMAs for a range of coastline areas e.g. estuarine, cliffs, towns and beaches. As part of the process, two CCMAs will be delivered for the partner local authorities; Taw Torridge Estuary and East Devon coastline.
Impact 1) WP1: Report on CCMA review ? Description: a comprehensive review of existing CCMA uptake in the UK and internationally, with analysis of the approach and methods adopted to achieve the designations. The report is available via the SWEEP website and pending upload onto to the Natural England website. ? Outcome: this has provided our partners, and others involved in CCMA work, with a comprehensive baseline resource and, as such, has contributed to a better, and wider, understanding of the gaps in current CCMA approaches and uptake. ? Expected outcomes: this provides a valuable baseline and reference to all those working to designate CCMAs and undertaking further CCMA studies, thus enhancing the robustness of their work. Alex Curd, MMO Marine Planning Officer (full testimony in SWEEP Store) '[myself and] my counterparts now have a greater knowledge of the coastal change management in those areas, in other areas, especially from your paper in WP1 that evaluated CCMAs'. 2) WP2: Report on CCMA best practice and approach methodology ? Description: a detailed summary report on the methods developed to define a CCMA area; from raw data to final mapping. Two case studies were used (in the Taw Torridge Estuary and East Devon) as examples to explore the types of data available and the role they play in developing a CCMA. ? Outcome: the report provides a workflow, and straightforward methodology, for defining a CCMA region for a range of coastal types and can be used in the future as datasets are updated. The report, and process of developing it, have enhanced stakeholder's knowledge and understanding about CCMAs. The report is available via SWEEP website and pending upload onto to the Natural England website. ? Expected outcomes: this new, easy to understand and scientifically robust methodology, once officially adopted, will be used further, both by the case study local planning authorities to extend their CCMA mapping work and other authorities around the region, and beyond. Corine Dyke, NE Lead Advisor - (full testimony in Impact Store) [the SWEEP methodology] .. 'will be useful and easy to follow by local planning authorities'. [This will be ] really useful as a toolkit for other local planning authorities it's going to make our job in the future easier if everybody is using a similar approach based on the toolkit - it's going to be easier for us to comment and to be involved in local planning work' 3) WP3: Report on provision of CCMAs to two LPAs in the South West (E Devon / Taw Torridge) ? Description: the report presents a summary on the application of WP2 methodology to the two selected case study areas in Devon. Included are mapped lines that represent current cliff positon and predicted retreat lines over 20, 50 and 100 years, and GIS files for the mapped region. The report it available on the SWEEP website and the GIS files have been provided to the LPAs. The report is also pending upload onto to the Natural England website. ? Outcome: the report provides a clear, concise methodology for designating a CCMA area, The GIS files will enable the LPAs to use the data within any future planning applications. ? Expected outcome: in time, it is anticipated they will be adopted formally through the Local Plans. To date East Devon LPA have formally submitted the CCMA areas to their Strategic Planning Committee for consideration whilst the local plan process is at an earlier stage in Taw Torridge and is yet to be considered. This is discussed more in section 6. Ian Rowland, Torridge District Council (full testimony in SWEEP Impact Store). 'I think certainly the work package two methodology documents are going to be essential - that's the type of information that adds to the credibility of the projects and allows us to really robustly defend those and justify them. I think the maps alone are great but you can't use them without being able to back them up with the methodology work'. 4) Training for the Local Planning Authorities (LPAs) ? Description: in February 2020 and May 2020 the SWEEP team presented and discussed the findings at two partners meetings with East Devon and Taw Torridge LPAs; both of which were attended by Natural England and the Environment Agency. During these sessions, a level of training was delivered to ensure the sufficient transfer of knowledge and skills to local partners. ? Outcome: this has enabled partners to fully understand the SWEEP methodology and mapping lines, communicating confidently about them, both with work colleagues and other external stakeholders. ? Expected outcome: this will help secure commitment to further CCMA work - both in extending the Taw Torridge and East Devon case study lines delivered by this SWEEP project and pushing for wider use and uptake in other regional LPAs, and beyond. Two articles have been/ are being delivered regarding the SWEEP CCMA project to help promote the work on a national level and inform future policy change. 5) Article on CCMAs published in 'The Planner' magazine (January 2021) ? Description: This article was co-written by Dr Tim Poate and Andrew Austen - Lead Officer, Planning Policy at North Devon Council. It tackles the question of how planners can 'hold the line' at a time when climate change is having a corrosive impact on coastlines and the people that live by them, introducing CCMAs as a tool to help with this. ? Outcome: as the official magazine of the Royal Town Planning Institute, this has disseminated the SWEEP work to the planning profession, increasing awareness, knowledge and engagement in the process. 6) Article on CCMAs in preparation for submission to Geography Review (due April 2021) ? Description: Geography Review is an educational geography publication aimed at A-level students. It provides topical articles and case studies on all areas relevant to A-level programs. The article was co-written by Dr Tim Poate, Dr Christopher Stokes, Prof. Gerd Masselink and Josie-Alice Kirby. It provides a succinct overview of CCMAs, why they are needed and how they are developed. ? Outcome: this will help to increase the awareness of coastal erosion issues more generally, and CCMAs specifically, with 16-19 year old geography students - potentially the coastal managers and planners of tomorrow.
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP024: Coastal Change Management Areas (CCMAs) - Methodology and Adoption 
Organisation Torridge District Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution With the aim of supporting Local Planning Authorities in making sustainable development decisions along the south west's coastline, this project worked with two local authorities on the Devon coastline. It aimed to help develop clear repeatable methodologies that can be employed to identify suitable CCMAs for a range of coastline areas e.g. estuarine, cliffs, towns and beaches. As part of the process, two CCMAs will be delivered for the partner local authorities; Taw Torridge Estuary and East Devon coastline.
Collaborator Contribution With the aim of supporting Local Planning Authorities in making sustainable development decisions along the south west's coastline, this project worked with two local authorities on the Devon coastline. It aimed to help develop clear repeatable methodologies that can be employed to identify suitable CCMAs for a range of coastline areas e.g. estuarine, cliffs, towns and beaches. As part of the process, two CCMAs will be delivered for the partner local authorities; Taw Torridge Estuary and East Devon coastline.
Impact 1) WP1: Report on CCMA review ? Description: a comprehensive review of existing CCMA uptake in the UK and internationally, with analysis of the approach and methods adopted to achieve the designations. The report is available via the SWEEP website and pending upload onto to the Natural England website. ? Outcome: this has provided our partners, and others involved in CCMA work, with a comprehensive baseline resource and, as such, has contributed to a better, and wider, understanding of the gaps in current CCMA approaches and uptake. ? Expected outcomes: this provides a valuable baseline and reference to all those working to designate CCMAs and undertaking further CCMA studies, thus enhancing the robustness of their work. Alex Curd, MMO Marine Planning Officer (full testimony in SWEEP Store) '[myself and] my counterparts now have a greater knowledge of the coastal change management in those areas, in other areas, especially from your paper in WP1 that evaluated CCMAs'. 2) WP2: Report on CCMA best practice and approach methodology ? Description: a detailed summary report on the methods developed to define a CCMA area; from raw data to final mapping. Two case studies were used (in the Taw Torridge Estuary and East Devon) as examples to explore the types of data available and the role they play in developing a CCMA. ? Outcome: the report provides a workflow, and straightforward methodology, for defining a CCMA region for a range of coastal types and can be used in the future as datasets are updated. The report, and process of developing it, have enhanced stakeholder's knowledge and understanding about CCMAs. The report is available via SWEEP website and pending upload onto to the Natural England website. ? Expected outcomes: this new, easy to understand and scientifically robust methodology, once officially adopted, will be used further, both by the case study local planning authorities to extend their CCMA mapping work and other authorities around the region, and beyond. Corine Dyke, NE Lead Advisor - (full testimony in Impact Store) [the SWEEP methodology] .. 'will be useful and easy to follow by local planning authorities'. [This will be ] really useful as a toolkit for other local planning authorities it's going to make our job in the future easier if everybody is using a similar approach based on the toolkit - it's going to be easier for us to comment and to be involved in local planning work' 3) WP3: Report on provision of CCMAs to two LPAs in the South West (E Devon / Taw Torridge) ? Description: the report presents a summary on the application of WP2 methodology to the two selected case study areas in Devon. Included are mapped lines that represent current cliff positon and predicted retreat lines over 20, 50 and 100 years, and GIS files for the mapped region. The report it available on the SWEEP website and the GIS files have been provided to the LPAs. The report is also pending upload onto to the Natural England website. ? Outcome: the report provides a clear, concise methodology for designating a CCMA area, The GIS files will enable the LPAs to use the data within any future planning applications. ? Expected outcome: in time, it is anticipated they will be adopted formally through the Local Plans. To date East Devon LPA have formally submitted the CCMA areas to their Strategic Planning Committee for consideration whilst the local plan process is at an earlier stage in Taw Torridge and is yet to be considered. This is discussed more in section 6. Ian Rowland, Torridge District Council (full testimony in SWEEP Impact Store). 'I think certainly the work package two methodology documents are going to be essential - that's the type of information that adds to the credibility of the projects and allows us to really robustly defend those and justify them. I think the maps alone are great but you can't use them without being able to back them up with the methodology work'. 4) Training for the Local Planning Authorities (LPAs) ? Description: in February 2020 and May 2020 the SWEEP team presented and discussed the findings at two partners meetings with East Devon and Taw Torridge LPAs; both of which were attended by Natural England and the Environment Agency. During these sessions, a level of training was delivered to ensure the sufficient transfer of knowledge and skills to local partners. ? Outcome: this has enabled partners to fully understand the SWEEP methodology and mapping lines, communicating confidently about them, both with work colleagues and other external stakeholders. ? Expected outcome: this will help secure commitment to further CCMA work - both in extending the Taw Torridge and East Devon case study lines delivered by this SWEEP project and pushing for wider use and uptake in other regional LPAs, and beyond. Two articles have been/ are being delivered regarding the SWEEP CCMA project to help promote the work on a national level and inform future policy change. 5) Article on CCMAs published in 'The Planner' magazine (January 2021) ? Description: This article was co-written by Dr Tim Poate and Andrew Austen - Lead Officer, Planning Policy at North Devon Council. It tackles the question of how planners can 'hold the line' at a time when climate change is having a corrosive impact on coastlines and the people that live by them, introducing CCMAs as a tool to help with this. ? Outcome: as the official magazine of the Royal Town Planning Institute, this has disseminated the SWEEP work to the planning profession, increasing awareness, knowledge and engagement in the process. 6) Article on CCMAs in preparation for submission to Geography Review (due April 2021) ? Description: Geography Review is an educational geography publication aimed at A-level students. It provides topical articles and case studies on all areas relevant to A-level programs. The article was co-written by Dr Tim Poate, Dr Christopher Stokes, Prof. Gerd Masselink and Josie-Alice Kirby. It provides a succinct overview of CCMAs, why they are needed and how they are developed. ? Outcome: this will help to increase the awareness of coastal erosion issues more generally, and CCMAs specifically, with 16-19 year old geography students - potentially the coastal managers and planners of tomorrow.
Start Year 2019
 
Description SWEEP025: Forecasting bathing hazards at Crantock Beach 
Organisation Crantock Life Saving Club
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution To inform beach safety decision making at Crantock Beach, Cornwall, using real-time forecasting of nearshore hydrodynamics
Collaborator Contribution To inform beach safety decision making at Crantock Beach, Cornwall, using real-time forecasting of nearshore hydrodynamics
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2020
 
Description SWEEP025: Forecasting bathing hazards at Crantock Beach 
Organisation National Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution To inform beach safety decision making at Crantock Beach, Cornwall, using real-time forecasting of nearshore hydrodynamics
Collaborator Contribution To inform beach safety decision making at Crantock Beach, Cornwall, using real-time forecasting of nearshore hydrodynamics
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2020
 
Description SWEEP025: Forecasting bathing hazards at Crantock Beach 
Organisation Royal National Lifeboat Institution
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution To inform beach safety decision making at Crantock Beach, Cornwall, using real-time forecasting of nearshore hydrodynamics
Collaborator Contribution To inform beach safety decision making at Crantock Beach, Cornwall, using real-time forecasting of nearshore hydrodynamics
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2020
 
Description SWEEP027: Delivering 'Environmental Net Gain': addressing knowledge gaps, understanding social preference trade-offs and exploring delivery mechanisms 
Organisation Cornwall Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Delivering 'Environmental Net Gain (ENG)': ? Review ongoing initiatives and proposals regarding the design and implementation of NEG in the UK and identify relevant knowledge gaps and improvement options. ? Address these knowledge gaps by investigating the social preferences for and trade-offs between different options for designing and implementing ENG schemes. These could refer to e.g. understanding the most socially desirable locations and scales of offsetting sites, as well as their ecological configuration, or recreational access opportunities. ? Contribute to policies, strategies & debate around the practical implementation of ENG.
Collaborator Contribution Delivering 'Environmental Net Gain (ENG)': ? Review ongoing initiatives and proposals regarding the design and implementation of NEG in the UK and identify relevant knowledge gaps and improvement options. ? Address these knowledge gaps by investigating the social preferences for and trade-offs between different options for designing and implementing ENG schemes. These could refer to e.g. understanding the most socially desirable locations and scales of offsetting sites, as well as their ecological configuration, or recreational access opportunities. ? Contribute to policies, strategies & debate around the practical implementation of ENG.
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2020
 
Description SWEEP027: Delivering 'Environmental Net Gain': addressing knowledge gaps, understanding social preference trade-offs and exploring delivery mechanisms 
Organisation Devon Wildlife Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Delivering 'Environmental Net Gain (ENG)': ? Review ongoing initiatives and proposals regarding the design and implementation of NEG in the UK and identify relevant knowledge gaps and improvement options. ? Address these knowledge gaps by investigating the social preferences for and trade-offs between different options for designing and implementing ENG schemes. These could refer to e.g. understanding the most socially desirable locations and scales of offsetting sites, as well as their ecological configuration, or recreational access opportunities. ? Contribute to policies, strategies & debate around the practical implementation of ENG.
Collaborator Contribution Delivering 'Environmental Net Gain (ENG)': ? Review ongoing initiatives and proposals regarding the design and implementation of NEG in the UK and identify relevant knowledge gaps and improvement options. ? Address these knowledge gaps by investigating the social preferences for and trade-offs between different options for designing and implementing ENG schemes. These could refer to e.g. understanding the most socially desirable locations and scales of offsetting sites, as well as their ecological configuration, or recreational access opportunities. ? Contribute to policies, strategies & debate around the practical implementation of ENG.
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2020
 
Description SWEEP027: Delivering 'Environmental Net Gain': addressing knowledge gaps, understanding social preference trade-offs and exploring delivery mechanisms 
Organisation Environment Bank Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Delivering 'Environmental Net Gain (ENG)': ? Review ongoing initiatives and proposals regarding the design and implementation of NEG in the UK and identify relevant knowledge gaps and improvement options. ? Address these knowledge gaps by investigating the social preferences for and trade-offs between different options for designing and implementing ENG schemes. These could refer to e.g. understanding the most socially desirable locations and scales of offsetting sites, as well as their ecological configuration, or recreational access opportunities. ? Contribute to policies, strategies & debate around the practical implementation of ENG.
Collaborator Contribution Delivering 'Environmental Net Gain (ENG)': ? Review ongoing initiatives and proposals regarding the design and implementation of NEG in the UK and identify relevant knowledge gaps and improvement options. ? Address these knowledge gaps by investigating the social preferences for and trade-offs between different options for designing and implementing ENG schemes. These could refer to e.g. understanding the most socially desirable locations and scales of offsetting sites, as well as their ecological configuration, or recreational access opportunities. ? Contribute to policies, strategies & debate around the practical implementation of ENG.
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2020
 
Description SWEEP027: Delivering 'Environmental Net Gain': addressing knowledge gaps, understanding social preference trade-offs and exploring delivery mechanisms 
Organisation North Devon Biosphere Foundation
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Delivering 'Environmental Net Gain (ENG)': ? Review ongoing initiatives and proposals regarding the design and implementation of NEG in the UK and identify relevant knowledge gaps and improvement options. ? Address these knowledge gaps by investigating the social preferences for and trade-offs between different options for designing and implementing ENG schemes. These could refer to e.g. understanding the most socially desirable locations and scales of offsetting sites, as well as their ecological configuration, or recreational access opportunities. ? Contribute to policies, strategies & debate around the practical implementation of ENG.
Collaborator Contribution Delivering 'Environmental Net Gain (ENG)': ? Review ongoing initiatives and proposals regarding the design and implementation of NEG in the UK and identify relevant knowledge gaps and improvement options. ? Address these knowledge gaps by investigating the social preferences for and trade-offs between different options for designing and implementing ENG schemes. These could refer to e.g. understanding the most socially desirable locations and scales of offsetting sites, as well as their ecological configuration, or recreational access opportunities. ? Contribute to policies, strategies & debate around the practical implementation of ENG.
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2020
 
Description SWEEP027: Delivering 'Environmental Net Gain': addressing knowledge gaps, understanding social preference trade-offs and exploring delivery mechanisms 
Organisation North Devon Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Delivering 'Environmental Net Gain (ENG)': ? Review ongoing initiatives and proposals regarding the design and implementation of NEG in the UK and identify relevant knowledge gaps and improvement options. ? Address these knowledge gaps by investigating the social preferences for and trade-offs between different options for designing and implementing ENG schemes. These could refer to e.g. understanding the most socially desirable locations and scales of offsetting sites, as well as their ecological configuration, or recreational access opportunities. ? Contribute to policies, strategies & debate around the practical implementation of ENG.
Collaborator Contribution Delivering 'Environmental Net Gain (ENG)': ? Review ongoing initiatives and proposals regarding the design and implementation of NEG in the UK and identify relevant knowledge gaps and improvement options. ? Address these knowledge gaps by investigating the social preferences for and trade-offs between different options for designing and implementing ENG schemes. These could refer to e.g. understanding the most socially desirable locations and scales of offsetting sites, as well as their ecological configuration, or recreational access opportunities. ? Contribute to policies, strategies & debate around the practical implementation of ENG.
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2020
 
Description SWEEP027: Delivering 'Environmental Net Gain': addressing knowledge gaps, understanding social preference trade-offs and exploring delivery mechanisms 
Organisation South West Water Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Delivering 'Environmental Net Gain (ENG)': ? Review ongoing initiatives and proposals regarding the design and implementation of NEG in the UK and identify relevant knowledge gaps and improvement options. ? Address these knowledge gaps by investigating the social preferences for and trade-offs between different options for designing and implementing ENG schemes. These could refer to e.g. understanding the most socially desirable locations and scales of offsetting sites, as well as their ecological configuration, or recreational access opportunities. ? Contribute to policies, strategies & debate around the practical implementation of ENG.
Collaborator Contribution Delivering 'Environmental Net Gain (ENG)': ? Review ongoing initiatives and proposals regarding the design and implementation of NEG in the UK and identify relevant knowledge gaps and improvement options. ? Address these knowledge gaps by investigating the social preferences for and trade-offs between different options for designing and implementing ENG schemes. These could refer to e.g. understanding the most socially desirable locations and scales of offsetting sites, as well as their ecological configuration, or recreational access opportunities. ? Contribute to policies, strategies & debate around the practical implementation of ENG.
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2020
 
Description SWEEP: Investing in Nature for Health 
Organisation University of Exeter
Department European Centre for Environment and Human Health
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The PML research team consisted, at the start of the partnership, of 4 people. Two subsequently left PML to work for University of Plymouth (1 still engaged with SWEEP) and 1 colleague withdrew from the project after reducing work hours. PML is the lead on an activity to present a business case for investing in nature for health. For this i have been conducting a scoping review to obtain evidence on UK studies that involve investments which connect human health and nature (natural capital). I have participated in regular project team meetings to discuss and monitor activity progress, and since Dec 2020 i have coordinated fortnightly activity progress meetings with UoE partners. In late 2020 the project team agreed to change tact away from completing a systematic review, instead deciding to work with selected stakeholders to develop custom business cases. As a result i have engaged with 4 stakeholders - Devon Wildlife Trust, Dartmoor National Park Authority, SylvaWood Seeds, and Nature's Tonic, meeting with each representative virtually and liaising with them and UoE partners to develop clear understanding of their evidence needs.
Collaborator Contribution UoE partners initially provided an advisory role on the PML led activity due to greater previous experience of systematic literature reviews. As the PML capacity reduced due to staff departures and withdrawals, UoE provided additional time for activity management and, particularly with the greater involvement of a SWEEP Impact Officer, acted as a liaison point between the team and the case study stakeholders, providing input to discussions, summarising discussion points and clarifying priorities for the case study foci with the stakeholders.
Impact Stakeholder workshop 22/10/2020 held as part of a 3 day SWEEP Expo event. This was jointly convened by myself, representing the Investing in Nature for Health project, and SWEEP Impact Fellow Grace Twiston-Davies, University of Exeter, representing another SWEEP project, Policy for Pollinators. This workshop attracted registrants from multiple sectors.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Stakeholder workshop - natural capital decision support tool 
Organisation Department For Environment, Food And Rural Affairs (DEFRA)
Department Marine Management Organisation (MMO)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Seven workshops and meeting between 20th November and 7th December exploring options for incorporating natural capital approaches into decision making, as the foundation ofor co-development of the natural capital support tool.
Collaborator Contribution Advice and recommendations for example the best tools and outputs for maximising impact (e.g. North Devon Local Plan)
Impact Ongoing process.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Stakeholder workshop - natural capital decision support tool 
Organisation Devon & Severn Inshore Fisheries & Conservation Authority
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Seven workshops and meeting between 20th November and 7th December exploring options for incorporating natural capital approaches into decision making, as the foundation ofor co-development of the natural capital support tool.
Collaborator Contribution Advice and recommendations for example the best tools and outputs for maximising impact (e.g. North Devon Local Plan)
Impact Ongoing process.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Stakeholder workshop - natural capital decision support tool 
Organisation Natural England
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Seven workshops and meeting between 20th November and 7th December exploring options for incorporating natural capital approaches into decision making, as the foundation ofor co-development of the natural capital support tool.
Collaborator Contribution Advice and recommendations for example the best tools and outputs for maximising impact (e.g. North Devon Local Plan)
Impact Ongoing process.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Stakeholder workshop - natural capital decision support tool 
Organisation North Devon Biosphere Service
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Seven workshops and meeting between 20th November and 7th December exploring options for incorporating natural capital approaches into decision making, as the foundation ofor co-development of the natural capital support tool.
Collaborator Contribution Advice and recommendations for example the best tools and outputs for maximising impact (e.g. North Devon Local Plan)
Impact Ongoing process.
Start Year 2017
 
Description A new deal for the UK countryside: Recommendations for a post-Brexit agricultural policy 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Invited presentation to the Conservative Party Conference 2017, Bright Blue event "Green and pleasant land: the countryside after Brexit", Central Convention Complex, Manchester, 1st October 2017 (alongside presentations from: Thérèse Coffey MP, Minister for the Environment and Rural Life Opportunities; Ross Murray, President of the Countryside Landowners Association (CLA); and Rebecca Speight, CEO of the Woodland Trust).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Building on the vision for the North Devon Marine Pioneer programme 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Stakeholder engagement workshop for the North Devon Marine Pioneer community
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Can Economics Save the Environment? 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Supporters
Results and Impact Global Conversation, Australian Museum, Sydney, Australia, 29th May 2017
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Civil Service Live 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Civil Service Live is our annual, cross department event for all civil servants helping us to become A Brilliant Civil Service. CS Live is your opportunity to engage with other civil servants, listen to thought-provoking sessions and meet inspiring people sharing their experiences, knowledge and expertise. With a variety of sessions, exhibitors, the opportunity to connect with other civil servants and meet Senior Civil Servants, CS Live aims to educate, engage and inspire you.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Defra EAU visit 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The Defra Environmental Analysis Unit are a mixed group of analysts who work on the environment and natural capital, feeding into policy development. The purpose of this visit is to understand how LEEP and SWEEP are working to champion the use natural capital in decision making regarding protecting and enhancing the environment and sustaining natural capital as an engine of economic growth and social wellbeing.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Developing Business Cases to Support Investment in Nature for Environmental, Health and Economic Benefits 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Stakeholder workshop was held as part of a 3 day SWEEP Expo event. This was jointly convened by PML, representing the Investing in Nature for Health project, and University of Exeter (SWEEP Impact Fellow Grace Twiston-Davies), representing another SWEEP project, Policy for Pollinators. This workshop attracted 120 registrants from multiple sectors. 30-40 people ended up attending after drop-out associated with the timing of the event at the end of the 3 day conference. Both projects have a remit to present a business case supporting each project's principle focus, namely nature and human health, and processes and products linked to increased pollination. It was felt that there were therefore commonalities across the projects, warranting a joint workshop where stakeholder participants would have an interest in one or another, or both of the projects. in both cases, we were keen to hear from different sectors what they understood by a business case, what a business case should include, and how a business case would most usefully be presented for their own benefit. This would then inform the approaches to be taken for the remainder of the SWEEP project timelines. It was anticipated that insights from the workshop would lead to more useful and usable business case outputs to be produced by each project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://sweep.ac.uk/natcapexpo/#1603203850760-9904fd70-8afa
 
Description Heart of the SW LEP Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The Heart of the South West LEP Annual Conference and AGM is an opportunity to meet with the wider LEP partnership and to network with other stakeholders. It's a free event that is aimed at the private, public, education and third sectors, and will include an update on the economic issues for the area and a look at what is planned for the future. This year, the focus will be around the implementation of the Action Plan for the area's Productivity Strategy and these sessions (including the LEP's AGM) will be in the afternoon. Delegates can find out about a range of free business support, including the latest help around digital technology. Support will also be available throughout the morning from the HotSW Growth Hub.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Identifying potential tipping points in the benefits derived from the UK's land ecosystems 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Valuing Nature Annual Conference 2017, John McIntyre Centre, Edinburgh, 18th - 19th October
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Integrating trade-offs and synergies into land use decision making 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Keynote presentation to the OECD Workshop: Biodiversity, Climate Change and Agriculture: Towards Coherent Approaches, Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Launch of Fifth NCC annual report 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Ian Bateman participation in launch of the fifth NCC annual report, Nobel House, London - 1st March 2018
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description MOOC on Ecosystem Services: A Method for Sustainable Development 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact At the University of Geneva, the Geneva Water Hub, the Luc Hoffmann Institute and the Natural Capital Project
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.coursera.org/learn/ecosystem-services
 
Description NAB keen to value 'natural capital' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Gregg Borschmann (2017) NAB keen to value 'natural capital', Interview with Ian Bateman on ABC Australia, 14th June 2017
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/breakfast/nab-keen-to-value-natural-capital/8616260
 
Description NATURAL CAPITAL AND LOCAL DECISION MAKING 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Stakeholder engagement workshop for the North Devon Marine Pioneer community
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description NCC Environment Group meetings 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Meetings between the NCC Environment Group including Ian Bateman and the Secretary for State for the Environment to discuss the 25 Year Plan for the Environment - 24th Jan and 28th Feb 2018.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description NERC Westminster Reception 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact SWEEP participation in NERC Westminster Reception, House of Commons, Westminster, London, 16th October 2017
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description National Parks for the Future 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Presentation at the National Parks UK Conference, South Downs National Park, Goodwood
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Natural Capital Committee potential advice regarding the 25 Year Environment Plan: Some speculations 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation to Natural Resources Wales, University of Exeter
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Natural Environment Panel Discussion (panel member) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presentation at 'Science for Defra: Excellence in the application of evidence', The Royal Society, London, 29th - 30th March
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Natural Environment Valuation Online (NEVO): A web-based tool for natural capital management and investment 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presentation to Defra, London, 21st September
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Natural capital and the 25 Year Environment Plan: Some speculations 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presented to the UK Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC), Head Office, Peterborough
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Natural capital: Economic growth through environmental improvement 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presentation to the Swindon and Wiltshire Local Economic Partnership (SWLEP) Rural Economy Sector Group, Wiltshire Wildlife Trust, Langford Lakes Visitor Centre, Steeple Langford,
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Post-Brexit agricultural policy discussion 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Ian Bateman meeting with the Secretary of State for the Environment to discuss the 25 Year Plan for the Environment and post-Brexit agricultural policy on 22nd January.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Recommendations for a post-Brexit agricultural policy: A fair deal for farming and forestry 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presentation at 'Putting down new roots: woods, trees and the post-CAP landscape', Woodland Trust event Hosted by Neil Parish MP, Members' Dining Room, House of Commons
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description SWEEP Expo 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The 3-day virtual SWEEP Expo, 20-22nd Oct 2020, showcased the results and successes achieved by the SWEEP team and our partners to date. SWEEP focuses on placing Natural Capital at the heart of decision making, and co-delivering the information and tools needed by our partners to enable this.

We welcomed keynote presentations from Tony Juniper, Dieter Helm and Luke Pollard MP, as well as a presentation from Steve Double MP.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://sweep.ac.uk/sweep_expo/
 
Description SWEEP National Parks presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Presentation at the 'Natural Capital approaches in Dartmoor and Exmoor National Parks' workshop, Dartmoor National Park, Parke, Bovey Tracey
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Valuing Natural Capital for Decision-Makers 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Presentation at 'Exmoor's Natural Capital', The Annual Spring Conference of The Exmoor Society and Exmoor National Park Authority, Dulverton, 7th April
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017