Building Socio-Ecological Resilience to Coral Reef Degradation in the Islands of the Western Indian Ocean

Lead Research Organisation: Plymouth Marine Laboratory
Department Name: Plymouth Marine Lab

Abstract

Half a billion people directly utilise coral reefs for essential ecosystem services (ES) such as food and coastal protection, many of whom live within rural areas of the poorest developing countries. This dependence is especially pronounced across the Western Indian Ocean (WIO) region. Coral reefs have been experiencing major and sustained ecological degradation, exacerbated by climate change. The resultant changes to these ecosystems are potentially devastating to coastal communities.

This project was co-developed with stakeholders from around the WIO and the UK, and involves a team with interdisciplinary expertise in natural science (coral reefs and ecosystem services), social science including governance and development studies, environmental economics, psychology, geography, theology, arts (a blend of fine art and design), and health. The project is ambitious in scope and is anticipated to generate novel and innovative outputs.

The project aims to create a network of experts from local community, government, NGO and academic stakeholders from the UK, Mauritius, Zanzibar and other WIO islands to scope opportunities for using ES related research to define and refine strategies and priorities for building socio-ecological resilience to long-term change in coral reefs. The project will involve four interlinked activities that will draw on the diversity of expertise and disciplinary backgrounds of the project team, subcontractors and project partners:

(1) Strategies that are currently used to manage coral reefs and which are often assumed to build resilience to climate change impacts will be mapped and assessed. The extent to which the ES framework is applied will be identified and assessment made of how it could be more effectively used in future to support the design of such strategies.

(2) A workshop in Mauritius will involve stakeholders from Mauritius (including Rodrigues), Zanzibar, Madagascar, Comoros, Seychelles and Kenya. This will include assessment of i) perceptions of the role of community management and institutions, and actions needed to overcome barriers; ii) opportunities to incentivise action; iii) communication strategies for building resilience. The workshop will include interactive sessions to provide an in-depth analysis of risk (including differences between public and expert framings) and a visual arts approach to participatory mapping to create experiential learning and elicit the more nuanced and intangible aspects of perception, values and identities in the context of real world ecological risk. Drawing participant experience and expertise, a protocol of these activities (involving a film) for replication elsewhere and a synthesis report will be co-developed.

(3) The protocol will be piloted in Mauritius and Zanzibar to explore the socio-cultural risks associated with different community-specific resilience strategies and different groups within the community, in order to validate the synthesis report and promote further reflection and dialogue on risks and values associated with coral reefs. It is anticipated that the culturally sensitive approach will allow a better means of investigating localised knowledge, more diverse identities and the dynamics of subject formation.

(4) A UK workshop will bring together partners from Mauritius, Madagascar, Zanzibar and the UK to synthesise project outputs, focusing on identifying gaps that can be addressed using the ES framework and the potential for future UK-WIO collaborations, as well as reflecting on the project activities in terms of multi-disciplinary working, engagement with stakeholders and the lessons learnt from this process. The structure for a journal article together with initial draft text and a timetable for final submission will be developed to ensure an academic legacy from the work. The workshop will also provide a platform for the non-UK partners to present their work and access a wider network of potential UK collaborators.

Planned Impact

Hundreds of millions of people rely on coral reefs to provide essential services such as food and coastal protection, and these ecosystems also contribute significantly to national economies through sectors such as tourism. Improving the resilience of communities and economies to the coral reef degradation expected as a result of climate change is therefore an issue of global importance. This project will be of benefit to those who need to assess the risks and benefits associated with different strategies for ensuring the essential ecosystem services provided by coral reef ecosystems continue to be provided under the challenges of climate change. This includes those involved in the management of coral reef resources, coastal protection, tourism, sustainable development, and the welfare and resilience of coastal communities.

The project is focused on the Western Indian Ocean region, and particularly the islands of Mauritius and Zanzibar, where beneficiaries will include: (1) Government agencies: the Ministry of Ocean Economy, Ministry of Fisheries, Mauritius Oceanography Institute, Ministry of Environment, Beach Authority, Ministry of Tourism, Tourism Authority, Ministry of Finance and Economic Development; the Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries (Zanzibar), the National Environmental Management Council; (2) Non-Governmental Organisations: Reef Conservation, Eco-Sud, Mauritius Marine Conservation Society, Shoals Rodrigues; IFEES; and (3) Community groups Roches Noires Eco Marine, Anse La Raie Voluntary Marine Conservation Area Committee, the Cap Malheureux Fishers Association, and the Mwambao Coastal Community Network.

These stakeholders will participate in the project through attendance at the workshop and follow-up pilot activities, with the former also involving key stakeholders from government and the non-governmental sectors in Madagascar, Comoros, Kenya, and Seychelles. They will benefit from clear, independent scientific information that will improve understanding of the challenges, from a range of different perspectives, of building resilience to coral reef degradation and climate change. They will also benefit from the opportunity to share experiences from around the Western Indian Ocean, and to evaluate different strategies for practical action that have been used in coral reef management from around the world. In particular, the project will highlight novel approaches, by providing i) a template for the application of ecosystem services frameworks as a practical tool for developing actions, and ii) methods for interdisciplinary approaches to resilience strategies, including a tool box for assessing the more intangible aspects of perceptions and values associated with coral reefs and with the risks from climate change and strategies developed for building resilience. A key component of this toolbox will be a film, that will be used both as a training material to support stakeholders in future co-development activities and for directly engaging communities and eliciting their perceptions of changes in their environment.

The stakeholders will also benefit from being part of a strengthened interdisciplinary, international network, providing them with access to a range of academic expertise to support the implementation of specific strategies to build resilience within their local communities. Leveraging this nine month project, key beneficiaries will be invited to co-develop further collaborative and cutting-edge research on social-ecological resilience in coastal communities in the region, extending the impact of this scoping project through enduring interactions.

Wider dissemination of project information will also ensure benefits across the Western Indian Ocean region, including through global organisations working in the region such as the CORDIO, IUCN, WCS, and WWF.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Title Coral Communities film 
Description A short film was produced to document how to apply the visual method for stakeholder and community engagement developed through the Coral Communities project. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact The film is still to be formally launched, but audience members who have seen the film have expressed interest in trying it out. 
URL https://vimeo.com/250967742
 
Title Coral Communities in Fundo film 
Description A short film was created documenting the application of the visual method developed by the Coral Communities project on Fundo Island, Zanzibar. The film has been shared in a workshop and through the internet. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact None known, although its screening has stimulated debate and interest among audience members 
URL https://vimeo.com/238758875
 
Description The key findings from this work arise from each of the three main work-streams: literature review, visual method development and workshops. The literature review focused on the practical application of resilience strategies in coastal settings in the Western Indian Ocean and the extent to which they generate social and ecological resilience among coastal communities. Findings indicate a general absence of evaluation for many applications of the different strategies making an assessment of their implications for resilience challenging. In some cases, unintentional consequences were apparent, such as the building of social resilience while at the same time eroding ecological resilience. An ecosystem service framework was considered a useful approach for identifying such trade-offs, but also as a way to better develop projects that could support resilience building. Applying an ecosystem service framework is not without its own challenges. Additional evidence is required to understand how resilience and ecosystem services concepts can be better integrated to support coastal communities to work with the changes that climate change may bring. The visual method (combining gift exchange, image and object elicitation, walking interviews and model coastscape creation together with elements of participatory video) proved effective in quickly gaining insights into the challenges faced by these communities and overcoming language barriers. It offered participants the opportunity to reflect and learn from their experiences and created a platform for them to express their concerns. The challenge now is to turn these insights into effective actions that can support these communities to build resilience to their changing environment. The workshops enabled the findings from the literature review to be "ground truthed" by stakeholders and for stakeholders to provide additional case studies and related evidence. They also helped identify gaps for future work and to create a network of people and organisations interested in furthering the practical resilience agenda in the Western Indian Ocean.
Exploitation Route We have produced a number of outputs from this project including a non-technical version of the literature review, two short films and an accompanying newspaper that should help anyone wishing to use our visual method to have a go. Academic outputs will also be forthcoming. Once finalised outputs will be circulated within our networks and to overseas contacts (this includes via the Ocean Actions SDG14 Ocean Conference website). The literature review identified a series of gaps in our knowledge about the practical application of resilience concepts. Opportunities are now being sought by project members and individuals with whom the project engaged to undertake work that will help to fill these gaps. The films and newspaper form a tool box that can be used to train others in how to apply the visual method we developed and we have had interest from people wanting to try the method.
Sectors Environment

URL http://www.pml.ac.uk/Research/Projects/Coral_Communities
 
Description Impacts have been generated in terms of practice by our NGO partners. We engaged with two developing country NGOs: Reef Conservation, Mauritius and Mwambao Coastal Communities Network, Tanzania. Both tested the visual method for engaging with communities/stakeholders on issues of resilience that we developed as part of our project. Reef Conservation, while initially sceptical have seen the value of the approach and intend to use it (or aspects of it) in future engagement activities. They also intend to bring different communities together to encourage knowledge sharing, as a result of this being done as part of Coral Communities. Mwambao already use visual methods (participatory video) with local communities, but still found our method valuable as it reminded them of the need to spend time to get to know new communities that they are starting to work with. They also intend to use aspects of our method in future community engagement activities.
First Year Of Impact 2017
Sector Environment
Impact Types Cultural

 
Description Use of visual method
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description 2019 Sustainable Earth Institute Creative Associate Awards
Amount £4,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of Plymouth 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2019 
End 06/2019
 
Title Visual mixed-method 
Description The Coral Communities project developed a phenomenological sensory visual mixed-method combining gift exchange, image and object elicitation, walking interviews and model coastscape creation together with elements of participatory video. 
Type Of Material Model of mechanisms or symptoms - human 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The toolbox to explain the method was launched in May 2018. Film viewings and discussions with interested parties have led to considerable interest in the method and we have seen the method cited in presentations given by other academics as an example of visual methods and natural science - arts collaborations. We have also been invited to contribute a chapter focusing on this method to an edited book on novel marine social science methods. 
URL http://www.pml.ac.uk/Research/Projects/Coral_Communities
 
Description Coral Communities 
Organisation Cardiff University
Department School of Psychology
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution PML led the Coral Communities project, co-ordinating and contributing to the literature review, workshop preparation, visual method development and preparation of project outputs.
Collaborator Contribution Reef Conservation, Mauritius, jointly coordinated and hosted the workshop in Mauritius. They also facilitated the trialling of the visual method in two communities in Mauritius, contributed to the UK workshop and provided input to the literature review and various project outputs. IFEES contributed to the literature review, participated in the Mauritius and UK workshop and provided a faith-based perspective that enriched the project outputs. They also facilitated the trialling of the visual method in Zanzibar through their existing links with Mwambao Coastal Community Network. Mwambao were not one of the original project partners, but became an integral partner as the project developed. Mwambao sent representatives to both the Mauritius and UK workshops, they supported the trialling of the visual method and contributed to the literature review. They also produced a short film documenting activities undertaken on Fundo Island, Zanzibar. Indeva Consulting has a small role in this project, providing critical feedback and comment on project outputs. University of Exeter (all members) contributed to the literature review, workshops and visual method development. Cardiff University had a small role and help develop our thinking relating to the visual method. Truro and Penwith College provided the film maker and a photography student to help document the trialling of the visual method and put together the film associated with it. Dominica Williamson was the designer and developer of the visual method and the accompanying newspaper that together with the films forms the project's visual methods toolbox.
Impact We have co-produced: a non-technical version of the literature review, two stakeholder workshops (one in Mauritius and one in the UK), two films, a newspaper and we are currently writing two academic articles (one of which will be a visual paper). The collaboration is multi-disciplinary including natural science (coral reef and ecosystem service expertise), social science including governance and development studies, environmental economics, psychology, geography, theology, arts (a blend of fine art and design), and health.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Coral Communities 
Organisation Islamic Foundation for Ecology and Environmental Sciences
PI Contribution PML led the Coral Communities project, co-ordinating and contributing to the literature review, workshop preparation, visual method development and preparation of project outputs.
Collaborator Contribution Reef Conservation, Mauritius, jointly coordinated and hosted the workshop in Mauritius. They also facilitated the trialling of the visual method in two communities in Mauritius, contributed to the UK workshop and provided input to the literature review and various project outputs. IFEES contributed to the literature review, participated in the Mauritius and UK workshop and provided a faith-based perspective that enriched the project outputs. They also facilitated the trialling of the visual method in Zanzibar through their existing links with Mwambao Coastal Community Network. Mwambao were not one of the original project partners, but became an integral partner as the project developed. Mwambao sent representatives to both the Mauritius and UK workshops, they supported the trialling of the visual method and contributed to the literature review. They also produced a short film documenting activities undertaken on Fundo Island, Zanzibar. Indeva Consulting has a small role in this project, providing critical feedback and comment on project outputs. University of Exeter (all members) contributed to the literature review, workshops and visual method development. Cardiff University had a small role and help develop our thinking relating to the visual method. Truro and Penwith College provided the film maker and a photography student to help document the trialling of the visual method and put together the film associated with it. Dominica Williamson was the designer and developer of the visual method and the accompanying newspaper that together with the films forms the project's visual methods toolbox.
Impact We have co-produced: a non-technical version of the literature review, two stakeholder workshops (one in Mauritius and one in the UK), two films, a newspaper and we are currently writing two academic articles (one of which will be a visual paper). The collaboration is multi-disciplinary including natural science (coral reef and ecosystem service expertise), social science including governance and development studies, environmental economics, psychology, geography, theology, arts (a blend of fine art and design), and health.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Coral Communities 
Organisation Mwambao Coastal Community Network
PI Contribution PML led the Coral Communities project, co-ordinating and contributing to the literature review, workshop preparation, visual method development and preparation of project outputs.
Collaborator Contribution Reef Conservation, Mauritius, jointly coordinated and hosted the workshop in Mauritius. They also facilitated the trialling of the visual method in two communities in Mauritius, contributed to the UK workshop and provided input to the literature review and various project outputs. IFEES contributed to the literature review, participated in the Mauritius and UK workshop and provided a faith-based perspective that enriched the project outputs. They also facilitated the trialling of the visual method in Zanzibar through their existing links with Mwambao Coastal Community Network. Mwambao were not one of the original project partners, but became an integral partner as the project developed. Mwambao sent representatives to both the Mauritius and UK workshops, they supported the trialling of the visual method and contributed to the literature review. They also produced a short film documenting activities undertaken on Fundo Island, Zanzibar. Indeva Consulting has a small role in this project, providing critical feedback and comment on project outputs. University of Exeter (all members) contributed to the literature review, workshops and visual method development. Cardiff University had a small role and help develop our thinking relating to the visual method. Truro and Penwith College provided the film maker and a photography student to help document the trialling of the visual method and put together the film associated with it. Dominica Williamson was the designer and developer of the visual method and the accompanying newspaper that together with the films forms the project's visual methods toolbox.
Impact We have co-produced: a non-technical version of the literature review, two stakeholder workshops (one in Mauritius and one in the UK), two films, a newspaper and we are currently writing two academic articles (one of which will be a visual paper). The collaboration is multi-disciplinary including natural science (coral reef and ecosystem service expertise), social science including governance and development studies, environmental economics, psychology, geography, theology, arts (a blend of fine art and design), and health.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Coral Communities 
Organisation Scaglia INDEVA Ltd.
PI Contribution PML led the Coral Communities project, co-ordinating and contributing to the literature review, workshop preparation, visual method development and preparation of project outputs.
Collaborator Contribution Reef Conservation, Mauritius, jointly coordinated and hosted the workshop in Mauritius. They also facilitated the trialling of the visual method in two communities in Mauritius, contributed to the UK workshop and provided input to the literature review and various project outputs. IFEES contributed to the literature review, participated in the Mauritius and UK workshop and provided a faith-based perspective that enriched the project outputs. They also facilitated the trialling of the visual method in Zanzibar through their existing links with Mwambao Coastal Community Network. Mwambao were not one of the original project partners, but became an integral partner as the project developed. Mwambao sent representatives to both the Mauritius and UK workshops, they supported the trialling of the visual method and contributed to the literature review. They also produced a short film documenting activities undertaken on Fundo Island, Zanzibar. Indeva Consulting has a small role in this project, providing critical feedback and comment on project outputs. University of Exeter (all members) contributed to the literature review, workshops and visual method development. Cardiff University had a small role and help develop our thinking relating to the visual method. Truro and Penwith College provided the film maker and a photography student to help document the trialling of the visual method and put together the film associated with it. Dominica Williamson was the designer and developer of the visual method and the accompanying newspaper that together with the films forms the project's visual methods toolbox.
Impact We have co-produced: a non-technical version of the literature review, two stakeholder workshops (one in Mauritius and one in the UK), two films, a newspaper and we are currently writing two academic articles (one of which will be a visual paper). The collaboration is multi-disciplinary including natural science (coral reef and ecosystem service expertise), social science including governance and development studies, environmental economics, psychology, geography, theology, arts (a blend of fine art and design), and health.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Coral Communities 
Organisation Truro and Penwith College
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution PML led the Coral Communities project, co-ordinating and contributing to the literature review, workshop preparation, visual method development and preparation of project outputs.
Collaborator Contribution Reef Conservation, Mauritius, jointly coordinated and hosted the workshop in Mauritius. They also facilitated the trialling of the visual method in two communities in Mauritius, contributed to the UK workshop and provided input to the literature review and various project outputs. IFEES contributed to the literature review, participated in the Mauritius and UK workshop and provided a faith-based perspective that enriched the project outputs. They also facilitated the trialling of the visual method in Zanzibar through their existing links with Mwambao Coastal Community Network. Mwambao were not one of the original project partners, but became an integral partner as the project developed. Mwambao sent representatives to both the Mauritius and UK workshops, they supported the trialling of the visual method and contributed to the literature review. They also produced a short film documenting activities undertaken on Fundo Island, Zanzibar. Indeva Consulting has a small role in this project, providing critical feedback and comment on project outputs. University of Exeter (all members) contributed to the literature review, workshops and visual method development. Cardiff University had a small role and help develop our thinking relating to the visual method. Truro and Penwith College provided the film maker and a photography student to help document the trialling of the visual method and put together the film associated with it. Dominica Williamson was the designer and developer of the visual method and the accompanying newspaper that together with the films forms the project's visual methods toolbox.
Impact We have co-produced: a non-technical version of the literature review, two stakeholder workshops (one in Mauritius and one in the UK), two films, a newspaper and we are currently writing two academic articles (one of which will be a visual paper). The collaboration is multi-disciplinary including natural science (coral reef and ecosystem service expertise), social science including governance and development studies, environmental economics, psychology, geography, theology, arts (a blend of fine art and design), and health.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Coral Communities 
Organisation University of Exeter
Department Department of Geography
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution PML led the Coral Communities project, co-ordinating and contributing to the literature review, workshop preparation, visual method development and preparation of project outputs.
Collaborator Contribution Reef Conservation, Mauritius, jointly coordinated and hosted the workshop in Mauritius. They also facilitated the trialling of the visual method in two communities in Mauritius, contributed to the UK workshop and provided input to the literature review and various project outputs. IFEES contributed to the literature review, participated in the Mauritius and UK workshop and provided a faith-based perspective that enriched the project outputs. They also facilitated the trialling of the visual method in Zanzibar through their existing links with Mwambao Coastal Community Network. Mwambao were not one of the original project partners, but became an integral partner as the project developed. Mwambao sent representatives to both the Mauritius and UK workshops, they supported the trialling of the visual method and contributed to the literature review. They also produced a short film documenting activities undertaken on Fundo Island, Zanzibar. Indeva Consulting has a small role in this project, providing critical feedback and comment on project outputs. University of Exeter (all members) contributed to the literature review, workshops and visual method development. Cardiff University had a small role and help develop our thinking relating to the visual method. Truro and Penwith College provided the film maker and a photography student to help document the trialling of the visual method and put together the film associated with it. Dominica Williamson was the designer and developer of the visual method and the accompanying newspaper that together with the films forms the project's visual methods toolbox.
Impact We have co-produced: a non-technical version of the literature review, two stakeholder workshops (one in Mauritius and one in the UK), two films, a newspaper and we are currently writing two academic articles (one of which will be a visual paper). The collaboration is multi-disciplinary including natural science (coral reef and ecosystem service expertise), social science including governance and development studies, environmental economics, psychology, geography, theology, arts (a blend of fine art and design), and health.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Coral Communities 
Organisation University of Exeter
Department Environment and Sustainability Institute
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution PML led the Coral Communities project, co-ordinating and contributing to the literature review, workshop preparation, visual method development and preparation of project outputs.
Collaborator Contribution Reef Conservation, Mauritius, jointly coordinated and hosted the workshop in Mauritius. They also facilitated the trialling of the visual method in two communities in Mauritius, contributed to the UK workshop and provided input to the literature review and various project outputs. IFEES contributed to the literature review, participated in the Mauritius and UK workshop and provided a faith-based perspective that enriched the project outputs. They also facilitated the trialling of the visual method in Zanzibar through their existing links with Mwambao Coastal Community Network. Mwambao were not one of the original project partners, but became an integral partner as the project developed. Mwambao sent representatives to both the Mauritius and UK workshops, they supported the trialling of the visual method and contributed to the literature review. They also produced a short film documenting activities undertaken on Fundo Island, Zanzibar. Indeva Consulting has a small role in this project, providing critical feedback and comment on project outputs. University of Exeter (all members) contributed to the literature review, workshops and visual method development. Cardiff University had a small role and help develop our thinking relating to the visual method. Truro and Penwith College provided the film maker and a photography student to help document the trialling of the visual method and put together the film associated with it. Dominica Williamson was the designer and developer of the visual method and the accompanying newspaper that together with the films forms the project's visual methods toolbox.
Impact We have co-produced: a non-technical version of the literature review, two stakeholder workshops (one in Mauritius and one in the UK), two films, a newspaper and we are currently writing two academic articles (one of which will be a visual paper). The collaboration is multi-disciplinary including natural science (coral reef and ecosystem service expertise), social science including governance and development studies, environmental economics, psychology, geography, theology, arts (a blend of fine art and design), and health.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Coral Communities 
Organisation University of Exeter
Department European Centre for Environment and Human Health
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution PML led the Coral Communities project, co-ordinating and contributing to the literature review, workshop preparation, visual method development and preparation of project outputs.
Collaborator Contribution Reef Conservation, Mauritius, jointly coordinated and hosted the workshop in Mauritius. They also facilitated the trialling of the visual method in two communities in Mauritius, contributed to the UK workshop and provided input to the literature review and various project outputs. IFEES contributed to the literature review, participated in the Mauritius and UK workshop and provided a faith-based perspective that enriched the project outputs. They also facilitated the trialling of the visual method in Zanzibar through their existing links with Mwambao Coastal Community Network. Mwambao were not one of the original project partners, but became an integral partner as the project developed. Mwambao sent representatives to both the Mauritius and UK workshops, they supported the trialling of the visual method and contributed to the literature review. They also produced a short film documenting activities undertaken on Fundo Island, Zanzibar. Indeva Consulting has a small role in this project, providing critical feedback and comment on project outputs. University of Exeter (all members) contributed to the literature review, workshops and visual method development. Cardiff University had a small role and help develop our thinking relating to the visual method. Truro and Penwith College provided the film maker and a photography student to help document the trialling of the visual method and put together the film associated with it. Dominica Williamson was the designer and developer of the visual method and the accompanying newspaper that together with the films forms the project's visual methods toolbox.
Impact We have co-produced: a non-technical version of the literature review, two stakeholder workshops (one in Mauritius and one in the UK), two films, a newspaper and we are currently writing two academic articles (one of which will be a visual paper). The collaboration is multi-disciplinary including natural science (coral reef and ecosystem service expertise), social science including governance and development studies, environmental economics, psychology, geography, theology, arts (a blend of fine art and design), and health.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Article and blog by Mwambao 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Mwambao Coastal Community Network wrote a blog post and newsletter article about the work they did with the Coral Communities project. The impacts of which are unknown.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.mwambao.or.tz/mwambao-news/
 
Description Article for newsletter 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Following a stakeholder workshop that we organised in Mauritius, an article was written for the WIOMSA newbrief describing the workshop activities and the use of visual methods in research and stakeholder engagement, with the intention of informing a wider network about the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.wiomsa.org/download/wiomsa_newsbriefs_/2017/WIOMSA-Newsbrief-June-2017_Vol-22-No-2.pdf
 
Description Breaking out of the Botanical 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A talk was given to the general public in Cornwall by Dominica Williamson (freelance artist working on Coral Communities) covering the aspects of the visual method developed as part of the project and the fieldwork undertaken in Mauritius and Zanzibar. Wide ranging discussions were held afterwards with considerable interest in the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/breaking-out-of-the-botanical-plate-tickets-55664651471?aff=efbeventt...
 
Description Engage research with communities 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact A lecture and discussions were held with 10 students at the University of Exeter on the need for innovative engagement techniques when working with communities. The visual method developed in Coral Communities was used to illustrate how this can be achieved. Discussion about the method and other similar techniques ensued.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Fundo Island workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A workshop was held on Fundo Island, Zanzibar with members of the local Shehia village level coastal management authority and our NGO partner, Mwambao Coastal Community Network. The workshop was used to test our visual method, refining it according to the local situation (e.g. in Mauritius we made model coastscapes in glass aquaria, but in Zanzibar one big model of Fundo Island was made on the beach as aquaria were unavailable). The workshop focused on the use of marine and coastal resources on Fundo Island and people's aspirations for the future. The outputs are being used by Mwambao to shape future engagement with the islanders.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.pml.ac.uk/coralcommunities
 
Description Mautritius workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Stakeholder workshop with participants from across the Western Indian Ocean, primarily NGOs, but also policy-makers. Workshop objectives were to: 1) Gather evidence of strategies that have been or could be used in the Western Indian Ocean to build resilience among coastal communities facing changes in coral reefs and strategies focused on coral reefs; 2) Capture lessons learnt about the different approaches, what has worked (or not), where and why. In particular understand to what extent ecosystem services language and approaches facilitate development and implementation of such strategies in the WIO context; 3) Trial a visual method of community engagement involving image exchange, participatory mapping, creation of mini coast-scapes and participatory video to assess resilience strategies. 4) Draw together a diverse group of stakeholders from across the WIO who may be interested in future collaboration. Each of these objectives were met and many participants highlighted their interest in working with us in future and for having a go at the visual method we developed
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Research Festival: Celebrating innovative ways of communicating sustainability research, Sustainable Earth Institute (SEI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The Coral Communities film, newspaper and social media handles were all presented as part of a wider portfolio of TAGSCAPE projects (http://www.tagscape.co.uk/). These outputs were used to illustrate how people from creative sectors can work successfully with researchers. One to one discussions were held with a number of participants to the event and copies of the newspaper were distributed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Society and the Sea Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Presentation given to an audience of approximately 35 people on the Coral Communities project, primarily focusing on the findings of the literature review and stakeholder workshop. An interactive workshop was also held to demonstrate part of the Coral Communities visual method. Participants showed considerable interest in the project and the visual method. A number of newspapers were distributed and one to one discussions held with conference participants.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Stakeholder workshop in Exeter 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This participative workshop was convened with NGO representatives as well as practitioners to 1) share and receive feedback on the work that Coral Communities has undertaken assessing resilience strategies in the Western Indian Ocean, and strengthen this assessment with international examples of best practice; 2) brainstorm the potential of ecosystem services approaches to enhance marine management in the UK and internationally, in particular the improved implementation of strategies to build social and ecological resilience; and 3) showcase novel visual methods trialled with communities in Mauritius and Zanzibar, let participants try out this method, and gather examples and experiences of where visual methods are being used effectively elsewhere. A report was prepared from this workshop and shared with participants. Discussions were held on next steps and participants reported interest in working with us again in future.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.pml.ac.uk/Research/Projects/Coral_Communities