GCRF - Building REearch Capacity for sustainable water and food security In drylands of sub-saharan Africa (BRECcIA)"

Lead Research Organisation: University of Southampton
Department Name: Sch of Geography & Environmental Sci

Abstract

The overall aim of this proposal is to develop research capacity and strengthen existing research capabilities in three sub-Saharan countries (Kenya, Malawi, and Ghana) in the related areas of water and food security. Climate variability has an enormous impact on livelihoods across much of SSA, where rain-fed agricultural production characterizes local subsistence and is the mainstay of most national economies. Coupled with rising demand from growing populations, urbanization, and rising incomes, climate change is projected to lead to cuts in GDP of up to 6%, setting the stage for migration and conflict. For these reasons, water security is considered one of the top global risks to development. Water security is also fundamental to attaining many of the Sustainable Development Goals, being a constraint on meeting a range of challenges including food security, access to clean water, and resilience to hydrological hazards. At the same time, attaining food security is a priority of national policy in SSA countries and is a key building block of development.

The reasons for insufficient progress in attaining water and food security are complex, but requires fine-scale, locally relevant research and solutions that are best developed and tested by local researchers and practitioners. Although capacity to carry out research in this area in SSA countries is variable, there are a number of fundamental gaps in the required skills and resources. To address these, our project will develop and implement a comprehensive and flexible programme of activities aimed at strengthening research capacity between the UK and SSA countries while addressing the grand challenges around water and food security. We will develop a pipeline of activities that is guided by a set of key research questions and implemented in the context of a collaborative network of researchers and practitioners that can sustain and propagate capacity and knowledge more broadly.

Our focus is on three countries in SSA: Kenya, Malawi, and Ghana. These are representative of different geographical, climate, socio-economic, cultural and institutional settings and challenges that will allow for comparative research and exchange of ideas, and the development of a richer collaborative network. These countries are also where we have complementary, ongoing university-level research projects and collaborations focused on various aspects of water/food security with institutions at different levels of capacity development. The programme of capacity building activities will be tailored to each institution and its goals through a process of co-evaluation of needs, co-development of activities and co-implementation, including south-south capacity building and knowledge exchange.

Planned Impact

BRECcIA will deliver impact through a programme of capacity development, capability enhancement, partnership building and targeted research in sustainable water and food security. It will engage with stakeholders, including community level, national and regional bodies. BRECcIA will target research to the most vulnerable ultimate beneficiaries living under the poverty line. Analysis of these vulnerabilities and risks will focus the research towards the needs of their arid and semi-arid land livelihoods and ecosystem services. It will also assess the governance and institutional support required to understand and integrate complex relationships into adaptation, planning and policy development.

We will carry out a stocktaking and gap analysis with project partners to identify specific requirements and opportunities across a wide group of individuals and institutions. We will directly reach researchers, managers and professional support staff in five academic institutions in three countries and in three regional centres, with programmes to extend this to a broader audience. A programme of capacity development includes research skills across disciplines, and cross-disciplinary and integrative research via research workshops, researcher exchanges, specific skills training, and summer schools. Capacity will be targeted from early career researchers to PI level. Capacity development will also address professional infrastructure through a research development framework that seeks to support individual researchers, institutional research strategy, management and support services. We aim to enhance transfer between organisations via UK-south capacity development activities and through south-south training and knowledge transfer.

Stakeholder organisations at sub-national, national, regional and international levels will be 'co-mapped' and their requirements and ability to make use of research outputs co-assessed within an inception stage during country-specific and regional workshops. National and regional workshops will be held to engage with key stakeholders, to understand the decision making process and to tailor research requirements and outputs to address key challenges. A Theory of Change will be agreed among the research collaborators and in consultation with stakeholders to resource/refine the programme of activities.

A Science Advisory Board will be convened to support research project selection, critical assessment of project outcomes, and monitoring. The project will capitalise on existing relationships with regional networks and intergovernmental organisations across water, agro-ecological and agricultural sectors with remits that match many of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). We will work with four regional / international Networks to provide a focus for regional transferability across water and agricultural research, and sustainable development challenges.

Project research outputs will be presented to industry via the British Science Festival and other Knowledge Transfer (KTN) events. We will draw from University of Southampton and other innovation and entrepreneurship resources to facilitate development and commercialization of technologies relevant to improving water and food security. An Industry Advisory Board will be appointed and we will carry out "Industry Workshops" to coincide with regional workshops in Africa.

Outreach and Dissemination will be achieved through a set of activities showcasing planned project developments and new partnerships and opportunities (particularly in the UK) to further develop and transfer knowledge created, and for stakeholders to provide feedback and context. We will provide a legacy of cross-disciplinary and cross-organisation capacity building which will provide a self-sustaining network of north-south researchers and a framework that enables international collaborative partnerships.

People

ORCID iD

Justin Sheffield (Principal Investigator)
Sosten Staphiel Chiotha (Co-Investigator)
Maurice Monjerezi (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1136-0653
Chris Hill (Co-Investigator)
Mawuli Dzodzomenyo (Co-Investigator)
Christopher Allan Shisanya (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0913-7161
Gilbert Ouma (Co-Investigator)
Mangani Chilala Katundu (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0898-0720
Levis Keliyasi Eneya (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4352-1052
Kathrin Schreckenberg (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3666-3792
Julie Dawn Reeves (Co-Investigator)
James Allan Wright (Co-Investigator)
Nyovani Janet Madise (Co-Investigator)
Guy Poppy (Co-Investigator)
Kaleb Adamba Mwendwa (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5274-9916
Laura A Lewis (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-2782-7254
Ced Hesse (Co-Investigator)
Luke O. OLANG (Co-Investigator)
John Obiri (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8939-9534
Cosmo Socrates Ngongondo (Co-Investigator)
Abou Amani (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-8009-6396
Jadunandan Dash (Co-Investigator)
Samuel Nii Ardey Codjoe (Co-Investigator)
Caroline Caroline King (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6511-2738
Sarvapali Dyanand Ramchurn (Co-Investigator)
Abdou Ali (Co-Investigator)
Joy Joan Obando (Co-Investigator)
Jean-Marie Kileshye Onema (Co-Investigator)
Mathews Daniel Tsirizeni (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-2800-5877
Morgan Williams (Researcher)

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description BRECcIA Research Collaboration Agreement 
Organisation AGRHYMET Regional Centre (ARC)
Country Global 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution University of Southampton are the lead partner on the "GCRF - Building Research Capacity for sustainable water and food security In drylands of sub-Saharan Africa (BRECcIA) project and as such have developed the formal research collaboration agreement.
Collaborator Contribution All partners have signed up the agreement which means that all the Parties will each use their reasonable endeavours to collaborate on the Project as described in tjhe proposal to GCRF. The Parties to the Collaboration Agreement shall be bound mutatis mutandis by the terms and conditions of the Contract from the Funding Body which forms part of this Collaboration Agreement.
Impact None
Start Year 2018
 
Description BRECcIA Research Collaboration Agreement 
Organisation International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution University of Southampton are the lead partner on the "GCRF - Building Research Capacity for sustainable water and food security In drylands of sub-Saharan Africa (BRECcIA) project and as such have developed the formal research collaboration agreement.
Collaborator Contribution All partners have signed up the agreement which means that all the Parties will each use their reasonable endeavours to collaborate on the Project as described in tjhe proposal to GCRF. The Parties to the Collaboration Agreement shall be bound mutatis mutandis by the terms and conditions of the Contract from the Funding Body which forms part of this Collaboration Agreement.
Impact None
Start Year 2018
 
Description BRECcIA Research Collaboration Agreement 
Organisation Kenyatta University
Country Kenya 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution University of Southampton are the lead partner on the "GCRF - Building Research Capacity for sustainable water and food security In drylands of sub-Saharan Africa (BRECcIA) project and as such have developed the formal research collaboration agreement.
Collaborator Contribution All partners have signed up the agreement which means that all the Parties will each use their reasonable endeavours to collaborate on the Project as described in tjhe proposal to GCRF. The Parties to the Collaboration Agreement shall be bound mutatis mutandis by the terms and conditions of the Contract from the Funding Body which forms part of this Collaboration Agreement.
Impact None
Start Year 2018
 
Description BRECcIA Research Collaboration Agreement 
Organisation King's College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution University of Southampton are the lead partner on the "GCRF - Building Research Capacity for sustainable water and food security In drylands of sub-Saharan Africa (BRECcIA) project and as such have developed the formal research collaboration agreement.
Collaborator Contribution All partners have signed up the agreement which means that all the Parties will each use their reasonable endeavours to collaborate on the Project as described in tjhe proposal to GCRF. The Parties to the Collaboration Agreement shall be bound mutatis mutandis by the terms and conditions of the Contract from the Funding Body which forms part of this Collaboration Agreement.
Impact None
Start Year 2018
 
Description BRECcIA Research Collaboration Agreement 
Organisation Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology
PI Contribution University of Southampton are the lead partner on the "GCRF - Building Research Capacity for sustainable water and food security In drylands of sub-Saharan Africa (BRECcIA) project and as such have developed the formal research collaboration agreement.
Collaborator Contribution All partners have signed up the agreement which means that all the Parties will each use their reasonable endeavours to collaborate on the Project as described in tjhe proposal to GCRF. The Parties to the Collaboration Agreement shall be bound mutatis mutandis by the terms and conditions of the Contract from the Funding Body which forms part of this Collaboration Agreement.
Impact None
Start Year 2018
 
Description BRECcIA Research Collaboration Agreement 
Organisation Technical University of Kenya
PI Contribution University of Southampton are the lead partner on the "GCRF - Building Research Capacity for sustainable water and food security In drylands of sub-Saharan Africa (BRECcIA) project and as such have developed the formal research collaboration agreement.
Collaborator Contribution All partners have signed up the agreement which means that all the Parties will each use their reasonable endeavours to collaborate on the Project as described in tjhe proposal to GCRF. The Parties to the Collaboration Agreement shall be bound mutatis mutandis by the terms and conditions of the Contract from the Funding Body which forms part of this Collaboration Agreement.
Impact None
Start Year 2018
 
Description BRECcIA Research Collaboration Agreement 
Organisation University of Ghana
Country Ghana 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution University of Southampton are the lead partner on the "GCRF - Building Research Capacity for sustainable water and food security In drylands of sub-Saharan Africa (BRECcIA) project and as such have developed the formal research collaboration agreement.
Collaborator Contribution All partners have signed up the agreement which means that all the Parties will each use their reasonable endeavours to collaborate on the Project as described in tjhe proposal to GCRF. The Parties to the Collaboration Agreement shall be bound mutatis mutandis by the terms and conditions of the Contract from the Funding Body which forms part of this Collaboration Agreement.
Impact None
Start Year 2018
 
Description BRECcIA Research Collaboration Agreement 
Organisation University of Nairobi
Country Kenya 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution University of Southampton are the lead partner on the "GCRF - Building Research Capacity for sustainable water and food security In drylands of sub-Saharan Africa (BRECcIA) project and as such have developed the formal research collaboration agreement.
Collaborator Contribution All partners have signed up the agreement which means that all the Parties will each use their reasonable endeavours to collaborate on the Project as described in tjhe proposal to GCRF. The Parties to the Collaboration Agreement shall be bound mutatis mutandis by the terms and conditions of the Contract from the Funding Body which forms part of this Collaboration Agreement.
Impact None
Start Year 2018
 
Description BRECcIA Small Research Project: Comprehensive assessment of small-scale irrigation cropland using Remotely Piloted Aircrafts (RPAs) technology - Case of Lake Chilwa Basin, Southern Malawi 
Organisation Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology
PI Contribution This research aims at utilizing Remotely Piloted Aircrafts (RPAs) as an affordable source of remote sensing data for precision agriculture Assessment of the level of water utilisation with a special focus on small-scale irrigation using RPAs will help to quantify the total size of land under irrigation and the size of food output to feed the growing population. Geographical Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) based approaches will be used for processing and interpretation of the drone imagery. The drone capacity as a remote sensing data collection platform will add a new dimension in RS capabilities for managing water and food security. The research will be implemented at Lake Chilwa basin in Southern Malawi and will be scaled out to drylands in Ghana and Kenya. The potential impacts include improved research capacity in the use of drones, improved access to information by smallholder farmers and dryland pastoralists on resilience building to climate and evidence based policy changes regarding the acceptance of technology (drones) for problem solving in the these countries.
Collaborator Contribution A new Small Research Projects team will work together to Project objectives: • Train 25 researchers in drone applications for precision agriculture and water security monitoring (Ghana, Malawi, Kenya and the UK) • Temporal and spatial small scale irrigation and water management data collection in sampled sites in Lake Chilwa Basin, & replicated in other sites in Kenya and Ghana • Analyse impact of poor water abstraction technologies on sustainable food security and water budget • Demonstrate evidence based research results for irrigation policy and food & nutrition policy changes.
Impact The project is interdisciplinary in nature and across wide geographical spectrum. The interdisciplinary is shown by integration of research team with different back grounds. Prof Sosten Chiotha is environmental scientist who has studied the link between water degradation and infestation schistosomiasis; Dr Wales Singini is fisheries scientist and a research fellow who has studies fisheries in many water bodies of Malawi including Lake Chilwa and its rivers; Prof Mauli Dzodzomenyo is an environmental health and microbiology specialist and a team leader for Ghana; Chengxiu Li is a PhD Student and senior research assistant with GIS and Remote Sensing background; Fanuel Kapute is senior lecturer and research scientist with vast experience in agriculture and food security including fisheries; Prof John Obiri is a senior research scientist and team leader for Kenya. Co-I Mentor for this project is Prof Jadu Dash who is a Professor in Remote Sensing The anticipated outcomes will include: a. 25 researchers able to operate and manage drone data and training resources b. 1 peer reviewed articles on drone technology for water quality monitoring to be published c. One video documentary produced describing impacts of upstream resource management models on small scale irrigation and water security in the wetland and floodplains d. A network of drone operators to be established in each country for enhanced collaboration on future drone research projects e. Drone operation training guide
Start Year 2019
 
Description BRECcIA Small Research Project: Comprehensive assessment of small-scale irrigation cropland using Remotely Piloted Aircrafts (RPAs) technology - Case of Lake Chilwa Basin, Southern Malawi 
Organisation Mzuzu University
Country Malawi 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution This research aims at utilizing Remotely Piloted Aircrafts (RPAs) as an affordable source of remote sensing data for precision agriculture Assessment of the level of water utilisation with a special focus on small-scale irrigation using RPAs will help to quantify the total size of land under irrigation and the size of food output to feed the growing population. Geographical Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) based approaches will be used for processing and interpretation of the drone imagery. The drone capacity as a remote sensing data collection platform will add a new dimension in RS capabilities for managing water and food security. The research will be implemented at Lake Chilwa basin in Southern Malawi and will be scaled out to drylands in Ghana and Kenya. The potential impacts include improved research capacity in the use of drones, improved access to information by smallholder farmers and dryland pastoralists on resilience building to climate and evidence based policy changes regarding the acceptance of technology (drones) for problem solving in the these countries.
Collaborator Contribution A new Small Research Projects team will work together to Project objectives: • Train 25 researchers in drone applications for precision agriculture and water security monitoring (Ghana, Malawi, Kenya and the UK) • Temporal and spatial small scale irrigation and water management data collection in sampled sites in Lake Chilwa Basin, & replicated in other sites in Kenya and Ghana • Analyse impact of poor water abstraction technologies on sustainable food security and water budget • Demonstrate evidence based research results for irrigation policy and food & nutrition policy changes.
Impact The project is interdisciplinary in nature and across wide geographical spectrum. The interdisciplinary is shown by integration of research team with different back grounds. Prof Sosten Chiotha is environmental scientist who has studied the link between water degradation and infestation schistosomiasis; Dr Wales Singini is fisheries scientist and a research fellow who has studies fisheries in many water bodies of Malawi including Lake Chilwa and its rivers; Prof Mauli Dzodzomenyo is an environmental health and microbiology specialist and a team leader for Ghana; Chengxiu Li is a PhD Student and senior research assistant with GIS and Remote Sensing background; Fanuel Kapute is senior lecturer and research scientist with vast experience in agriculture and food security including fisheries; Prof John Obiri is a senior research scientist and team leader for Kenya. Co-I Mentor for this project is Prof Jadu Dash who is a Professor in Remote Sensing The anticipated outcomes will include: a. 25 researchers able to operate and manage drone data and training resources b. 1 peer reviewed articles on drone technology for water quality monitoring to be published c. One video documentary produced describing impacts of upstream resource management models on small scale irrigation and water security in the wetland and floodplains d. A network of drone operators to be established in each country for enhanced collaboration on future drone research projects e. Drone operation training guide
Start Year 2019
 
Description BRECcIA Small Research Project: Comprehensive assessment of small-scale irrigation cropland using Remotely Piloted Aircrafts (RPAs) technology - Case of Lake Chilwa Basin, Southern Malawi 
Organisation University of Ghana
Country Ghana 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This research aims at utilizing Remotely Piloted Aircrafts (RPAs) as an affordable source of remote sensing data for precision agriculture Assessment of the level of water utilisation with a special focus on small-scale irrigation using RPAs will help to quantify the total size of land under irrigation and the size of food output to feed the growing population. Geographical Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) based approaches will be used for processing and interpretation of the drone imagery. The drone capacity as a remote sensing data collection platform will add a new dimension in RS capabilities for managing water and food security. The research will be implemented at Lake Chilwa basin in Southern Malawi and will be scaled out to drylands in Ghana and Kenya. The potential impacts include improved research capacity in the use of drones, improved access to information by smallholder farmers and dryland pastoralists on resilience building to climate and evidence based policy changes regarding the acceptance of technology (drones) for problem solving in the these countries.
Collaborator Contribution A new Small Research Projects team will work together to Project objectives: • Train 25 researchers in drone applications for precision agriculture and water security monitoring (Ghana, Malawi, Kenya and the UK) • Temporal and spatial small scale irrigation and water management data collection in sampled sites in Lake Chilwa Basin, & replicated in other sites in Kenya and Ghana • Analyse impact of poor water abstraction technologies on sustainable food security and water budget • Demonstrate evidence based research results for irrigation policy and food & nutrition policy changes.
Impact The project is interdisciplinary in nature and across wide geographical spectrum. The interdisciplinary is shown by integration of research team with different back grounds. Prof Sosten Chiotha is environmental scientist who has studied the link between water degradation and infestation schistosomiasis; Dr Wales Singini is fisheries scientist and a research fellow who has studies fisheries in many water bodies of Malawi including Lake Chilwa and its rivers; Prof Mauli Dzodzomenyo is an environmental health and microbiology specialist and a team leader for Ghana; Chengxiu Li is a PhD Student and senior research assistant with GIS and Remote Sensing background; Fanuel Kapute is senior lecturer and research scientist with vast experience in agriculture and food security including fisheries; Prof John Obiri is a senior research scientist and team leader for Kenya. Co-I Mentor for this project is Prof Jadu Dash who is a Professor in Remote Sensing The anticipated outcomes will include: a. 25 researchers able to operate and manage drone data and training resources b. 1 peer reviewed articles on drone technology for water quality monitoring to be published c. One video documentary produced describing impacts of upstream resource management models on small scale irrigation and water security in the wetland and floodplains d. A network of drone operators to be established in each country for enhanced collaboration on future drone research projects e. Drone operation training guide
Start Year 2019
 
Description BRECcIA Small Research Project: Comprehensive assessment of small-scale irrigation cropland using Remotely Piloted Aircrafts (RPAs) technology - Case of Lake Chilwa Basin, Southern Malawi 
Organisation University of Southampton
Department University of Southampton Clinical Trials Unit
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This research aims at utilizing Remotely Piloted Aircrafts (RPAs) as an affordable source of remote sensing data for precision agriculture Assessment of the level of water utilisation with a special focus on small-scale irrigation using RPAs will help to quantify the total size of land under irrigation and the size of food output to feed the growing population. Geographical Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) based approaches will be used for processing and interpretation of the drone imagery. The drone capacity as a remote sensing data collection platform will add a new dimension in RS capabilities for managing water and food security. The research will be implemented at Lake Chilwa basin in Southern Malawi and will be scaled out to drylands in Ghana and Kenya. The potential impacts include improved research capacity in the use of drones, improved access to information by smallholder farmers and dryland pastoralists on resilience building to climate and evidence based policy changes regarding the acceptance of technology (drones) for problem solving in the these countries.
Collaborator Contribution A new Small Research Projects team will work together to Project objectives: • Train 25 researchers in drone applications for precision agriculture and water security monitoring (Ghana, Malawi, Kenya and the UK) • Temporal and spatial small scale irrigation and water management data collection in sampled sites in Lake Chilwa Basin, & replicated in other sites in Kenya and Ghana • Analyse impact of poor water abstraction technologies on sustainable food security and water budget • Demonstrate evidence based research results for irrigation policy and food & nutrition policy changes.
Impact The project is interdisciplinary in nature and across wide geographical spectrum. The interdisciplinary is shown by integration of research team with different back grounds. Prof Sosten Chiotha is environmental scientist who has studied the link between water degradation and infestation schistosomiasis; Dr Wales Singini is fisheries scientist and a research fellow who has studies fisheries in many water bodies of Malawi including Lake Chilwa and its rivers; Prof Mauli Dzodzomenyo is an environmental health and microbiology specialist and a team leader for Ghana; Chengxiu Li is a PhD Student and senior research assistant with GIS and Remote Sensing background; Fanuel Kapute is senior lecturer and research scientist with vast experience in agriculture and food security including fisheries; Prof John Obiri is a senior research scientist and team leader for Kenya. Co-I Mentor for this project is Prof Jadu Dash who is a Professor in Remote Sensing The anticipated outcomes will include: a. 25 researchers able to operate and manage drone data and training resources b. 1 peer reviewed articles on drone technology for water quality monitoring to be published c. One video documentary produced describing impacts of upstream resource management models on small scale irrigation and water security in the wetland and floodplains d. A network of drone operators to be established in each country for enhanced collaboration on future drone research projects e. Drone operation training guide
Start Year 2019
 
Description BRECcIA Small Research Project: Evaluation of land use change on water and food security in Lagha Bor Catchment, Wajir County, Kenya 
Organisation Kenyatta University
Department Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Country Kenya 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Project designed and approved under the BRECcIA Small Research Projects call.
Collaborator Contribution Kenya has a varied ecological environment, which is characterized by differences in agricultural potential and in patterns of food production. Wajir county has faced increasing food deficits, and high rural poverty levels, a fact attributed to high population growth, environmental degradation and limited sources of livelihoods. However, this problem is more prominent in arid and semiarid lands (ASALs) which constitute about 80% of the total land mass in Kenya where pastoralism is the main livelihood activity. This project seeks to understand the effects of land use change and climate variability on vegetation dynamics (vegetation, soil and water balance) in the Lagha Bor catchment area of Wajir County in Kenya. Furthermore, it will seek to understand the impacts of long term land use including water development and settlement; on sustainable livestock livelihooda. This will inform possible technological interventions for improved water and food security in the region. Research questions 1. What are the natural and human factors affecting water and food security in Lagha Bor catchment in Wajir County? 2. What are the effects of land use change and climate variability on: a. Vegetation dynamics in the catchment? b. Soil around villages and piospheres? c. Water balance and erosion dynamics in the study area? 3. What are the best policy interventions to enable improved water and food security in the study area and County? Methodology The methodology will involve the use of both primary and secondary data. The primary data will include remote sensing, climactic, topography and soils data. The methods used shall include an analysis of climate (rainfall amount and distribution, frequency of extreme events as appropriate and temperature changes), human and livestock population trends, land use land and management practices, access to water and vegetation and resource management interventions and their contribution to land degradation in the catchment in the last 35 years. More specifically the study will use: • Imagery data from five different Landsat missions, including the Thematic Mapper (TM) present on Landsats 4 and 5, and Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) present on Landsats 6 and 7 as well as the most recent Landsat 8 • Soil sampling • Hydrological modelling. (SWAT MODFLOW model) (Arnold and Allen, 1998; Baker and Miller, 2013)
Impact The interdisciplinary nature of the project is reflected in the combination of a hydrological study with a policy study. The outputs from the study on the effects of land use change and climate variability on water balance will directly feed into a policy research element of the project though the policy workshops that will be held at Wajir county. This will give us an opportunity to share these findings with policy makers at the county level in order to assist them in formulating sustainable policies around water management including regulation measures. In the simulation of water balance the out puts will be maps and trend analysis showing temporal and spatial variation of water components which includes groundwater recharge, surface runoff, soil moisture, evapotransipration and erosion. Other outputs will include stream flow hydrographs for simulation of surface runoff. Erosion and siltation data and maps is another output that will assist in development of land management rehabilitation mechanisms. The same will help in development plans for rehabilitation of surface waterpans and improve their useful life. Other Key outputs shall include maps and data on suitable site for spate irrigation with due consideration of topography, soils and hydrological flows. Spate irrigation is considered a key adaptation measure for arid and semi-arid areas. This could be use alongside grass-reseeding for improved performance. Furthermore, It is anticipated that two journal papers will emerge from this project. One focusing on the findings from the hydrological study and the other focusing on the policy element The proposed projected aims at ensuring better water and food security policies for Wajir County. Information obtained through the study could be used for adjusted planning and management of the watershed within Wajir County to meet the requirements for better water harvesting, controlled utilization of groundwater, identifying suitable sites for artificial aquifer recharge, improvement of livelihood through spate irrigation and land rehabilitation measures necessary for adapted rangeland management. Another anticipated impact is capacity building of the PhD student involved in the project and the PDRA in the research and management skills needed to successfully undertake this project. As the project seeks to involve key stakeholders in Wajir county as co-researchers, one impact will be the skills transfer to the local government and community on sustainable food and water security.
Start Year 2019
 
Description BRECcIA Small Research Project: Evaluation of land use change on water and food security in Lagha Bor Catchment, Wajir County, Kenya 
Organisation Technical University of Kenya
PI Contribution Project designed and approved under the BRECcIA Small Research Projects call.
Collaborator Contribution Kenya has a varied ecological environment, which is characterized by differences in agricultural potential and in patterns of food production. Wajir county has faced increasing food deficits, and high rural poverty levels, a fact attributed to high population growth, environmental degradation and limited sources of livelihoods. However, this problem is more prominent in arid and semiarid lands (ASALs) which constitute about 80% of the total land mass in Kenya where pastoralism is the main livelihood activity. This project seeks to understand the effects of land use change and climate variability on vegetation dynamics (vegetation, soil and water balance) in the Lagha Bor catchment area of Wajir County in Kenya. Furthermore, it will seek to understand the impacts of long term land use including water development and settlement; on sustainable livestock livelihooda. This will inform possible technological interventions for improved water and food security in the region. Research questions 1. What are the natural and human factors affecting water and food security in Lagha Bor catchment in Wajir County? 2. What are the effects of land use change and climate variability on: a. Vegetation dynamics in the catchment? b. Soil around villages and piospheres? c. Water balance and erosion dynamics in the study area? 3. What are the best policy interventions to enable improved water and food security in the study area and County? Methodology The methodology will involve the use of both primary and secondary data. The primary data will include remote sensing, climactic, topography and soils data. The methods used shall include an analysis of climate (rainfall amount and distribution, frequency of extreme events as appropriate and temperature changes), human and livestock population trends, land use land and management practices, access to water and vegetation and resource management interventions and their contribution to land degradation in the catchment in the last 35 years. More specifically the study will use: • Imagery data from five different Landsat missions, including the Thematic Mapper (TM) present on Landsats 4 and 5, and Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) present on Landsats 6 and 7 as well as the most recent Landsat 8 • Soil sampling • Hydrological modelling. (SWAT MODFLOW model) (Arnold and Allen, 1998; Baker and Miller, 2013)
Impact The interdisciplinary nature of the project is reflected in the combination of a hydrological study with a policy study. The outputs from the study on the effects of land use change and climate variability on water balance will directly feed into a policy research element of the project though the policy workshops that will be held at Wajir county. This will give us an opportunity to share these findings with policy makers at the county level in order to assist them in formulating sustainable policies around water management including regulation measures. In the simulation of water balance the out puts will be maps and trend analysis showing temporal and spatial variation of water components which includes groundwater recharge, surface runoff, soil moisture, evapotransipration and erosion. Other outputs will include stream flow hydrographs for simulation of surface runoff. Erosion and siltation data and maps is another output that will assist in development of land management rehabilitation mechanisms. The same will help in development plans for rehabilitation of surface waterpans and improve their useful life. Other Key outputs shall include maps and data on suitable site for spate irrigation with due consideration of topography, soils and hydrological flows. Spate irrigation is considered a key adaptation measure for arid and semi-arid areas. This could be use alongside grass-reseeding for improved performance. Furthermore, It is anticipated that two journal papers will emerge from this project. One focusing on the findings from the hydrological study and the other focusing on the policy element The proposed projected aims at ensuring better water and food security policies for Wajir County. Information obtained through the study could be used for adjusted planning and management of the watershed within Wajir County to meet the requirements for better water harvesting, controlled utilization of groundwater, identifying suitable sites for artificial aquifer recharge, improvement of livelihood through spate irrigation and land rehabilitation measures necessary for adapted rangeland management. Another anticipated impact is capacity building of the PhD student involved in the project and the PDRA in the research and management skills needed to successfully undertake this project. As the project seeks to involve key stakeholders in Wajir county as co-researchers, one impact will be the skills transfer to the local government and community on sustainable food and water security.
Start Year 2019
 
Description BRECcIA Small Research Project: Evaluation of land use change on water and food security in Lagha Bor Catchment, Wajir County, Kenya 
Organisation University of Southampton
Department University of Southampton Clinical Trials Unit
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Project designed and approved under the BRECcIA Small Research Projects call.
Collaborator Contribution Kenya has a varied ecological environment, which is characterized by differences in agricultural potential and in patterns of food production. Wajir county has faced increasing food deficits, and high rural poverty levels, a fact attributed to high population growth, environmental degradation and limited sources of livelihoods. However, this problem is more prominent in arid and semiarid lands (ASALs) which constitute about 80% of the total land mass in Kenya where pastoralism is the main livelihood activity. This project seeks to understand the effects of land use change and climate variability on vegetation dynamics (vegetation, soil and water balance) in the Lagha Bor catchment area of Wajir County in Kenya. Furthermore, it will seek to understand the impacts of long term land use including water development and settlement; on sustainable livestock livelihooda. This will inform possible technological interventions for improved water and food security in the region. Research questions 1. What are the natural and human factors affecting water and food security in Lagha Bor catchment in Wajir County? 2. What are the effects of land use change and climate variability on: a. Vegetation dynamics in the catchment? b. Soil around villages and piospheres? c. Water balance and erosion dynamics in the study area? 3. What are the best policy interventions to enable improved water and food security in the study area and County? Methodology The methodology will involve the use of both primary and secondary data. The primary data will include remote sensing, climactic, topography and soils data. The methods used shall include an analysis of climate (rainfall amount and distribution, frequency of extreme events as appropriate and temperature changes), human and livestock population trends, land use land and management practices, access to water and vegetation and resource management interventions and their contribution to land degradation in the catchment in the last 35 years. More specifically the study will use: • Imagery data from five different Landsat missions, including the Thematic Mapper (TM) present on Landsats 4 and 5, and Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) present on Landsats 6 and 7 as well as the most recent Landsat 8 • Soil sampling • Hydrological modelling. (SWAT MODFLOW model) (Arnold and Allen, 1998; Baker and Miller, 2013)
Impact The interdisciplinary nature of the project is reflected in the combination of a hydrological study with a policy study. The outputs from the study on the effects of land use change and climate variability on water balance will directly feed into a policy research element of the project though the policy workshops that will be held at Wajir county. This will give us an opportunity to share these findings with policy makers at the county level in order to assist them in formulating sustainable policies around water management including regulation measures. In the simulation of water balance the out puts will be maps and trend analysis showing temporal and spatial variation of water components which includes groundwater recharge, surface runoff, soil moisture, evapotransipration and erosion. Other outputs will include stream flow hydrographs for simulation of surface runoff. Erosion and siltation data and maps is another output that will assist in development of land management rehabilitation mechanisms. The same will help in development plans for rehabilitation of surface waterpans and improve their useful life. Other Key outputs shall include maps and data on suitable site for spate irrigation with due consideration of topography, soils and hydrological flows. Spate irrigation is considered a key adaptation measure for arid and semi-arid areas. This could be use alongside grass-reseeding for improved performance. Furthermore, It is anticipated that two journal papers will emerge from this project. One focusing on the findings from the hydrological study and the other focusing on the policy element The proposed projected aims at ensuring better water and food security policies for Wajir County. Information obtained through the study could be used for adjusted planning and management of the watershed within Wajir County to meet the requirements for better water harvesting, controlled utilization of groundwater, identifying suitable sites for artificial aquifer recharge, improvement of livelihood through spate irrigation and land rehabilitation measures necessary for adapted rangeland management. Another anticipated impact is capacity building of the PhD student involved in the project and the PDRA in the research and management skills needed to successfully undertake this project. As the project seeks to involve key stakeholders in Wajir county as co-researchers, one impact will be the skills transfer to the local government and community on sustainable food and water security.
Start Year 2019
 
Description BRECcIA Small Research Project: Evaluation of land use change on water and food security in Lagha Bor Catchment, Wajir County, Kenya 
Organisation Wajir County Government
Country Kenya 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Project designed and approved under the BRECcIA Small Research Projects call.
Collaborator Contribution Kenya has a varied ecological environment, which is characterized by differences in agricultural potential and in patterns of food production. Wajir county has faced increasing food deficits, and high rural poverty levels, a fact attributed to high population growth, environmental degradation and limited sources of livelihoods. However, this problem is more prominent in arid and semiarid lands (ASALs) which constitute about 80% of the total land mass in Kenya where pastoralism is the main livelihood activity. This project seeks to understand the effects of land use change and climate variability on vegetation dynamics (vegetation, soil and water balance) in the Lagha Bor catchment area of Wajir County in Kenya. Furthermore, it will seek to understand the impacts of long term land use including water development and settlement; on sustainable livestock livelihooda. This will inform possible technological interventions for improved water and food security in the region. Research questions 1. What are the natural and human factors affecting water and food security in Lagha Bor catchment in Wajir County? 2. What are the effects of land use change and climate variability on: a. Vegetation dynamics in the catchment? b. Soil around villages and piospheres? c. Water balance and erosion dynamics in the study area? 3. What are the best policy interventions to enable improved water and food security in the study area and County? Methodology The methodology will involve the use of both primary and secondary data. The primary data will include remote sensing, climactic, topography and soils data. The methods used shall include an analysis of climate (rainfall amount and distribution, frequency of extreme events as appropriate and temperature changes), human and livestock population trends, land use land and management practices, access to water and vegetation and resource management interventions and their contribution to land degradation in the catchment in the last 35 years. More specifically the study will use: • Imagery data from five different Landsat missions, including the Thematic Mapper (TM) present on Landsats 4 and 5, and Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) present on Landsats 6 and 7 as well as the most recent Landsat 8 • Soil sampling • Hydrological modelling. (SWAT MODFLOW model) (Arnold and Allen, 1998; Baker and Miller, 2013)
Impact The interdisciplinary nature of the project is reflected in the combination of a hydrological study with a policy study. The outputs from the study on the effects of land use change and climate variability on water balance will directly feed into a policy research element of the project though the policy workshops that will be held at Wajir county. This will give us an opportunity to share these findings with policy makers at the county level in order to assist them in formulating sustainable policies around water management including regulation measures. In the simulation of water balance the out puts will be maps and trend analysis showing temporal and spatial variation of water components which includes groundwater recharge, surface runoff, soil moisture, evapotransipration and erosion. Other outputs will include stream flow hydrographs for simulation of surface runoff. Erosion and siltation data and maps is another output that will assist in development of land management rehabilitation mechanisms. The same will help in development plans for rehabilitation of surface waterpans and improve their useful life. Other Key outputs shall include maps and data on suitable site for spate irrigation with due consideration of topography, soils and hydrological flows. Spate irrigation is considered a key adaptation measure for arid and semi-arid areas. This could be use alongside grass-reseeding for improved performance. Furthermore, It is anticipated that two journal papers will emerge from this project. One focusing on the findings from the hydrological study and the other focusing on the policy element The proposed projected aims at ensuring better water and food security policies for Wajir County. Information obtained through the study could be used for adjusted planning and management of the watershed within Wajir County to meet the requirements for better water harvesting, controlled utilization of groundwater, identifying suitable sites for artificial aquifer recharge, improvement of livelihood through spate irrigation and land rehabilitation measures necessary for adapted rangeland management. Another anticipated impact is capacity building of the PhD student involved in the project and the PDRA in the research and management skills needed to successfully undertake this project. As the project seeks to involve key stakeholders in Wajir county as co-researchers, one impact will be the skills transfer to the local government and community on sustainable food and water security.
Start Year 2019
 
Description BRECcIA Small Research Project: Evidence to Support Policy Amendment of Water and Food Security in Drylands of Malawi 
Organisation University of Malawi
Country Malawi 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Project designed and approved under the BRECcIA Small Research Projects call, lead by University of Southampton
Collaborator Contribution Management of water and food security in the drylands of Malawi remains a challenge due to limited capacity to manage disasters, risks and uncertainties associated with climate change. Anecdotal information suggests that conflicting policies and the omission of specific information on food and water security in drylands is a root cause. This project will support the security of food and water in the drylands of Malawi through the provision of evidence-based information that can feed into policy amendments to ensure sustainable water and food security in these drylands. The aim of the research is to understand fundamental capacity gaps that contribute to low adaptive capacities and weak resilience among dryland communities. The study sites are Balaka, Ntcheu and Salima Districts. The research will include a review of legal and institutional frameworks, focus group discussions with local leaders, including Village Development Committees (VDC), Area Development Committee (ADC) and lead farmers, informant interviews with policy makers, biophysical assessments and hydrological mapping to generate water profiles and livelihood mapping to assess the conditions of livelihood supporting assets.
Impact The project is integrating more than one discipline through the following: ? Review of existing laws and policies including institutional arrangements regarding drylands management will involve policy makers, legal experts, development experts and policy implementers in Malawi and collaborating countries; ? Assessment of adaptive capacities and identification of both historical and current best practices for managing water and food security within drylands will involve livelihoods experts, historians, development experts, policy implementers, food security experts, water resource managers, natural resource manager, environmentalists and agriculturalists; The output will be a research paper and a policy brief with recommendations for creating a more enabling legal and institutional framework for resilience building with regards to water and food security in the drylands
Start Year 2019
 
Description BRECcIA Small Research Project: Monitoring agricultural land use change and its linkage to food security in Sub-Saharan Africa 
Organisation Kenyatta University
Department Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Country Kenya 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution University of Southampton Early Career Researchers lead on the project. To ensure food security, we must first understand where the food grows, how the agricultural land area changes and why these changes happen. This information and understanding is scarce in sub-Saharan Africa. This project therefore aims to monitor spatial and temporal changes in agricultural land area in relation to land use and land cover change. By using high spatial resolution satellite images we will develop an algorithm for classifying agricultural area and land use types. We will monitor changes in agricultural areas at country scale in Malawi, Ghana, and Kenya with a spatial resolution of 30 m. This research will generate agricultural extent maps, which are the first step in evaluating food production and to improving agricultural productivity. This research will also detect agricultural areas undergoing rapid changes and potentially explore the factors responsible for these changes, which possibly will be delivered to policy makers and provide guidance on areas where attention is needed. The research output will also help to understand how the specific policies affect changes in agricultural area and eventually food security in Sub-Saharan Africa.
Collaborator Contribution Partners will collaborate on project activities: To achieve the research aim, the following research activities will be followed: 1. Assess existing satellite data availability and data quality The satellite data availability and quality will be assessed in drylands of three countries. The availability of satellite data further helps to identify the area where high-resolution satellite data can be put into use. 2. Apply for high resolution satellite data The high-resolution satellite data selection and application will be coordinated with site selection and interdisciplinary work, for example on how agricultural area and production related to land tenure conflict and migration pattern of pastoralist. 3. Train classification algorithm and accuracy assessment The accuracies of different classification algorithms will be compared and approaches with the highest accuracy will be applied. 4. Coordination on drone data collection and decision on field data campaign If the high-resolution data is not available as in step 3, the drone image collection and field data collection approaches will be discussed and implemented. This field data collection will be coordinated with LEAD research group. However, funding for potential field data collection will not be requested at this stage. 5. Detect hotspot of agricultural expansion/shrinkage and land use changes 6. Monitoring crop intensity and fallow area 7. Analysis of changes in agricultural area and attendant production 8. Result interpretation
Impact Multi-disciplinary framework is needed to understand why and how agricultural expansion/shrinkage happened, and what are potential impacts on this? This project will potentially collaborate with following interdisciplinary research questions: • What are main drivers for agricultural expansion/shrinkage in SSA, especially how the national policy (fertilizer, seed variety, etc) and agricultural program contribute to the agricultural expansion/shrinkage and what are differences on this in three countries? • How community resilience differs under agricultural expansion and shrinkage circumstances? Specially whether community resilience is lower in agricultural expansion area and will be weaker in the long-term; whether community resilience has been built in agricultural shrinkage area where potential agricultural intensification might have happened? Expected outputs include new datasets, publications and a network development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description BRECcIA Small Research Project: Monitoring agricultural land use change and its linkage to food security in Sub-Saharan Africa 
Organisation University of Ghana
Country Ghana 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution University of Southampton Early Career Researchers lead on the project. To ensure food security, we must first understand where the food grows, how the agricultural land area changes and why these changes happen. This information and understanding is scarce in sub-Saharan Africa. This project therefore aims to monitor spatial and temporal changes in agricultural land area in relation to land use and land cover change. By using high spatial resolution satellite images we will develop an algorithm for classifying agricultural area and land use types. We will monitor changes in agricultural areas at country scale in Malawi, Ghana, and Kenya with a spatial resolution of 30 m. This research will generate agricultural extent maps, which are the first step in evaluating food production and to improving agricultural productivity. This research will also detect agricultural areas undergoing rapid changes and potentially explore the factors responsible for these changes, which possibly will be delivered to policy makers and provide guidance on areas where attention is needed. The research output will also help to understand how the specific policies affect changes in agricultural area and eventually food security in Sub-Saharan Africa.
Collaborator Contribution Partners will collaborate on project activities: To achieve the research aim, the following research activities will be followed: 1. Assess existing satellite data availability and data quality The satellite data availability and quality will be assessed in drylands of three countries. The availability of satellite data further helps to identify the area where high-resolution satellite data can be put into use. 2. Apply for high resolution satellite data The high-resolution satellite data selection and application will be coordinated with site selection and interdisciplinary work, for example on how agricultural area and production related to land tenure conflict and migration pattern of pastoralist. 3. Train classification algorithm and accuracy assessment The accuracies of different classification algorithms will be compared and approaches with the highest accuracy will be applied. 4. Coordination on drone data collection and decision on field data campaign If the high-resolution data is not available as in step 3, the drone image collection and field data collection approaches will be discussed and implemented. This field data collection will be coordinated with LEAD research group. However, funding for potential field data collection will not be requested at this stage. 5. Detect hotspot of agricultural expansion/shrinkage and land use changes 6. Monitoring crop intensity and fallow area 7. Analysis of changes in agricultural area and attendant production 8. Result interpretation
Impact Multi-disciplinary framework is needed to understand why and how agricultural expansion/shrinkage happened, and what are potential impacts on this? This project will potentially collaborate with following interdisciplinary research questions: • What are main drivers for agricultural expansion/shrinkage in SSA, especially how the national policy (fertilizer, seed variety, etc) and agricultural program contribute to the agricultural expansion/shrinkage and what are differences on this in three countries? • How community resilience differs under agricultural expansion and shrinkage circumstances? Specially whether community resilience is lower in agricultural expansion area and will be weaker in the long-term; whether community resilience has been built in agricultural shrinkage area where potential agricultural intensification might have happened? Expected outputs include new datasets, publications and a network development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description BRECcIA Small Research Project: Monitoring agricultural land use change and its linkage to food security in Sub-Saharan Africa 
Organisation University of Southampton
Department University of Southampton Clinical Trials Unit
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution University of Southampton Early Career Researchers lead on the project. To ensure food security, we must first understand where the food grows, how the agricultural land area changes and why these changes happen. This information and understanding is scarce in sub-Saharan Africa. This project therefore aims to monitor spatial and temporal changes in agricultural land area in relation to land use and land cover change. By using high spatial resolution satellite images we will develop an algorithm for classifying agricultural area and land use types. We will monitor changes in agricultural areas at country scale in Malawi, Ghana, and Kenya with a spatial resolution of 30 m. This research will generate agricultural extent maps, which are the first step in evaluating food production and to improving agricultural productivity. This research will also detect agricultural areas undergoing rapid changes and potentially explore the factors responsible for these changes, which possibly will be delivered to policy makers and provide guidance on areas where attention is needed. The research output will also help to understand how the specific policies affect changes in agricultural area and eventually food security in Sub-Saharan Africa.
Collaborator Contribution Partners will collaborate on project activities: To achieve the research aim, the following research activities will be followed: 1. Assess existing satellite data availability and data quality The satellite data availability and quality will be assessed in drylands of three countries. The availability of satellite data further helps to identify the area where high-resolution satellite data can be put into use. 2. Apply for high resolution satellite data The high-resolution satellite data selection and application will be coordinated with site selection and interdisciplinary work, for example on how agricultural area and production related to land tenure conflict and migration pattern of pastoralist. 3. Train classification algorithm and accuracy assessment The accuracies of different classification algorithms will be compared and approaches with the highest accuracy will be applied. 4. Coordination on drone data collection and decision on field data campaign If the high-resolution data is not available as in step 3, the drone image collection and field data collection approaches will be discussed and implemented. This field data collection will be coordinated with LEAD research group. However, funding for potential field data collection will not be requested at this stage. 5. Detect hotspot of agricultural expansion/shrinkage and land use changes 6. Monitoring crop intensity and fallow area 7. Analysis of changes in agricultural area and attendant production 8. Result interpretation
Impact Multi-disciplinary framework is needed to understand why and how agricultural expansion/shrinkage happened, and what are potential impacts on this? This project will potentially collaborate with following interdisciplinary research questions: • What are main drivers for agricultural expansion/shrinkage in SSA, especially how the national policy (fertilizer, seed variety, etc) and agricultural program contribute to the agricultural expansion/shrinkage and what are differences on this in three countries? • How community resilience differs under agricultural expansion and shrinkage circumstances? Specially whether community resilience is lower in agricultural expansion area and will be weaker in the long-term; whether community resilience has been built in agricultural shrinkage area where potential agricultural intensification might have happened? Expected outputs include new datasets, publications and a network development.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Arid & Semi Arid Lands Stakeholder Forum (ASF), Kenya (July 2018) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Introduction of the BRECcIA project to the ASAL Stakeholder Forum in Kenya (Omar Mohammed) via the BRECcIA Research Meeting in Kisumu, Kneya (10-13 July 2018). The ASAL Stakeholder Forum (ASF) is a platform for all stakeholders working in Kenya's ASALs created through ASAL policy as part of ASAL transformation institution. ASF is designed to bring together Government, Academia, UN agencies, development partners, NGOs & the private sector, in a forum to enhance inclusivity & collaboration. The functions of ASF include Engagements amongst development actors to strengthen cross-sectoral & cross-agency coordination of development initiatives. They create greater synergy in interventions and sharing of experiences, with a view to optimizing use of resources for benefit of ASAL communities in Kenya.

BRECcIA and the ASAL Stakeholder Forum (ASF) will work together as a network to engage project stakeholders within Kenya.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description BRECcIA Interview for Kenyan NTV (July 2018) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact NTV Kenya videos (News outlet) recorded a short interview with members of the BRECcIA team whilst we held our 2018 Annual Research Meeting in Kisumu, Kenya with the aim of disseminating the basis and introduction to the BRECcIA project on national TV news in Kenya. The clip was shown live on the NTV news on Sat 14 July 2018 and uploaded to YouTube on 22 July 2018. In one week it has had more than 500 views on Youtube.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://youtu.be/wsy0ghvcu78
 
Description BRECcIA National Stakeholders Workshop - Ghana, 22 Nov 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The School of Public Health and the Regional Institute for Population Studies (RIPS), University of Ghana are collaborating with the University of Southampton and other partners from Kenya and Malawi to implement a four-year project on Building Research Capacity for sustainable water and food security in sub-Saharan Africa (BRECcIA). The project which aims to develop research capacity across institutions that are self-sustaining and focused on improving food and water security for the poorest of society, is being supported by the UK Government through its Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF), Research Councils UK Collective Fund. Ultimately, the project seeks to strengthen research capacity and capabilities in institutions in Ghana, Malawi and Kenya to carry out impactful research that leads to positive policy and practice change for sustainable water and food security, which will have benefits for the people living in the Sub Saharan Africa dry lands. BRECcIA will deliver impact through a programme of capacity development, capability enhancement, partnership building and targeted research in sustainable water and food security.
To introduce, co-develop and implement the BRECcIA project with relevant stakeholders, two inception workshops were organised: one in Accra on November 22, 2018 and the second in Tamale on November 27, 2018. Specifically, the workshop sought to:
• Introduce and discuss the BRECcIA project with relevant stakeholders, ensuring widespread understanding of the goals, potential outcome for institutions, and the crucial role stakeholders may play for an achieved goal.
• Identify research questions. To be relevant, impactful and foster long term "buy-in" from stakeholders, research questions must be built on an understanding of several factors including:
? Existing research and policy gaps.
? Existing barriers to food and water security in the drylands in each country.
? Community priorities in dryland areas.
? Opportunities for research findings to have impact.
• To encourage buy-in of stakeholders to research goals, through engaging stakeholders in developing the research in relation to them and their district/community's needs, priorities, interests and potential for influence.
• Foster networking and relationship building between BRECcIA researchers and potential research or communications partners.
This report provides an overview of the stakeholder meeting in Accra (see Appendix I for agenda) and a summary of discussions with the stakeholders present (see Appendix III for list of participants).
Attendance: The workshop was attended by a number of policy makers, representatives from NGOs, some lecturers from University of Ghana, representatives from Southampton and Kenya, media persons, and some invited guests. In all, there were about 40 participants
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description BRECcIA sub-National Stakeholder Workshop, Tamale, Ghana, 24 Nov 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The BRECcIA project local level stakeholder inception workshop was held at the Global Dream Hotel, Tamale (27th November, 2018) to introduce the project to stakeholders and to discuss pertinent issues of the environment, climate change and resilience in the context of semi-arid areas of northern- Ghana. The workshop also sought to identify study sites and stakeholders to co-develop and to implement the BRECcIA project with. The workshop brought together thirty-two (32) participants who represented researchers, local level policy makers and implementers from various governmental and non-governmental institutions.
In his welcome address, Dr. Godfred Seidu Jasaw, Deputy Director of the Kazuhiko Takeuchi Centre for Sustainability and Resilience, University for Development Studies (UDS), Tamale and the Head of Department of Community Development, Faculty of Planning and land Management- UDS, Wa campus, lauded the focus of the BRECcIA project in addressing water and food security in northern Ghana. Dr. Jasaw also urged the consideration of livestock in the research. He explained that while livestock contributes to food security in northern Ghana, it was barely considered in most projects addressing food security in these areas. Dr. Jasaw concluded by urging the BRECcIA team to bridge the gap between research and implementation in the process of addressing its research findings. The project could do so by operating both as an intervention and a research undertaking that seeks to solve pertinent issues in water and food security. The integration of research-policy practices could generate outputs that are implementable on the ground.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Malawi Core Stakeholder Group Meeting - 7 August 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact There were a total of 20 Participants including LEAD Malawi's Board of Directors. Out of the 20 participants, 14 were members of the Core Stakeholder Working Group. These participants were drawn from academia, civil society, NGOs and government. These organisations were identified during the desk identification of stakeholders through regional meeting in the central and northern regions of Malawi. Their mandate is to work with LEAD and Chancellor College in the identification, analysis and mapping of primary and secondary stakeholders for the BRECcIA project in readiness for National Stakeholder Workshop to be held in the last quarter of 2018. The meeting coincided with LEAD Malawi Board of Directors meeting and the BoD members were invited to attend the introductory part of BRECcIA project. This is important so that the BoD should be fully aware of the project and be able to provided oversight in its course of implementation. It was agreed that one of tasks during national stakeholder workshop is to come up with dry-lands area backed up by data from government departments such as Department of Climate Change and Metrological Services (DCCMS) and Environmental Affairs Department among others. groups were given a task to analyse each stakeholder from the initial list of stakeholders. They were tasked to categorise the stakeholder, scale them in terms of coverage of their work, provide name of person and contact details. They were also supposed to explain the relevance of the stakeholder in the project, rate their interest in the project and influence over the project and its outcomes. Finally, the groups were supposed to identify an engagement strategy and communication approach for each stakeholder.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Malawi Round 1 Stakeholder Workshop, Salima 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact On 30 October 2018 BRECcIA held the first of its three country-level stakeholder workshops in Salima, Malawi. LEAD, along with Chancellor College, University of Malawi, organised and facilitated the workshop.

This national stakeholder workshop brought together potential partner stakeholders for the following aims:
- To introduce and discuss the BRECCIA project with relevant stakeholders, ensuring widespread understanding of the goals, potential outcome for institutions, and the crucial role stakeholders must play for goals to be achieved.
- To identify research questions. To be relevant, impactful and foster long term buy-in from stakeholders, research questions must be built on understanding of several factors including:
o Existing research and policy gaps
o Existing barriers to food and water security in the drylands in each country
o Community priorities in dryland areas
o Opportunities for research findings to have impact
This understanding must come from broad-based in country knowledge of both local community needs, as well as local and national government policy or planning decisions.
- To encourage "buy-in" of stakeholders to research goals in each country, through engaging stakeholders in developing the research in relation to them and their constituencies own needs, priorities, interests and potential for influence.
- To foster networking and relationship building between BRECcIA researchers and potential research or communications partners.

This workshop lead to the development of a BRECcIA Small Research Project proposal ('Towards a resilient economy in Malawi') between LEAD and government based stakeholders. The stakeholders have also set up their own communication channels with the BRECcIA project in Malawi via WhatsApp group.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.gcrf-breccia.com/2018/11/21/reflecting-on-our-first-malawi-stakeholder-workshop/