Addressing Challenges of Coastal Communities through Ocean Research for Developing Economies (ACCORD).

Lead Research Organisation: National Oceanography Centre
Department Name: Science and Technology

Abstract

Addressing Challenges of Coastal Communities through Ocean Research for Developing Economies (ACCORD).

The coastal and marine environments of South East Asia and the Western Indian Ocean (the regional foci of ACCORD) are rich and diverse, possessing high levels of biodiversity and productivity. These regions also have hydrate-bearing seafloor sediments and seafloor mineral resources. Coastal ecosystems and the services they provide are under threat from growth in human activities, including the demands of increasing population size (globally, 2 billion people live within 100km of the coast) and global markets, the desire for economic growth, and the less direct impact of global climate change. This affects both the resilience of living resources to pressures and the ecosystem services we derive from them. Many coastal communities depend on nearby coastal and marine resources for their livelihoods and welfare yet lack alternatives when these services deteriorate due to over-exploitation or adverse effects of climate change. A the same time coastal developing nations are looking to the ocean to provide opportunities for sustainable economic growth through resource exploitation (e.g. mineral extraction) and livelihood diversification (e.g. tourism, aquaculture, and blue carbon initiatives) and to support food security (e.g. fisheries and aquaculture). For developing coastal nations the ocean is also an opportunity for diversification of their economies through the production of clean, renewable and unconventional energy and resource exploitation, yet these opportunities need to be balanced carefully against the need to protect habitats and preserve the total value of national resources. The concept of Blue Economy integrates ocean-based economic activities with conservation and sustainable use through effective marine planning.

We identify two overarching development challenges: a) Sustainable growth of, and resilience to change for, the blue economies of partner countries and b) Resilience to natural hazards including impact-based, climate-proof coastal flood warning systems.

Our aim is to deliver high quality science outcomes required to improve the environmental information available to support these challenges in coastal states on the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) list of Official Development Aid (ODA) recipients. Identifying and protecting critical habitats from overexploitation, and degradation is the cornerstone of the integrated ocean management required for sustainable blue economies. ACCORD will achieve this firstly by understanding the mechanisms and processes that determine the potential sensitivity or resilience of marine ecosystems to both globally and locally induced environmental change. Secondly, we will use this understanding to determine the environmental and societal consequences of ecosystem change to inform risk assessment, adaptive spatial management and mitigation strategies. Our approach will provide partner countries with an improved capability for integrated and sustainable management of marine activities. This capability will help partner countries to build a resilient marine and coastal socio-ecological system, and support their growing Blue Economies.

Planned Impact

The primary beneficiaries of our research will be the coastal states on the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) list of Official Development Aid (ODA) recipients in our two study regions. For the western Indian Ocean region these are Kenya, Mozambique, Madagascar, South Africa and Tanzania; for SE Asia we will be collaborating with Bangladesh, China, India, Malaysia, Indonesia, Myanmar, Philippines, Cambodia, and Vietnam. The primary beneficiaries are policy makers, resource managers and coastal managers tasked with delivering sustainable management of marine living resources and climate adaptation options (including protection from natural hazards). The benefits are an increased knowledge base and local capability to deliver up-to-date relevant environmental and socio-economic information to deliver evidence-based development plans and adaptation planning.

ACCORD will work in partnership with all identified states (focused by our stakeholder consultations and strategic analyses) to develop resilience to natural hazards and the growth of Blue Economies via supporting decision-makers in identifying ways to adapt to the next century of environmental and climatic stressors. The evidence and tools provided by the research will allow decision makers to better include the needs and values of some of the poorest and most vulnerable groups in future cost-benefit analyses to guide the decision-making process.

Our research will inform and influence policy and management, strategy and technology advances for coastal economies through the following objectives:
(i) to enhance the available environmental information by improving the observations, numerical models and other predictive tools available to determine how ecosystem services are affected by climate change in relation to other endogenic stressors;
(ii) to combine the improved physical and socio-economic data to provide decision support for policy development, planning, coastal zone management and resilience to natural hazards on a range of spatial and temporal scales and hence
(iii) to deliver evidence on the value to local communities of services from key coastal ecosystems in SE Asia and the western Indian Ocean;


Through these case studies we will deliver specific development outcomes at the national scale through government agencies. For example, our sea level work will directly support the development of impact-based, climate-proof coastal flood hazard warning systems in all our partner countries. We will pave the way for the in-state development of fit-for-purpose operational warning systems which allow partner countries to deliver reduced disaster risk measurable under the UN Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR).

The evidence and tools provided by the research will allow decision makers to better protect sustainable growth and deliver resilience to natural hazards and will include the needs and values of some of the poorest and most vulnerable groups in these countries. The work will also leave a legacy of collaborative links and improved capability and capacity for all our partners.

Publications

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De La Fuente M (2020) A densification mechanism to model the mechanical effect of methane hydrates in sandy sediments in International Journal for Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics

 
Title NetComFish film 
Description A four minute film has been created by the NetComFish team to highlight the importance of the mangroves in the Klang Islands, the threats that they face and how local communities and businesses can be part of the solution for mangroves in the area. The general public are the target audience for this film. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact We have only just completed the film and have yet to start sharing it widely. We will use it in our follow-on project NexAMS as an engagement tool. 
 
Description Tim Le Bas & James Strong presented some of the first results of the March 2018 ACCORD fieldwork in Malaysia at the Commonwealth Marine Science event held at NOC on 9 April 2018, demonstrating the capacity of NOC and the ACCORD programme to have a real impact through scientific collaborations in Commonwealth countries. Their work shows that acoustic techniques developed by NOC can be used in Malaysian MPAs with suitable training. This has significant implications for future management of MPAs in developing countries.
Tools for the development of sectorally balanced economic development in Vietnam (Da Nang Bay) have been developed and will be applied in a planning demonstrator process during 2020. Our work in Bangladesh has led to new proposals and new observational strategies for delta management by the Bangladesh government. The model scripts we have created have driven other projects (see 'other funding') and proven the value of fast application regional models
Exploitation Route The same approach applies in all countries developing MPAs. The ACCORD project has shown the value of 'deep' international cooperation where the objectives are co-designed and co-mananged with overseas partners. Long term relationships are essential for effective capcity building
Sectors Agriculture, Food and Drink,Creative Economy,Environment,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

 
Description We have engaged with overseas collaborators and have scoped out the case studies for the remainder of the ACCORD project. Importantly, we have identified the targets for social and economic impact A number of key reports have emerged that assist Capacity Building in the various Case Studies that form a key part of the project 1. "Recommended Operational Guidelines for marine habitat mapping of Malaysian protected sites": document compiled by James Strong and provided to Malaysian partners for use in their habitat mapping programme 2. Data management guidance documents developed by James Strong, Tim Le bas and Claire Postlewhaite, and provided to Malaysian partners to support their habitat mapping programme Case Studies have been developed with our collaborators in Bangladesh, Cambodia, Indonesia, Vietnam, South Africa and Malaysia. We are capacity building in all locations around a broad range of skills including: marine modelling, marine spatial planning, habitat mapping, coastal flood forecasting and marine minerals
First Year Of Impact 2018
Sector Agriculture, Food and Drink,Communities and Social Services/Policy,Environment,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Economic,Policy & public services

 
Description Citation in agreement under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea on the conservation and sustainable use of marine biological diversity of areas beyond national jurisdiction
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
Impact United Nations member states are negotiating a new International Legally Binding Instrument on the conservation and sustainable management of marine biodiversity in Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction (ABNJ). These waters do not exist in isolation: marine ecosystems are interconnected by ocean currents and the movement of migratory species. What happens in ABNJ can therefore cause impacts in territorial waters. Many Least Developed Countries (LDCs) and Small Island Developing States (SIDS) depend heavily on marine resources, but the benefits from conservation and management measures in ABNJ will not be evenly distributed. By highlighting which regions of ABNJ are most connected to coastal LDCs and other developing coastal states via ocean currents, the project helped the parties ensure that area-based management regimes in ABNJ protect these countries' interests and rights. We have run a side event at the UNCLOS negotiations in March 2019, based on the project publication (Popova et al., 2019) and the policy briefs (as listed in research fish with the key word ABNJ) The approach brought concrete results: the latest draft of the negotiating text was updated to recognise that the treaty must protect the many millions of people who depend on the high seas.
URL https://www.un.org/bbnj/sites/www.un.org.bbnj/files/draft_text_a.conf_.232.2019.6_advanced_unedited_...
 
Description Comoros: Connectivity between Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction and the coastal zones (Country Profile)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
Impact UN member states negotiating a legally binding instrument governing ABNJ must include provisions to ensure that all future management regimes are informed by their potential impacts on territorial waters - particularly in Least Developed Countries. Vigorous and seasonally reversing circulation of the WIO make East African coastal countries highly vulnerable to negative impacts of the fishing and extraction activities in the ABNJ The coastline of the Comoros is well connected to ABNJ indicating enhanced socio-economic vulnerability to the activities in the ABNJ. The project provided a detailed policy brief describing vulnerability of the coastal zone of Comoros to the activities in ABNJ and advocated explicit inclusion of the downstream connectivity to the treaty. The approach brought concrete results: the latest draft of the negotiating text was updated to recognise that the treaty must protect the many millions of people who depend on the high seas. The advice aims to ensure that: The criteria for establishing Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and other area-based management tools in ABNJ must include the potential socioeconomic benefits for vulnerable coastal communities, as well as the ecological or biological significance of the area in question. Governments must ensure that management systems in ABNJ are adaptive and dynamic, and share the technology, data capacity and investment needed to rapidly respond to shifts in species distribution or ocean circulation caused by climate change. Uncertainty around future climate change and impacts on connectivity necessitate a precautionary approach to ABNJ governance.
URL https://www.solstice-wio.org/outputs/policy-briefs
 
Description Kenya: Connectivity between Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction and the coastal zones (Country Profile)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
Impact UN member states negotiating a legally binding instrument governing ABNJ must include provisions to ensure that all future management regimes are informed by their potential impacts on territorial waters - particularly in Least Developed Countries. Vigorous and seasonally reversing circulation of the WIO make East African coastal countries highly vulnerable to negative impacts of the fishing and extraction activities in the ABNJ The coastline of Kenya is one of most ABNJ-connected coastlines in the world indicating enhanced socio-economic vulnerability to the activities in the ABNJ. The project provided a detailed policy brief describing vulnerability of the coastal zone of Kenya to the activities in ABNJ and advocated explicit inclusion of the downstream connectivity to the treaty. The approach brought concrete results: the latest draft of the negotiating text was updated to recognise that the treaty must protect the many millions of people who depend on the high seas. The advice aims to ensure that: The criteria for establishing Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and other area-based management tools in ABNJ must include the potential socioeconomic benefits for vulnerable coastal communities, as well as the ecological or biological significance of the area in question. Governments must ensure that management systems in ABNJ are adaptive and dynamic, and share the technology, data capacity and investment needed to rapidly respond to shifts in species distribution or ocean circulation caused by climate change. Uncertainty around future climate change and impacts on connectivity necessitate a precautionary approach to ABNJ governance.
URL https://www.solstice-wio.org/outputs/policy-briefs
 
Description Madagascar: Connectivity between Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction and the coastal zones (Country Profile)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
Impact UN member states negotiating a legally binding instrument governing ABNJ must include provisions to ensure that all future management regimes are informed by their potential impacts on territorial waters - particularly in Least Developed Countries. Vigorous and seasonally reversing circulation of the WIO make East African coastal countries highly vulnerable to negative impacts of the fishing and extraction activities in the ABNJ The coastline of Madagascar is one of most ABNJ-connected coastlines in the world indicating enhanced socio-economic vulnerability to the activities in the ABNJ. The project provided a detailed policy brief describing vulnerability of the coastal zone of Madagascar to the activities in ABNJ and advocated explicit inclusion of the downstream connectivity to the treaty. The approach brought concrete results: the latest draft of the negotiating text was updated to recognise that the treaty must protect the many millions of people who depend on the high seas. The advice aims to ensure that: The criteria for establishing Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and other area-based management tools in ABNJ must include the potential socioeconomic benefits for vulnerable coastal communities, as well as the ecological or biological significance of the area in question. Governments must ensure that management systems in ABNJ are adaptive and dynamic, and share the technology, data capacity and investment needed to rapidly respond to shifts in species distribution or ocean circulation caused by climate change. Uncertainty around future climate change and impacts on connectivity necessitate a precautionary approach to ABNJ governance.
URL https://www.solstice-wio.org/outputs/policy-briefs
 
Description Mozambique: Connectivity between Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction and the coastal zones (Country Profile)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
Impact UN member states are negotiating a legally binding instrument governing ABNJ must include provisions to ensure that all future management regimes are informed by their potential impacts on territorial waters - particularly in Least Developed Countries. Vigorous and seasonally reversing circulation of the WIO make East African coastal countries highly vulnerable to negative impacts of the fishing and extraction activities in the ABNJ The coastline of Mozambique is one of most ABNJ-connected coastlines in the world indicating enhanced socio-economic vulnerability to the activities in the ABNJ. The project provided a detailed policy brief describing vulnerability of the coastal zone of Mozambique to the activities in ABNJ and advocated explicit inclusion of the downstream connectivity to the treaty. The approach brought concrete results: the latest draft of the negotiating text was updated to recognise that the treaty must protect the many millions of people who depend on the high seas. The advice aims to ensure that: The criteria for establishing Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and other area-based management tools in ABNJ must include the potential socioeconomic benefits for vulnerable coastal communities, as well as the ecological or biological significance of the area in question. Governments must ensure that management systems in ABNJ are adaptive and dynamic, and share the technology, data capacity and investment needed to rapidly respond to shifts in species distribution or ocean circulation caused by climate change. Uncertainty around future climate change and impacts on connectivity necessitate a precautionary approach to ABNJ governance.
URL https://www.solstice-wio.org/outputs/policy-briefs
 
Description Side event at the United Nations Law of The Sea negotiations: So far yet so close: Why the High Seas matter to vulnerable coastal communities
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
Impact The project has provided a review of evince for the connectivity between the ABNJ and vulnerable coastal communities around the world (Popova et al., 2019) and produced a number of policy briefs aiming at negotiators of the UNCLOS ABNJ treaty. Using this material, we run a side event during the ABNJ negotiations at UN in New York in March 2019 entitled "So far yet so close: Why the High Seas matter to vulnerable coastal communities". Around 60 negotiators and participants were present. The approach brought concrete results: the latest draft of the negotiating text was updated to recognise that the treaty must protect the many millions of people who depend on the high seas.
URL https://www.un.org/bbnj/sites/www.un.org.bbnj/files/draft_text_a.conf_.232.2019.6_advanced_unedited_...
 
Description So far, yet so close: ecological connectivity between ABNJ and territorial waters
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
URL http://pubs.iied.org/17500IIED/
 
Description Somalia: Connectivity between Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction and the coastal zones (Country Profile)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
Impact UN member states negotiating a legally binding instrument governing ABNJ must include provisions to ensure that all future management regimes are informed by their potential impacts on territorial waters - particularly in Least Developed Countries. Vigorous and seasonally reversing circulation of the WIO make East African coastal countries highly vulnerable to negative impacts of the fishing and extraction activities in the ABNJ The coastline of Somalia is one of most ABNJ-connected coastlines in the world indicating enhanced socio-economic vulnerability to the activities in the ABNJ. The project provided a detailed policy brief describing vulnerability of the coastal zone of Somalia to the activities in ABNJ and advocated explicit inclusion of the downstream connectivity to the treaty. The approach brought concrete results: the latest draft of the negotiating text was updated to recognise that the treaty must protect the many millions of people who depend on the high seas. The advice aims to ensure that: The criteria for establishing Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and other area-based management tools in ABNJ must include the potential socioeconomic benefits for vulnerable coastal communities, as well as the ecological or biological significance of the area in question. Governments must ensure that management systems in ABNJ are adaptive and dynamic, and share the technology, data capacity and investment needed to rapidly respond to shifts in species distribution or ocean circulation caused by climate change. Uncertainty around future climate change and impacts on connectivity necessitate a precautionary approach to ABNJ governance.
URL https://www.solstice-wio.org/outputs/policy-briefs
 
Description Tanzania: Connectivity between Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction and the coastal zones (Country Profile)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
Impact UN member states negotiating a legally binding instrument governing ABNJ must include provisions to ensure that all future management regimes are informed by their potential impacts on territorial waters - particularly in Least Developed Countries. Vigorous and seasonally reversing circulation of the WIO make East African coastal countries highly vulnerable to negative impacts of the fishing and extraction activities in the ABNJ The coastline of Tanzania is one of most ABNJ-connected coastlines in the world indicating enhanced socio-economic vulnerability to the activities in the ABNJ. The project provided a detailed policy brief describing vulnerability of the coastal zone of Tanzania to the activities in ABNJ and advocated explicit inclusion of the downstream connectivity to the treaty. The approach brought concrete results: the latest draft of the negotiating text was updated to recognise that the treaty must protect the many millions of people who depend on the high seas. The advice aims to ensure that: The criteria for establishing Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and other area-based management tools in ABNJ must include the potential socioeconomic benefits for vulnerable coastal communities, as well as the ecological or biological significance of the area in question. Governments must ensure that management systems in ABNJ are adaptive and dynamic, and share the technology, data capacity and investment needed to rapidly respond to shifts in species distribution or ocean circulation caused by climate change. Uncertainty around future climate change and impacts on connectivity necessitate a precautionary approach to ABNJ governance.
URL https://www.solstice-wio.org/outputs/policy-briefs
 
Description ACCORD extension 2020-2021
Amount £1,393,549 (GBP)
Funding ID NE/T012420/1 ACCORD 
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2020 
End 03/2021
 
Description Coastal Resilience to flooding Impact through relocatable Storm surge forecasting Capability for developing nations (C-RISC)
Amount £101,338 (GBP)
Funding ID NE/R009406/1 
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2017 
End 04/2019
 
Description GCRF South Asian Nitrogen Hub
Amount £17,534,969 (GBP)
Funding ID NE/S009019/1 
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2019 
End 05/2024
 
Description NC-ODA ACCORD uplift (GCRF under-spend)
Amount £20,000 (GBP)
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2019 
End 08/2019
 
Description The likely occurrence of natural seafloor hydrates offshore Bangladesh - a scoping study.
Amount £232,000 (GBP)
Organisation Government of Bangladesh 
Sector Public
Country Bangladesh
Start 07/2019 
End 12/2020
 
Title Fieldwork planning for Vietnam 
Description Following an MOU agreement in 2019, substantial efforts have been undertaken to develop links with our Vietnamese partners. A delegation from the Vietnamese administration visited PML for a one-week training opportunity in marine science applications, methods and lectures. Planning activities for fieldwork are underway; provisionally scheduled for summer/autumn 2020. A provisional date of March 2020 was postponed due to delays in a Research Licence application process. Fieldwork will involve physical, chemical and biological characterisation of the Da Nang Bay area, in addition to training opportunities for Vietnamese partners (Department of Natural Resources, City or Da Nang). 
Type Of Material Biological samples 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact N/A at this stage 
 
Title Fieldwork undertaken in Cambodia 
Description Following an MOU agreement in 2019, the first fieldwork project in the Cambodian Archipelago was undertaken in July 2019. Over a two week period, the benthic environment was mapped using side-scan sonar. Benthic observations were made during surveys. At multiple stations across the archipelago, samples were collected for benthic and pelagic characterisations (including water column chemistry and structure, benthic estimation type). These observations have been combined to provide a view of the ecosystem, presented as a series of reports, drafts of which have been provided to stakeholders (Marine Conservation Cambodia, Cambodian Ministry of Environment). These initial observations form benchmark data against which subsequent visits may be compared. 
Type Of Material Biological samples 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact N/A at this stage 
 
Title Hydrodynamic model of FVCOM in coastal waters of Vietnam 
Description A FVCOM hydrodynamic model of the coastal waters of Vietnam has been run and updated using tidal forcing, surface atmospheric forcing from ERA5, and open boundary from NEMO model outputs. 
Type Of Material Computer model/algorithm 
Year Produced 2019 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The hydrodynamic outputs from this model are needed to simulate water quality around Da Nang bay. The model is also being used to design new proposals in the region to investigate the impacts of plastic pollution in the coastal area. 
 
Title NEMO-ERSEM Relocatable Model System 
Description This is a proceadure for rapidly delopying the NEMO-ERSEM model system, in any sea region in the world. It has been publically released for the example of the Caribbean Seas. 
Type Of Material Computer model/algorithm 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact This systems allows a wide range of marine information to be generate supporting regional stakeholder, with a particular focus on ODA countries in this application. 
URL https://github.com/NOC-MSM/Caribbean/releases
 
Title Seabed acoustic and ground-truthing data for the Pilau Bidong coral reef 
Description 90 videos of the coral reef at Pilau Bidong. Collected by a Remotely Operated Vehicle video and used to ground-truth acrostic data in the area. Datasets acquired with multibeam bathymetry and backscatter (5.5 days) Datasets acquired with sidescan sonar imagery (5 days) To be combined, using geostatistical tools, into marine habitat maps of the area. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Without this information, it is not possible to produce marine habitat maps of the area. The same information was used to trouble-shoot existing survey practices at UMT. The observations will enable (i) the collection of high-quality acoustic and ground-truthing data in the future; (ii) acoustic and ground-truthing interpretation and analysis by UMT; (iii) object-based image analysis using RSOBIA by UMT; and (iv) geospatial modelling techniques for coral reef mapping. 
 
Description Bangladesh seafloor hydrates 
Organisation Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Country Bangladesh 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution NOC is working with the Bangladesh Ministry of Foreign Affairs (BMoFA) on the topic of seafloor gas hydrates research. As a result, BMoFA commissioned NOC to conduct a 12 month desktop study (starting July 2019) to assess the potential for seafloor methane gas hydrates in the Bangladesh deep water EEZ areas of the Bay of Bengal. This involves analysis of seismic data already collected by Bangladesh as part of their previous UNCLOS submission.
Collaborator Contribution They have provided seismic data and other relevant seafloor scientific datasets already collected, and access to software licenses for industry seismic data processing.
Impact The activity is ongoing, and the results will be published subject to agreement with BMoFA.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Fisheries in Sundarbans 
Organisation University of Glasgow
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have shared our ACCORD model outputs with researchers (led by Dr David Bailey) at Glasgow University and the University of Shajalal in Bangladesh (Dr Swapan Sarker). The model outputs help the Bangladesh Forest and Fisheries Agency understand the vulnerability of juvenile fish to climate change and in particular saline intrusions
Collaborator Contribution They have used our data to inform fisheries patrol routes and will further use them in policy guidance
Impact We have written a new proposal for further GCRF funding and will continue to produce guidance notes that help the Bangladesh Forestry and Fisheries agency
Start Year 2019
 
Description Integrated hazard modelling with BMKG Indonesia 
Organisation Government of Indonesia
Department Meteorological, Climatological, and Geophysical Agency
Country Indonesia 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution BMKG launched the Indonesia Coastal Inundation Forecasting System (Ina-CIFS) on April 8, 2019 at BMKG Headquarter Auditorium in the Opening Ceremony of 10th Meeting of The JCOMM. Ina-CIFS is a coastal flood early warning monitoring system that protects tens of thousands of people in Jakarta and Semarang. Ina-CIFS which currently implemented in Jakarta and Semarang, considering that the two areas have a major impact due to the Coastal Flood. This is the result of 6 years of hard work in the development of the Coastal Inundation Forecasting Demonstration Project (CIFDP-I), with assistance from the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) and UK scientists from NOC
Collaborator Contribution Tidal analysis software and training. Advice on implementation of new coastal modeling systems. Further development of automated tide gauge QC software
Impact Workshop reports, final implementation reports
Start Year 2018
 
Description Mapping research with University of Malaysia Terengganu (UMT) and specifically with INOS (Institute of Oceanography and Environment) 
Organisation University of Malaysia, Terengganu
Country Malaysia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Activity to date: Initial processing of existing UMT multibeam and sidescan sonar data. Production of data management guidance documents Survey trouble-shooting visit (2 weeks in April 2018) to improve: (i) the collection of high-quality acoustic and ground-truthing data; (ii) acoustic and ground-truthing interpretation and analysis; (iii) object-based image analysis using RSOBIA; and (iv) geospatial modelling techniques. Drafting of the 'Recommended Operating Guidelines (ROG) for marine habitat mapping of Malaysian protected sites' and the NOC/UMT MOU. Survey work included: Datasets acquired with multibeam bathymetry and backscatter (5.5 days) Datasets acquired with sidescan sonar imagery (5 days) Datasets acquired with ROV imagery (3.5 days) - 84 dives Datasets acquired with Diving profiles (2 days) - 6 dives - support rule-based habitat mapping (producing maps when no GT is present. • Troubleshooting acoustic data collection in realtime Training delivered included: RSOBIA, Acquisition, processing and theory on multibeam and sidescan sonar systems, Geospatial modelling techniques, Data management theory Other outcomes: Standard Operating Procedure for Ground-truth and video analysis
Collaborator Contribution Full engagement with the survey work and training (approx. 15 staff). Boats made available. MOU with UMT and NOC. MSc Student supervision FRGS joint proposal on coral trait mapping (lead: UMT; partner: NOC)
Impact Activity to date: 1. Scoping visit (1 week in Jan 2018) to establish needs, vessel and equipment availability, staffing, permits and University clearance (i.e. MOU). 2. Initial processing of existing UMT multibeam and sidescan sonar data. 3. Production of data management guidance documents 4. Survey trouble-shooting visit (2 weeks in April 2018) to improve: (i) the collection of high-quality acoustic and ground-truthing data; (ii) acoustic and ground-truthing interpretation and analysis; (iii) object-based image analysis using RSOBIA; and (iv) geospatial modelling techniques. 5. Drafting of the 'Recommended Operating Guidelines (ROG) for marine habitat mapping of Malaysian protected sites' and the NOC/UMT MOU. Activity 4 - survey work included: • Datasets acquired with multibeam bathymetry and backscatter (5.5 days) • Datasets acquired with sidescan sonar imagery (5 days) • Datasets acquired with ROV imagery (3.5 days) - 84 dives • Datasets acquired with Diving profiles (2 days) - 6 dives - support rule-based habitat mapping (producing maps when no GT is present. • Troubleshooting acoustic data collection in realtime Training delivered included: • RSOBIA, • acquisition, processing and theory on multibeam and sidescan sonar systems, • geospatial modelling techniques, • management theory Other outcomes: • MOU with UMT and NOC. • MSc Student supervision • Standard Operating Procedure for Ground-truth and video analysis • FRGS joint proposal on coral trait mapping (lead: UMT; partner: NOC)
Start Year 2018
 
Description Marine habitat mapping on Koh Ach Seh Island, Cambodia 
Organisation Government of Cambodia
Department Department of the Environment
Country Cambodia 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The overall aim of the ACCORD project is to deliver high quality science that supports: (i) the sustainable growth of blue economies in partner countries; and (ii) the long-term resilience of these blue economies, within partner countries, to natural hazards stemming from climate change. During a scoping trip to Cambodia, Plymouth Marine Laboratory (PML) identified Marine Conservation Cambodia (MCC), a non-governmental organisation (NGO) dedicated to delivery marine conservation on behalf of the Cambodian Ministry of the Environment in Kep province. Marine Conservation Cambodia operate from Koh Ach Seh Island (Kep province). Their primary interests include: (i) the deployment of concrete seabed structures that act as both artificial reef units and anti-trawl devices (to dissuade illegal fishing within protected areas); (ii) sea mammal monitoring; (iii) seahorse conservation projects; and (iv) other marine conservation efforts such as marine litter removal. Besides being responsible for the management and protection of Koh Ach Seh, Marine Conservation Cambodia is also responsible for 13 other island reefs in the area and roughly 30 km2 of seagrass beds within Kep Province. MCC were deemed a suitable in-country partner for involvement with the ACCORD project and also provided a base of operations for the ACCORD fieldwork.
Collaborator Contribution Partners contributed staff to support the fieldwork.
Impact An extensive area of sidescan sonar data was collected in challenging conditions (a shallow and irregular seabed with daily heavy seas). The sidescan was able to differentiate between coral mounds and two additional acoustic ground-types. The third 'silty sand with seagrass' class appeared to be heavily influenced by survey artefacts and was judged to be a poor representation of seagrass coverage. A total of 66 ROV ground truthing stations allowed the identification of the broad-scale habitats as well as the epifaunal and emergent infaunal species that characterised the area. The supervised and unsupervised classifications of both the acoustic data and optical (drone) imagery were able broadly to identify the main zones and features present across the survey site. Further work is required to optimise these models by: (i) reprocessing the ground-truthing in the laboratory rather than relying on field observations; (ii) splitting the available grounding into calibration and validation datasets; (iii) examine the potential of ensemble models; (iv) access additional observations held by MCC; and (v) assess the performance of the models using a validation data set. The trials with the aerial drone were very promising. The mosaic and DEM look credible but require additional ground-truthing (potentially provided by PML's shallow benthic survey). As the fringing reef is all located in shallow waters, the use of drone technology appears to be the most appropriate method for mapping these features.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Marine habitat mapping on Koh Ach Seh Island, Cambodia 
Organisation Marine Conservation Cambodia
Country Cambodia 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The overall aim of the ACCORD project is to deliver high quality science that supports: (i) the sustainable growth of blue economies in partner countries; and (ii) the long-term resilience of these blue economies, within partner countries, to natural hazards stemming from climate change. During a scoping trip to Cambodia, Plymouth Marine Laboratory (PML) identified Marine Conservation Cambodia (MCC), a non-governmental organisation (NGO) dedicated to delivery marine conservation on behalf of the Cambodian Ministry of the Environment in Kep province. Marine Conservation Cambodia operate from Koh Ach Seh Island (Kep province). Their primary interests include: (i) the deployment of concrete seabed structures that act as both artificial reef units and anti-trawl devices (to dissuade illegal fishing within protected areas); (ii) sea mammal monitoring; (iii) seahorse conservation projects; and (iv) other marine conservation efforts such as marine litter removal. Besides being responsible for the management and protection of Koh Ach Seh, Marine Conservation Cambodia is also responsible for 13 other island reefs in the area and roughly 30 km2 of seagrass beds within Kep Province. MCC were deemed a suitable in-country partner for involvement with the ACCORD project and also provided a base of operations for the ACCORD fieldwork.
Collaborator Contribution Partners contributed staff to support the fieldwork.
Impact An extensive area of sidescan sonar data was collected in challenging conditions (a shallow and irregular seabed with daily heavy seas). The sidescan was able to differentiate between coral mounds and two additional acoustic ground-types. The third 'silty sand with seagrass' class appeared to be heavily influenced by survey artefacts and was judged to be a poor representation of seagrass coverage. A total of 66 ROV ground truthing stations allowed the identification of the broad-scale habitats as well as the epifaunal and emergent infaunal species that characterised the area. The supervised and unsupervised classifications of both the acoustic data and optical (drone) imagery were able broadly to identify the main zones and features present across the survey site. Further work is required to optimise these models by: (i) reprocessing the ground-truthing in the laboratory rather than relying on field observations; (ii) splitting the available grounding into calibration and validation datasets; (iii) examine the potential of ensemble models; (iv) access additional observations held by MCC; and (v) assess the performance of the models using a validation data set. The trials with the aerial drone were very promising. The mosaic and DEM look credible but require additional ground-truthing (potentially provided by PML's shallow benthic survey). As the fringing reef is all located in shallow waters, the use of drone technology appears to be the most appropriate method for mapping these features.
Start Year 2019
 
Description NetComFish 
Organisation University of Malaya
Country Malaysia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The PML team has supported the preparation of workshops with stakeholders and coastal communities in Malaysia, the design of two MSc student projects and the supervision of these two students. They have also: - delivered training and capacity building activities with the UM team - led the analysis of workshop and focus group outputs - contributed to the design of the mangrove festival, development of the NetComFish video and policy brief - led the development of the first project paper submitted for publication and the successful submission of the proposal for follow-on funds from the Newton Fund Impact Scheme - secured additional funding from the ACCORD project (with input from the UM team) for a project exploring potential mangrove replanting sites in the Klang Islands
Collaborator Contribution The University of Malaya team has been responsible for the design, organisation and facilitation of stakeholder and community workshops and focus groups as well as the mangrove festival. They host the two MSc students and are responsible for their day to day supervision. The UM team has also: - been responsible for communicating with local policy-makers and relevant research networks about the project and have engaged with the Malaysia media to promote the project's activities. - participated in training and capacity building activities, the analysis of workshop and focus group outputs - contributed to the development of the NetComFish video and policy brief. - contributed to the development of the first project paper submitted for publication and the proposal submitted to the Newton Fund Impact Scheme (especially in terms of ensuring support from key stakeholders). - been responsible for the development and delivery of a school education programme focusing on mangroves and they have actively promoted the project at academic events held in the SE Asia region. - secured funding from a local developer through their CSR programme to develop a book on the flora and fauna of the Klang Islands.
Impact This is a multi-disciplinary team involving natural science (biology and ecosystem services sciences) and social science, planning and governance. Outputs include five stakeholder workshops and focus groups in coastal communities in the Klang Islands, Malaysia, a newsletter article, as series of scoping interviews with stakeholders and community members, engagement with the Penang Inshore Fishermen's Welfare Association (PIFWA) and interest by a local development company in supporting the project via its CSR fund. In addition the project has produced: - a policy brief encouraging more effective management of mangroves and recommendations for how this can be achieved - education materials aimed at primary school children - a project video about the importance of mangroves aimed at the public - a project website, detailing the activities undertaken by the project One of the key outcomes of the projects is increased stakeholder interest and participation in the project, evidenced by the support given to the successful proposal submitted to the Newton Fund Impact Scheme for follow-on funds.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Water quality for shrimp farming in Bangladesh 
Organisation East West University
Country Bangladesh 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have co-written a proposal to combine our model outputs for the Bay of Bengal with a novel observational strategy to monitor the water quality of fish/shrimp ponds. During 2020 the NOC will make available some water variable sensors and will provide training in their use. The long term aim is a new partnership to make cheaper sensors for mass use
Collaborator Contribution East West university (Dr Mohammad Hakim) has co-written a future proposal to expand the collaboration. During the 2020 trials phase, he will act as local project lead and will liaise with the Bangladesh Shrimp and Fisheries Foundation (BSFF). Dr Hakim will use his research team to provide the data-transfer/telemetry needed to collect the water quality data during the trials phase
Impact Co-written proposal for future funding. Demonstration phase to go ahead in May or June 2020
Start Year 2019
 
Title New GIS Toolbox for multibeam and sidescan data manipulation analysis 
Description New easy tools for data manipulation, interpretation and analysis. Sits inside the ArcGIS software suite, namely ArcMap. About 15 separate tools for mosaic processing and final map production. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact Still to be fully tested by external researchers - but planned for March 2020. 
 
Description Attended PEMSEA ESA meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Attended annual congress of PEMSEA to buidl collaboativie links the SE Asia, most notably in cambodia and in vietnam
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Co-design of the Kenyan case study with the stakeholders 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact We carried out a formal workshop with Kenyan stakeholders in July 2017 to co-design Kenyan Case Study. The workshop was carried out at the Kenyan Fisheries Research Institute and involved KMFRI and CORDIO.
Kenya Case Study has been selected: Emerging fishery of the North Kenya Bank, an opportunity for coastal populations
The North Kenya Bank fishery is expected to spur economic growth for local communities. If well managed, it could help achieve national development goals, including poverty alleviation and wealth creation. Sustainability requires informed management interventions, but there is only scant information on the ecological status and drivers of the fishery.

Using modelling, remote sensing, field observations and socio-economic studies, SOLSTICE will explore processes related to productivity and resilience of the ecosystems supporting the fishery, identify the main drivers of variability and change, and advise the fishery and government on how to optimise use of this important resource.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Co-design of the Tanzanian case study with stakeholders 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In July 2017 we carried out a formal workshop to select and co-design Tanzanian case study. The workshop involved Institute of Marine Science (Zanzibar), Tanzanian Fisheries research Institute, Western Indian Ocean Association of Marine Science.

The following Case Study has been selected for Tanzania: Pemba Channel small pelagic fishery under climate threat
The small pelagic fishery is important for local communities in Zanzibar and mainland Tanzania as a source of food security, nutrition and livelihood support. This diverse group includes mackerel, sardines and anchovies - found in schools over the continental shelf, in bays and deep lagoons with nutrient rich waters. They are more abundant during the southeast monsoon, when stronger winds drive upwelling that brings nutrient rich water to the surface.

Despite its importance for coastal economies, there is a lack of data and information about the fishery, which hampers effective management. Using robotics, modelling, remote sensing, field observations and socio-economic studies, SOLSTICE will identify key environmental and anthropogenic drivers of the main species and address climatic pressures on this fishery.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Engagement with Cambodian ministry of the Environment 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact PML scientists with expertise in Remote Sensing, Modelling and Biogeochemical Observations, visited Cambodia December 2018. Meetings were held with the Cambodian Ministry of the Environment deputy director general, and the Ministry's GIS Team to discuss the ACCORD project, and the development of the collaboration. A second series of meetings were held with the Marine Conservation Cambodia (MCC) NGO to discuss the ACCORD project, and the development of the collaboration.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Fifth NetComFish worksop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The final NetComFIsh workshop was convened to showcase NetComFish research findings regarding collaborative mangrove management in Klang Islands to local stakeholders; collect feedback and comments on the draft policy brief and identify routes for disemination; and discuss opportunities for collaborative management of the Klang Islands mangroves including all relevant bodies. 16 stakeholders from local and state government and NGOs. Extremely useful feedback was offered on the policy brief as well as on the process for ensuring the policy brief reaches the correct stakeholders. There was considerable enthusiasm to take this work forward and many participants subsequently wrote letters of support for our applications for follow-on funding for this work.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description First NetComFish workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact We organised a workshop with stakeholders who have an in interest in the mangroves and/or their associated fishery in the Klang Islands. The purpose was to understand the inter-relationship between the different uses and pressures on the mangroves and to identify additional stakeholders with whom the project should interact. The workshop has been used to shape later activities in the project and to engage with a wider set of stakeholders including industry and businesses as well as local coastal communities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://netcomfish.wixsite.com/netcomfish
 
Description Fourth NetComFIsh workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact This workshop was convened to present the key findings from earlier workshops, focus groups and interviews and by other key experts to illustrate the importance of mangroves; the impact of mangrove loss, and how mangroves are included in people's visions for the future. It also aimed to identify barriers to engagement in mangrove related activity and management and gather feedback on potential policy/management options identified by the NetComFish team. The workshop was attended by 24 participants from local and state government, NGOs, fishers committees and community representatives. The workshop led to the creation of a draft policy brief and increased interest in the NetComFish project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description James Strong and Tim Le Bas visited our collaborators in Malaysia (Dr Khaira Ismail) to set up the fieldwork for the MG contribution to the ACCORD programme (17-23 Jan) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact James Strong and Tim Le Bas visited our collaborators in Malaysia (Dr Khaira Ismail) to set up the fieldwork for the MG contribution to the ACCORD programme (17-23 Jan)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Kosmo! newspaper 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Following our mangrove festival in July 2019, the event was featured in the Kosmo!, a Malay language daily newspaper, on the 14th August in an article entitled "Tanggungjawab memelihara 'hutan di antara laut dan darat" (The responsibility of maintaining the 'forest between sea and land').

It was featured at this URL: http://https:www.kosmo.com.my/k2/infiniti/tanggungjawab-memelihara-hutan-di-antara-laut-dan-darat-1.954034, but Kosmo! was closed in October 2019 and the URL is no longer active.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Malaysian fieldwork 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Within the framework of the ACCORD programme, Tim Le Bas and James Strong then carried out 3 weeks of fieldwork in March 2018, together with our Malaysian partners. They discovered a new and previously unknown deep reef offshore the island of Pulau Bidong in about 25m of water. The discovery was made during an acoustic multibeam survey of the area and then verified by sidescan sonar imagery. The team sent down the NOC mini-ROV to look at the new reef and confirmed it had major interest for habitat mapping. The University Malaysia Terengganu (UMT), our partners, then sent a diving team to closely view and identify species of hard and soft corals.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Marine Regions Forum 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Dr.Popova was invited to provide evidence for marine connectivity of the Western Indian Ocean and its relevance for the proposed Deep Sea Mining at the Marine Regions Forum in October 2019.

The Marine Regions Forum supports the transition towards integrated ocean governance by developing and implementing a new format for solution-oriented learning and exchange among different marine regions at the interface of science and marine policy.

The Marine Regions Forum is a unique dialogue platform that:

engages a broad range of stakeholders groups from non-governmental organisations and industry (such as fisheries, environment, tourism, shipping, energy and oil), to scientists and decision-makers;
focuses explicitly at the regional level and aims to strengthen regional ocean governance;
facilitates the joint development of new scalable solutions to current ocean sustainability challenges;
is a knowledge-driven conference developed by independent research institutes and think-tanks together with a broad network of experts and in dialogue with decision-makers and civil society; and
provides a space outside of formal governance arrangements where stakeholders engage in discussion as individual experts and where different types of knowledge can be brought together on an equal footing.

A dedicated team composed of ocean governance experts based at the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS), the Institute for Sustainable Development and International Relations (IDDRI), and TMG - Think Tank for Sustainability is developing and hosting the Marine Regions Forum together with the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety, the European Commission and renowned international experts, many of which are part of the Advisory Board and Steering Group of the Marine Regions Forum.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.prog-ocean.org/marine-regions-forum/
 
Description MoU with University of Malaysia, Terrenganu 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact A Memorandum of Understanding was developed between UMT and NOC in late 2018 to facilitate further work within the framework of ACCORD
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Oriental Daily newspaper 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Following our mangrove festival in July 2019, the event was features in the Oriental Daily, an Chinese language daily newspaper in Malaysia under the title: Guardian that guard coastal area on the 21st September. The article helped to raise awareness about the importance of mangroves.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://www.orientaldaily.com.my/news/education/2019/09/21/307216
 
Description PEMSEA East Asian Seas Congress 2018: Exhibition stand showcasing science and research conducted by PML in collaboration with East Asian partners 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Plymouth Marine Laboratory is a Partner of PEMSEA and had an exhibition stand throughout the PEMSEA East Asian Seas Congress, where the research activities of PML in the Southeast Asia region were highlighted in particular the GCRF Blue Communities programme, ACCORD project and other activities . The exhibition stand was managed by several members of staff from PML including the GCRF Blue Communities programme (Prof. Austen, Dr. Loveday, Dr. Cheung) as well as ACCORD (Prof. Allen) and other staff from PML (Dr. Evers-King). Nearly 1000 delegates attended the Congress and visitors to the stand included school groups, undergraduate students, representatives from NGOs, intergovernmental organizations and the Ministers from the East Asia region.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Presentation at 2nd International Workshop on Waves Storm Surges and Coastal Hazards 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This talk, at a high profile international gathering for operational model practitioners, reached out to that global community with results from our programme
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Pulau Indah Mangrove Festival 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact To raise awareness about mangroves in the Klang Islands, share findings from the NetComFish project and support World Mangrove Day, a mangrove festival was held on Pulau Indah, Klang Islands, Malaysia. Approximately 400 people attended the day where they took part in mangrove related activities including drawing, photography, poetry and cooking competitions; discussions about mangroves and fisheries; cooking with mangrove products demonstrations; and mangrove awareness raising activities. This event was officiated by the Department of Forestry who subsequently have supported a successful proposal for follow-on funding for this project. Other participants at this festival also supported our proposal.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://netcomfish.wixsite.com/netcomfish
 
Description Researcher visit to NOC from Universiti Malaysia Terengganu 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Azizi Bin Ali and Mr Roslan Latif came to the NOC to work shadow Dr Tim Le Bas and Dr James Strong for knowledge exchange and training. They came for three weeks in November and December 2019. Mainly looking at sidescan processing, GIS and data analysis but also including hardware engineering of gliders and AUVs.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Second NetComFish workshops 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact A second workshop with stakeholders relevant to the Klang Islands mangroves and associate fishery was conducted to examine stakeholders' and coastal community members' aspirations for the future of the mangroves. The outcomes will be used to fine-tune future stakeholder engagement and direct the remainder of the project activities. One outcome is that one of the development companies involved with the removal of the mangroves on one of the Klang Islands has invited the project team to work with them to see how mangroves can be integrated within their future development activities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Society and the Sea Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Three presentations given on the preliminary findings of NetComFish, focusing on the Klang Islands, Malaysia and covering (1) the links between mangroves and fisheries; (2) links between mangrove ecosystem services and well-being, and (3) on visions for the future of mangroves by communities and stakeholders. Discussion had on empowerment and engagement of communities in mangrove restoration.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description The Regional Ocean Governance Workshop for the Western Indian Ocean (WIO) Region 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Nairobi Convention (UNDP) is executing the project on 'Strategic Action Programme Policy Harmonization and Institutional Reforms' (SAPPHIRE), and has organized a Regional Ocean Governance workshop for the Western Indian Ocean (WIO) region during 04-05 September 2019 in Seychelles. E.Popova and M.Roberts were invited to present evidence towards strong connectivity between ABNJ and coastal zones.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description The Star News 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Following our mangrove festival in July 2019 and a presentation and interview with NetComFish UM co-I Amy Then, a write-up appeared in The Star News, an English language daily newspaper in Malaysia under the title "Finding right avenue to save mangroves". The article helped to raise awareness of the importance of mangroves.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.thestar.com.my/metro/metro-news/2019/09/25/finding-right-avenue-to-save-mangroves
 
Description Third NetComFish workshop: Research training 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact As part of the NetComFish project, training was offered to two Blue Communities partners from the University of Malaya, together with another researcher and two postgraduate students from the University of Malaya during a visit to PML in July 2018 (all members of the NetComFish team). Training covered effective questionnaire development, qualitative data analysis using Nvivo and an introduction to multicriteria analysis. The skills developed will be used in future NetComFish and Blue Communities activities as well as in other research projets.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Training workshop in Malaysia 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact James Strong provided expertise in the design, analysis and interpretation of ground truthing data to the habitat mapping team of the Universiti Malaysia Terengganu during a 3-day workshop (2-4 Sept 2018) as part of the ACCORD programme
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018