GCRF One Ocean Hub

Lead Research Organisation: University of Strathclyde
Department Name: Law

Abstract

Over 70% of the earth's surface is ocean. As a global population, we are entirely reliant upon a healthy ocean: it contributes to the renewal of freshwater; it absorbs over a quarter of global carbon dioxide, and it produces half the oxygen we breathe. The ocean has the potential to make significant contributions to sustainable development. Many developing countries already depend on their ocean resources for food, work and livelihoods. Yet we are reaching an ocean health crisis: cumulative pressures such as over-exploitation of its resources, ocean plastics and pollution and climate change, all compounded by multiple competing uses, are pushing the ocean ecosystem to a tipping point.
There is an urgent need for more integrated ocean governance, to ensure greater balance between ocean conservation and sustainable use (Sustainable Development Goal 14) and realise the ocean's potential to contribute to poverty reduction, human health, healthy ecosystems on land, climate change mitigation and adaptation, equitable economic growth and decent employment.
"We are the sea...we must wake up to this ancient truth...It is time to create things for ourselves, to create established standards of excellence that match those of our ancestors."
It is with this spirit that the ONE OCEAN Hub will transform our response to the urgent challenges facing our ocean. The Hub will weave learning from the ocean, and traditional knowledge of the peoples who rely upon it, with scientific excellence, innovative legal approaches and artistic methods. Our aim is to bridge the disconnections in law, science and policy across all levels from the local to the international. We aim to empower vulnerable communities, woman and youth in the blue economy and catalyse the inclusive and integrated governance approaches required to ensure a healthy ocean and flourishing communities and economies.
The Hub will specifically address the challenges of South Africa, Namibia, Ghana, Fiji and Solomon Islands in realising the economic, socio-cultural and environmental benefits from the ocean. It aims to support these countries' efforts towards developing a sustainable and fair blue economy by providing new scientific data and tools to engage different sectors and groups within society, particularly vulnerable communities, woman and youth, in identifying opportunities, risks and trade-offs to: i) prevent and mitigate negative development impacts connected to the ocean, ii) participate in traditional and emerging ocean activities, and iii) predict the socioeconomic benefits of ocean conservation.
The Hub pioneers integrating law and arts, policy, informatics, education, history, anthropology, and philosophy to provide targeted advice on coherent and flexible, pro-poor and gender- sensitive, climate-proofed and transparent laws and policies across the areas of environmental, human rights, science and technology, trade and investment. The Hub will further integrate biology, physics, chemistry, oceanography, ecology, mathematics, socio-environmental sciences and law to advance understanding of sustainable fisheries in the face of climate change impacts, as well as socio-economic and cultural considerations. The Hub will also increase understanding of conservation and extraction options for deep-sea mineral, biological and freshwater resources, integrating biology, ecology, geology, socio-environmental sciences and law. Through innovative use of arts the hub will transcend traditional boundaries in policy, law, and between ocean stakeholders from local communties to international organisatons, to respectfully and effectively include local communities' traditional knowledge in decision-making at the national and local level on the blue economy. The Hub will develop the integrated governance frameworks and strengthen the capacity within commnities to drive innovative approaches to a fair and sustainable blue economy for South Africa, Namibia, Ghana, Fiji and Solomon Islands

Planned Impact

In coastal and island communities healthy oceans are fundamental to healthy economies and livelihoods. The One Ocean Hub aims to improve the livelihoods of small-scale fishing and indigenous communities that are dependent on the ocean, with particular attention to women and youth in South Africa, Namibia, Ghana, Fiji and the Solomon Islands. The Hub will empower, build capacity within, and learn from, the people who rely on the oceans, and whom are disproportionally impacted by the failure to protect it. It is on this local level that the Hub will have the greatest impact. Community leadership in research and arts-based approaches will enable better understanding of traditional practices. It will build capacity and co-develop new resources for communities, and, in so doing, will support the integration of community views, values and knowledge in scientific assessments, management and decision-making on ocean conservation and the blue economy. Legal empowerment will enhance the capacity of communities, women and youth to fight for their rights and improve, through legal literacy, their livelihoods. Youths will directly benefit from a One Ocean education programme designed to inform, inspire and empower 'Generation 2030' on ocean matters and through the development of legal mechanisms (Youth Ocean Charter) to amplify youth voices at international level.
At national-regional level, governments and inter-governmental organisations will benefit from access to a new scientific evidence base, methods and technologies to underpin integrated ocean assessment and management. Specifically, government entities (eg Namibian Ministry for Fisheries and Marine Resources, will benefit from region-specific integrated assessments of cumulative pressures on ocean ecosystems. Through targeted capacity strengthening, governments and national research institutes will be empowered to undertake integrated marine research and monitoring programmes, and through co-developed decision-making frameworks will be able to implement ocean resource management which balances ocean conservation and sustainable use for fair and equitable benefit sharing. We will work with regional and national governments to implement sustainable, inclusive and collaborative ocean management strategies, such as the ocean dimension of the African Union's Science, Technology and Innovation Strategy for Africa and the Pacific Community Centre for Ocean Science. The above, together with the development of guidance for the coherent implementation of international law at different levels and through a programme of legal capacity building, the negotiating capacity of developing countries will be strengthened within relevant international fora.
The One Ocean Hub is a direct and systematic response to the Call for Action agreed upon at the 2017 UN Ocean Conference on Sustainable Development Goal 14. The Hub's network of international project partners (eg UNEP, UNDP, UNOALOS, FAO) will support national process of implementation of international law on the ocean and sustainable development. These partners have already co-defined the Hub's research to ensure its aligned to key ongoing international processes. Specifically, the Hub will contribute to the preparations of the 2020 UN Ocean Follow-up Conference, an expected mandate in 2019 from the UN Environment Assembly to develop new instruments on ocean plastics, a post-2020 global biodiversity framework, and the 2020-2030 Programme for the Development and Periodic Review of Environmental Law of UNEP. The involvement of the Hub in such processes will ensure that knowledge from across the Hub, from local to regional levels, will influence international process. The Hub network will benefit all partner organisations by bringing together organisations across sectors and scales to tackle institutional disconnects and promote sustainable partnerships from the local-international level.

Organisations

People

ORCID iD

Elisa Morgera (Principal Investigator)
Martin J. Attrill (Co-Investigator)
Warwick Sauer (Co-Investigator)
Emmanuel Acheampong (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-6243-294X
Tobias Schonwetter (Co-Investigator)
Alison Cathcart (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1291-6561
BOLANLE ERINOSHO (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-0734-2383
Hendrik Johannes Van As (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5288-5344
J Murray Roberts (Co-Investigator)
Pierre MAZZEGA (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-2398-3954
Andrew Kenny (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4944-1221
Philile Nonhlanhla Mbatha (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5705-0330
Harrison Kwame Golo (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9805-5477
Tom Baum (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5918-847X
Elaine Webster (Co-Investigator)
Michael Heath (Co-Investigator)
Rosemary Ann Dorrington (Co-Investigator)
Joseph Aggrey-Fynn (Co-Investigator)
Marie Jennifer Boswell (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7099-7713
Kerry Edward Howell (Co-Investigator)
Amanda Lombard (Co-Investigator)
Ann Cheryl Armstrong (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3282-8916
Matthew Harrison (Co-Investigator)
Benjamin Kofi Nyarko (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6560-9613
Daniela Diz Pereira Pinto (Co-Investigator)
Stephanie Switzer (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3928-988X
Maria Baker (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-6977-8935
Kitche Magak (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8336-9932
Andrew Sweetman (Co-Investigator)
Catherine Muhoma (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0816-1661
Stuart Jeffrey (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-2084-4174
Tracy Shimmield (Co-Investigator)
Sian Rees (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9606-783X
Matthew Grant Allen (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3490-9960
Lorenzo Cotula (Co-Investigator)
Sylvie Da Lomba (Co-Investigator)
Claire Lajaunie (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-8838-9062
Dylan Kenneth McGarry (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5738-3813
Bernadette Snow (Co-Investigator)
Alexander Claus Winkler (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7864-8243
KERRY SINK (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5051-573X
John Windie Ansah (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-7123-888X
Paul Lusty (Co-Investigator)
Clive Fox (Co-Investigator)
Mathew Upton (Co-Investigator)
Alana Malinde Soma Nkese Lancaster (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-8956-7297
José Adolfo De Oliveira (Co-Investigator)
Suzanne Jane Painting (Co-Investigator)
Merle Sowman (Co-Investigator)
Carol Jacqueline Cotterill (Co-Investigator)
Warren Potts (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6707-0383
Bryan John Clark (Co-Investigator)
Daniel Oliver Jones (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5218-1649
Georgina Yaa Oduro (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3030-7196
Morgan Wairiu (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-8245-5778
Matthew Revie (Co-Investigator)
Patrick Vrancken (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9941-4718
Stephen Robin Dye (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-4182-8475
Rachel Paula Wynberg (Co-Investigator)
Sebastian Hennige (Co-Investigator)
Bhavani Narayanaswamy (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5810-9127
Gilianne Brodie (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6896-4696
Derrick Armstrong (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1671-9290
Saskia Anna Filip Vermeylen (Co-Investigator)
Francesco Sindico (Co-Investigator)
Katherine Rebbecca Royse (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5660-2615
Margit R Wilhelm (Co-Investigator)
Lynne Shannon (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7842-0636
Jeremy Maxwell Hills (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9204-2536
Natalia Serpetti (Researcher Co-Investigator)
Robin Cook (Researcher Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9604-0204
 
Title Lalela Ulwandle - Empatheatre - SOUTH AFRICA 
Description Empatheatre is a research-based, theatre-making methodology. A script is developed and performed, emerging from a social science research process consisting of interviews and ethnogrpahy. Post-analysis the team sets out to shape the data into an engrossing and relevant true-to-life theatrical experience. Such experiences are intended to offer theatrical epiphanies that speak emotively to the realities of the situation, and above all to honour the informants' narratives, narratives which are carefully woven into the messaging fabric of the play. Performances are then played to strategic audiences, often made up of people with diverse, even conflicting, views on the central concern represented in the play. Post-play facilitated dialogues allow for another layer of reflexive data to emerge. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact The play has been performed to audiences that consist of hundreds of people who have reported not only realising the depth of their feeling and connection to the ocean, but also of the imperative to protect it. In South Africa, formal nature conservation has a damaging legacy of exclusion to answer for, given that our conservation policies 'have, to date, almost exclusively reflected Western scientific values and beliefs, with an emphasis on protecting nature from human impacts' (Cocks et al., 2012). South Africa is not alone in grappling with this tension; in many countries, well-meaning biodiversity protection policies have resulted in additional formal exclusions for indigenous and economically marginalized groups (Crandall et al., 2018). Some of the social impacts of Marine Protected Areas in South Africa include weakening of local participatory governance, the loss of tenure rights, access to resources by already marginalised communities, leading to food insecurity and reduced household income, and negative impacts on culture and identity (Sowman and Sunde, 2018). Recognizing how different knowledge systems and programs underpinned by these can lead to disparities and exclusions, environmental researchers have argued for an understanding of the important relationship between biodiversity and cultural diversity in conservation management (Cocks et al., 2012). Representatives of the International Association for Impact Assessment (IAIA) South Africa came to see one of the Durban Shows, and went on to bring more representatives to shows after that. Since the performance they have invited Lalela to two different events, one locally and another abroad. Empatheatre researchers plan to continue to cultivate particular audiences to encourage conversation and strategising around the tradeoffs that lead to conservation wins awarded at the expense of marginal groups, or where marginal groups are awarded socio-economic resources at the expense of environmental conservation. 
URL https://sancor.nrf.ac.za/Documents/Oct%202019%20Emphatheatre.pdf
 
Title What is Empatheatre: Short Documentary Film 
Description This short documentary film introduces Empatheatre as a methodology in sculpting new social spaces that act as amphitheaters for empathy. A space for reflexive deep listening in society over a public concern, that contributes to participatory justice in decision making, meaning making and solidarity building across societal spheres. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact The documentary as published in December 2020 with the aim to engage a range of stakeholders, in particular researchers, policy makers, and practitioners responsible for undertaking public dialogues and consultation in policy and planning processes. The documentary seeks to introduce new approaches to participation in decision making. 
URL https://www.empatheatre.com/
 
Description Our findings indicate that current approaches to ocean governance are not sufficiently integrated, thereby undermining ocean health, and they are not inclusive of different needs in society. We also obtained preliminary confirmation that a human rights-based approach to ocean governance could support more integrated and inclusive decision making, to the benefit of the most marginalised, by integrating natural and social science findings (data or methods) so that authorities recognise their responsibility to act upon these findings, while enabling marginalized actors to voice their demands as legal entitlements. In Ghana, our gap analysis determined that highest social impact would emerge from evidence and interventions that positively impact artisanal fishing communities (60% of whom are women and youth). Our findings from stock assessments suggest that key fisheries are under high fishing pressure, including potential collapse of the seabream fishery. We have also found reduced production despite increased fisher effort, and potential differences in temperature responses affecting the vulnerability of species important to ecosystem functioning. We are thus providing evidence (and tools, such as a geodatabase to enhance data integration and accessibility) to support the government's efforts towards balancing multiple and competing fisheries and other marine sectors (e.g. oil and gas). To support sustainable livelihoods of artisanal fisher communities as part of these efforts, our legal and social sciences findings serve to ensure that the human rights of small-scale fishers, including respect for their traditional knowledge, cultural heritage and customary norms, as well as the distinctive human rights of women and children, are taken into account in the analysis of evidence and ensuing decisions. The preliminary findings from the scoping fieldwork just completed in Namibia, where the coastline is primed for economic uses, relate to how various actors, including communities that have been displaced from the coast, view their relationship to ocean use and what benefits they derive from the hake fishery, and recreational fishing industry. These findings are informing our assessment of fisheries and the value of other aspects of "blue" natural capital, so that they can be related to the needs and human rights of different actors (notably indigenous peoples) on the basis of social sciences and law, with a view to feeding into a constructive and integrated critique of proposed blue economy initiatives. In South Africa, we found tensions in the application of policy and legislation on small-scale fisheries (SSF) and marine conservation. Researchers documented exclusion of SSF communities from relevant policy and decision-making processes and undue enforcement action, which were both exacerbated during the lockdown. Researchers also identified authorities' challenges in understanding and complying with a recent ruling by the Supreme Court that upheld that communities' customary fishing rights should be recognised under all ocean-related policies. We are identifying these as specific human rights issues so that communities can be supported by local legal aid organizations, and authorities can recognize their responsibility and identify solutions based on policy coherence. Finally, our self-reflection on fair partnerships also led to research findings. We conducted a survey to better understand the barriers to deep-sea research for DAC-country researchers and the implications for decision-making at the national and regional level in the SE Atlantic. The survey yielded evidence supporting our (and GCRF) approach: funding conditions and co-development of research plans are critical to ensure fair inclusion on international research cruises, identification of opportunities for technology co-development and equitable sharing of funding. These solutions are implemented by our research institutions, and were shared with UK and EU bodies considering future directions for international development cooperation and ocean research funding. Our human rights-related outcomes are being taken forward by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, in its guidance on legislation on SSF, and the UN Environment Programme (UNEP), in capacity-building tools on SDG14 and ocean plastics. These partnerships add to the legitimacy of our research findings, contributing to their take-up in our focus countries. They also contribute to share our lessons learnt with other countries. We have co-developed the first management tool to assist users in different marine sectors to plan in our Algoa Bay pilot. The value of this outcome has been recognised by UNEP, which has commissioned Hub researchers from the Algoa Bay team to inform the development of the Western Indian Ocean Marine Spatial Planning Strategy. The broader relevance of our outcomes has further been recognised in the Global North: our empatheatre script now forms the basis of a full module on Cultural Heritage, Oceans and Climate Change at the University of Central Florida.
Exploitation Route In coastal and island communities healthy oceans are fundamental to healthy economies and livelihoods. The One Ocean Hub aims to improve the livelihoods of small scale fishing and indigenous communities that are dependent on the ocean, with particular attention to women and youth in South Africa, Namibia, Ghana, Fiji and the Solomon Islands. The Hub will empower, build capacity within, and learn from, the people who rely on the oceans, and whom are disproportionally impacted by the failure to protect it. It is at this local level that the Hub will have the greatest impact. Community leadership in research and arts-based approaches will enable better understanding of traditional practices. It will build capacity and co-develop new resources for communities, and, in so doing, will support the integration of community views, values and knowledge in scientific assessments, management and decision-making on ocean conservation and the blue economy. Legal empowerment will enhance the capacity of communities, women and youth to fight for their rights and improve, through legal literacy, their livelihoods. Youths will directly benefit from a One Ocean education programme designed to inform, inspire and empower 'Generation 2030' on ocean matters and through the development of legal mechanisms (Youth Ocean Charter) to amplify youth voices at international level. At national regional level, governments and inter-governmental organisations will benefit from access to a new scientific evidence base, methods and technologies to underpin integrated ocean assessment and management. Specifically, government entities will benefit from region specific integrated assessments of cumulative pressures on ocean ecosystems. Through targeted capacity strengthening, governments and national research institutes will be empowered to undertake integrated marine research and monitoring programmes, and through co-developed decision-making frameworks will be able to implement ocean resource management that balances ocean conservation and sustainable use for fair and equitable benefit sharing. We will work with regional and national governments to implement sustainable, inclusive and collaborative ocean management strategies, such as the Office of the Pacific Ocean Commissioner. Together with the development of guidance for the coherent implementation of international law at different levels and through a programme of legal capacity building, the negotiating capacity of developing countries will be strengthened within relevant international fora. The Hub's network of international project partners (eg UNEP, UNDOALOS, FAO) will support national process of implementation of international law on the ocean and sustainable development. These partners have already co-defined the Hub's research to ensure it is aligned to key ongoing international processes. The involvement of the Hub in such processes will ensure that knowledge from across the Hub, from local to regional levels, will influence international process. The Hub network will benefit all partner organisations by bringing together organisations across sectors and scales to tackle institutional disconnects and promote sustainable partnerships from the local to international level.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Creative Economy,Environment,Government, Democracy and Justice

URL https://oneoceanhub.org/
 
Description Ocean resources that are essential for human wellbeing (SDG14) cross, and may not fall, under any nation's jurisdiction. Ocean governance is a complex and contested multilevel arena: its impacts are felt by local communities. To enhance the social and economic wellbeing of ocean-reliant communities for real, lasting change, we are creating the networks and enabling conditions to facilitate their equal participation in ocean decision-making arenas (SDG10&16). To this end, we connect research on human rights and the environment (including women's and children's rights), to the production of an integrated (social and natural) scientific evidence base to support socially and economically just, and ecologically sustainable, ocean management (SDG 1-3,5,8,10,13). We are also developing practical tools, and supporting the capacity to implement them, for different actors to take action on this evidence. In Ghana, the fishery ecosystems that support the ways of life of artisanal fishing communities are under pressure. We collaborate with the Environment Protection Authority and the Fisheries Commission to provide the tools and capacity to implement area-based management to sustainably manage multiple competing fisheries and other ocean uses to avoid negative disruption to coastal livelihoods (SDG16&2). In addition, we collaborate with the coastal communities of Elmina and Winneba, the Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection, and Judicial services, to explore how to support supplementary livelihoods to alleviate poverty, and implement fisheries laws to achieve ecological sustainability. We explore with them the need to acknowledge local communities' customary laws and respect their human rights, including rights of children and women that represent 60% of those working in the artisanal fishing sector. In South Africa using a case-study approach (Algoa Bay, Eastern Cape), we are developing, in partnership with Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality, national government (Departments of: Environment, Forestry and Fisheries; and Transport), maritime sector representatives, an integrated and inclusive approach to Marine Spatial Planning (MSP) for informing four larger marine area plans. We have evidenced that small-scale fisher (SSF) communities are often excluded (directly or indirectly) in ocean management, with decisions often detrimental to their livelihoods. Hub researchers have established the Coastal Justice Network (CJN) to connect SSF leaders to information and resources offered by local civil society organisations and legal aid professionals. The Hub supports participation of SSF leaders in the CJN, through data provision. Women fisherfolk requested their own network supported by a dedicated Whatsapp group, which provides a direct window into their experiences and needs (SDG5). Our partner SANBI, a government agency, has facilitated the inclusion of our researchers working with SSF communities in Kwa Zulu Natal (KZN), Western Cape and Eastern Cape Provinces in national MSP processes. This is an important step towards widening inclusion in decision-making beyond biodiversity and commercial considerations. Our Empatheatre production, Lalela Ulwandle, aimed to broaden public dialogue around ocean decision making in South Africa, particularly along the KZN coastline - an area targeted in blue economy developments. Through a 6-town tour, and associated media coverage, Lalela reached an audience of over 170,000, sparking a regional conversation on the intersection of tangible and intangible heritage and economic development. An interview with an Empatheatre researcher on national radio, led to the "For Water For Life" podcast episode on another media outlet (The Daily Maverick). To facilitate wider citizen participation in decision-making, we have developed a 'cradle-to-grave' multi-level ocean literacy programme. The Mzansea project is co-developing with the Marine Coastal Educators Network a suite of ocean literacy resources for implementation by network members. In the Solomon Islands, the 'Our Ocean: Our Identity' project aims to showcase gendered conceptions of the ocean in Melanesian contexts through public art, to foreground cultural heritage and indigenous identity in ocean dialogues. Our youth partners, the Pacific Islands Students Fighting Climate Change, are working with primary school teachers in Western Province to develop a challenge-led ocean education programme which integrates Pacific culture, indigenous knowledge, and science. Our policy coherence analysis (SDG17) has informed Fiji's National Oceans Policy and the regional State of the Pacific Ocean Report, as recognised in a letter from Dame Meg Taylor, Pacific Ocean Commissioner. At the international level, Hub researchers developed policy options on digital sequence information, which were referred to by the UN Convention on Biological Diversity to support fair and equitable benefit-sharing with DAC countries. Furthermore, the Hub collaborates with the UN Food and Agriculture Organization on legal tools for Sustainable SSF, and the UN Environment Programme on e-learning tools on SDG14, to direct international resources and support towards the needs we identified with SSF, indigenous communities, women and children in our focus countries.
First Year Of Impact 2020
Sector Creative Economy,Education,Environment,Government, Democracy and Justice
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description Assessing the feasibility and modalities of setting up a new EU-Africa Task Force for policy cooperation and dialogue on international ocean governance.
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Biodiversity as a Human Right and its implications for the EU's External Action
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
URL https://www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/document.html?reference=EXPO_STU(2020)603491
 
Description Blue Pacific Ocean Report' of the Office of the Pacific Ocean Commissioner
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
URL https://opocbluepacific.net/publications/#blue-pacific-ocean-report
 
Description Convention on Biological Diversity Thematic Workshop on Marine and Coastal Biodiversity for the Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
Impact OOH Deputy Director, Dr Daniela Diz (Strathclyde), was invited to contribute to the Convention on Biological Diversity Thematic Workshop on Marine and Coastal Biodiversity for the Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework in Montreal, Canada.
 
Description Course on Multilateral Environmental Agreements
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Lalela Ulwandle - Empatheatre- SOUTH AFRICA
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
 
Description National Ocean Policy of Fiji
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
URL https://www.economy.gov.fj/images/CCIC/uploads/Ocean/NOP_2020_Print01.pdf
 
Description SEYCHELLES Ocean's Policy
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
 
Description South Africa Government Marine Spatial Planning Working Group
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description South Africa Government Scientific Working Group and Task Team
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description UK Government Biodiversity and Ecosystems Enquiry
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
URL https://committees.parliament.uk/committee/62/environmental-audit-committee/publications/oral-eviden...
 
Description UN Food and Agriculture Organisation: Guide on Legislating for Small Scale Fisheries
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
URL http://www.fao.org/documents/card/en/c/cb0885en
 
Description (MISSION ATLANTIC) - Towards the Sustainable Development of the Atlantic Ocean: Mapping and Assessing the present and future status of Atlantic marine ecosystems under the influence of climate change and exploitation
Amount € 11,564,093 (EUR)
Funding ID 862428 
Organisation European Commission 
Sector Public
Country European Union (EU)
Start 09/2020 
End 08/2025
 
Description Community of Practice (CoP): Marine Spatial Plan for Algoa Bay; Phase II Algoa Bay, South Africa
Amount R 7,000,000 (ZAR)
Organisation South African National Research Foundation (NRF) 
Sector Public
Country South Africa
Start 10/2020 
End 09/2022
 
Description Deep Connections
Amount R 1,246,950 (ZAR)
Funding ID ACEP200210502862 - Grant Number: 129216 
Organisation South African National Research Foundation (NRF) 
Sector Public
Country South Africa
Start 01/2021 
End 12/2023
 
Description Harnessing natural product diversity to combat multidrug-resistant pathogens
Amount £1,900,000 (GBP)
Funding ID MC_PC_MR/T029579/1 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2020 
End 03/2023
 
Description Marine Research and Innovation for a Sustainable management of Coasts and Oceans (MARISCO)
Amount $250,000 (USD)
Funding ID https://www.belmontforum.org/projects/marine-research-and-innovation-for-a-sustainable-management-of-coasts-and-oceans/ 
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Department Belmont Forum
Sector Public
Country Global
Start 02/2020 
End 02/2023
 
Description Building blue capacity across the globe: Massive Open Online Learning Course for the Blue Economy 
Organisation Commonwealth of Learning (COL)
Country Canada 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub project partner, University of Seychelles, is leading the development and facilitation of four massive open online courses (MOOC) on the blue economy. The courses are being offered by Blue Economy Research Institute - University of Seychelles in collaboration with The Commonwealth of Learning. To date, 3 MOOCs have been developed by UoSeychelles working with researchers from across the Hub network in conceptualizing the course, developing and delivering modules. The courses have drawn on expertise from across all Hub regions and disciplines: Dr Holly Niner, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. (Teaching Assistant for the MOOC). OOH Knowledge Exchange Fellow Prof Kerry Howell, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Co-Director Dr Kirsty McQauid, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Post Doctoral Researcher Prof Martin Attril, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Researcher Prof Mathew Upton, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Researcher. Dr Dylan McGarry, Rhodes University, South Africa. Environmental Learning Research Centre. OOH Co-Director Dr Alex Winkler, Rhodes University, South Africa. Department of Ichthyology and Fisheries Science. OOH Researcher Dr Alana Lancaster, University of West Indies. OOH Co-Director Prof Rose Boswell, Nelson Mandela University, Research Chair in Ocean Cultures and Heritage. OOH Researcher Dr Bernadette Snow, University of Strathclyde, OOH Deputy Director Prof Kerry Sink, South African National Biodiversity Institute. OOH Co-Director Mia Strand, Nelson Mandela University. Department of Development Studies. OOH PhD Student Dr Daniela Diz, Heriot Watt University, School of Energy and Geoscience. OOH Researcher Prof Elisa Morgera, University of Strathclyde. OOH Director and PI
Collaborator Contribution The Commonwealth of Learning empowers people through learning that leads to economic growth, social inclusion and environmental conservation. The Commonwealth of Learning (COL) is an intergovernmental organisation created by Commonwealth Heads of Government in 1987 to promote the development and sharing of open learning and distance education knowledge, resources and technologies. COL's greatest impact is in supporting efforts to provide Commonwealth citizens greater access to quality education and training through open, distance and technology-enabled learning, thereby allowing them to benefit from improved livelihoods, greater gender equity and overall economic, social and cultural development leading to sustainable development. The COL hosts a MOOC platform that provides a good learning experience at low bandwidth and offline where necessary. The COL partnered with University of Seychelles on the development of a MOOC, titled 'The Blue Economy-Blue Resources'. This MOOC introduces key blue economy sectors that can be developed, for example, Fisheries, Aquaculture, Marine Renewable Energy, Seabed Mining and Marine Biotechnology. The course also explores some of the key considerations that influence the sustainability of individual sectors and blue economy strategies as a whole, such as gender equality and human rights. The course is hosted on the COL MOOCs for Development Website, and facilitated via the Commonwealth of Learning. https://www.mooc4dev.org/BlueEconomy3
Impact This partnership has led to a series of MOOCs on the Blue Economy. Benefitting from the interdisciplinary global network of the One Ocean Hub, these MOOCs take an interdisciplinary holistic view of the Blue Economy, across key sectors for blue economy development: Fisheries, Aquaculture, Marine Renewable Energy, Seabed Mining and Marine Biotechnology. This is an introductory course for persons from various backgrounds, both technical and non-technical. Upon completion of this course, learners can: (1) Describe the key components that form part of each blue sector. (2) Discuss the factors that influence the sustainability of each blue sector. (3) Assess the role of the blue sectors in the evolution of a nation's Blue Economy as a whole. The course has run 3 times to date, reaching over 3000 registered participants in over 70 countries globally. Course evaluation will take place during 2021 and will capture course outcomes, and inform future course development. Disciplines Involved: Law Anthropology Art Marine Science Sociology
Start Year 2020
 
Description Building blue capacity across the globe: Massive Open Online Learning Course for the Blue Economy 
Organisation Heriot-Watt University Malaysia
Country Malaysia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub project partner, University of Seychelles, is leading the development and facilitation of four massive open online courses (MOOC) on the blue economy. The courses are being offered by Blue Economy Research Institute - University of Seychelles in collaboration with The Commonwealth of Learning. To date, 3 MOOCs have been developed by UoSeychelles working with researchers from across the Hub network in conceptualizing the course, developing and delivering modules. The courses have drawn on expertise from across all Hub regions and disciplines: Dr Holly Niner, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. (Teaching Assistant for the MOOC). OOH Knowledge Exchange Fellow Prof Kerry Howell, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Co-Director Dr Kirsty McQauid, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Post Doctoral Researcher Prof Martin Attril, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Researcher Prof Mathew Upton, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Researcher. Dr Dylan McGarry, Rhodes University, South Africa. Environmental Learning Research Centre. OOH Co-Director Dr Alex Winkler, Rhodes University, South Africa. Department of Ichthyology and Fisheries Science. OOH Researcher Dr Alana Lancaster, University of West Indies. OOH Co-Director Prof Rose Boswell, Nelson Mandela University, Research Chair in Ocean Cultures and Heritage. OOH Researcher Dr Bernadette Snow, University of Strathclyde, OOH Deputy Director Prof Kerry Sink, South African National Biodiversity Institute. OOH Co-Director Mia Strand, Nelson Mandela University. Department of Development Studies. OOH PhD Student Dr Daniela Diz, Heriot Watt University, School of Energy and Geoscience. OOH Researcher Prof Elisa Morgera, University of Strathclyde. OOH Director and PI
Collaborator Contribution The Commonwealth of Learning empowers people through learning that leads to economic growth, social inclusion and environmental conservation. The Commonwealth of Learning (COL) is an intergovernmental organisation created by Commonwealth Heads of Government in 1987 to promote the development and sharing of open learning and distance education knowledge, resources and technologies. COL's greatest impact is in supporting efforts to provide Commonwealth citizens greater access to quality education and training through open, distance and technology-enabled learning, thereby allowing them to benefit from improved livelihoods, greater gender equity and overall economic, social and cultural development leading to sustainable development. The COL hosts a MOOC platform that provides a good learning experience at low bandwidth and offline where necessary. The COL partnered with University of Seychelles on the development of a MOOC, titled 'The Blue Economy-Blue Resources'. This MOOC introduces key blue economy sectors that can be developed, for example, Fisheries, Aquaculture, Marine Renewable Energy, Seabed Mining and Marine Biotechnology. The course also explores some of the key considerations that influence the sustainability of individual sectors and blue economy strategies as a whole, such as gender equality and human rights. The course is hosted on the COL MOOCs for Development Website, and facilitated via the Commonwealth of Learning. https://www.mooc4dev.org/BlueEconomy3
Impact This partnership has led to a series of MOOCs on the Blue Economy. Benefitting from the interdisciplinary global network of the One Ocean Hub, these MOOCs take an interdisciplinary holistic view of the Blue Economy, across key sectors for blue economy development: Fisheries, Aquaculture, Marine Renewable Energy, Seabed Mining and Marine Biotechnology. This is an introductory course for persons from various backgrounds, both technical and non-technical. Upon completion of this course, learners can: (1) Describe the key components that form part of each blue sector. (2) Discuss the factors that influence the sustainability of each blue sector. (3) Assess the role of the blue sectors in the evolution of a nation's Blue Economy as a whole. The course has run 3 times to date, reaching over 3000 registered participants in over 70 countries globally. Course evaluation will take place during 2021 and will capture course outcomes, and inform future course development. Disciplines Involved: Law Anthropology Art Marine Science Sociology
Start Year 2020
 
Description Building blue capacity across the globe: Massive Open Online Learning Course for the Blue Economy 
Organisation Nelson Mandela University
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub project partner, University of Seychelles, is leading the development and facilitation of four massive open online courses (MOOC) on the blue economy. The courses are being offered by Blue Economy Research Institute - University of Seychelles in collaboration with The Commonwealth of Learning. To date, 3 MOOCs have been developed by UoSeychelles working with researchers from across the Hub network in conceptualizing the course, developing and delivering modules. The courses have drawn on expertise from across all Hub regions and disciplines: Dr Holly Niner, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. (Teaching Assistant for the MOOC). OOH Knowledge Exchange Fellow Prof Kerry Howell, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Co-Director Dr Kirsty McQauid, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Post Doctoral Researcher Prof Martin Attril, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Researcher Prof Mathew Upton, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Researcher. Dr Dylan McGarry, Rhodes University, South Africa. Environmental Learning Research Centre. OOH Co-Director Dr Alex Winkler, Rhodes University, South Africa. Department of Ichthyology and Fisheries Science. OOH Researcher Dr Alana Lancaster, University of West Indies. OOH Co-Director Prof Rose Boswell, Nelson Mandela University, Research Chair in Ocean Cultures and Heritage. OOH Researcher Dr Bernadette Snow, University of Strathclyde, OOH Deputy Director Prof Kerry Sink, South African National Biodiversity Institute. OOH Co-Director Mia Strand, Nelson Mandela University. Department of Development Studies. OOH PhD Student Dr Daniela Diz, Heriot Watt University, School of Energy and Geoscience. OOH Researcher Prof Elisa Morgera, University of Strathclyde. OOH Director and PI
Collaborator Contribution The Commonwealth of Learning empowers people through learning that leads to economic growth, social inclusion and environmental conservation. The Commonwealth of Learning (COL) is an intergovernmental organisation created by Commonwealth Heads of Government in 1987 to promote the development and sharing of open learning and distance education knowledge, resources and technologies. COL's greatest impact is in supporting efforts to provide Commonwealth citizens greater access to quality education and training through open, distance and technology-enabled learning, thereby allowing them to benefit from improved livelihoods, greater gender equity and overall economic, social and cultural development leading to sustainable development. The COL hosts a MOOC platform that provides a good learning experience at low bandwidth and offline where necessary. The COL partnered with University of Seychelles on the development of a MOOC, titled 'The Blue Economy-Blue Resources'. This MOOC introduces key blue economy sectors that can be developed, for example, Fisheries, Aquaculture, Marine Renewable Energy, Seabed Mining and Marine Biotechnology. The course also explores some of the key considerations that influence the sustainability of individual sectors and blue economy strategies as a whole, such as gender equality and human rights. The course is hosted on the COL MOOCs for Development Website, and facilitated via the Commonwealth of Learning. https://www.mooc4dev.org/BlueEconomy3
Impact This partnership has led to a series of MOOCs on the Blue Economy. Benefitting from the interdisciplinary global network of the One Ocean Hub, these MOOCs take an interdisciplinary holistic view of the Blue Economy, across key sectors for blue economy development: Fisheries, Aquaculture, Marine Renewable Energy, Seabed Mining and Marine Biotechnology. This is an introductory course for persons from various backgrounds, both technical and non-technical. Upon completion of this course, learners can: (1) Describe the key components that form part of each blue sector. (2) Discuss the factors that influence the sustainability of each blue sector. (3) Assess the role of the blue sectors in the evolution of a nation's Blue Economy as a whole. The course has run 3 times to date, reaching over 3000 registered participants in over 70 countries globally. Course evaluation will take place during 2021 and will capture course outcomes, and inform future course development. Disciplines Involved: Law Anthropology Art Marine Science Sociology
Start Year 2020
 
Description Building blue capacity across the globe: Massive Open Online Learning Course for the Blue Economy 
Organisation Rhodes University
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub project partner, University of Seychelles, is leading the development and facilitation of four massive open online courses (MOOC) on the blue economy. The courses are being offered by Blue Economy Research Institute - University of Seychelles in collaboration with The Commonwealth of Learning. To date, 3 MOOCs have been developed by UoSeychelles working with researchers from across the Hub network in conceptualizing the course, developing and delivering modules. The courses have drawn on expertise from across all Hub regions and disciplines: Dr Holly Niner, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. (Teaching Assistant for the MOOC). OOH Knowledge Exchange Fellow Prof Kerry Howell, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Co-Director Dr Kirsty McQauid, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Post Doctoral Researcher Prof Martin Attril, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Researcher Prof Mathew Upton, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Researcher. Dr Dylan McGarry, Rhodes University, South Africa. Environmental Learning Research Centre. OOH Co-Director Dr Alex Winkler, Rhodes University, South Africa. Department of Ichthyology and Fisheries Science. OOH Researcher Dr Alana Lancaster, University of West Indies. OOH Co-Director Prof Rose Boswell, Nelson Mandela University, Research Chair in Ocean Cultures and Heritage. OOH Researcher Dr Bernadette Snow, University of Strathclyde, OOH Deputy Director Prof Kerry Sink, South African National Biodiversity Institute. OOH Co-Director Mia Strand, Nelson Mandela University. Department of Development Studies. OOH PhD Student Dr Daniela Diz, Heriot Watt University, School of Energy and Geoscience. OOH Researcher Prof Elisa Morgera, University of Strathclyde. OOH Director and PI
Collaborator Contribution The Commonwealth of Learning empowers people through learning that leads to economic growth, social inclusion and environmental conservation. The Commonwealth of Learning (COL) is an intergovernmental organisation created by Commonwealth Heads of Government in 1987 to promote the development and sharing of open learning and distance education knowledge, resources and technologies. COL's greatest impact is in supporting efforts to provide Commonwealth citizens greater access to quality education and training through open, distance and technology-enabled learning, thereby allowing them to benefit from improved livelihoods, greater gender equity and overall economic, social and cultural development leading to sustainable development. The COL hosts a MOOC platform that provides a good learning experience at low bandwidth and offline where necessary. The COL partnered with University of Seychelles on the development of a MOOC, titled 'The Blue Economy-Blue Resources'. This MOOC introduces key blue economy sectors that can be developed, for example, Fisheries, Aquaculture, Marine Renewable Energy, Seabed Mining and Marine Biotechnology. The course also explores some of the key considerations that influence the sustainability of individual sectors and blue economy strategies as a whole, such as gender equality and human rights. The course is hosted on the COL MOOCs for Development Website, and facilitated via the Commonwealth of Learning. https://www.mooc4dev.org/BlueEconomy3
Impact This partnership has led to a series of MOOCs on the Blue Economy. Benefitting from the interdisciplinary global network of the One Ocean Hub, these MOOCs take an interdisciplinary holistic view of the Blue Economy, across key sectors for blue economy development: Fisheries, Aquaculture, Marine Renewable Energy, Seabed Mining and Marine Biotechnology. This is an introductory course for persons from various backgrounds, both technical and non-technical. Upon completion of this course, learners can: (1) Describe the key components that form part of each blue sector. (2) Discuss the factors that influence the sustainability of each blue sector. (3) Assess the role of the blue sectors in the evolution of a nation's Blue Economy as a whole. The course has run 3 times to date, reaching over 3000 registered participants in over 70 countries globally. Course evaluation will take place during 2021 and will capture course outcomes, and inform future course development. Disciplines Involved: Law Anthropology Art Marine Science Sociology
Start Year 2020
 
Description Building blue capacity across the globe: Massive Open Online Learning Course for the Blue Economy 
Organisation South African National Biodiversity Institute
Country South Africa 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub project partner, University of Seychelles, is leading the development and facilitation of four massive open online courses (MOOC) on the blue economy. The courses are being offered by Blue Economy Research Institute - University of Seychelles in collaboration with The Commonwealth of Learning. To date, 3 MOOCs have been developed by UoSeychelles working with researchers from across the Hub network in conceptualizing the course, developing and delivering modules. The courses have drawn on expertise from across all Hub regions and disciplines: Dr Holly Niner, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. (Teaching Assistant for the MOOC). OOH Knowledge Exchange Fellow Prof Kerry Howell, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Co-Director Dr Kirsty McQauid, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Post Doctoral Researcher Prof Martin Attril, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Researcher Prof Mathew Upton, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Researcher. Dr Dylan McGarry, Rhodes University, South Africa. Environmental Learning Research Centre. OOH Co-Director Dr Alex Winkler, Rhodes University, South Africa. Department of Ichthyology and Fisheries Science. OOH Researcher Dr Alana Lancaster, University of West Indies. OOH Co-Director Prof Rose Boswell, Nelson Mandela University, Research Chair in Ocean Cultures and Heritage. OOH Researcher Dr Bernadette Snow, University of Strathclyde, OOH Deputy Director Prof Kerry Sink, South African National Biodiversity Institute. OOH Co-Director Mia Strand, Nelson Mandela University. Department of Development Studies. OOH PhD Student Dr Daniela Diz, Heriot Watt University, School of Energy and Geoscience. OOH Researcher Prof Elisa Morgera, University of Strathclyde. OOH Director and PI
Collaborator Contribution The Commonwealth of Learning empowers people through learning that leads to economic growth, social inclusion and environmental conservation. The Commonwealth of Learning (COL) is an intergovernmental organisation created by Commonwealth Heads of Government in 1987 to promote the development and sharing of open learning and distance education knowledge, resources and technologies. COL's greatest impact is in supporting efforts to provide Commonwealth citizens greater access to quality education and training through open, distance and technology-enabled learning, thereby allowing them to benefit from improved livelihoods, greater gender equity and overall economic, social and cultural development leading to sustainable development. The COL hosts a MOOC platform that provides a good learning experience at low bandwidth and offline where necessary. The COL partnered with University of Seychelles on the development of a MOOC, titled 'The Blue Economy-Blue Resources'. This MOOC introduces key blue economy sectors that can be developed, for example, Fisheries, Aquaculture, Marine Renewable Energy, Seabed Mining and Marine Biotechnology. The course also explores some of the key considerations that influence the sustainability of individual sectors and blue economy strategies as a whole, such as gender equality and human rights. The course is hosted on the COL MOOCs for Development Website, and facilitated via the Commonwealth of Learning. https://www.mooc4dev.org/BlueEconomy3
Impact This partnership has led to a series of MOOCs on the Blue Economy. Benefitting from the interdisciplinary global network of the One Ocean Hub, these MOOCs take an interdisciplinary holistic view of the Blue Economy, across key sectors for blue economy development: Fisheries, Aquaculture, Marine Renewable Energy, Seabed Mining and Marine Biotechnology. This is an introductory course for persons from various backgrounds, both technical and non-technical. Upon completion of this course, learners can: (1) Describe the key components that form part of each blue sector. (2) Discuss the factors that influence the sustainability of each blue sector. (3) Assess the role of the blue sectors in the evolution of a nation's Blue Economy as a whole. The course has run 3 times to date, reaching over 3000 registered participants in over 70 countries globally. Course evaluation will take place during 2021 and will capture course outcomes, and inform future course development. Disciplines Involved: Law Anthropology Art Marine Science Sociology
Start Year 2020
 
Description Building blue capacity across the globe: Massive Open Online Learning Course for the Blue Economy 
Organisation University of Plymouth
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub project partner, University of Seychelles, is leading the development and facilitation of four massive open online courses (MOOC) on the blue economy. The courses are being offered by Blue Economy Research Institute - University of Seychelles in collaboration with The Commonwealth of Learning. To date, 3 MOOCs have been developed by UoSeychelles working with researchers from across the Hub network in conceptualizing the course, developing and delivering modules. The courses have drawn on expertise from across all Hub regions and disciplines: Dr Holly Niner, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. (Teaching Assistant for the MOOC). OOH Knowledge Exchange Fellow Prof Kerry Howell, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Co-Director Dr Kirsty McQauid, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Post Doctoral Researcher Prof Martin Attril, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Researcher Prof Mathew Upton, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Researcher. Dr Dylan McGarry, Rhodes University, South Africa. Environmental Learning Research Centre. OOH Co-Director Dr Alex Winkler, Rhodes University, South Africa. Department of Ichthyology and Fisheries Science. OOH Researcher Dr Alana Lancaster, University of West Indies. OOH Co-Director Prof Rose Boswell, Nelson Mandela University, Research Chair in Ocean Cultures and Heritage. OOH Researcher Dr Bernadette Snow, University of Strathclyde, OOH Deputy Director Prof Kerry Sink, South African National Biodiversity Institute. OOH Co-Director Mia Strand, Nelson Mandela University. Department of Development Studies. OOH PhD Student Dr Daniela Diz, Heriot Watt University, School of Energy and Geoscience. OOH Researcher Prof Elisa Morgera, University of Strathclyde. OOH Director and PI
Collaborator Contribution The Commonwealth of Learning empowers people through learning that leads to economic growth, social inclusion and environmental conservation. The Commonwealth of Learning (COL) is an intergovernmental organisation created by Commonwealth Heads of Government in 1987 to promote the development and sharing of open learning and distance education knowledge, resources and technologies. COL's greatest impact is in supporting efforts to provide Commonwealth citizens greater access to quality education and training through open, distance and technology-enabled learning, thereby allowing them to benefit from improved livelihoods, greater gender equity and overall economic, social and cultural development leading to sustainable development. The COL hosts a MOOC platform that provides a good learning experience at low bandwidth and offline where necessary. The COL partnered with University of Seychelles on the development of a MOOC, titled 'The Blue Economy-Blue Resources'. This MOOC introduces key blue economy sectors that can be developed, for example, Fisheries, Aquaculture, Marine Renewable Energy, Seabed Mining and Marine Biotechnology. The course also explores some of the key considerations that influence the sustainability of individual sectors and blue economy strategies as a whole, such as gender equality and human rights. The course is hosted on the COL MOOCs for Development Website, and facilitated via the Commonwealth of Learning. https://www.mooc4dev.org/BlueEconomy3
Impact This partnership has led to a series of MOOCs on the Blue Economy. Benefitting from the interdisciplinary global network of the One Ocean Hub, these MOOCs take an interdisciplinary holistic view of the Blue Economy, across key sectors for blue economy development: Fisheries, Aquaculture, Marine Renewable Energy, Seabed Mining and Marine Biotechnology. This is an introductory course for persons from various backgrounds, both technical and non-technical. Upon completion of this course, learners can: (1) Describe the key components that form part of each blue sector. (2) Discuss the factors that influence the sustainability of each blue sector. (3) Assess the role of the blue sectors in the evolution of a nation's Blue Economy as a whole. The course has run 3 times to date, reaching over 3000 registered participants in over 70 countries globally. Course evaluation will take place during 2021 and will capture course outcomes, and inform future course development. Disciplines Involved: Law Anthropology Art Marine Science Sociology
Start Year 2020
 
Description Building blue capacity across the globe: Massive Open Online Learning Course for the Blue Economy 
Organisation University of Seychelles
Country Seychelles 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub project partner, University of Seychelles, is leading the development and facilitation of four massive open online courses (MOOC) on the blue economy. The courses are being offered by Blue Economy Research Institute - University of Seychelles in collaboration with The Commonwealth of Learning. To date, 3 MOOCs have been developed by UoSeychelles working with researchers from across the Hub network in conceptualizing the course, developing and delivering modules. The courses have drawn on expertise from across all Hub regions and disciplines: Dr Holly Niner, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. (Teaching Assistant for the MOOC). OOH Knowledge Exchange Fellow Prof Kerry Howell, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Co-Director Dr Kirsty McQauid, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Post Doctoral Researcher Prof Martin Attril, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Researcher Prof Mathew Upton, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Researcher. Dr Dylan McGarry, Rhodes University, South Africa. Environmental Learning Research Centre. OOH Co-Director Dr Alex Winkler, Rhodes University, South Africa. Department of Ichthyology and Fisheries Science. OOH Researcher Dr Alana Lancaster, University of West Indies. OOH Co-Director Prof Rose Boswell, Nelson Mandela University, Research Chair in Ocean Cultures and Heritage. OOH Researcher Dr Bernadette Snow, University of Strathclyde, OOH Deputy Director Prof Kerry Sink, South African National Biodiversity Institute. OOH Co-Director Mia Strand, Nelson Mandela University. Department of Development Studies. OOH PhD Student Dr Daniela Diz, Heriot Watt University, School of Energy and Geoscience. OOH Researcher Prof Elisa Morgera, University of Strathclyde. OOH Director and PI
Collaborator Contribution The Commonwealth of Learning empowers people through learning that leads to economic growth, social inclusion and environmental conservation. The Commonwealth of Learning (COL) is an intergovernmental organisation created by Commonwealth Heads of Government in 1987 to promote the development and sharing of open learning and distance education knowledge, resources and technologies. COL's greatest impact is in supporting efforts to provide Commonwealth citizens greater access to quality education and training through open, distance and technology-enabled learning, thereby allowing them to benefit from improved livelihoods, greater gender equity and overall economic, social and cultural development leading to sustainable development. The COL hosts a MOOC platform that provides a good learning experience at low bandwidth and offline where necessary. The COL partnered with University of Seychelles on the development of a MOOC, titled 'The Blue Economy-Blue Resources'. This MOOC introduces key blue economy sectors that can be developed, for example, Fisheries, Aquaculture, Marine Renewable Energy, Seabed Mining and Marine Biotechnology. The course also explores some of the key considerations that influence the sustainability of individual sectors and blue economy strategies as a whole, such as gender equality and human rights. The course is hosted on the COL MOOCs for Development Website, and facilitated via the Commonwealth of Learning. https://www.mooc4dev.org/BlueEconomy3
Impact This partnership has led to a series of MOOCs on the Blue Economy. Benefitting from the interdisciplinary global network of the One Ocean Hub, these MOOCs take an interdisciplinary holistic view of the Blue Economy, across key sectors for blue economy development: Fisheries, Aquaculture, Marine Renewable Energy, Seabed Mining and Marine Biotechnology. This is an introductory course for persons from various backgrounds, both technical and non-technical. Upon completion of this course, learners can: (1) Describe the key components that form part of each blue sector. (2) Discuss the factors that influence the sustainability of each blue sector. (3) Assess the role of the blue sectors in the evolution of a nation's Blue Economy as a whole. The course has run 3 times to date, reaching over 3000 registered participants in over 70 countries globally. Course evaluation will take place during 2021 and will capture course outcomes, and inform future course development. Disciplines Involved: Law Anthropology Art Marine Science Sociology
Start Year 2020
 
Description Building blue capacity across the globe: Massive Open Online Learning Course for the Blue Economy 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub project partner, University of Seychelles, is leading the development and facilitation of four massive open online courses (MOOC) on the blue economy. The courses are being offered by Blue Economy Research Institute - University of Seychelles in collaboration with The Commonwealth of Learning. To date, 3 MOOCs have been developed by UoSeychelles working with researchers from across the Hub network in conceptualizing the course, developing and delivering modules. The courses have drawn on expertise from across all Hub regions and disciplines: Dr Holly Niner, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. (Teaching Assistant for the MOOC). OOH Knowledge Exchange Fellow Prof Kerry Howell, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Co-Director Dr Kirsty McQauid, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Post Doctoral Researcher Prof Martin Attril, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Researcher Prof Mathew Upton, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Researcher. Dr Dylan McGarry, Rhodes University, South Africa. Environmental Learning Research Centre. OOH Co-Director Dr Alex Winkler, Rhodes University, South Africa. Department of Ichthyology and Fisheries Science. OOH Researcher Dr Alana Lancaster, University of West Indies. OOH Co-Director Prof Rose Boswell, Nelson Mandela University, Research Chair in Ocean Cultures and Heritage. OOH Researcher Dr Bernadette Snow, University of Strathclyde, OOH Deputy Director Prof Kerry Sink, South African National Biodiversity Institute. OOH Co-Director Mia Strand, Nelson Mandela University. Department of Development Studies. OOH PhD Student Dr Daniela Diz, Heriot Watt University, School of Energy and Geoscience. OOH Researcher Prof Elisa Morgera, University of Strathclyde. OOH Director and PI
Collaborator Contribution The Commonwealth of Learning empowers people through learning that leads to economic growth, social inclusion and environmental conservation. The Commonwealth of Learning (COL) is an intergovernmental organisation created by Commonwealth Heads of Government in 1987 to promote the development and sharing of open learning and distance education knowledge, resources and technologies. COL's greatest impact is in supporting efforts to provide Commonwealth citizens greater access to quality education and training through open, distance and technology-enabled learning, thereby allowing them to benefit from improved livelihoods, greater gender equity and overall economic, social and cultural development leading to sustainable development. The COL hosts a MOOC platform that provides a good learning experience at low bandwidth and offline where necessary. The COL partnered with University of Seychelles on the development of a MOOC, titled 'The Blue Economy-Blue Resources'. This MOOC introduces key blue economy sectors that can be developed, for example, Fisheries, Aquaculture, Marine Renewable Energy, Seabed Mining and Marine Biotechnology. The course also explores some of the key considerations that influence the sustainability of individual sectors and blue economy strategies as a whole, such as gender equality and human rights. The course is hosted on the COL MOOCs for Development Website, and facilitated via the Commonwealth of Learning. https://www.mooc4dev.org/BlueEconomy3
Impact This partnership has led to a series of MOOCs on the Blue Economy. Benefitting from the interdisciplinary global network of the One Ocean Hub, these MOOCs take an interdisciplinary holistic view of the Blue Economy, across key sectors for blue economy development: Fisheries, Aquaculture, Marine Renewable Energy, Seabed Mining and Marine Biotechnology. This is an introductory course for persons from various backgrounds, both technical and non-technical. Upon completion of this course, learners can: (1) Describe the key components that form part of each blue sector. (2) Discuss the factors that influence the sustainability of each blue sector. (3) Assess the role of the blue sectors in the evolution of a nation's Blue Economy as a whole. The course has run 3 times to date, reaching over 3000 registered participants in over 70 countries globally. Course evaluation will take place during 2021 and will capture course outcomes, and inform future course development. Disciplines Involved: Law Anthropology Art Marine Science Sociology
Start Year 2020
 
Description Building blue capacity across the globe: Massive Open Online Learning Course for the Blue Economy 
Organisation University of the West Indies
Country Barbados 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub project partner, University of Seychelles, is leading the development and facilitation of four massive open online courses (MOOC) on the blue economy. The courses are being offered by Blue Economy Research Institute - University of Seychelles in collaboration with The Commonwealth of Learning. To date, 3 MOOCs have been developed by UoSeychelles working with researchers from across the Hub network in conceptualizing the course, developing and delivering modules. The courses have drawn on expertise from across all Hub regions and disciplines: Dr Holly Niner, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. (Teaching Assistant for the MOOC). OOH Knowledge Exchange Fellow Prof Kerry Howell, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Co-Director Dr Kirsty McQauid, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Post Doctoral Researcher Prof Martin Attril, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Researcher Prof Mathew Upton, University of Plymouth, Marine Conservation Research Group. OOH Researcher. Dr Dylan McGarry, Rhodes University, South Africa. Environmental Learning Research Centre. OOH Co-Director Dr Alex Winkler, Rhodes University, South Africa. Department of Ichthyology and Fisheries Science. OOH Researcher Dr Alana Lancaster, University of West Indies. OOH Co-Director Prof Rose Boswell, Nelson Mandela University, Research Chair in Ocean Cultures and Heritage. OOH Researcher Dr Bernadette Snow, University of Strathclyde, OOH Deputy Director Prof Kerry Sink, South African National Biodiversity Institute. OOH Co-Director Mia Strand, Nelson Mandela University. Department of Development Studies. OOH PhD Student Dr Daniela Diz, Heriot Watt University, School of Energy and Geoscience. OOH Researcher Prof Elisa Morgera, University of Strathclyde. OOH Director and PI
Collaborator Contribution The Commonwealth of Learning empowers people through learning that leads to economic growth, social inclusion and environmental conservation. The Commonwealth of Learning (COL) is an intergovernmental organisation created by Commonwealth Heads of Government in 1987 to promote the development and sharing of open learning and distance education knowledge, resources and technologies. COL's greatest impact is in supporting efforts to provide Commonwealth citizens greater access to quality education and training through open, distance and technology-enabled learning, thereby allowing them to benefit from improved livelihoods, greater gender equity and overall economic, social and cultural development leading to sustainable development. The COL hosts a MOOC platform that provides a good learning experience at low bandwidth and offline where necessary. The COL partnered with University of Seychelles on the development of a MOOC, titled 'The Blue Economy-Blue Resources'. This MOOC introduces key blue economy sectors that can be developed, for example, Fisheries, Aquaculture, Marine Renewable Energy, Seabed Mining and Marine Biotechnology. The course also explores some of the key considerations that influence the sustainability of individual sectors and blue economy strategies as a whole, such as gender equality and human rights. The course is hosted on the COL MOOCs for Development Website, and facilitated via the Commonwealth of Learning. https://www.mooc4dev.org/BlueEconomy3
Impact This partnership has led to a series of MOOCs on the Blue Economy. Benefitting from the interdisciplinary global network of the One Ocean Hub, these MOOCs take an interdisciplinary holistic view of the Blue Economy, across key sectors for blue economy development: Fisheries, Aquaculture, Marine Renewable Energy, Seabed Mining and Marine Biotechnology. This is an introductory course for persons from various backgrounds, both technical and non-technical. Upon completion of this course, learners can: (1) Describe the key components that form part of each blue sector. (2) Discuss the factors that influence the sustainability of each blue sector. (3) Assess the role of the blue sectors in the evolution of a nation's Blue Economy as a whole. The course has run 3 times to date, reaching over 3000 registered participants in over 70 countries globally. Course evaluation will take place during 2021 and will capture course outcomes, and inform future course development. Disciplines Involved: Law Anthropology Art Marine Science Sociology
Start Year 2020
 
Description Capacity Strengthening and Connecting Knowledge Systems in the Deep Sea 
Organisation Rhodes University
Department Environmental Learning Research Centre (ELRC)
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The interdisciplinary framework of the One Ocean Hub has brought together within South Africa, for the first time, deep sea scientists (South Africa National Biodiversity Institute), sociologists (Rhodes University and University of Cape Town), artists (Rhodes University), and expertise in knowledge systems, ethics, and benefit sharing (University of Cape Town), together with expertise in ethical innovation and knowledge production at the University of Strathclyde, UK. This interdisciplinary team seek to address 2 critical challenges fundamental in underpinning fair and equitable access to and benefit from deep sea ecosystems: 1. Building capacity to undertake research in the deep sea in DAC countries There are historical barriers to wider global participation in offshore research. This has impact on the ability of all nations to participate in evidence-based decision-making on deep sea areas within their jurisdictions and beyond. Widening participation in deep-sea science has therefore become a significant goal of the Hub. While planned cruises and research were delayed by COVID, it allowed for a more considered approach to the Deep Sea Science capacity-strengthening programme. 2. Integrating knowledge systems and learning from multiple conceptions of the deep sea, for holistic ocean literacy Understanding and surfacing different ways of knowing the deep sea, as well as decolonising the science of the Deep Sea, are critical steps in addressing issues of inequity in representation and participation in deep-sea research (including with indigenous knowledge systems). Integrating different ways of knowing and understanding the deep sea has become a key interdisciplinary focus for the Hub, working towards ocean literacy outputs informed by both science and indigenous knowledge systems.
Collaborator Contribution University of Strathclyde and South Africa National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI): Understanding the barriers to deep-sea science and research in a DAC context The team undertook a survey of deep sea and marine scientists on Access to Marine Subject Area Education and Research to understand the barriers to deep-sea research and how DAC country researchers can be better supported and included. The survey yielded evidence that supports the Hub approach: training on the use of equipment and inclusion on research cruises will be most impactful (as opposed to data sharing agreements, which are also valued). In addition, a campaign around ocean literacy that increases knowledge and interest in deep-science research careers will create a pipeline of future scientists and a populace that invests in it. This has further informed the design of the Hub's capacity-strengthening programme for deep sea research, and ocean literacy at all levels. The capacity strengthening programme led by SANBI and University of Plymouth, in partnership with the Deep Ocean Stewardship Initiative (DOSI), involves the design and delivery of a programme of training across key aspects and skill areas of deep sea research, targeted to researchers and Government scientists. In addition, this partnership is collating undergraduate training materials in marine science to make available in a usable package to educators in HEIs across SA. SANBI also leads on engagement with the South Africa Government in increasing capacity for knowledge-based decision making for the marine ecosystem. As active members of the Marine Spatial Planning Working Group of the South Africa Government, SANBI are well placed to connect Hub outputs with key actors, and support capacity strengthening for implementation. South Africa National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI) SANBI is leading on a new Flexible Fund project titled 'Mzansea: Revealing South Africa's Marine Ecosystems'. Mzansea aims to foster ocean literacy and provide resources for educators, students and decision makers. The project is a direct response to the outcomes emerging from the Marine and Coastal Educators Network (MCEN) conference in early 2020, which was the realisation of the limited knowledge and resources on marine ecosystems in general and deep ocean ecosystems in particular within South Africa. Educators themselves were not able to connect to these ecosystems and therefore neither were their students. Additionally, despite South Africa having 11 official languages, as far as we are aware there are no ocean educational resources in languages other than English or Afrikaans, thereby failing to reach a large proportion of people in South Africa. There is therefore a need for educational resources regarding marine ecosystems in South Africa in multiple languages. SANBI will lead on the production of a suite of resources revealing 14 marine ecosystem types suitable for learners from children to decision makers. These resources will also be translated into at least 3 coastal languages (Xhosa, Zulu, Afrikaans). Through the One Ocean Hub, the deep sea science team behind Mzansea, have partnered with colleagues from Rhodes University Environmental Learning Research Centre, to expand Mzansea to include other forms of knowledge. Bridging the fields of marine science and marine sociology/anthropology, the researchers are collaborating at the intersection of cultural heritage and scientific heritage in describing at least 9 of the 14 marine ecosystems of South Africa, through both perspectives. This collaboration seeks to highlight the alignment between indigenous and scientific knowledge. The collaboration began as an output of early cultural heritage research by the Rhodes team, which produced the Indlela yokuphila Empatheatre animation project which offers a digital storytelling experience through animation that tells the story of the soul's journey through the oceans in Zulu traditional ancestral belief. This will now be worked into the Mzansea outputs to form a holistic package of ocean literacy materials. The SANBI/Rhodes collaboration has expanded to include also colleagues at the University of Cape Town, to explore the intersection of scientific and indigenous knowledge in the context of the deep sea more broadly. This team have formed the 'Deep Knowing' working group. In this collaboration, the University of Cape Town, through a PhD research project, is examining the epistemological interactions and practical implications of working with different knowledge systems, specifically "Science" and "Indigenous Knowledge Systems". The group will also examine specific ethical questions (linked to the One Ocean Hub code of practice) - around representation, participation and working with indigenous/contextual/embodied ways of knowing in the context of deep-sea science.
Impact Outputs Further Funding: The SANBI/Rhodes collaboration which formed under the One Ocean Hub has led to a successful new project, funded by the the South African National Research Foundation, titled 'Deep Connections'. Deep Connections is a 3-year project which will start in 2021 (see Further Funding). The Deep Connections project is a multi-disciplinary project that aims to build knowledge about offshore marine connectivity for inclusion in spatial assessment and prioritisation. This will be achieved by investigating genetic, species and ecosystem levels of biodiversity together with targeted geoscience and oceanographic research and innovative socio-cultural learning and knowledge co-production. This project builds on the transdisciplinary team working on related aspects through the One Ocean Hub and strives to help address current capacity shortfalls and gaps in spatial assessment and planning. Publications: Worm, B; Elliff C; Fonseca JG; Gell FR; Gon'alves ACS; Helder N; Murray K; Peckham H; Prelovec L; Sink K. Making Ocean Literacy Inclusive and Accessible. Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics https://doi.org/10.3354/esep00196 Outputs in progress: The Indlela Yokuphila animation project, will conclude this year. Early progress can be viewed at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?app=desktop&v=AAy0RDSido0&ab_channel=OneOceanHub Outcomes This partnership is working towards the specific outcome of increased research capacity in deep-sea knowledge, techniques and data (SDG 14A). Towards this outcome, the partnership has began a programme of deep-sea research methods training. They delivered training in benthic biodiversity data collection to 15 researchers and government scientists from both South Africa and Namibia in collaboration with the DOSI-Project. Further events are planned for March 2021 and beyond. SANBI have participated and presented in all meetings of the SA Marine Spatial Planning Working Group. In addition, this working group benefitted from the new interdisciplinary connections developed under the One Ocean Hub: interdisciplinary input from the One Ocean Hub team was provided at an information session on "Marine spatial biodiversity priorities as an input into marine spatial planning", which took place on 22 October 2020, hosted by Biodiversity & Coastal Research Department of Environmental Affairs, Forestry and Fisheries (DEFF): Oceans and Coasts, South Africa Government. As an outcome of this meeting, members of the technical team of planners who inform environmental priorities in marine spatial planning have requested a follow-up meeting with Hub researchers to discuss key issues raised (meeting to be arranged in 2021). The Mzansea team have presented to the Marine and Coastal Educators Network and are in discussion with members of this network from the 3 South Africa aquariums on the implementation of the Mzansea products.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Capacity Strengthening and Connecting Knowledge Systems in the Deep Sea 
Organisation South African National Biodiversity Institute
Country South Africa 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The interdisciplinary framework of the One Ocean Hub has brought together within South Africa, for the first time, deep sea scientists (South Africa National Biodiversity Institute), sociologists (Rhodes University and University of Cape Town), artists (Rhodes University), and expertise in knowledge systems, ethics, and benefit sharing (University of Cape Town), together with expertise in ethical innovation and knowledge production at the University of Strathclyde, UK. This interdisciplinary team seek to address 2 critical challenges fundamental in underpinning fair and equitable access to and benefit from deep sea ecosystems: 1. Building capacity to undertake research in the deep sea in DAC countries There are historical barriers to wider global participation in offshore research. This has impact on the ability of all nations to participate in evidence-based decision-making on deep sea areas within their jurisdictions and beyond. Widening participation in deep-sea science has therefore become a significant goal of the Hub. While planned cruises and research were delayed by COVID, it allowed for a more considered approach to the Deep Sea Science capacity-strengthening programme. 2. Integrating knowledge systems and learning from multiple conceptions of the deep sea, for holistic ocean literacy Understanding and surfacing different ways of knowing the deep sea, as well as decolonising the science of the Deep Sea, are critical steps in addressing issues of inequity in representation and participation in deep-sea research (including with indigenous knowledge systems). Integrating different ways of knowing and understanding the deep sea has become a key interdisciplinary focus for the Hub, working towards ocean literacy outputs informed by both science and indigenous knowledge systems.
Collaborator Contribution University of Strathclyde and South Africa National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI): Understanding the barriers to deep-sea science and research in a DAC context The team undertook a survey of deep sea and marine scientists on Access to Marine Subject Area Education and Research to understand the barriers to deep-sea research and how DAC country researchers can be better supported and included. The survey yielded evidence that supports the Hub approach: training on the use of equipment and inclusion on research cruises will be most impactful (as opposed to data sharing agreements, which are also valued). In addition, a campaign around ocean literacy that increases knowledge and interest in deep-science research careers will create a pipeline of future scientists and a populace that invests in it. This has further informed the design of the Hub's capacity-strengthening programme for deep sea research, and ocean literacy at all levels. The capacity strengthening programme led by SANBI and University of Plymouth, in partnership with the Deep Ocean Stewardship Initiative (DOSI), involves the design and delivery of a programme of training across key aspects and skill areas of deep sea research, targeted to researchers and Government scientists. In addition, this partnership is collating undergraduate training materials in marine science to make available in a usable package to educators in HEIs across SA. SANBI also leads on engagement with the South Africa Government in increasing capacity for knowledge-based decision making for the marine ecosystem. As active members of the Marine Spatial Planning Working Group of the South Africa Government, SANBI are well placed to connect Hub outputs with key actors, and support capacity strengthening for implementation. South Africa National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI) SANBI is leading on a new Flexible Fund project titled 'Mzansea: Revealing South Africa's Marine Ecosystems'. Mzansea aims to foster ocean literacy and provide resources for educators, students and decision makers. The project is a direct response to the outcomes emerging from the Marine and Coastal Educators Network (MCEN) conference in early 2020, which was the realisation of the limited knowledge and resources on marine ecosystems in general and deep ocean ecosystems in particular within South Africa. Educators themselves were not able to connect to these ecosystems and therefore neither were their students. Additionally, despite South Africa having 11 official languages, as far as we are aware there are no ocean educational resources in languages other than English or Afrikaans, thereby failing to reach a large proportion of people in South Africa. There is therefore a need for educational resources regarding marine ecosystems in South Africa in multiple languages. SANBI will lead on the production of a suite of resources revealing 14 marine ecosystem types suitable for learners from children to decision makers. These resources will also be translated into at least 3 coastal languages (Xhosa, Zulu, Afrikaans). Through the One Ocean Hub, the deep sea science team behind Mzansea, have partnered with colleagues from Rhodes University Environmental Learning Research Centre, to expand Mzansea to include other forms of knowledge. Bridging the fields of marine science and marine sociology/anthropology, the researchers are collaborating at the intersection of cultural heritage and scientific heritage in describing at least 9 of the 14 marine ecosystems of South Africa, through both perspectives. This collaboration seeks to highlight the alignment between indigenous and scientific knowledge. The collaboration began as an output of early cultural heritage research by the Rhodes team, which produced the Indlela yokuphila Empatheatre animation project which offers a digital storytelling experience through animation that tells the story of the soul's journey through the oceans in Zulu traditional ancestral belief. This will now be worked into the Mzansea outputs to form a holistic package of ocean literacy materials. The SANBI/Rhodes collaboration has expanded to include also colleagues at the University of Cape Town, to explore the intersection of scientific and indigenous knowledge in the context of the deep sea more broadly. This team have formed the 'Deep Knowing' working group. In this collaboration, the University of Cape Town, through a PhD research project, is examining the epistemological interactions and practical implications of working with different knowledge systems, specifically "Science" and "Indigenous Knowledge Systems". The group will also examine specific ethical questions (linked to the One Ocean Hub code of practice) - around representation, participation and working with indigenous/contextual/embodied ways of knowing in the context of deep-sea science.
Impact Outputs Further Funding: The SANBI/Rhodes collaboration which formed under the One Ocean Hub has led to a successful new project, funded by the the South African National Research Foundation, titled 'Deep Connections'. Deep Connections is a 3-year project which will start in 2021 (see Further Funding). The Deep Connections project is a multi-disciplinary project that aims to build knowledge about offshore marine connectivity for inclusion in spatial assessment and prioritisation. This will be achieved by investigating genetic, species and ecosystem levels of biodiversity together with targeted geoscience and oceanographic research and innovative socio-cultural learning and knowledge co-production. This project builds on the transdisciplinary team working on related aspects through the One Ocean Hub and strives to help address current capacity shortfalls and gaps in spatial assessment and planning. Publications: Worm, B; Elliff C; Fonseca JG; Gell FR; Gon'alves ACS; Helder N; Murray K; Peckham H; Prelovec L; Sink K. Making Ocean Literacy Inclusive and Accessible. Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics https://doi.org/10.3354/esep00196 Outputs in progress: The Indlela Yokuphila animation project, will conclude this year. Early progress can be viewed at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?app=desktop&v=AAy0RDSido0&ab_channel=OneOceanHub Outcomes This partnership is working towards the specific outcome of increased research capacity in deep-sea knowledge, techniques and data (SDG 14A). Towards this outcome, the partnership has began a programme of deep-sea research methods training. They delivered training in benthic biodiversity data collection to 15 researchers and government scientists from both South Africa and Namibia in collaboration with the DOSI-Project. Further events are planned for March 2021 and beyond. SANBI have participated and presented in all meetings of the SA Marine Spatial Planning Working Group. In addition, this working group benefitted from the new interdisciplinary connections developed under the One Ocean Hub: interdisciplinary input from the One Ocean Hub team was provided at an information session on "Marine spatial biodiversity priorities as an input into marine spatial planning", which took place on 22 October 2020, hosted by Biodiversity & Coastal Research Department of Environmental Affairs, Forestry and Fisheries (DEFF): Oceans and Coasts, South Africa Government. As an outcome of this meeting, members of the technical team of planners who inform environmental priorities in marine spatial planning have requested a follow-up meeting with Hub researchers to discuss key issues raised (meeting to be arranged in 2021). The Mzansea team have presented to the Marine and Coastal Educators Network and are in discussion with members of this network from the 3 South Africa aquariums on the implementation of the Mzansea products.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Capacity Strengthening and Connecting Knowledge Systems in the Deep Sea 
Organisation University of Cape Town
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The interdisciplinary framework of the One Ocean Hub has brought together within South Africa, for the first time, deep sea scientists (South Africa National Biodiversity Institute), sociologists (Rhodes University and University of Cape Town), artists (Rhodes University), and expertise in knowledge systems, ethics, and benefit sharing (University of Cape Town), together with expertise in ethical innovation and knowledge production at the University of Strathclyde, UK. This interdisciplinary team seek to address 2 critical challenges fundamental in underpinning fair and equitable access to and benefit from deep sea ecosystems: 1. Building capacity to undertake research in the deep sea in DAC countries There are historical barriers to wider global participation in offshore research. This has impact on the ability of all nations to participate in evidence-based decision-making on deep sea areas within their jurisdictions and beyond. Widening participation in deep-sea science has therefore become a significant goal of the Hub. While planned cruises and research were delayed by COVID, it allowed for a more considered approach to the Deep Sea Science capacity-strengthening programme. 2. Integrating knowledge systems and learning from multiple conceptions of the deep sea, for holistic ocean literacy Understanding and surfacing different ways of knowing the deep sea, as well as decolonising the science of the Deep Sea, are critical steps in addressing issues of inequity in representation and participation in deep-sea research (including with indigenous knowledge systems). Integrating different ways of knowing and understanding the deep sea has become a key interdisciplinary focus for the Hub, working towards ocean literacy outputs informed by both science and indigenous knowledge systems.
Collaborator Contribution University of Strathclyde and South Africa National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI): Understanding the barriers to deep-sea science and research in a DAC context The team undertook a survey of deep sea and marine scientists on Access to Marine Subject Area Education and Research to understand the barriers to deep-sea research and how DAC country researchers can be better supported and included. The survey yielded evidence that supports the Hub approach: training on the use of equipment and inclusion on research cruises will be most impactful (as opposed to data sharing agreements, which are also valued). In addition, a campaign around ocean literacy that increases knowledge and interest in deep-science research careers will create a pipeline of future scientists and a populace that invests in it. This has further informed the design of the Hub's capacity-strengthening programme for deep sea research, and ocean literacy at all levels. The capacity strengthening programme led by SANBI and University of Plymouth, in partnership with the Deep Ocean Stewardship Initiative (DOSI), involves the design and delivery of a programme of training across key aspects and skill areas of deep sea research, targeted to researchers and Government scientists. In addition, this partnership is collating undergraduate training materials in marine science to make available in a usable package to educators in HEIs across SA. SANBI also leads on engagement with the South Africa Government in increasing capacity for knowledge-based decision making for the marine ecosystem. As active members of the Marine Spatial Planning Working Group of the South Africa Government, SANBI are well placed to connect Hub outputs with key actors, and support capacity strengthening for implementation. South Africa National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI) SANBI is leading on a new Flexible Fund project titled 'Mzansea: Revealing South Africa's Marine Ecosystems'. Mzansea aims to foster ocean literacy and provide resources for educators, students and decision makers. The project is a direct response to the outcomes emerging from the Marine and Coastal Educators Network (MCEN) conference in early 2020, which was the realisation of the limited knowledge and resources on marine ecosystems in general and deep ocean ecosystems in particular within South Africa. Educators themselves were not able to connect to these ecosystems and therefore neither were their students. Additionally, despite South Africa having 11 official languages, as far as we are aware there are no ocean educational resources in languages other than English or Afrikaans, thereby failing to reach a large proportion of people in South Africa. There is therefore a need for educational resources regarding marine ecosystems in South Africa in multiple languages. SANBI will lead on the production of a suite of resources revealing 14 marine ecosystem types suitable for learners from children to decision makers. These resources will also be translated into at least 3 coastal languages (Xhosa, Zulu, Afrikaans). Through the One Ocean Hub, the deep sea science team behind Mzansea, have partnered with colleagues from Rhodes University Environmental Learning Research Centre, to expand Mzansea to include other forms of knowledge. Bridging the fields of marine science and marine sociology/anthropology, the researchers are collaborating at the intersection of cultural heritage and scientific heritage in describing at least 9 of the 14 marine ecosystems of South Africa, through both perspectives. This collaboration seeks to highlight the alignment between indigenous and scientific knowledge. The collaboration began as an output of early cultural heritage research by the Rhodes team, which produced the Indlela yokuphila Empatheatre animation project which offers a digital storytelling experience through animation that tells the story of the soul's journey through the oceans in Zulu traditional ancestral belief. This will now be worked into the Mzansea outputs to form a holistic package of ocean literacy materials. The SANBI/Rhodes collaboration has expanded to include also colleagues at the University of Cape Town, to explore the intersection of scientific and indigenous knowledge in the context of the deep sea more broadly. This team have formed the 'Deep Knowing' working group. In this collaboration, the University of Cape Town, through a PhD research project, is examining the epistemological interactions and practical implications of working with different knowledge systems, specifically "Science" and "Indigenous Knowledge Systems". The group will also examine specific ethical questions (linked to the One Ocean Hub code of practice) - around representation, participation and working with indigenous/contextual/embodied ways of knowing in the context of deep-sea science.
Impact Outputs Further Funding: The SANBI/Rhodes collaboration which formed under the One Ocean Hub has led to a successful new project, funded by the the South African National Research Foundation, titled 'Deep Connections'. Deep Connections is a 3-year project which will start in 2021 (see Further Funding). The Deep Connections project is a multi-disciplinary project that aims to build knowledge about offshore marine connectivity for inclusion in spatial assessment and prioritisation. This will be achieved by investigating genetic, species and ecosystem levels of biodiversity together with targeted geoscience and oceanographic research and innovative socio-cultural learning and knowledge co-production. This project builds on the transdisciplinary team working on related aspects through the One Ocean Hub and strives to help address current capacity shortfalls and gaps in spatial assessment and planning. Publications: Worm, B; Elliff C; Fonseca JG; Gell FR; Gon'alves ACS; Helder N; Murray K; Peckham H; Prelovec L; Sink K. Making Ocean Literacy Inclusive and Accessible. Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics https://doi.org/10.3354/esep00196 Outputs in progress: The Indlela Yokuphila animation project, will conclude this year. Early progress can be viewed at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?app=desktop&v=AAy0RDSido0&ab_channel=OneOceanHub Outcomes This partnership is working towards the specific outcome of increased research capacity in deep-sea knowledge, techniques and data (SDG 14A). Towards this outcome, the partnership has began a programme of deep-sea research methods training. They delivered training in benthic biodiversity data collection to 15 researchers and government scientists from both South Africa and Namibia in collaboration with the DOSI-Project. Further events are planned for March 2021 and beyond. SANBI have participated and presented in all meetings of the SA Marine Spatial Planning Working Group. In addition, this working group benefitted from the new interdisciplinary connections developed under the One Ocean Hub: interdisciplinary input from the One Ocean Hub team was provided at an information session on "Marine spatial biodiversity priorities as an input into marine spatial planning", which took place on 22 October 2020, hosted by Biodiversity & Coastal Research Department of Environmental Affairs, Forestry and Fisheries (DEFF): Oceans and Coasts, South Africa Government. As an outcome of this meeting, members of the technical team of planners who inform environmental priorities in marine spatial planning have requested a follow-up meeting with Hub researchers to discuss key issues raised (meeting to be arranged in 2021). The Mzansea team have presented to the Marine and Coastal Educators Network and are in discussion with members of this network from the 3 South Africa aquariums on the implementation of the Mzansea products.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Capacity Strengthening and Connecting Knowledge Systems in the Deep Sea 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The interdisciplinary framework of the One Ocean Hub has brought together within South Africa, for the first time, deep sea scientists (South Africa National Biodiversity Institute), sociologists (Rhodes University and University of Cape Town), artists (Rhodes University), and expertise in knowledge systems, ethics, and benefit sharing (University of Cape Town), together with expertise in ethical innovation and knowledge production at the University of Strathclyde, UK. This interdisciplinary team seek to address 2 critical challenges fundamental in underpinning fair and equitable access to and benefit from deep sea ecosystems: 1. Building capacity to undertake research in the deep sea in DAC countries There are historical barriers to wider global participation in offshore research. This has impact on the ability of all nations to participate in evidence-based decision-making on deep sea areas within their jurisdictions and beyond. Widening participation in deep-sea science has therefore become a significant goal of the Hub. While planned cruises and research were delayed by COVID, it allowed for a more considered approach to the Deep Sea Science capacity-strengthening programme. 2. Integrating knowledge systems and learning from multiple conceptions of the deep sea, for holistic ocean literacy Understanding and surfacing different ways of knowing the deep sea, as well as decolonising the science of the Deep Sea, are critical steps in addressing issues of inequity in representation and participation in deep-sea research (including with indigenous knowledge systems). Integrating different ways of knowing and understanding the deep sea has become a key interdisciplinary focus for the Hub, working towards ocean literacy outputs informed by both science and indigenous knowledge systems.
Collaborator Contribution University of Strathclyde and South Africa National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI): Understanding the barriers to deep-sea science and research in a DAC context The team undertook a survey of deep sea and marine scientists on Access to Marine Subject Area Education and Research to understand the barriers to deep-sea research and how DAC country researchers can be better supported and included. The survey yielded evidence that supports the Hub approach: training on the use of equipment and inclusion on research cruises will be most impactful (as opposed to data sharing agreements, which are also valued). In addition, a campaign around ocean literacy that increases knowledge and interest in deep-science research careers will create a pipeline of future scientists and a populace that invests in it. This has further informed the design of the Hub's capacity-strengthening programme for deep sea research, and ocean literacy at all levels. The capacity strengthening programme led by SANBI and University of Plymouth, in partnership with the Deep Ocean Stewardship Initiative (DOSI), involves the design and delivery of a programme of training across key aspects and skill areas of deep sea research, targeted to researchers and Government scientists. In addition, this partnership is collating undergraduate training materials in marine science to make available in a usable package to educators in HEIs across SA. SANBI also leads on engagement with the South Africa Government in increasing capacity for knowledge-based decision making for the marine ecosystem. As active members of the Marine Spatial Planning Working Group of the South Africa Government, SANBI are well placed to connect Hub outputs with key actors, and support capacity strengthening for implementation. South Africa National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI) SANBI is leading on a new Flexible Fund project titled 'Mzansea: Revealing South Africa's Marine Ecosystems'. Mzansea aims to foster ocean literacy and provide resources for educators, students and decision makers. The project is a direct response to the outcomes emerging from the Marine and Coastal Educators Network (MCEN) conference in early 2020, which was the realisation of the limited knowledge and resources on marine ecosystems in general and deep ocean ecosystems in particular within South Africa. Educators themselves were not able to connect to these ecosystems and therefore neither were their students. Additionally, despite South Africa having 11 official languages, as far as we are aware there are no ocean educational resources in languages other than English or Afrikaans, thereby failing to reach a large proportion of people in South Africa. There is therefore a need for educational resources regarding marine ecosystems in South Africa in multiple languages. SANBI will lead on the production of a suite of resources revealing 14 marine ecosystem types suitable for learners from children to decision makers. These resources will also be translated into at least 3 coastal languages (Xhosa, Zulu, Afrikaans). Through the One Ocean Hub, the deep sea science team behind Mzansea, have partnered with colleagues from Rhodes University Environmental Learning Research Centre, to expand Mzansea to include other forms of knowledge. Bridging the fields of marine science and marine sociology/anthropology, the researchers are collaborating at the intersection of cultural heritage and scientific heritage in describing at least 9 of the 14 marine ecosystems of South Africa, through both perspectives. This collaboration seeks to highlight the alignment between indigenous and scientific knowledge. The collaboration began as an output of early cultural heritage research by the Rhodes team, which produced the Indlela yokuphila Empatheatre animation project which offers a digital storytelling experience through animation that tells the story of the soul's journey through the oceans in Zulu traditional ancestral belief. This will now be worked into the Mzansea outputs to form a holistic package of ocean literacy materials. The SANBI/Rhodes collaboration has expanded to include also colleagues at the University of Cape Town, to explore the intersection of scientific and indigenous knowledge in the context of the deep sea more broadly. This team have formed the 'Deep Knowing' working group. In this collaboration, the University of Cape Town, through a PhD research project, is examining the epistemological interactions and practical implications of working with different knowledge systems, specifically "Science" and "Indigenous Knowledge Systems". The group will also examine specific ethical questions (linked to the One Ocean Hub code of practice) - around representation, participation and working with indigenous/contextual/embodied ways of knowing in the context of deep-sea science.
Impact Outputs Further Funding: The SANBI/Rhodes collaboration which formed under the One Ocean Hub has led to a successful new project, funded by the the South African National Research Foundation, titled 'Deep Connections'. Deep Connections is a 3-year project which will start in 2021 (see Further Funding). The Deep Connections project is a multi-disciplinary project that aims to build knowledge about offshore marine connectivity for inclusion in spatial assessment and prioritisation. This will be achieved by investigating genetic, species and ecosystem levels of biodiversity together with targeted geoscience and oceanographic research and innovative socio-cultural learning and knowledge co-production. This project builds on the transdisciplinary team working on related aspects through the One Ocean Hub and strives to help address current capacity shortfalls and gaps in spatial assessment and planning. Publications: Worm, B; Elliff C; Fonseca JG; Gell FR; Gon'alves ACS; Helder N; Murray K; Peckham H; Prelovec L; Sink K. Making Ocean Literacy Inclusive and Accessible. Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics https://doi.org/10.3354/esep00196 Outputs in progress: The Indlela Yokuphila animation project, will conclude this year. Early progress can be viewed at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?app=desktop&v=AAy0RDSido0&ab_channel=OneOceanHub Outcomes This partnership is working towards the specific outcome of increased research capacity in deep-sea knowledge, techniques and data (SDG 14A). Towards this outcome, the partnership has began a programme of deep-sea research methods training. They delivered training in benthic biodiversity data collection to 15 researchers and government scientists from both South Africa and Namibia in collaboration with the DOSI-Project. Further events are planned for March 2021 and beyond. SANBI have participated and presented in all meetings of the SA Marine Spatial Planning Working Group. In addition, this working group benefitted from the new interdisciplinary connections developed under the One Ocean Hub: interdisciplinary input from the One Ocean Hub team was provided at an information session on "Marine spatial biodiversity priorities as an input into marine spatial planning", which took place on 22 October 2020, hosted by Biodiversity & Coastal Research Department of Environmental Affairs, Forestry and Fisheries (DEFF): Oceans and Coasts, South Africa Government. As an outcome of this meeting, members of the technical team of planners who inform environmental priorities in marine spatial planning have requested a follow-up meeting with Hub researchers to discuss key issues raised (meeting to be arranged in 2021). The Mzansea team have presented to the Marine and Coastal Educators Network and are in discussion with members of this network from the 3 South Africa aquariums on the implementation of the Mzansea products.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Fiji: Analysing regional ocean policy inter-linkages 
Organisation Government of Fiji
Department Ministry of Economy
Country Fiji 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The One Ocean Hub has provided the infrastructure to bring together multiple stakeholders to co-design a transdisciplinary programme to address critical ocean governance issues arising in both national and regional level policy spaces in Fiji. On specific request from the Ministry of Economy, a One Ocean Hub team of researchers comprising Prof. Pierre Mazzega (CNRS, University Jean Jaurès, France), Dr. Claire Lajaunie (INSERM, University Aix-Marseille, France), Prof. Jeremy Hills (USP-overseas staff), Payal Maharaj (USP-Fiji), and Dr Senia Febrica (University of Strathclyde) analysed sector-based ocean policies in relation to the Fiji National Development Plan, to inform the development of a National Ocean Policy for Fiji. The analysis provided specific recommendations for strengthening coherence between the National Development Plan and ocean-related policies, and the interface between national policy priorities and the various sectors related directly or indirectly to the ocean. In parallel, the research team have been in ongoing engagement with the Office of the Pacific Ocean Commissioner (OPOC) to discuss the analysis and reviews of regional ocean policies in order to suggest a reform of these policies.
Collaborator Contribution The Office of the Pacific Ocean Commissioner (OPOC), joined the One Ocean Hub in 2020 as a Project Partner. OPOC is a strategic policy, coordination and advocacy construct on regional ocean priorities for the Pacific region. The primary mission is to foster stewardship at scale, and enhance coordination, collaboration and integration for the sustainable development, management and conservation of the Pacific Ocean and its resources under the Framework for a Pacific Oceanscape and relevant regional policies and plans. Through its strategic situation and mandate, it can assist in guiding and identifying key gaps and relevant research focus for the One Ocean Hub. OPOC can contribute to identifying research topics, sourcing, identifying and connecting regional experts with the One Ocean Hub, disseminate results and outputs of the Hub as well as learning from experiences from other regions the One Ocean Hub is working with. OPOC can provide time for staff to work with the Hub on specific projects. When necessary, it could share costs to convene seminars, workshops and even space and facilities for visiting experts. Data produced by OPOC for public purposes can be shared with the Hub, including data as outcomes of specific joint work with the Hub. OPOC also has the possibility of using Hub outputs as high-level advocacy at the regional and global level, through the Pacific Ocean Commissioner and other senior regional representatives. Fiji's Ministry of Economy was leading the development of the first National Ocean Policy for Fiji. The Ministry engaged with Hub researchers in ongoing discussion and made available to the researchers relevant policy materials to aid the analysis.
Impact Outputs The recommendations made to the Ministry of Economy have been incorporated into the National Ocean Policy, and are explicitly cited on page 19 https://www.economy.gov.fj/images/CCIC/uploads/Ocean/NOP_2020_Print01.pdf The analysis has also informed the 'Blue Pacific Ocean Report' of the Office of the Pacific Ocean Commissioner, and is included within the report, explicitly cited on page 141. https://opocbluepacific.net/publications/#blue-pacific-ocean-report Journal Articles - In press Hills, J; Mazega, P, Lajaunie, C; Nandini-Maharaj, P. Orchestrating the Ocean using National Ocean Policies: the case of the Solomon Islands. Frontiers of Marine Science Special Edition. (In press).
Start Year 2019
 
Description Fiji: Analysing regional ocean policy inter-linkages 
Organisation National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM)
Country France 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The One Ocean Hub has provided the infrastructure to bring together multiple stakeholders to co-design a transdisciplinary programme to address critical ocean governance issues arising in both national and regional level policy spaces in Fiji. On specific request from the Ministry of Economy, a One Ocean Hub team of researchers comprising Prof. Pierre Mazzega (CNRS, University Jean Jaurès, France), Dr. Claire Lajaunie (INSERM, University Aix-Marseille, France), Prof. Jeremy Hills (USP-overseas staff), Payal Maharaj (USP-Fiji), and Dr Senia Febrica (University of Strathclyde) analysed sector-based ocean policies in relation to the Fiji National Development Plan, to inform the development of a National Ocean Policy for Fiji. The analysis provided specific recommendations for strengthening coherence between the National Development Plan and ocean-related policies, and the interface between national policy priorities and the various sectors related directly or indirectly to the ocean. In parallel, the research team have been in ongoing engagement with the Office of the Pacific Ocean Commissioner (OPOC) to discuss the analysis and reviews of regional ocean policies in order to suggest a reform of these policies.
Collaborator Contribution The Office of the Pacific Ocean Commissioner (OPOC), joined the One Ocean Hub in 2020 as a Project Partner. OPOC is a strategic policy, coordination and advocacy construct on regional ocean priorities for the Pacific region. The primary mission is to foster stewardship at scale, and enhance coordination, collaboration and integration for the sustainable development, management and conservation of the Pacific Ocean and its resources under the Framework for a Pacific Oceanscape and relevant regional policies and plans. Through its strategic situation and mandate, it can assist in guiding and identifying key gaps and relevant research focus for the One Ocean Hub. OPOC can contribute to identifying research topics, sourcing, identifying and connecting regional experts with the One Ocean Hub, disseminate results and outputs of the Hub as well as learning from experiences from other regions the One Ocean Hub is working with. OPOC can provide time for staff to work with the Hub on specific projects. When necessary, it could share costs to convene seminars, workshops and even space and facilities for visiting experts. Data produced by OPOC for public purposes can be shared with the Hub, including data as outcomes of specific joint work with the Hub. OPOC also has the possibility of using Hub outputs as high-level advocacy at the regional and global level, through the Pacific Ocean Commissioner and other senior regional representatives. Fiji's Ministry of Economy was leading the development of the first National Ocean Policy for Fiji. The Ministry engaged with Hub researchers in ongoing discussion and made available to the researchers relevant policy materials to aid the analysis.
Impact Outputs The recommendations made to the Ministry of Economy have been incorporated into the National Ocean Policy, and are explicitly cited on page 19 https://www.economy.gov.fj/images/CCIC/uploads/Ocean/NOP_2020_Print01.pdf The analysis has also informed the 'Blue Pacific Ocean Report' of the Office of the Pacific Ocean Commissioner, and is included within the report, explicitly cited on page 141. https://opocbluepacific.net/publications/#blue-pacific-ocean-report Journal Articles - In press Hills, J; Mazega, P, Lajaunie, C; Nandini-Maharaj, P. Orchestrating the Ocean using National Ocean Policies: the case of the Solomon Islands. Frontiers of Marine Science Special Edition. (In press).
Start Year 2019
 
Description Fiji: Analysing regional ocean policy inter-linkages 
Organisation Office of the Pacific Ocean Commissioner (OPOC)
Country Fiji 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The One Ocean Hub has provided the infrastructure to bring together multiple stakeholders to co-design a transdisciplinary programme to address critical ocean governance issues arising in both national and regional level policy spaces in Fiji. On specific request from the Ministry of Economy, a One Ocean Hub team of researchers comprising Prof. Pierre Mazzega (CNRS, University Jean Jaurès, France), Dr. Claire Lajaunie (INSERM, University Aix-Marseille, France), Prof. Jeremy Hills (USP-overseas staff), Payal Maharaj (USP-Fiji), and Dr Senia Febrica (University of Strathclyde) analysed sector-based ocean policies in relation to the Fiji National Development Plan, to inform the development of a National Ocean Policy for Fiji. The analysis provided specific recommendations for strengthening coherence between the National Development Plan and ocean-related policies, and the interface between national policy priorities and the various sectors related directly or indirectly to the ocean. In parallel, the research team have been in ongoing engagement with the Office of the Pacific Ocean Commissioner (OPOC) to discuss the analysis and reviews of regional ocean policies in order to suggest a reform of these policies.
Collaborator Contribution The Office of the Pacific Ocean Commissioner (OPOC), joined the One Ocean Hub in 2020 as a Project Partner. OPOC is a strategic policy, coordination and advocacy construct on regional ocean priorities for the Pacific region. The primary mission is to foster stewardship at scale, and enhance coordination, collaboration and integration for the sustainable development, management and conservation of the Pacific Ocean and its resources under the Framework for a Pacific Oceanscape and relevant regional policies and plans. Through its strategic situation and mandate, it can assist in guiding and identifying key gaps and relevant research focus for the One Ocean Hub. OPOC can contribute to identifying research topics, sourcing, identifying and connecting regional experts with the One Ocean Hub, disseminate results and outputs of the Hub as well as learning from experiences from other regions the One Ocean Hub is working with. OPOC can provide time for staff to work with the Hub on specific projects. When necessary, it could share costs to convene seminars, workshops and even space and facilities for visiting experts. Data produced by OPOC for public purposes can be shared with the Hub, including data as outcomes of specific joint work with the Hub. OPOC also has the possibility of using Hub outputs as high-level advocacy at the regional and global level, through the Pacific Ocean Commissioner and other senior regional representatives. Fiji's Ministry of Economy was leading the development of the first National Ocean Policy for Fiji. The Ministry engaged with Hub researchers in ongoing discussion and made available to the researchers relevant policy materials to aid the analysis.
Impact Outputs The recommendations made to the Ministry of Economy have been incorporated into the National Ocean Policy, and are explicitly cited on page 19 https://www.economy.gov.fj/images/CCIC/uploads/Ocean/NOP_2020_Print01.pdf The analysis has also informed the 'Blue Pacific Ocean Report' of the Office of the Pacific Ocean Commissioner, and is included within the report, explicitly cited on page 141. https://opocbluepacific.net/publications/#blue-pacific-ocean-report Journal Articles - In press Hills, J; Mazega, P, Lajaunie, C; Nandini-Maharaj, P. Orchestrating the Ocean using National Ocean Policies: the case of the Solomon Islands. Frontiers of Marine Science Special Edition. (In press).
Start Year 2019
 
Description Fiji: Analysing regional ocean policy inter-linkages 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The One Ocean Hub has provided the infrastructure to bring together multiple stakeholders to co-design a transdisciplinary programme to address critical ocean governance issues arising in both national and regional level policy spaces in Fiji. On specific request from the Ministry of Economy, a One Ocean Hub team of researchers comprising Prof. Pierre Mazzega (CNRS, University Jean Jaurès, France), Dr. Claire Lajaunie (INSERM, University Aix-Marseille, France), Prof. Jeremy Hills (USP-overseas staff), Payal Maharaj (USP-Fiji), and Dr Senia Febrica (University of Strathclyde) analysed sector-based ocean policies in relation to the Fiji National Development Plan, to inform the development of a National Ocean Policy for Fiji. The analysis provided specific recommendations for strengthening coherence between the National Development Plan and ocean-related policies, and the interface between national policy priorities and the various sectors related directly or indirectly to the ocean. In parallel, the research team have been in ongoing engagement with the Office of the Pacific Ocean Commissioner (OPOC) to discuss the analysis and reviews of regional ocean policies in order to suggest a reform of these policies.
Collaborator Contribution The Office of the Pacific Ocean Commissioner (OPOC), joined the One Ocean Hub in 2020 as a Project Partner. OPOC is a strategic policy, coordination and advocacy construct on regional ocean priorities for the Pacific region. The primary mission is to foster stewardship at scale, and enhance coordination, collaboration and integration for the sustainable development, management and conservation of the Pacific Ocean and its resources under the Framework for a Pacific Oceanscape and relevant regional policies and plans. Through its strategic situation and mandate, it can assist in guiding and identifying key gaps and relevant research focus for the One Ocean Hub. OPOC can contribute to identifying research topics, sourcing, identifying and connecting regional experts with the One Ocean Hub, disseminate results and outputs of the Hub as well as learning from experiences from other regions the One Ocean Hub is working with. OPOC can provide time for staff to work with the Hub on specific projects. When necessary, it could share costs to convene seminars, workshops and even space and facilities for visiting experts. Data produced by OPOC for public purposes can be shared with the Hub, including data as outcomes of specific joint work with the Hub. OPOC also has the possibility of using Hub outputs as high-level advocacy at the regional and global level, through the Pacific Ocean Commissioner and other senior regional representatives. Fiji's Ministry of Economy was leading the development of the first National Ocean Policy for Fiji. The Ministry engaged with Hub researchers in ongoing discussion and made available to the researchers relevant policy materials to aid the analysis.
Impact Outputs The recommendations made to the Ministry of Economy have been incorporated into the National Ocean Policy, and are explicitly cited on page 19 https://www.economy.gov.fj/images/CCIC/uploads/Ocean/NOP_2020_Print01.pdf The analysis has also informed the 'Blue Pacific Ocean Report' of the Office of the Pacific Ocean Commissioner, and is included within the report, explicitly cited on page 141. https://opocbluepacific.net/publications/#blue-pacific-ocean-report Journal Articles - In press Hills, J; Mazega, P, Lajaunie, C; Nandini-Maharaj, P. Orchestrating the Ocean using National Ocean Policies: the case of the Solomon Islands. Frontiers of Marine Science Special Edition. (In press).
Start Year 2019
 
Description Fiji: Analysing regional ocean policy inter-linkages 
Organisation University of the South Pacific, Laucala
Country Fiji 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The One Ocean Hub has provided the infrastructure to bring together multiple stakeholders to co-design a transdisciplinary programme to address critical ocean governance issues arising in both national and regional level policy spaces in Fiji. On specific request from the Ministry of Economy, a One Ocean Hub team of researchers comprising Prof. Pierre Mazzega (CNRS, University Jean Jaurès, France), Dr. Claire Lajaunie (INSERM, University Aix-Marseille, France), Prof. Jeremy Hills (USP-overseas staff), Payal Maharaj (USP-Fiji), and Dr Senia Febrica (University of Strathclyde) analysed sector-based ocean policies in relation to the Fiji National Development Plan, to inform the development of a National Ocean Policy for Fiji. The analysis provided specific recommendations for strengthening coherence between the National Development Plan and ocean-related policies, and the interface between national policy priorities and the various sectors related directly or indirectly to the ocean. In parallel, the research team have been in ongoing engagement with the Office of the Pacific Ocean Commissioner (OPOC) to discuss the analysis and reviews of regional ocean policies in order to suggest a reform of these policies.
Collaborator Contribution The Office of the Pacific Ocean Commissioner (OPOC), joined the One Ocean Hub in 2020 as a Project Partner. OPOC is a strategic policy, coordination and advocacy construct on regional ocean priorities for the Pacific region. The primary mission is to foster stewardship at scale, and enhance coordination, collaboration and integration for the sustainable development, management and conservation of the Pacific Ocean and its resources under the Framework for a Pacific Oceanscape and relevant regional policies and plans. Through its strategic situation and mandate, it can assist in guiding and identifying key gaps and relevant research focus for the One Ocean Hub. OPOC can contribute to identifying research topics, sourcing, identifying and connecting regional experts with the One Ocean Hub, disseminate results and outputs of the Hub as well as learning from experiences from other regions the One Ocean Hub is working with. OPOC can provide time for staff to work with the Hub on specific projects. When necessary, it could share costs to convene seminars, workshops and even space and facilities for visiting experts. Data produced by OPOC for public purposes can be shared with the Hub, including data as outcomes of specific joint work with the Hub. OPOC also has the possibility of using Hub outputs as high-level advocacy at the regional and global level, through the Pacific Ocean Commissioner and other senior regional representatives. Fiji's Ministry of Economy was leading the development of the first National Ocean Policy for Fiji. The Ministry engaged with Hub researchers in ongoing discussion and made available to the researchers relevant policy materials to aid the analysis.
Impact Outputs The recommendations made to the Ministry of Economy have been incorporated into the National Ocean Policy, and are explicitly cited on page 19 https://www.economy.gov.fj/images/CCIC/uploads/Ocean/NOP_2020_Print01.pdf The analysis has also informed the 'Blue Pacific Ocean Report' of the Office of the Pacific Ocean Commissioner, and is included within the report, explicitly cited on page 141. https://opocbluepacific.net/publications/#blue-pacific-ocean-report Journal Articles - In press Hills, J; Mazega, P, Lajaunie, C; Nandini-Maharaj, P. Orchestrating the Ocean using National Ocean Policies: the case of the Solomon Islands. Frontiers of Marine Science Special Edition. (In press).
Start Year 2019
 
Description Ghana Deep Fund Project: Cocooned in Harmony: Power, agency and multiple realities in the songs of indigenous Ghanaian seine fisherfolk 
Organisation Glasgow School of Art
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub research in ocean art, culture and heritage aims to surface and provide an outlet for the views of those groups that are generally under-represented in more traditional approaches to ocean science and management. This research programme will provide sources of customary law for analysis under the Ocean Governance research programme and insights into traditional knowledge and livelihoods to inform all research themes. This research programme is supported by a "Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund" to commission artistic responses that capture evolving challenges to ocean management, the ocean's multiple contributions to human wellbeing, and Hub findings. This fund is administered by the University of Strathclyde as lead partners in the One Ocean Hub project. "Cocooned in Harmony: Power, agency and multiple realities in the songs of indigenous Ghanaian seine fisherfolk " is a new project initiated under the Deep Fund, led by Eric Otchere, University of Cape Coast Ghana. Glasgow School of Art will provide project management support for the project, as well providing a conduit through which the findings of this project can inform wider Hub research in Ghana.
Collaborator Contribution Singing is an integral part of the diurnal activities of indigenous Ghanaian seine/artisanal fishermen. Beyond the function of providing reference points for coordinated activity and helping ease the strenuous activities, music serves other purposes. The songs have pointers to issues of identity, power/inequality, agency, gender and beliefs about the ocean among others. Through the music, the fishermen create and inhabit spaces where they find their (often sidelined) voice. In this project, Ghanaian researcher Eric Otchere will examine the act of singing to reveal issues of fisher-folk identity, power, inequality, gender and connectedness to the sea. The songs and their meanings will be shared in a documentary film that focuses on fishing communities from the four main coastal regions of the country: Volta, Greater Accra, Central and Western regions from East to West respectively.
Impact This project started in February 2021. The output of this project will be a documentary film. The community engagement undertaken in this project will also contribute knowledge towards two Hub outcomes in Ghana: (1) integrated and inclusive approaches to marine planning (by informing the community voice in providing a further link between community and researchers) and (2) Methods for supplementary livelihoods (through engaging with and understanding better the livelihoods of fisherfolk, their challenges, and opportunities). It thus contributes and will work in partnership with the collaboration detailed under the entry 'Sustainable and equitable fisheries, Ghana'.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Ghana Deep Fund Project: Cocooned in Harmony: Power, agency and multiple realities in the songs of indigenous Ghanaian seine fisherfolk 
Organisation University of Cape Coast
Country Ghana 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub research in ocean art, culture and heritage aims to surface and provide an outlet for the views of those groups that are generally under-represented in more traditional approaches to ocean science and management. This research programme will provide sources of customary law for analysis under the Ocean Governance research programme and insights into traditional knowledge and livelihoods to inform all research themes. This research programme is supported by a "Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund" to commission artistic responses that capture evolving challenges to ocean management, the ocean's multiple contributions to human wellbeing, and Hub findings. This fund is administered by the University of Strathclyde as lead partners in the One Ocean Hub project. "Cocooned in Harmony: Power, agency and multiple realities in the songs of indigenous Ghanaian seine fisherfolk " is a new project initiated under the Deep Fund, led by Eric Otchere, University of Cape Coast Ghana. Glasgow School of Art will provide project management support for the project, as well providing a conduit through which the findings of this project can inform wider Hub research in Ghana.
Collaborator Contribution Singing is an integral part of the diurnal activities of indigenous Ghanaian seine/artisanal fishermen. Beyond the function of providing reference points for coordinated activity and helping ease the strenuous activities, music serves other purposes. The songs have pointers to issues of identity, power/inequality, agency, gender and beliefs about the ocean among others. Through the music, the fishermen create and inhabit spaces where they find their (often sidelined) voice. In this project, Ghanaian researcher Eric Otchere will examine the act of singing to reveal issues of fisher-folk identity, power, inequality, gender and connectedness to the sea. The songs and their meanings will be shared in a documentary film that focuses on fishing communities from the four main coastal regions of the country: Volta, Greater Accra, Central and Western regions from East to West respectively.
Impact This project started in February 2021. The output of this project will be a documentary film. The community engagement undertaken in this project will also contribute knowledge towards two Hub outcomes in Ghana: (1) integrated and inclusive approaches to marine planning (by informing the community voice in providing a further link between community and researchers) and (2) Methods for supplementary livelihoods (through engaging with and understanding better the livelihoods of fisherfolk, their challenges, and opportunities). It thus contributes and will work in partnership with the collaboration detailed under the entry 'Sustainable and equitable fisheries, Ghana'.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Ghana Deep Fund Project: Cocooned in Harmony: Power, agency and multiple realities in the songs of indigenous Ghanaian seine fisherfolk 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub research in ocean art, culture and heritage aims to surface and provide an outlet for the views of those groups that are generally under-represented in more traditional approaches to ocean science and management. This research programme will provide sources of customary law for analysis under the Ocean Governance research programme and insights into traditional knowledge and livelihoods to inform all research themes. This research programme is supported by a "Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund" to commission artistic responses that capture evolving challenges to ocean management, the ocean's multiple contributions to human wellbeing, and Hub findings. This fund is administered by the University of Strathclyde as lead partners in the One Ocean Hub project. "Cocooned in Harmony: Power, agency and multiple realities in the songs of indigenous Ghanaian seine fisherfolk " is a new project initiated under the Deep Fund, led by Eric Otchere, University of Cape Coast Ghana. Glasgow School of Art will provide project management support for the project, as well providing a conduit through which the findings of this project can inform wider Hub research in Ghana.
Collaborator Contribution Singing is an integral part of the diurnal activities of indigenous Ghanaian seine/artisanal fishermen. Beyond the function of providing reference points for coordinated activity and helping ease the strenuous activities, music serves other purposes. The songs have pointers to issues of identity, power/inequality, agency, gender and beliefs about the ocean among others. Through the music, the fishermen create and inhabit spaces where they find their (often sidelined) voice. In this project, Ghanaian researcher Eric Otchere will examine the act of singing to reveal issues of fisher-folk identity, power, inequality, gender and connectedness to the sea. The songs and their meanings will be shared in a documentary film that focuses on fishing communities from the four main coastal regions of the country: Volta, Greater Accra, Central and Western regions from East to West respectively.
Impact This project started in February 2021. The output of this project will be a documentary film. The community engagement undertaken in this project will also contribute knowledge towards two Hub outcomes in Ghana: (1) integrated and inclusive approaches to marine planning (by informing the community voice in providing a further link between community and researchers) and (2) Methods for supplementary livelihoods (through engaging with and understanding better the livelihoods of fisherfolk, their challenges, and opportunities). It thus contributes and will work in partnership with the collaboration detailed under the entry 'Sustainable and equitable fisheries, Ghana'.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Law, Heritage and the Blue Economy 
Organisation International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The research of One Ocean Hub co-investigators and initial awardees has highlighted the existing disconnect between international and national law on ocean protection and local customs in South Africa and Ghana. Novel questions about insufficient attention to lifestyle needs and intangible cultural heritage in the context of various blue economy activities (offshore oil and gas developments, fisheries, bio-prospecting and seabed mining) have emerged, as well as questions about the degree of evidence of intangible cultural heritage that would stand in courts or in planning processes have been identified among the preliminary findings of social science researchers in Ghana and the empatheatre methodology in South Africa. The clash between modern laws and customary laws has taken centre stage in fishing and ocean governance. Our preliminary report on Ghana demonstrates that distinctive heritage customs impact fishing activities and other ocean related practices. Traditional chains of command which have long adjudicated over observable breaches of customary law are challenged by changed social dynamics that create contexts within which new laws are seen to be necessary. Modern laws, however, have been established without recourse to customary practices, and often privilege large blue economy investments over small-scale livelihood practices thereby creating clashes. In addition, challenges such as poverty, limited employment opportunities create a dilemma about legislating for ocean health and its exploitation for survival. With regard to the long standing perspective which upholds the notion that poverty is a direct precursor of child labour, it was confirmed in preliminary research that some children with poor parents were working for fishermen. Preliminary research has also confirmed the importance of linking research in international investment law with socio-legal research at the national level and local stakeholder engagement about the blue economy. The initial research on international investment law has also underscored that "blue economy narratives" (blue economy policies and promotional activities) may restrict the opportunities for governments and judiciary to protect local communities' interests that may be negatively impacts by blue economy initiatives, because of international obligations to protect foreign investors. In South Africa, foreign investment in offshore oil and gas development has been identified as a threat by coastal communities. In Ghana, local fishermen feel cheated by the low level of law enforcement associated with industrial fish trawling, which features new patterns of capital mobility such as Chinese investment. The protection of foreign investment in both countries may limit the ability of national governemts to respond to the threats of altering livelihoods for artisanal fisherfolk and other coastal communities.
Collaborator Contribution The intuition to focus on the integration of human rights and the environment to tackle socio-cultural issues around the blue economy has been confirmed by engagement with new partners in civil society and grassroots organisations. A transdisciplinary conference in January on Transformed and Transformative Governance that included these partners, generated working principles for the group.
Impact Outputs: Transformed and Transformed Governance Conference Lalela Ulwandle Empatheatre SOUTH AFRICA Successful Flexible Fund Application by Early Career Researchers to plan and host an Culture and Intangible Heritage Workshop in GHANA Disciplines: Law, Sociology, Anthropology, History, Economics, Marine Science.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Law, Heritage and the Blue Economy 
Organisation Nelson Mandela University
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research of One Ocean Hub co-investigators and initial awardees has highlighted the existing disconnect between international and national law on ocean protection and local customs in South Africa and Ghana. Novel questions about insufficient attention to lifestyle needs and intangible cultural heritage in the context of various blue economy activities (offshore oil and gas developments, fisheries, bio-prospecting and seabed mining) have emerged, as well as questions about the degree of evidence of intangible cultural heritage that would stand in courts or in planning processes have been identified among the preliminary findings of social science researchers in Ghana and the empatheatre methodology in South Africa. The clash between modern laws and customary laws has taken centre stage in fishing and ocean governance. Our preliminary report on Ghana demonstrates that distinctive heritage customs impact fishing activities and other ocean related practices. Traditional chains of command which have long adjudicated over observable breaches of customary law are challenged by changed social dynamics that create contexts within which new laws are seen to be necessary. Modern laws, however, have been established without recourse to customary practices, and often privilege large blue economy investments over small-scale livelihood practices thereby creating clashes. In addition, challenges such as poverty, limited employment opportunities create a dilemma about legislating for ocean health and its exploitation for survival. With regard to the long standing perspective which upholds the notion that poverty is a direct precursor of child labour, it was confirmed in preliminary research that some children with poor parents were working for fishermen. Preliminary research has also confirmed the importance of linking research in international investment law with socio-legal research at the national level and local stakeholder engagement about the blue economy. The initial research on international investment law has also underscored that "blue economy narratives" (blue economy policies and promotional activities) may restrict the opportunities for governments and judiciary to protect local communities' interests that may be negatively impacts by blue economy initiatives, because of international obligations to protect foreign investors. In South Africa, foreign investment in offshore oil and gas development has been identified as a threat by coastal communities. In Ghana, local fishermen feel cheated by the low level of law enforcement associated with industrial fish trawling, which features new patterns of capital mobility such as Chinese investment. The protection of foreign investment in both countries may limit the ability of national governemts to respond to the threats of altering livelihoods for artisanal fisherfolk and other coastal communities.
Collaborator Contribution The intuition to focus on the integration of human rights and the environment to tackle socio-cultural issues around the blue economy has been confirmed by engagement with new partners in civil society and grassroots organisations. A transdisciplinary conference in January on Transformed and Transformative Governance that included these partners, generated working principles for the group.
Impact Outputs: Transformed and Transformed Governance Conference Lalela Ulwandle Empatheatre SOUTH AFRICA Successful Flexible Fund Application by Early Career Researchers to plan and host an Culture and Intangible Heritage Workshop in GHANA Disciplines: Law, Sociology, Anthropology, History, Economics, Marine Science.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Law, Heritage and the Blue Economy 
Organisation Rhodes University
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research of One Ocean Hub co-investigators and initial awardees has highlighted the existing disconnect between international and national law on ocean protection and local customs in South Africa and Ghana. Novel questions about insufficient attention to lifestyle needs and intangible cultural heritage in the context of various blue economy activities (offshore oil and gas developments, fisheries, bio-prospecting and seabed mining) have emerged, as well as questions about the degree of evidence of intangible cultural heritage that would stand in courts or in planning processes have been identified among the preliminary findings of social science researchers in Ghana and the empatheatre methodology in South Africa. The clash between modern laws and customary laws has taken centre stage in fishing and ocean governance. Our preliminary report on Ghana demonstrates that distinctive heritage customs impact fishing activities and other ocean related practices. Traditional chains of command which have long adjudicated over observable breaches of customary law are challenged by changed social dynamics that create contexts within which new laws are seen to be necessary. Modern laws, however, have been established without recourse to customary practices, and often privilege large blue economy investments over small-scale livelihood practices thereby creating clashes. In addition, challenges such as poverty, limited employment opportunities create a dilemma about legislating for ocean health and its exploitation for survival. With regard to the long standing perspective which upholds the notion that poverty is a direct precursor of child labour, it was confirmed in preliminary research that some children with poor parents were working for fishermen. Preliminary research has also confirmed the importance of linking research in international investment law with socio-legal research at the national level and local stakeholder engagement about the blue economy. The initial research on international investment law has also underscored that "blue economy narratives" (blue economy policies and promotional activities) may restrict the opportunities for governments and judiciary to protect local communities' interests that may be negatively impacts by blue economy initiatives, because of international obligations to protect foreign investors. In South Africa, foreign investment in offshore oil and gas development has been identified as a threat by coastal communities. In Ghana, local fishermen feel cheated by the low level of law enforcement associated with industrial fish trawling, which features new patterns of capital mobility such as Chinese investment. The protection of foreign investment in both countries may limit the ability of national governemts to respond to the threats of altering livelihoods for artisanal fisherfolk and other coastal communities.
Collaborator Contribution The intuition to focus on the integration of human rights and the environment to tackle socio-cultural issues around the blue economy has been confirmed by engagement with new partners in civil society and grassroots organisations. A transdisciplinary conference in January on Transformed and Transformative Governance that included these partners, generated working principles for the group.
Impact Outputs: Transformed and Transformed Governance Conference Lalela Ulwandle Empatheatre SOUTH AFRICA Successful Flexible Fund Application by Early Career Researchers to plan and host an Culture and Intangible Heritage Workshop in GHANA Disciplines: Law, Sociology, Anthropology, History, Economics, Marine Science.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Law, Heritage and the Blue Economy 
Organisation University of Cape Coast
Country Ghana 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research of One Ocean Hub co-investigators and initial awardees has highlighted the existing disconnect between international and national law on ocean protection and local customs in South Africa and Ghana. Novel questions about insufficient attention to lifestyle needs and intangible cultural heritage in the context of various blue economy activities (offshore oil and gas developments, fisheries, bio-prospecting and seabed mining) have emerged, as well as questions about the degree of evidence of intangible cultural heritage that would stand in courts or in planning processes have been identified among the preliminary findings of social science researchers in Ghana and the empatheatre methodology in South Africa. The clash between modern laws and customary laws has taken centre stage in fishing and ocean governance. Our preliminary report on Ghana demonstrates that distinctive heritage customs impact fishing activities and other ocean related practices. Traditional chains of command which have long adjudicated over observable breaches of customary law are challenged by changed social dynamics that create contexts within which new laws are seen to be necessary. Modern laws, however, have been established without recourse to customary practices, and often privilege large blue economy investments over small-scale livelihood practices thereby creating clashes. In addition, challenges such as poverty, limited employment opportunities create a dilemma about legislating for ocean health and its exploitation for survival. With regard to the long standing perspective which upholds the notion that poverty is a direct precursor of child labour, it was confirmed in preliminary research that some children with poor parents were working for fishermen. Preliminary research has also confirmed the importance of linking research in international investment law with socio-legal research at the national level and local stakeholder engagement about the blue economy. The initial research on international investment law has also underscored that "blue economy narratives" (blue economy policies and promotional activities) may restrict the opportunities for governments and judiciary to protect local communities' interests that may be negatively impacts by blue economy initiatives, because of international obligations to protect foreign investors. In South Africa, foreign investment in offshore oil and gas development has been identified as a threat by coastal communities. In Ghana, local fishermen feel cheated by the low level of law enforcement associated with industrial fish trawling, which features new patterns of capital mobility such as Chinese investment. The protection of foreign investment in both countries may limit the ability of national governemts to respond to the threats of altering livelihoods for artisanal fisherfolk and other coastal communities.
Collaborator Contribution The intuition to focus on the integration of human rights and the environment to tackle socio-cultural issues around the blue economy has been confirmed by engagement with new partners in civil society and grassroots organisations. A transdisciplinary conference in January on Transformed and Transformative Governance that included these partners, generated working principles for the group.
Impact Outputs: Transformed and Transformed Governance Conference Lalela Ulwandle Empatheatre SOUTH AFRICA Successful Flexible Fund Application by Early Career Researchers to plan and host an Culture and Intangible Heritage Workshop in GHANA Disciplines: Law, Sociology, Anthropology, History, Economics, Marine Science.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Law, Heritage and the Blue Economy 
Organisation University of Cape Town
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research of One Ocean Hub co-investigators and initial awardees has highlighted the existing disconnect between international and national law on ocean protection and local customs in South Africa and Ghana. Novel questions about insufficient attention to lifestyle needs and intangible cultural heritage in the context of various blue economy activities (offshore oil and gas developments, fisheries, bio-prospecting and seabed mining) have emerged, as well as questions about the degree of evidence of intangible cultural heritage that would stand in courts or in planning processes have been identified among the preliminary findings of social science researchers in Ghana and the empatheatre methodology in South Africa. The clash between modern laws and customary laws has taken centre stage in fishing and ocean governance. Our preliminary report on Ghana demonstrates that distinctive heritage customs impact fishing activities and other ocean related practices. Traditional chains of command which have long adjudicated over observable breaches of customary law are challenged by changed social dynamics that create contexts within which new laws are seen to be necessary. Modern laws, however, have been established without recourse to customary practices, and often privilege large blue economy investments over small-scale livelihood practices thereby creating clashes. In addition, challenges such as poverty, limited employment opportunities create a dilemma about legislating for ocean health and its exploitation for survival. With regard to the long standing perspective which upholds the notion that poverty is a direct precursor of child labour, it was confirmed in preliminary research that some children with poor parents were working for fishermen. Preliminary research has also confirmed the importance of linking research in international investment law with socio-legal research at the national level and local stakeholder engagement about the blue economy. The initial research on international investment law has also underscored that "blue economy narratives" (blue economy policies and promotional activities) may restrict the opportunities for governments and judiciary to protect local communities' interests that may be negatively impacts by blue economy initiatives, because of international obligations to protect foreign investors. In South Africa, foreign investment in offshore oil and gas development has been identified as a threat by coastal communities. In Ghana, local fishermen feel cheated by the low level of law enforcement associated with industrial fish trawling, which features new patterns of capital mobility such as Chinese investment. The protection of foreign investment in both countries may limit the ability of national governemts to respond to the threats of altering livelihoods for artisanal fisherfolk and other coastal communities.
Collaborator Contribution The intuition to focus on the integration of human rights and the environment to tackle socio-cultural issues around the blue economy has been confirmed by engagement with new partners in civil society and grassroots organisations. A transdisciplinary conference in January on Transformed and Transformative Governance that included these partners, generated working principles for the group.
Impact Outputs: Transformed and Transformed Governance Conference Lalela Ulwandle Empatheatre SOUTH AFRICA Successful Flexible Fund Application by Early Career Researchers to plan and host an Culture and Intangible Heritage Workshop in GHANA Disciplines: Law, Sociology, Anthropology, History, Economics, Marine Science.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Law, Heritage and the Blue Economy 
Organisation University of Plymouth
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research of One Ocean Hub co-investigators and initial awardees has highlighted the existing disconnect between international and national law on ocean protection and local customs in South Africa and Ghana. Novel questions about insufficient attention to lifestyle needs and intangible cultural heritage in the context of various blue economy activities (offshore oil and gas developments, fisheries, bio-prospecting and seabed mining) have emerged, as well as questions about the degree of evidence of intangible cultural heritage that would stand in courts or in planning processes have been identified among the preliminary findings of social science researchers in Ghana and the empatheatre methodology in South Africa. The clash between modern laws and customary laws has taken centre stage in fishing and ocean governance. Our preliminary report on Ghana demonstrates that distinctive heritage customs impact fishing activities and other ocean related practices. Traditional chains of command which have long adjudicated over observable breaches of customary law are challenged by changed social dynamics that create contexts within which new laws are seen to be necessary. Modern laws, however, have been established without recourse to customary practices, and often privilege large blue economy investments over small-scale livelihood practices thereby creating clashes. In addition, challenges such as poverty, limited employment opportunities create a dilemma about legislating for ocean health and its exploitation for survival. With regard to the long standing perspective which upholds the notion that poverty is a direct precursor of child labour, it was confirmed in preliminary research that some children with poor parents were working for fishermen. Preliminary research has also confirmed the importance of linking research in international investment law with socio-legal research at the national level and local stakeholder engagement about the blue economy. The initial research on international investment law has also underscored that "blue economy narratives" (blue economy policies and promotional activities) may restrict the opportunities for governments and judiciary to protect local communities' interests that may be negatively impacts by blue economy initiatives, because of international obligations to protect foreign investors. In South Africa, foreign investment in offshore oil and gas development has been identified as a threat by coastal communities. In Ghana, local fishermen feel cheated by the low level of law enforcement associated with industrial fish trawling, which features new patterns of capital mobility such as Chinese investment. The protection of foreign investment in both countries may limit the ability of national governemts to respond to the threats of altering livelihoods for artisanal fisherfolk and other coastal communities.
Collaborator Contribution The intuition to focus on the integration of human rights and the environment to tackle socio-cultural issues around the blue economy has been confirmed by engagement with new partners in civil society and grassroots organisations. A transdisciplinary conference in January on Transformed and Transformative Governance that included these partners, generated working principles for the group.
Impact Outputs: Transformed and Transformed Governance Conference Lalela Ulwandle Empatheatre SOUTH AFRICA Successful Flexible Fund Application by Early Career Researchers to plan and host an Culture and Intangible Heritage Workshop in GHANA Disciplines: Law, Sociology, Anthropology, History, Economics, Marine Science.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Law, Heritage and the Blue Economy 
Organisation University of Seychelles
Country Seychelles 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research of One Ocean Hub co-investigators and initial awardees has highlighted the existing disconnect between international and national law on ocean protection and local customs in South Africa and Ghana. Novel questions about insufficient attention to lifestyle needs and intangible cultural heritage in the context of various blue economy activities (offshore oil and gas developments, fisheries, bio-prospecting and seabed mining) have emerged, as well as questions about the degree of evidence of intangible cultural heritage that would stand in courts or in planning processes have been identified among the preliminary findings of social science researchers in Ghana and the empatheatre methodology in South Africa. The clash between modern laws and customary laws has taken centre stage in fishing and ocean governance. Our preliminary report on Ghana demonstrates that distinctive heritage customs impact fishing activities and other ocean related practices. Traditional chains of command which have long adjudicated over observable breaches of customary law are challenged by changed social dynamics that create contexts within which new laws are seen to be necessary. Modern laws, however, have been established without recourse to customary practices, and often privilege large blue economy investments over small-scale livelihood practices thereby creating clashes. In addition, challenges such as poverty, limited employment opportunities create a dilemma about legislating for ocean health and its exploitation for survival. With regard to the long standing perspective which upholds the notion that poverty is a direct precursor of child labour, it was confirmed in preliminary research that some children with poor parents were working for fishermen. Preliminary research has also confirmed the importance of linking research in international investment law with socio-legal research at the national level and local stakeholder engagement about the blue economy. The initial research on international investment law has also underscored that "blue economy narratives" (blue economy policies and promotional activities) may restrict the opportunities for governments and judiciary to protect local communities' interests that may be negatively impacts by blue economy initiatives, because of international obligations to protect foreign investors. In South Africa, foreign investment in offshore oil and gas development has been identified as a threat by coastal communities. In Ghana, local fishermen feel cheated by the low level of law enforcement associated with industrial fish trawling, which features new patterns of capital mobility such as Chinese investment. The protection of foreign investment in both countries may limit the ability of national governemts to respond to the threats of altering livelihoods for artisanal fisherfolk and other coastal communities.
Collaborator Contribution The intuition to focus on the integration of human rights and the environment to tackle socio-cultural issues around the blue economy has been confirmed by engagement with new partners in civil society and grassroots organisations. A transdisciplinary conference in January on Transformed and Transformative Governance that included these partners, generated working principles for the group.
Impact Outputs: Transformed and Transformed Governance Conference Lalela Ulwandle Empatheatre SOUTH AFRICA Successful Flexible Fund Application by Early Career Researchers to plan and host an Culture and Intangible Heritage Workshop in GHANA Disciplines: Law, Sociology, Anthropology, History, Economics, Marine Science.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Law, Heritage and the Blue Economy 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Department Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences (HaSS)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research of One Ocean Hub co-investigators and initial awardees has highlighted the existing disconnect between international and national law on ocean protection and local customs in South Africa and Ghana. Novel questions about insufficient attention to lifestyle needs and intangible cultural heritage in the context of various blue economy activities (offshore oil and gas developments, fisheries, bio-prospecting and seabed mining) have emerged, as well as questions about the degree of evidence of intangible cultural heritage that would stand in courts or in planning processes have been identified among the preliminary findings of social science researchers in Ghana and the empatheatre methodology in South Africa. The clash between modern laws and customary laws has taken centre stage in fishing and ocean governance. Our preliminary report on Ghana demonstrates that distinctive heritage customs impact fishing activities and other ocean related practices. Traditional chains of command which have long adjudicated over observable breaches of customary law are challenged by changed social dynamics that create contexts within which new laws are seen to be necessary. Modern laws, however, have been established without recourse to customary practices, and often privilege large blue economy investments over small-scale livelihood practices thereby creating clashes. In addition, challenges such as poverty, limited employment opportunities create a dilemma about legislating for ocean health and its exploitation for survival. With regard to the long standing perspective which upholds the notion that poverty is a direct precursor of child labour, it was confirmed in preliminary research that some children with poor parents were working for fishermen. Preliminary research has also confirmed the importance of linking research in international investment law with socio-legal research at the national level and local stakeholder engagement about the blue economy. The initial research on international investment law has also underscored that "blue economy narratives" (blue economy policies and promotional activities) may restrict the opportunities for governments and judiciary to protect local communities' interests that may be negatively impacts by blue economy initiatives, because of international obligations to protect foreign investors. In South Africa, foreign investment in offshore oil and gas development has been identified as a threat by coastal communities. In Ghana, local fishermen feel cheated by the low level of law enforcement associated with industrial fish trawling, which features new patterns of capital mobility such as Chinese investment. The protection of foreign investment in both countries may limit the ability of national governemts to respond to the threats of altering livelihoods for artisanal fisherfolk and other coastal communities.
Collaborator Contribution The intuition to focus on the integration of human rights and the environment to tackle socio-cultural issues around the blue economy has been confirmed by engagement with new partners in civil society and grassroots organisations. A transdisciplinary conference in January on Transformed and Transformative Governance that included these partners, generated working principles for the group.
Impact Outputs: Transformed and Transformed Governance Conference Lalela Ulwandle Empatheatre SOUTH AFRICA Successful Flexible Fund Application by Early Career Researchers to plan and host an Culture and Intangible Heritage Workshop in GHANA Disciplines: Law, Sociology, Anthropology, History, Economics, Marine Science.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Law, Heritage and the Blue Economy 
Organisation University of the West Indies
Country Barbados 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research of One Ocean Hub co-investigators and initial awardees has highlighted the existing disconnect between international and national law on ocean protection and local customs in South Africa and Ghana. Novel questions about insufficient attention to lifestyle needs and intangible cultural heritage in the context of various blue economy activities (offshore oil and gas developments, fisheries, bio-prospecting and seabed mining) have emerged, as well as questions about the degree of evidence of intangible cultural heritage that would stand in courts or in planning processes have been identified among the preliminary findings of social science researchers in Ghana and the empatheatre methodology in South Africa. The clash between modern laws and customary laws has taken centre stage in fishing and ocean governance. Our preliminary report on Ghana demonstrates that distinctive heritage customs impact fishing activities and other ocean related practices. Traditional chains of command which have long adjudicated over observable breaches of customary law are challenged by changed social dynamics that create contexts within which new laws are seen to be necessary. Modern laws, however, have been established without recourse to customary practices, and often privilege large blue economy investments over small-scale livelihood practices thereby creating clashes. In addition, challenges such as poverty, limited employment opportunities create a dilemma about legislating for ocean health and its exploitation for survival. With regard to the long standing perspective which upholds the notion that poverty is a direct precursor of child labour, it was confirmed in preliminary research that some children with poor parents were working for fishermen. Preliminary research has also confirmed the importance of linking research in international investment law with socio-legal research at the national level and local stakeholder engagement about the blue economy. The initial research on international investment law has also underscored that "blue economy narratives" (blue economy policies and promotional activities) may restrict the opportunities for governments and judiciary to protect local communities' interests that may be negatively impacts by blue economy initiatives, because of international obligations to protect foreign investors. In South Africa, foreign investment in offshore oil and gas development has been identified as a threat by coastal communities. In Ghana, local fishermen feel cheated by the low level of law enforcement associated with industrial fish trawling, which features new patterns of capital mobility such as Chinese investment. The protection of foreign investment in both countries may limit the ability of national governemts to respond to the threats of altering livelihoods for artisanal fisherfolk and other coastal communities.
Collaborator Contribution The intuition to focus on the integration of human rights and the environment to tackle socio-cultural issues around the blue economy has been confirmed by engagement with new partners in civil society and grassroots organisations. A transdisciplinary conference in January on Transformed and Transformative Governance that included these partners, generated working principles for the group.
Impact Outputs: Transformed and Transformed Governance Conference Lalela Ulwandle Empatheatre SOUTH AFRICA Successful Flexible Fund Application by Early Career Researchers to plan and host an Culture and Intangible Heritage Workshop in GHANA Disciplines: Law, Sociology, Anthropology, History, Economics, Marine Science.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Participatory Governance SOUTH AFRICA 
Organisation Durban University of Technology
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This collaboration explores alternative approaches to public participation in decision-making in environmental protection. Lack of meaningful engagement of citizens in decision-making processes not only creates citizen apathy with respect to environmental responsibility but it also leads to low understanding of how these decisions impact livelihood activities. This collaboration develops methodologies for inclusive decision-making and also aims to include overlooked knowledge areas. Our preliminary research in South Africa has identified specific questions among coastal communities about how theirl needs can be included in the creation of marine protected areas, as well as how overall public participation can be ensured in Marine Protected Area management. These questions will inform future inter- and trans-disciplinary marine and social science research on the need and process for the designation of new marine protected areas in South Africa. The pilot emphatheatre research sought to demonstrate what meaningful, robust participatory decision- making forums could and should look like, as a counter-process to the superficial 'tick-box' approach to public consultation that characterises many ocean governance processes in South Africa. Researchers are careful not to take a particular stand on whether developments/exploration/protection measures should go ahead or not - instead, we provide the forum for unheard interests to come to the fore. A test case emerged from the pilot that led to a petition for review of an environmental impact assessment (EIA) that approved exploratory deep-sea drillingoffshore oil and gas drilling licenses in South Africa. Through this activity we have been able to identify specific research questions about how local-level needs can be included in decision-making over extractives and the creation of marine protected areas. Namely, the integration of intangible cultural heritage, protection of livelihoods.
Collaborator Contribution A series of meetings with local NGOs, community representatives and international NGOs provided an opportunity for OOH Co-Is to learn aboutt 1) the law-related needs of the NGOs appealing the decision, as well as about the variety of legal arguments that could be explored in the appeal (NGO appellants focused on international climate change law and constitutional human rights law, for instance).OOH Co-I's from a range of disciplines were requested to share their expertise with regards to the EIA's technical reports on fisheries impact marine ecology impact/heritage impact. International investment law experts from the OOH (IIED) discussed international investment law perspectives, which have implications at the national and local level. All Hub Co-Is who wished to do so, were invited to contribute to the appeal in their personal capacity.
Impact This collaboration has produced: The Lalela Ulwandle production The disciplines involved are: Law and Sociology
Start Year 2019
 
Description Participatory Governance SOUTH AFRICA 
Organisation Government of South Africa
Department Department of Environmental Affairs
Country South Africa 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution This collaboration explores alternative approaches to public participation in decision-making in environmental protection. Lack of meaningful engagement of citizens in decision-making processes not only creates citizen apathy with respect to environmental responsibility but it also leads to low understanding of how these decisions impact livelihood activities. This collaboration develops methodologies for inclusive decision-making and also aims to include overlooked knowledge areas. Our preliminary research in South Africa has identified specific questions among coastal communities about how theirl needs can be included in the creation of marine protected areas, as well as how overall public participation can be ensured in Marine Protected Area management. These questions will inform future inter- and trans-disciplinary marine and social science research on the need and process for the designation of new marine protected areas in South Africa. The pilot emphatheatre research sought to demonstrate what meaningful, robust participatory decision- making forums could and should look like, as a counter-process to the superficial 'tick-box' approach to public consultation that characterises many ocean governance processes in South Africa. Researchers are careful not to take a particular stand on whether developments/exploration/protection measures should go ahead or not - instead, we provide the forum for unheard interests to come to the fore. A test case emerged from the pilot that led to a petition for review of an environmental impact assessment (EIA) that approved exploratory deep-sea drillingoffshore oil and gas drilling licenses in South Africa. Through this activity we have been able to identify specific research questions about how local-level needs can be included in decision-making over extractives and the creation of marine protected areas. Namely, the integration of intangible cultural heritage, protection of livelihoods.
Collaborator Contribution A series of meetings with local NGOs, community representatives and international NGOs provided an opportunity for OOH Co-Is to learn aboutt 1) the law-related needs of the NGOs appealing the decision, as well as about the variety of legal arguments that could be explored in the appeal (NGO appellants focused on international climate change law and constitutional human rights law, for instance).OOH Co-I's from a range of disciplines were requested to share their expertise with regards to the EIA's technical reports on fisheries impact marine ecology impact/heritage impact. International investment law experts from the OOH (IIED) discussed international investment law perspectives, which have implications at the national and local level. All Hub Co-Is who wished to do so, were invited to contribute to the appeal in their personal capacity.
Impact This collaboration has produced: The Lalela Ulwandle production The disciplines involved are: Law and Sociology
Start Year 2019
 
Description Participatory Governance SOUTH AFRICA 
Organisation International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This collaboration explores alternative approaches to public participation in decision-making in environmental protection. Lack of meaningful engagement of citizens in decision-making processes not only creates citizen apathy with respect to environmental responsibility but it also leads to low understanding of how these decisions impact livelihood activities. This collaboration develops methodologies for inclusive decision-making and also aims to include overlooked knowledge areas. Our preliminary research in South Africa has identified specific questions among coastal communities about how theirl needs can be included in the creation of marine protected areas, as well as how overall public participation can be ensured in Marine Protected Area management. These questions will inform future inter- and trans-disciplinary marine and social science research on the need and process for the designation of new marine protected areas in South Africa. The pilot emphatheatre research sought to demonstrate what meaningful, robust participatory decision- making forums could and should look like, as a counter-process to the superficial 'tick-box' approach to public consultation that characterises many ocean governance processes in South Africa. Researchers are careful not to take a particular stand on whether developments/exploration/protection measures should go ahead or not - instead, we provide the forum for unheard interests to come to the fore. A test case emerged from the pilot that led to a petition for review of an environmental impact assessment (EIA) that approved exploratory deep-sea drillingoffshore oil and gas drilling licenses in South Africa. Through this activity we have been able to identify specific research questions about how local-level needs can be included in decision-making over extractives and the creation of marine protected areas. Namely, the integration of intangible cultural heritage, protection of livelihoods.
Collaborator Contribution A series of meetings with local NGOs, community representatives and international NGOs provided an opportunity for OOH Co-Is to learn aboutt 1) the law-related needs of the NGOs appealing the decision, as well as about the variety of legal arguments that could be explored in the appeal (NGO appellants focused on international climate change law and constitutional human rights law, for instance).OOH Co-I's from a range of disciplines were requested to share their expertise with regards to the EIA's technical reports on fisheries impact marine ecology impact/heritage impact. International investment law experts from the OOH (IIED) discussed international investment law perspectives, which have implications at the national and local level. All Hub Co-Is who wished to do so, were invited to contribute to the appeal in their personal capacity.
Impact This collaboration has produced: The Lalela Ulwandle production The disciplines involved are: Law and Sociology
Start Year 2019
 
Description Participatory Governance SOUTH AFRICA 
Organisation Nelson Mandela University
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This collaboration explores alternative approaches to public participation in decision-making in environmental protection. Lack of meaningful engagement of citizens in decision-making processes not only creates citizen apathy with respect to environmental responsibility but it also leads to low understanding of how these decisions impact livelihood activities. This collaboration develops methodologies for inclusive decision-making and also aims to include overlooked knowledge areas. Our preliminary research in South Africa has identified specific questions among coastal communities about how theirl needs can be included in the creation of marine protected areas, as well as how overall public participation can be ensured in Marine Protected Area management. These questions will inform future inter- and trans-disciplinary marine and social science research on the need and process for the designation of new marine protected areas in South Africa. The pilot emphatheatre research sought to demonstrate what meaningful, robust participatory decision- making forums could and should look like, as a counter-process to the superficial 'tick-box' approach to public consultation that characterises many ocean governance processes in South Africa. Researchers are careful not to take a particular stand on whether developments/exploration/protection measures should go ahead or not - instead, we provide the forum for unheard interests to come to the fore. A test case emerged from the pilot that led to a petition for review of an environmental impact assessment (EIA) that approved exploratory deep-sea drillingoffshore oil and gas drilling licenses in South Africa. Through this activity we have been able to identify specific research questions about how local-level needs can be included in decision-making over extractives and the creation of marine protected areas. Namely, the integration of intangible cultural heritage, protection of livelihoods.
Collaborator Contribution A series of meetings with local NGOs, community representatives and international NGOs provided an opportunity for OOH Co-Is to learn aboutt 1) the law-related needs of the NGOs appealing the decision, as well as about the variety of legal arguments that could be explored in the appeal (NGO appellants focused on international climate change law and constitutional human rights law, for instance).OOH Co-I's from a range of disciplines were requested to share their expertise with regards to the EIA's technical reports on fisheries impact marine ecology impact/heritage impact. International investment law experts from the OOH (IIED) discussed international investment law perspectives, which have implications at the national and local level. All Hub Co-Is who wished to do so, were invited to contribute to the appeal in their personal capacity.
Impact This collaboration has produced: The Lalela Ulwandle production The disciplines involved are: Law and Sociology
Start Year 2019
 
Description Participatory Governance SOUTH AFRICA 
Organisation Rhodes University
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This collaboration explores alternative approaches to public participation in decision-making in environmental protection. Lack of meaningful engagement of citizens in decision-making processes not only creates citizen apathy with respect to environmental responsibility but it also leads to low understanding of how these decisions impact livelihood activities. This collaboration develops methodologies for inclusive decision-making and also aims to include overlooked knowledge areas. Our preliminary research in South Africa has identified specific questions among coastal communities about how theirl needs can be included in the creation of marine protected areas, as well as how overall public participation can be ensured in Marine Protected Area management. These questions will inform future inter- and trans-disciplinary marine and social science research on the need and process for the designation of new marine protected areas in South Africa. The pilot emphatheatre research sought to demonstrate what meaningful, robust participatory decision- making forums could and should look like, as a counter-process to the superficial 'tick-box' approach to public consultation that characterises many ocean governance processes in South Africa. Researchers are careful not to take a particular stand on whether developments/exploration/protection measures should go ahead or not - instead, we provide the forum for unheard interests to come to the fore. A test case emerged from the pilot that led to a petition for review of an environmental impact assessment (EIA) that approved exploratory deep-sea drillingoffshore oil and gas drilling licenses in South Africa. Through this activity we have been able to identify specific research questions about how local-level needs can be included in decision-making over extractives and the creation of marine protected areas. Namely, the integration of intangible cultural heritage, protection of livelihoods.
Collaborator Contribution A series of meetings with local NGOs, community representatives and international NGOs provided an opportunity for OOH Co-Is to learn aboutt 1) the law-related needs of the NGOs appealing the decision, as well as about the variety of legal arguments that could be explored in the appeal (NGO appellants focused on international climate change law and constitutional human rights law, for instance).OOH Co-I's from a range of disciplines were requested to share their expertise with regards to the EIA's technical reports on fisheries impact marine ecology impact/heritage impact. International investment law experts from the OOH (IIED) discussed international investment law perspectives, which have implications at the national and local level. All Hub Co-Is who wished to do so, were invited to contribute to the appeal in their personal capacity.
Impact This collaboration has produced: The Lalela Ulwandle production The disciplines involved are: Law and Sociology
Start Year 2019
 
Description Participatory Governance SOUTH AFRICA 
Organisation University of Cape Town
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This collaboration explores alternative approaches to public participation in decision-making in environmental protection. Lack of meaningful engagement of citizens in decision-making processes not only creates citizen apathy with respect to environmental responsibility but it also leads to low understanding of how these decisions impact livelihood activities. This collaboration develops methodologies for inclusive decision-making and also aims to include overlooked knowledge areas. Our preliminary research in South Africa has identified specific questions among coastal communities about how theirl needs can be included in the creation of marine protected areas, as well as how overall public participation can be ensured in Marine Protected Area management. These questions will inform future inter- and trans-disciplinary marine and social science research on the need and process for the designation of new marine protected areas in South Africa. The pilot emphatheatre research sought to demonstrate what meaningful, robust participatory decision- making forums could and should look like, as a counter-process to the superficial 'tick-box' approach to public consultation that characterises many ocean governance processes in South Africa. Researchers are careful not to take a particular stand on whether developments/exploration/protection measures should go ahead or not - instead, we provide the forum for unheard interests to come to the fore. A test case emerged from the pilot that led to a petition for review of an environmental impact assessment (EIA) that approved exploratory deep-sea drillingoffshore oil and gas drilling licenses in South Africa. Through this activity we have been able to identify specific research questions about how local-level needs can be included in decision-making over extractives and the creation of marine protected areas. Namely, the integration of intangible cultural heritage, protection of livelihoods.
Collaborator Contribution A series of meetings with local NGOs, community representatives and international NGOs provided an opportunity for OOH Co-Is to learn aboutt 1) the law-related needs of the NGOs appealing the decision, as well as about the variety of legal arguments that could be explored in the appeal (NGO appellants focused on international climate change law and constitutional human rights law, for instance).OOH Co-I's from a range of disciplines were requested to share their expertise with regards to the EIA's technical reports on fisheries impact marine ecology impact/heritage impact. International investment law experts from the OOH (IIED) discussed international investment law perspectives, which have implications at the national and local level. All Hub Co-Is who wished to do so, were invited to contribute to the appeal in their personal capacity.
Impact This collaboration has produced: The Lalela Ulwandle production The disciplines involved are: Law and Sociology
Start Year 2019
 
Description Participatory Governance SOUTH AFRICA 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Department Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences (HaSS)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This collaboration explores alternative approaches to public participation in decision-making in environmental protection. Lack of meaningful engagement of citizens in decision-making processes not only creates citizen apathy with respect to environmental responsibility but it also leads to low understanding of how these decisions impact livelihood activities. This collaboration develops methodologies for inclusive decision-making and also aims to include overlooked knowledge areas. Our preliminary research in South Africa has identified specific questions among coastal communities about how theirl needs can be included in the creation of marine protected areas, as well as how overall public participation can be ensured in Marine Protected Area management. These questions will inform future inter- and trans-disciplinary marine and social science research on the need and process for the designation of new marine protected areas in South Africa. The pilot emphatheatre research sought to demonstrate what meaningful, robust participatory decision- making forums could and should look like, as a counter-process to the superficial 'tick-box' approach to public consultation that characterises many ocean governance processes in South Africa. Researchers are careful not to take a particular stand on whether developments/exploration/protection measures should go ahead or not - instead, we provide the forum for unheard interests to come to the fore. A test case emerged from the pilot that led to a petition for review of an environmental impact assessment (EIA) that approved exploratory deep-sea drillingoffshore oil and gas drilling licenses in South Africa. Through this activity we have been able to identify specific research questions about how local-level needs can be included in decision-making over extractives and the creation of marine protected areas. Namely, the integration of intangible cultural heritage, protection of livelihoods.
Collaborator Contribution A series of meetings with local NGOs, community representatives and international NGOs provided an opportunity for OOH Co-Is to learn aboutt 1) the law-related needs of the NGOs appealing the decision, as well as about the variety of legal arguments that could be explored in the appeal (NGO appellants focused on international climate change law and constitutional human rights law, for instance).OOH Co-I's from a range of disciplines were requested to share their expertise with regards to the EIA's technical reports on fisheries impact marine ecology impact/heritage impact. International investment law experts from the OOH (IIED) discussed international investment law perspectives, which have implications at the national and local level. All Hub Co-Is who wished to do so, were invited to contribute to the appeal in their personal capacity.
Impact This collaboration has produced: The Lalela Ulwandle production The disciplines involved are: Law and Sociology
Start Year 2019
 
Description Solomon Islands Deep Fund Project: Our Ocean, Our Identity 
Organisation Glasgow School of Art
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub research in ocean art, culture and heritage aims to surface and provide an outlet for the views of those groups that are generally under-represented in more traditional approaches to ocean science and management. This research programme will provide sources of customary law for analysis under the Ocean Governance research programme and insights into traditional knowledge and livelihoods to inform all research themes. This research programme is supported by a "Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund" to commission artistic responses that capture evolving challenges to ocean management, the ocean's multiple contributions to human wellbeing, and Hub findings. The Deep Fund is administered by the University of Strathclyde as lead partners in the One Ocean Hub project. "Our Ocean, Our Identity" is a new project initiated under the Deep Fund, led by Pax Jakupa (Papua New Guinea), in collaboration with artists in Solomon Islands and Vanuatu. Glasgow School of Art will provide project management support for the project, as well providing a conduit through which the findings of this project can inform wider Hub research in the Solomon Islands and Fiji.
Collaborator Contribution This project brings together three artists based in the Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea and Vanuatu who will co-produce public murals that visually convey the shared emotional significance of the ocean to women of the Western Pacific. By way of community workshops and archival research, each artist will compile local histories, narratives and memories about the sea. During a four-week residency in the Solomon Islands, the research findings will be collated and the mural collaboratively designed and completed, which will form the template for subsequent co-reproduction in Papua New Guinea and Vanuatu.
Impact This project started in February 2021. The output of this project will be a mural. An initiative of three local artists - Lloyd Newton (Solomon Islands), Pax Jakupa (Papua New Guinea) and Alvaro Sumaki Kuautonga (Vanuatu), the project is a rare opportunity for artistic cross-country engagement in a region often overlooked by global art markets. The project is transdisciplinary and will convert ethnographic and archival research into visual formats for broad audience outreach. The project seeks to achieve multiple outcomes including, but not limited to, showcasing gendered conceptions of the ocean in Melanesian contexts, strengthening regional resolve to actively protect the sea, bolstering community participation in governance strategies and expanding local understanding of sustainable marine practices. The murals will share and celebrate multigenerational and culturally diverse knowledge, practices and worldviews related to the sea. Moreover, the project will foster relationships between artists based in the Western Pacific, visually enhance urban centres and increase the socio-political capital of public art in the Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea and Vanuatu. The project intends to foreground the knowledge and experiences of Melanesian women, educate and impart new skills to local youth, encourage grass-roots development, engage government officials and policymakers, foster active ocean conservation and develop artistic relationships in the Western Pacific. The murals will reinforce the importance of cultural heritage, indigenous identity and regional resilience while also bolstering inclusive and equitable marine management strategies.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Solomon Islands Deep Fund Project: Our Ocean, Our Identity 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub research in ocean art, culture and heritage aims to surface and provide an outlet for the views of those groups that are generally under-represented in more traditional approaches to ocean science and management. This research programme will provide sources of customary law for analysis under the Ocean Governance research programme and insights into traditional knowledge and livelihoods to inform all research themes. This research programme is supported by a "Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund" to commission artistic responses that capture evolving challenges to ocean management, the ocean's multiple contributions to human wellbeing, and Hub findings. The Deep Fund is administered by the University of Strathclyde as lead partners in the One Ocean Hub project. "Our Ocean, Our Identity" is a new project initiated under the Deep Fund, led by Pax Jakupa (Papua New Guinea), in collaboration with artists in Solomon Islands and Vanuatu. Glasgow School of Art will provide project management support for the project, as well providing a conduit through which the findings of this project can inform wider Hub research in the Solomon Islands and Fiji.
Collaborator Contribution This project brings together three artists based in the Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea and Vanuatu who will co-produce public murals that visually convey the shared emotional significance of the ocean to women of the Western Pacific. By way of community workshops and archival research, each artist will compile local histories, narratives and memories about the sea. During a four-week residency in the Solomon Islands, the research findings will be collated and the mural collaboratively designed and completed, which will form the template for subsequent co-reproduction in Papua New Guinea and Vanuatu.
Impact This project started in February 2021. The output of this project will be a mural. An initiative of three local artists - Lloyd Newton (Solomon Islands), Pax Jakupa (Papua New Guinea) and Alvaro Sumaki Kuautonga (Vanuatu), the project is a rare opportunity for artistic cross-country engagement in a region often overlooked by global art markets. The project is transdisciplinary and will convert ethnographic and archival research into visual formats for broad audience outreach. The project seeks to achieve multiple outcomes including, but not limited to, showcasing gendered conceptions of the ocean in Melanesian contexts, strengthening regional resolve to actively protect the sea, bolstering community participation in governance strategies and expanding local understanding of sustainable marine practices. The murals will share and celebrate multigenerational and culturally diverse knowledge, practices and worldviews related to the sea. Moreover, the project will foster relationships between artists based in the Western Pacific, visually enhance urban centres and increase the socio-political capital of public art in the Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea and Vanuatu. The project intends to foreground the knowledge and experiences of Melanesian women, educate and impart new skills to local youth, encourage grass-roots development, engage government officials and policymakers, foster active ocean conservation and develop artistic relationships in the Western Pacific. The murals will reinforce the importance of cultural heritage, indigenous identity and regional resilience while also bolstering inclusive and equitable marine management strategies.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Solomon Islands Ocean Literacy Primary Education Programme 
Organisation Pacific Islands Students Fighting Climate Change
Country Solomon Islands 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The One Ocean Hub aims to contribute to the enhancement of ocean literacy in partner countries, through the development of an 'Ocean Explorers' education programme for primary schools. In order to be successful, the ocean explorers programme must be rooted in the context of each partner country, with resources developed that complement the curriculum and context of each school. In doing this, the programme seeks not to be a 'one-off' project for schools, but to become an embedded part of the learning programme in each school, beyond the Hub funding cycle. Ocean Explorers builds on the success of 'Island Explorers', a programme designed for primary schools in Scotland to engage in the Sustainable Development Goals, developed by the University of Strathclyde. The University of Strathclyde has partnered with the Pacific Islands Students Fighting Climate Change association in the Ocean Explorers project for the Solomon Islands. This project aims to develop and deliver the Ocean Explorers component of the One Ocean Hub programme in the Solomon Islands, as a unique, immersive, multidisciplinary education for sustainability project for primary schools. The project will, building on existing works undertaken by Strathclyde (Island Explorers), develop a suit of ocean education materials developed specifically for the context of primary schools in the Solomon Islands. The project will engage directly with teachers to ensure the suitability of the project and teacher engagement, and will support teachers in the implementation of the project. The overall aim of the project is to inspire young leaders in creating their own solutions to sustainability challenges through creative, multidisciplinary, challenge led, learning. Towards this aim, the University of Strathclyde will bring learning and example resources from the Island Explorers programme and work in collaboration with PISFCC to redevelop these for the context of the Solomon Islands. Strathclyde will provide project management support for the project. In addition, through the wider One Ocean Hub network, Strathclyde will provide networking support to PISFCC, particularly in the establishing necessary connection with relevant ministries. Strathclyde will also support PISFCC in their wider objectives and provide capacity building opportunities for their members.
Collaborator Contribution Pacific Islands Students Fighting Climate Change is a youth-led organisation, headquartered in the Solomon Islands, whose members are students from the Pacific Island countries. The Pacific Islands Students Association will lead on the development of the Ocean Explorers programme for the Solomon Islands. Specifically, they will undertake reconnaissance visits to 4 remote schools in the Solomon Islands in the Western Province & Central Province (Nagotago Island) to learn from teachers about the opportunities, challenges, and constraints facing schools in engaging with new programmes, and work with teachers to understand the learning priorities and curriculum design. PISFCC will use this learning in order to, in collaboration with the University of Strathclyde, design a suite of ocean education resources rooted in the context of the schools. PISFCC will design and deliver relevant teacher training in order to support the implementation of the programme in schools.
Impact This project began in February 2021, an internal field report from the reconnaissance mission has been completed. The final output will be a package of educational resources for primary schools in the Solomon Islands, including a teachers resource pack and pupil learning resources. Expected Outcomes The aim of the Ocean Explorers programme is to connect pupils and teachers with the ocean, embed ocean learning in school activities and build school-school (and pupil to pupil) relationships and solidarity in tackling common ocean challenges through respectful collaboration and innovation. Success of the programme would be, in the long term, uptake of Ocean Explorer resources by teachers and education providers in region (independent of Hub support), a self-sustaining and organising network of schools in each country, and most importantly, in the aspiration, engagement and connection of pupils with the ocean.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Solomon Islands Ocean Literacy Primary Education Programme 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The One Ocean Hub aims to contribute to the enhancement of ocean literacy in partner countries, through the development of an 'Ocean Explorers' education programme for primary schools. In order to be successful, the ocean explorers programme must be rooted in the context of each partner country, with resources developed that complement the curriculum and context of each school. In doing this, the programme seeks not to be a 'one-off' project for schools, but to become an embedded part of the learning programme in each school, beyond the Hub funding cycle. Ocean Explorers builds on the success of 'Island Explorers', a programme designed for primary schools in Scotland to engage in the Sustainable Development Goals, developed by the University of Strathclyde. The University of Strathclyde has partnered with the Pacific Islands Students Fighting Climate Change association in the Ocean Explorers project for the Solomon Islands. This project aims to develop and deliver the Ocean Explorers component of the One Ocean Hub programme in the Solomon Islands, as a unique, immersive, multidisciplinary education for sustainability project for primary schools. The project will, building on existing works undertaken by Strathclyde (Island Explorers), develop a suit of ocean education materials developed specifically for the context of primary schools in the Solomon Islands. The project will engage directly with teachers to ensure the suitability of the project and teacher engagement, and will support teachers in the implementation of the project. The overall aim of the project is to inspire young leaders in creating their own solutions to sustainability challenges through creative, multidisciplinary, challenge led, learning. Towards this aim, the University of Strathclyde will bring learning and example resources from the Island Explorers programme and work in collaboration with PISFCC to redevelop these for the context of the Solomon Islands. Strathclyde will provide project management support for the project. In addition, through the wider One Ocean Hub network, Strathclyde will provide networking support to PISFCC, particularly in the establishing necessary connection with relevant ministries. Strathclyde will also support PISFCC in their wider objectives and provide capacity building opportunities for their members.
Collaborator Contribution Pacific Islands Students Fighting Climate Change is a youth-led organisation, headquartered in the Solomon Islands, whose members are students from the Pacific Island countries. The Pacific Islands Students Association will lead on the development of the Ocean Explorers programme for the Solomon Islands. Specifically, they will undertake reconnaissance visits to 4 remote schools in the Solomon Islands in the Western Province & Central Province (Nagotago Island) to learn from teachers about the opportunities, challenges, and constraints facing schools in engaging with new programmes, and work with teachers to understand the learning priorities and curriculum design. PISFCC will use this learning in order to, in collaboration with the University of Strathclyde, design a suite of ocean education resources rooted in the context of the schools. PISFCC will design and deliver relevant teacher training in order to support the implementation of the programme in schools.
Impact This project began in February 2021, an internal field report from the reconnaissance mission has been completed. The final output will be a package of educational resources for primary schools in the Solomon Islands, including a teachers resource pack and pupil learning resources. Expected Outcomes The aim of the Ocean Explorers programme is to connect pupils and teachers with the ocean, embed ocean learning in school activities and build school-school (and pupil to pupil) relationships and solidarity in tackling common ocean challenges through respectful collaboration and innovation. Success of the programme would be, in the long term, uptake of Ocean Explorer resources by teachers and education providers in region (independent of Hub support), a self-sustaining and organising network of schools in each country, and most importantly, in the aspiration, engagement and connection of pupils with the ocean.
Start Year 2021
 
Description South Africa Deep Fund Project: Fishers' Tales 
Organisation Durban University of Technology
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub research in ocean art, culture and heritage aims to surface and provide an outlet for the views of those groups that are generally under-represented in more traditional approaches to ocean science and management. This research programme will provide sources of customary law for analysis under the Ocean Governance research programme and insights into traditional knowledge and livelihoods to inform all research themes. This programme is supported by a "Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund" to commission artistic responses that capture evolving challenges to ocean management, the ocean's multiple contributions to human wellbeing, and Hub findings. The Deep Fund is administered by the University of Strathclyde as lead partners in the One Ocean Hub project. "Fishers' Tales" is a new project initiated under the Deep Fund, led by South Durban Community Environmental Alliance, South Africa. Glasgow School of Art will provide project management support for the project, as well providing a conduit through which the findings of this project can inform wider Hub research in South Africa.
Collaborator Contribution 'Fishers' Tales' is an arts-based storytelling project led by the South Durban Community Environmental Alliance (SDCEA). The project collects the wondrous tales that fishers enjoy telling about their ocean adventures, and creates a unique artwork to accompany each story. An online archive of visual stories will be shared through a website and social media. Whilst this is a new project, it builds on existing partnerships and research from the One Ocean Hub empatheatre project Lalela uLwandle. This visual storytelling forms an advocacy and solidarity-building tool in collaboration with researchers and civil society partners on the One Ocean Hub.
Impact This project started in February 2021. The output of this project will be a series of 15 digital stories. Each story will be captured in English and isiZulu and will be accompanied by unique art work created by young black artists working in media such as drawing, painting, animation and film. The completed stories will be exhibited on a dedicated website and the One Ocean Hub website. This project seeks to explore fishers' connections and emotional bonds to the ocean using a visual storytelling approach. The stories and accompanying artwork seek to highlight the similarities and differences in fishers' engagements with the ocean; provoking reflection, empathy and dialogue. In this sense, the project hopes to build both awareness and solidarity, as well as contribute to the production of knowledge on how the ocean is used and valued by diverse actors, which can potentially transform traditional approaches to ocean governance. The data generated through the project will feed into the broader One Ocean Hub to inform research and impact pathway activity related to sustaining small scale fishers in South Africa (see Partnership Entry: Sustaining Small Scale Fishers: Balancing Multiple Fisheries and the Blue Economy).
Start Year 2021
 
Description South Africa Deep Fund Project: Fishers' Tales 
Organisation Glasgow School of Art
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub research in ocean art, culture and heritage aims to surface and provide an outlet for the views of those groups that are generally under-represented in more traditional approaches to ocean science and management. This research programme will provide sources of customary law for analysis under the Ocean Governance research programme and insights into traditional knowledge and livelihoods to inform all research themes. This programme is supported by a "Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund" to commission artistic responses that capture evolving challenges to ocean management, the ocean's multiple contributions to human wellbeing, and Hub findings. The Deep Fund is administered by the University of Strathclyde as lead partners in the One Ocean Hub project. "Fishers' Tales" is a new project initiated under the Deep Fund, led by South Durban Community Environmental Alliance, South Africa. Glasgow School of Art will provide project management support for the project, as well providing a conduit through which the findings of this project can inform wider Hub research in South Africa.
Collaborator Contribution 'Fishers' Tales' is an arts-based storytelling project led by the South Durban Community Environmental Alliance (SDCEA). The project collects the wondrous tales that fishers enjoy telling about their ocean adventures, and creates a unique artwork to accompany each story. An online archive of visual stories will be shared through a website and social media. Whilst this is a new project, it builds on existing partnerships and research from the One Ocean Hub empatheatre project Lalela uLwandle. This visual storytelling forms an advocacy and solidarity-building tool in collaboration with researchers and civil society partners on the One Ocean Hub.
Impact This project started in February 2021. The output of this project will be a series of 15 digital stories. Each story will be captured in English and isiZulu and will be accompanied by unique art work created by young black artists working in media such as drawing, painting, animation and film. The completed stories will be exhibited on a dedicated website and the One Ocean Hub website. This project seeks to explore fishers' connections and emotional bonds to the ocean using a visual storytelling approach. The stories and accompanying artwork seek to highlight the similarities and differences in fishers' engagements with the ocean; provoking reflection, empathy and dialogue. In this sense, the project hopes to build both awareness and solidarity, as well as contribute to the production of knowledge on how the ocean is used and valued by diverse actors, which can potentially transform traditional approaches to ocean governance. The data generated through the project will feed into the broader One Ocean Hub to inform research and impact pathway activity related to sustaining small scale fishers in South Africa (see Partnership Entry: Sustaining Small Scale Fishers: Balancing Multiple Fisheries and the Blue Economy).
Start Year 2021
 
Description South Africa Deep Fund Project: Fishers' Tales 
Organisation South Durban Community Environmental Alliance
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub research in ocean art, culture and heritage aims to surface and provide an outlet for the views of those groups that are generally under-represented in more traditional approaches to ocean science and management. This research programme will provide sources of customary law for analysis under the Ocean Governance research programme and insights into traditional knowledge and livelihoods to inform all research themes. This programme is supported by a "Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund" to commission artistic responses that capture evolving challenges to ocean management, the ocean's multiple contributions to human wellbeing, and Hub findings. The Deep Fund is administered by the University of Strathclyde as lead partners in the One Ocean Hub project. "Fishers' Tales" is a new project initiated under the Deep Fund, led by South Durban Community Environmental Alliance, South Africa. Glasgow School of Art will provide project management support for the project, as well providing a conduit through which the findings of this project can inform wider Hub research in South Africa.
Collaborator Contribution 'Fishers' Tales' is an arts-based storytelling project led by the South Durban Community Environmental Alliance (SDCEA). The project collects the wondrous tales that fishers enjoy telling about their ocean adventures, and creates a unique artwork to accompany each story. An online archive of visual stories will be shared through a website and social media. Whilst this is a new project, it builds on existing partnerships and research from the One Ocean Hub empatheatre project Lalela uLwandle. This visual storytelling forms an advocacy and solidarity-building tool in collaboration with researchers and civil society partners on the One Ocean Hub.
Impact This project started in February 2021. The output of this project will be a series of 15 digital stories. Each story will be captured in English and isiZulu and will be accompanied by unique art work created by young black artists working in media such as drawing, painting, animation and film. The completed stories will be exhibited on a dedicated website and the One Ocean Hub website. This project seeks to explore fishers' connections and emotional bonds to the ocean using a visual storytelling approach. The stories and accompanying artwork seek to highlight the similarities and differences in fishers' engagements with the ocean; provoking reflection, empathy and dialogue. In this sense, the project hopes to build both awareness and solidarity, as well as contribute to the production of knowledge on how the ocean is used and valued by diverse actors, which can potentially transform traditional approaches to ocean governance. The data generated through the project will feed into the broader One Ocean Hub to inform research and impact pathway activity related to sustaining small scale fishers in South Africa (see Partnership Entry: Sustaining Small Scale Fishers: Balancing Multiple Fisheries and the Blue Economy).
Start Year 2021
 
Description South Africa Deep Fund Project: Fishers' Tales 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub research in ocean art, culture and heritage aims to surface and provide an outlet for the views of those groups that are generally under-represented in more traditional approaches to ocean science and management. This research programme will provide sources of customary law for analysis under the Ocean Governance research programme and insights into traditional knowledge and livelihoods to inform all research themes. This programme is supported by a "Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund" to commission artistic responses that capture evolving challenges to ocean management, the ocean's multiple contributions to human wellbeing, and Hub findings. The Deep Fund is administered by the University of Strathclyde as lead partners in the One Ocean Hub project. "Fishers' Tales" is a new project initiated under the Deep Fund, led by South Durban Community Environmental Alliance, South Africa. Glasgow School of Art will provide project management support for the project, as well providing a conduit through which the findings of this project can inform wider Hub research in South Africa.
Collaborator Contribution 'Fishers' Tales' is an arts-based storytelling project led by the South Durban Community Environmental Alliance (SDCEA). The project collects the wondrous tales that fishers enjoy telling about their ocean adventures, and creates a unique artwork to accompany each story. An online archive of visual stories will be shared through a website and social media. Whilst this is a new project, it builds on existing partnerships and research from the One Ocean Hub empatheatre project Lalela uLwandle. This visual storytelling forms an advocacy and solidarity-building tool in collaboration with researchers and civil society partners on the One Ocean Hub.
Impact This project started in February 2021. The output of this project will be a series of 15 digital stories. Each story will be captured in English and isiZulu and will be accompanied by unique art work created by young black artists working in media such as drawing, painting, animation and film. The completed stories will be exhibited on a dedicated website and the One Ocean Hub website. This project seeks to explore fishers' connections and emotional bonds to the ocean using a visual storytelling approach. The stories and accompanying artwork seek to highlight the similarities and differences in fishers' engagements with the ocean; provoking reflection, empathy and dialogue. In this sense, the project hopes to build both awareness and solidarity, as well as contribute to the production of knowledge on how the ocean is used and valued by diverse actors, which can potentially transform traditional approaches to ocean governance. The data generated through the project will feed into the broader One Ocean Hub to inform research and impact pathway activity related to sustaining small scale fishers in South Africa (see Partnership Entry: Sustaining Small Scale Fishers: Balancing Multiple Fisheries and the Blue Economy).
Start Year 2021
 
Description South Africa Deep Fund Project: Our Sacred Ocean 
Organisation Glasgow School of Art
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub research in ocean art, culture and heritage aims to surface and provide an outlet for the views of those groups that are generally under-represented in more traditional approaches to ocean science and management. This research programme will provide sources of customary law for analysis under the Ocean Governance research programme and insights into traditional knowledge and livelihoods to inform all research themes. This programme is supported by a "Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund" to commission artistic responses that capture evolving challenges to ocean management, the ocean's multiple contributions to human wellbeing, and Hub findings. The Deep Fund is administered by the University of Strathclyde as lead partners in the One Ocean Hub project. "Our Sacred Ocean: Celebrating centuries of spiritual connection between the Xhosa people of the Eastern Cape, South Africa and the sea" is a new project initiated under the Deep Fund, led by Keiskamma Trust, South Africa. Glasgow School of Art will provide project management support for the project, as well providing a conduit through which the findings of this project can inform wider Hub research in South Africa.
Collaborator Contribution The Keiskamma Art Trust was established twenty years ago with the purpose of bringing dignity and economic empowerment to the rural, poor communities alongside the Keiskamma River by providing skills and meaningful work. In the "Our Sacred Ocean" Deep Fund project, the Trust will work with a core team of 14 Xhosa women and 2 Xhosa men to create a monumental embroidery that embodies local memories, prayers and rituals communicates the urgent need for inclusive ocean stewardship to protect and preserve the health of the ocean. Combining intergenerational knowledge, the project will make visible the cultural centrality of the sea to multiple age groups and advocates for recognition of powerful intangible relationships that are central to human and environmental wellbeing and prosperity.
Impact This project started in February 2021. The output of this project will be a monumental tapestry, as well as an online exhibition (which will include a mini-documentary made entirely on cellphone footage). The project seeks to affect change not only in the lives of mostly women involved in the project, but in the lives of the youth It will especially seek to ensure that oral history is not lost to younger generations, but rather that we revive the beauty and sacred nature of traditional beliefs. The project also seeks to educate a wider audience about the sacred connections experienced by vulnerable, under-represented communities who are not without a voice, or stake, in the health of the sea. Success will be measured qualitatively through feedback responses and quantitatively by Keiskamma Art Trust's ability to employ a greater number of artists. The creation of monumental works provide critical livelihoods to rural women, and through the sale of works, generate the income to sustain the project. Art making and art selling provide essential income to the Trust and the local people it employs as artists, thus contributing directly to the development of a sustainable creative economy.
Start Year 2021
 
Description South Africa Deep Fund Project: Our Sacred Ocean 
Organisation Keiskamma Trust
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub research in ocean art, culture and heritage aims to surface and provide an outlet for the views of those groups that are generally under-represented in more traditional approaches to ocean science and management. This research programme will provide sources of customary law for analysis under the Ocean Governance research programme and insights into traditional knowledge and livelihoods to inform all research themes. This programme is supported by a "Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund" to commission artistic responses that capture evolving challenges to ocean management, the ocean's multiple contributions to human wellbeing, and Hub findings. The Deep Fund is administered by the University of Strathclyde as lead partners in the One Ocean Hub project. "Our Sacred Ocean: Celebrating centuries of spiritual connection between the Xhosa people of the Eastern Cape, South Africa and the sea" is a new project initiated under the Deep Fund, led by Keiskamma Trust, South Africa. Glasgow School of Art will provide project management support for the project, as well providing a conduit through which the findings of this project can inform wider Hub research in South Africa.
Collaborator Contribution The Keiskamma Art Trust was established twenty years ago with the purpose of bringing dignity and economic empowerment to the rural, poor communities alongside the Keiskamma River by providing skills and meaningful work. In the "Our Sacred Ocean" Deep Fund project, the Trust will work with a core team of 14 Xhosa women and 2 Xhosa men to create a monumental embroidery that embodies local memories, prayers and rituals communicates the urgent need for inclusive ocean stewardship to protect and preserve the health of the ocean. Combining intergenerational knowledge, the project will make visible the cultural centrality of the sea to multiple age groups and advocates for recognition of powerful intangible relationships that are central to human and environmental wellbeing and prosperity.
Impact This project started in February 2021. The output of this project will be a monumental tapestry, as well as an online exhibition (which will include a mini-documentary made entirely on cellphone footage). The project seeks to affect change not only in the lives of mostly women involved in the project, but in the lives of the youth It will especially seek to ensure that oral history is not lost to younger generations, but rather that we revive the beauty and sacred nature of traditional beliefs. The project also seeks to educate a wider audience about the sacred connections experienced by vulnerable, under-represented communities who are not without a voice, or stake, in the health of the sea. Success will be measured qualitatively through feedback responses and quantitatively by Keiskamma Art Trust's ability to employ a greater number of artists. The creation of monumental works provide critical livelihoods to rural women, and through the sale of works, generate the income to sustain the project. Art making and art selling provide essential income to the Trust and the local people it employs as artists, thus contributing directly to the development of a sustainable creative economy.
Start Year 2021
 
Description South Africa Deep Fund Project: Our Sacred Ocean 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub research in ocean art, culture and heritage aims to surface and provide an outlet for the views of those groups that are generally under-represented in more traditional approaches to ocean science and management. This research programme will provide sources of customary law for analysis under the Ocean Governance research programme and insights into traditional knowledge and livelihoods to inform all research themes. This programme is supported by a "Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund" to commission artistic responses that capture evolving challenges to ocean management, the ocean's multiple contributions to human wellbeing, and Hub findings. The Deep Fund is administered by the University of Strathclyde as lead partners in the One Ocean Hub project. "Our Sacred Ocean: Celebrating centuries of spiritual connection between the Xhosa people of the Eastern Cape, South Africa and the sea" is a new project initiated under the Deep Fund, led by Keiskamma Trust, South Africa. Glasgow School of Art will provide project management support for the project, as well providing a conduit through which the findings of this project can inform wider Hub research in South Africa.
Collaborator Contribution The Keiskamma Art Trust was established twenty years ago with the purpose of bringing dignity and economic empowerment to the rural, poor communities alongside the Keiskamma River by providing skills and meaningful work. In the "Our Sacred Ocean" Deep Fund project, the Trust will work with a core team of 14 Xhosa women and 2 Xhosa men to create a monumental embroidery that embodies local memories, prayers and rituals communicates the urgent need for inclusive ocean stewardship to protect and preserve the health of the ocean. Combining intergenerational knowledge, the project will make visible the cultural centrality of the sea to multiple age groups and advocates for recognition of powerful intangible relationships that are central to human and environmental wellbeing and prosperity.
Impact This project started in February 2021. The output of this project will be a monumental tapestry, as well as an online exhibition (which will include a mini-documentary made entirely on cellphone footage). The project seeks to affect change not only in the lives of mostly women involved in the project, but in the lives of the youth It will especially seek to ensure that oral history is not lost to younger generations, but rather that we revive the beauty and sacred nature of traditional beliefs. The project also seeks to educate a wider audience about the sacred connections experienced by vulnerable, under-represented communities who are not without a voice, or stake, in the health of the sea. Success will be measured qualitatively through feedback responses and quantitatively by Keiskamma Art Trust's ability to employ a greater number of artists. The creation of monumental works provide critical livelihoods to rural women, and through the sale of works, generate the income to sustain the project. Art making and art selling provide essential income to the Trust and the local people it employs as artists, thus contributing directly to the development of a sustainable creative economy.
Start Year 2021
 
Description South Africa Deep Fund Project: The Sea and Tsitsikamma: cultural heritage and meaning of the sea for the people of Tsitsikamma 
Organisation Glasgow School of Art
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub research in ocean art, culture and heritage aims to surface and provide an outlet for the views of those groups that are generally under-represented in more traditional approaches to ocean science and management. This research programme will provide better understanding of communities' customary law for analysis under the Ocean Governance research programme and insights into traditional knowledge and livelihoods to inform all research themes. This research programme is supported by a "Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund" to commission artistic responses that capture evolving challenges to ocean management, the ocean's multiple contributions to human wellbeing, and Hub findings. The Deep Fund is administered by the University of Strathclyde as lead partners in the One Ocean Hub project. This project "The Sea and Tsitsikamma: cultural heritage and meaning of the sea for the people of Tsitsikamma" is a new project initiated under the Deep Fund, led by Rhodes University, South Africa. Glasgow School of Art will provide project management support for the project, as well providing a conduit through which the findings of this project can inform wider Hub research in South Africa.
Collaborator Contribution In this project, Rhodes University will explore the historical and cultural centrality of the ocean to the people of Tsitsikamma, a diverse set of communities situated within the marine and terrestrial protected Garden Route National Park located on South Africa's southern coast. The project seeks to illuminate intergenerational bonds, knowledge and values attached to the sea. Through digital storytelling, the project will reveal personal narratives. In undertaking cultural heritage mapping with eleven villages, it will share communal meanings of place. Plays by three secondary schools will examine the experiences of youth who are often omitted from dialogue and debates regarding ocean policy and governance.
Impact This project started in February 2021. The project will produce digital stories and a cultural map of the region. In addition, working with young people, high school plays in three schools in the Tsitsikamma area will be produced. Outcomes The project seeks to engage with Government officials who make decisions about the marine protected areas and park management agencies, as well as tourists of these area, in order to deepen their understanding of the different values attached to the sea, as well as the cultural and historical importance of these spaces, to inform future management decisions.
Start Year 2021
 
Description South Africa Deep Fund Project: The Sea and Tsitsikamma: cultural heritage and meaning of the sea for the people of Tsitsikamma 
Organisation Rhodes University
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub research in ocean art, culture and heritage aims to surface and provide an outlet for the views of those groups that are generally under-represented in more traditional approaches to ocean science and management. This research programme will provide better understanding of communities' customary law for analysis under the Ocean Governance research programme and insights into traditional knowledge and livelihoods to inform all research themes. This research programme is supported by a "Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund" to commission artistic responses that capture evolving challenges to ocean management, the ocean's multiple contributions to human wellbeing, and Hub findings. The Deep Fund is administered by the University of Strathclyde as lead partners in the One Ocean Hub project. This project "The Sea and Tsitsikamma: cultural heritage and meaning of the sea for the people of Tsitsikamma" is a new project initiated under the Deep Fund, led by Rhodes University, South Africa. Glasgow School of Art will provide project management support for the project, as well providing a conduit through which the findings of this project can inform wider Hub research in South Africa.
Collaborator Contribution In this project, Rhodes University will explore the historical and cultural centrality of the ocean to the people of Tsitsikamma, a diverse set of communities situated within the marine and terrestrial protected Garden Route National Park located on South Africa's southern coast. The project seeks to illuminate intergenerational bonds, knowledge and values attached to the sea. Through digital storytelling, the project will reveal personal narratives. In undertaking cultural heritage mapping with eleven villages, it will share communal meanings of place. Plays by three secondary schools will examine the experiences of youth who are often omitted from dialogue and debates regarding ocean policy and governance.
Impact This project started in February 2021. The project will produce digital stories and a cultural map of the region. In addition, working with young people, high school plays in three schools in the Tsitsikamma area will be produced. Outcomes The project seeks to engage with Government officials who make decisions about the marine protected areas and park management agencies, as well as tourists of these area, in order to deepen their understanding of the different values attached to the sea, as well as the cultural and historical importance of these spaces, to inform future management decisions.
Start Year 2021
 
Description South Africa Deep Fund Project: The Sea and Tsitsikamma: cultural heritage and meaning of the sea for the people of Tsitsikamma 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub research in ocean art, culture and heritage aims to surface and provide an outlet for the views of those groups that are generally under-represented in more traditional approaches to ocean science and management. This research programme will provide better understanding of communities' customary law for analysis under the Ocean Governance research programme and insights into traditional knowledge and livelihoods to inform all research themes. This research programme is supported by a "Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund" to commission artistic responses that capture evolving challenges to ocean management, the ocean's multiple contributions to human wellbeing, and Hub findings. The Deep Fund is administered by the University of Strathclyde as lead partners in the One Ocean Hub project. This project "The Sea and Tsitsikamma: cultural heritage and meaning of the sea for the people of Tsitsikamma" is a new project initiated under the Deep Fund, led by Rhodes University, South Africa. Glasgow School of Art will provide project management support for the project, as well providing a conduit through which the findings of this project can inform wider Hub research in South Africa.
Collaborator Contribution In this project, Rhodes University will explore the historical and cultural centrality of the ocean to the people of Tsitsikamma, a diverse set of communities situated within the marine and terrestrial protected Garden Route National Park located on South Africa's southern coast. The project seeks to illuminate intergenerational bonds, knowledge and values attached to the sea. Through digital storytelling, the project will reveal personal narratives. In undertaking cultural heritage mapping with eleven villages, it will share communal meanings of place. Plays by three secondary schools will examine the experiences of youth who are often omitted from dialogue and debates regarding ocean policy and governance.
Impact This project started in February 2021. The project will produce digital stories and a cultural map of the region. In addition, working with young people, high school plays in three schools in the Tsitsikamma area will be produced. Outcomes The project seeks to engage with Government officials who make decisions about the marine protected areas and park management agencies, as well as tourists of these area, in order to deepen their understanding of the different values attached to the sea, as well as the cultural and historical importance of these spaces, to inform future management decisions.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Strengthening capacity in international ocean governance 
Organisation UN Division for Ocean Affairs and the Law of the Sea
Country United States 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The One Ocean Hub brings together scholars from 21 research insitutions across 10 countries, with expertise in multiple disciplines including law, marine scince, social sciences, arts, humanities, and development studies. In April 2020 the One Ocean Hub was approached by the UN Division on Ocean Affairs and the Law of the Sea (UNDOALOS) to develop/share a series of online content and co-organize joint events to reach out to the ocean community during the COVID-19 emergency. It was considered that these events represented an exciting opportunity not to only to establish an authoritative and engaging voice for the Hub internationally, but also to advance our research and research planning in conversation with government, UN and non-governmental partners across the world. In response to this invitation, the Hub developed a series of online sessions which, in partnership with UNDOALOS, sought to engage with UN/Nippon Fellow alumni network of government officers from 80 countries. The purpose of these sessions was to provide a platform to learn about Hub researchers' findings; share their own challenges and ideas for more effective ocean governance; and better understand opportunities to contribute to the ocean science-policy interface. The programme of events included 8 webinars (listed under 'outputs'), led by Hub researchers from: South Africa National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI); Rhodes University; University of Plymouth; University of Strathclyde; University of Cape Coast; University of Education, Winneba, Ghana; Nelson Mandela University; University of Cape Town; University of West Indies; University of Edinburgh; Heriot Watt University.
Collaborator Contribution As a result of the COVID19 pandemic, UNDOALOS sought to refocus its capacity-building activities for Nippon Fellows and Alumni. In doing so, UNDOALOS partnered with the One Ocean Hub to develop a programme of webinar-based learning seminars and training sessions to be delivered in an adapted virtual format. The seminars aimed at providing opportunities for continued learning, discussions, and engagement in key ocean-related spheres, including to identify and address the new and additional challenges stemming from the impacts of COVID-19. Through this partnership, the Hub led a series of seminars under the 'current and specialised ocean-related' theme (see full programme here: https://www.un.org/Depts/los/nippon/OnlineAlumniActivities.pdf ). These seminars drew on research conducted in the Hub, as well as the experiences of Hub researchers more broadly. By opening its network of Nippon Fellows, UNDOALOS facilitated the connection of Hub researchers with government and civil society working on ocean issues from more than 80 countries, creating opportunities for international exposure for DAC and UK researchers, as well as opportunities for small-scale fishing communities leaders to share their views internationally and potentially explore opportunities for cross-national learning and alliances (contributing directly to the Hub's objective of connecting knowledge and dialogue across scales from local to international level). UNDOALOS has approached the Hub to continue to develop further online capacity-building activities in 2021, and has referred to the video-recordings of Hub-oragnized seminars as reference materials for new capacity-building activities.
Impact Outputs: In this programme of capacity building, a series of 8 webinars were produced: Covid-19 Impacts on the South African Small Scale Fisheries Sector: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDeJJG3qt0E Understanding marine science and the ocean science policy interface https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=acRnJj4ckas Understanding social science and the ocean science policy interface https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IQoYS0C_au4 Gender Mainstreaming in the Ocean: promoting equality, including in the context of Covid-19 recovery https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pxETnwaWIWU Domestic Customary Law & Ocean Governance: An Introduction to Different Perspectives and Approaches https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f5U4On_lZsk Small-Scale Fisheries and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgdbVNhHf6Q Oceans and Climate Change: Impact and Adaptation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fzR9cHUQ9WE These videos are now used as reference materials for new capacity-building initiatives and resources led by UNDOALOS.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Strengthening capacity in international ocean governance 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The One Ocean Hub brings together scholars from 21 research insitutions across 10 countries, with expertise in multiple disciplines including law, marine scince, social sciences, arts, humanities, and development studies. In April 2020 the One Ocean Hub was approached by the UN Division on Ocean Affairs and the Law of the Sea (UNDOALOS) to develop/share a series of online content and co-organize joint events to reach out to the ocean community during the COVID-19 emergency. It was considered that these events represented an exciting opportunity not to only to establish an authoritative and engaging voice for the Hub internationally, but also to advance our research and research planning in conversation with government, UN and non-governmental partners across the world. In response to this invitation, the Hub developed a series of online sessions which, in partnership with UNDOALOS, sought to engage with UN/Nippon Fellow alumni network of government officers from 80 countries. The purpose of these sessions was to provide a platform to learn about Hub researchers' findings; share their own challenges and ideas for more effective ocean governance; and better understand opportunities to contribute to the ocean science-policy interface. The programme of events included 8 webinars (listed under 'outputs'), led by Hub researchers from: South Africa National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI); Rhodes University; University of Plymouth; University of Strathclyde; University of Cape Coast; University of Education, Winneba, Ghana; Nelson Mandela University; University of Cape Town; University of West Indies; University of Edinburgh; Heriot Watt University.
Collaborator Contribution As a result of the COVID19 pandemic, UNDOALOS sought to refocus its capacity-building activities for Nippon Fellows and Alumni. In doing so, UNDOALOS partnered with the One Ocean Hub to develop a programme of webinar-based learning seminars and training sessions to be delivered in an adapted virtual format. The seminars aimed at providing opportunities for continued learning, discussions, and engagement in key ocean-related spheres, including to identify and address the new and additional challenges stemming from the impacts of COVID-19. Through this partnership, the Hub led a series of seminars under the 'current and specialised ocean-related' theme (see full programme here: https://www.un.org/Depts/los/nippon/OnlineAlumniActivities.pdf ). These seminars drew on research conducted in the Hub, as well as the experiences of Hub researchers more broadly. By opening its network of Nippon Fellows, UNDOALOS facilitated the connection of Hub researchers with government and civil society working on ocean issues from more than 80 countries, creating opportunities for international exposure for DAC and UK researchers, as well as opportunities for small-scale fishing communities leaders to share their views internationally and potentially explore opportunities for cross-national learning and alliances (contributing directly to the Hub's objective of connecting knowledge and dialogue across scales from local to international level). UNDOALOS has approached the Hub to continue to develop further online capacity-building activities in 2021, and has referred to the video-recordings of Hub-oragnized seminars as reference materials for new capacity-building activities.
Impact Outputs: In this programme of capacity building, a series of 8 webinars were produced: Covid-19 Impacts on the South African Small Scale Fisheries Sector: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDeJJG3qt0E Understanding marine science and the ocean science policy interface https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=acRnJj4ckas Understanding social science and the ocean science policy interface https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IQoYS0C_au4 Gender Mainstreaming in the Ocean: promoting equality, including in the context of Covid-19 recovery https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pxETnwaWIWU Domestic Customary Law & Ocean Governance: An Introduction to Different Perspectives and Approaches https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f5U4On_lZsk Small-Scale Fisheries and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgdbVNhHf6Q Oceans and Climate Change: Impact and Adaptation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fzR9cHUQ9WE These videos are now used as reference materials for new capacity-building initiatives and resources led by UNDOALOS.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Supporting the implementation of a sustainable blue economy in Namibia 
Organisation Centre For Environment, Fisheries And Aquaculture Science
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Early research in the Hub identified the implementation of the Namibia Blue Economy strategy as a high priority area for research, and within this, the value of ecosystem services in key sectors such as the recreational fisheries sector to the economy of Namibia, particularly in coastal towns. The Namibian territorial waters and exclusive economic zone (EEZ) provide enormous scope for further development and this has been recognised in the promotion of a blue economy concept in Namibia's 5th National Development plan, to cover industries and resources such as fisheries and aquaculture, water resources, shipping and transport, tourism, marine renewable energy, minerals, genetic resources, pharmaceutical, blue carbon trading, biotechnology and general sea based products. Within this plan, the blue economy concept is not articulated beyond the need for improved policies to align the various sectors, improved spatial planning and, within that, the identification of Ecologically or Biologically Significant Marine Areas (EBSAs) (to align with Sustainable Development Goal commitments). The government of Namibia is also developing a policy and action plan for the country's Sustainable Blue Economy, and aims to develop and implement an Ecosystems Approach to fisheries management. The implementation of this policy and action plan will require trade-offs that at this stage are at best only partially understood. Significant knowledge gaps must be filled to enhance the understanding of the marine ecosystems in Namibia and how different economic activities rely on them and impact them In response this identified need, a cross-stakeholder, multidisciplinary programme has commenced, comprising 3 collaborative and interconnected collaborations (including 2 Flexible Fund projects, to add to and complement the existing Hub research in Namibia), which combined seek to advance understanding of the value of marine ecosystem services linked to the ecosystem and ecological processes within the Namibian EEZ, in order to sustain key sectors such as the recreational line fishery, and ensure that further implementation of the blue economy considers impacts on community livelihoods. The One Ocean Hub's Flexible Fund enables the Hub to be adaptive and responsive to in-country needs and seek partnerships with organisation with expertise and influence that contribute to the Hub's impact goals. In 2020, two Flexible Fund projects have brought together new collaborations between the University of Namibia, Rhodes University (South Africa), the Centre of Environment, Fisheries, and Aquaculture Science (Cefas, UK), South Africa Environmental Research Institute, the Namibia Nature Foundation, and the Overseas Development Institute. These 2 new projects are linked to each other, as well as with the existing One Ocean Hub sociology research team at the University of Namibia.
Collaborator Contribution South Atlantic Environmental Research Institute; Namibia Nature Foundation; Overseas Development Institute This project aims to advance understanding on the value of ecosystem services in Namibia's exclusive economic zone, in order to inform the sustainable implementation of Namibia's Blue Economy plan as well as appropriate marine protected area designation and management. Namibia's maritime and coastal environment fall within the exceptionally biologically rich Benguela current ecosystem. The fisheries sector, which currently constitutes the major commercial activity in the marine environment, contributes an average of 3.5% to real GDP and is the 4th largest foreign currency earner. Within this, the recreational fishery sector in particular is of considerable economic importance in coastal towns in which fishing-based tourism forms a major source of income. UNAM, Cefas, Rhodes University Namibian shore-based marine fisheries are the lifeblood of the coastal communities of central Namibia as they provide a critical source of income (through tourism) and food for the coastal communities in the region. The recreational sector is enormous with foreign and local tourists flocking to this coastal area to enjoy the excellent angling opportunities. The recreational sector provides almost all of the livelihood opportunities for coastal towns such as Henties Bay and in terms of economics, was shown to be far more valuable than the competing commercial fishery (Kirchner et al. 2000)1. Unfortunately, the popularity of this fishery has reduced the fish resources and while these were well monitored and managed in the 1990s, they have been neglected in recent years. The poor management of the recreational fishery in recent times has placed additional pressure on the fish stocks and this has had a considerable impact on other fisheries sectors (including subsistence fishery), whose participants rely directly on the resources for their livelihoods. In addition to concerns around overexploitation, coastal fisheries resources are threatened by the impacts of a rapidly changing climate. Central and northern Namibia have been recognised as an ocean warming hotspot (Potts et al. 2014) and changes in temperature are having a marked impact on the distribution, movement patterns and life history of coastal fishery species (Potts et al. 2014, Pringle 20203). The overall purpose of the project will be to improve the long-term sustainability of the shore-based fishery (recreational and small-scale) along the rapidly changing Namibian coastal ocean. This will be achieved by: 1. Working closely with recreational anglers to understand their catch and effort, levels of compliance, catch-and-release techniques, and develop best-practice to enhance survival and improve compliance. 2. Generating biological knowledge of one of the key species harvested by shore-anglers in Namibia, West coast steenbras, and updating its stock assessment. 3. Provide recommendations for managing a broader range of inshore fisheries and develop best practice. This project creates an opportunity for comparative analysis of the recreational fishing sector, and its management, in Namibia and South Africa, with a view to developing shared learning.
Impact These projects commenced in February 2021. Outputs will be reported from 2022 onwards
Start Year 2020
 
Description Supporting the implementation of a sustainable blue economy in Namibia 
Organisation Namibia Nature Foundation
Country Namibia 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Early research in the Hub identified the implementation of the Namibia Blue Economy strategy as a high priority area for research, and within this, the value of ecosystem services in key sectors such as the recreational fisheries sector to the economy of Namibia, particularly in coastal towns. The Namibian territorial waters and exclusive economic zone (EEZ) provide enormous scope for further development and this has been recognised in the promotion of a blue economy concept in Namibia's 5th National Development plan, to cover industries and resources such as fisheries and aquaculture, water resources, shipping and transport, tourism, marine renewable energy, minerals, genetic resources, pharmaceutical, blue carbon trading, biotechnology and general sea based products. Within this plan, the blue economy concept is not articulated beyond the need for improved policies to align the various sectors, improved spatial planning and, within that, the identification of Ecologically or Biologically Significant Marine Areas (EBSAs) (to align with Sustainable Development Goal commitments). The government of Namibia is also developing a policy and action plan for the country's Sustainable Blue Economy, and aims to develop and implement an Ecosystems Approach to fisheries management. The implementation of this policy and action plan will require trade-offs that at this stage are at best only partially understood. Significant knowledge gaps must be filled to enhance the understanding of the marine ecosystems in Namibia and how different economic activities rely on them and impact them In response this identified need, a cross-stakeholder, multidisciplinary programme has commenced, comprising 3 collaborative and interconnected collaborations (including 2 Flexible Fund projects, to add to and complement the existing Hub research in Namibia), which combined seek to advance understanding of the value of marine ecosystem services linked to the ecosystem and ecological processes within the Namibian EEZ, in order to sustain key sectors such as the recreational line fishery, and ensure that further implementation of the blue economy considers impacts on community livelihoods. The One Ocean Hub's Flexible Fund enables the Hub to be adaptive and responsive to in-country needs and seek partnerships with organisation with expertise and influence that contribute to the Hub's impact goals. In 2020, two Flexible Fund projects have brought together new collaborations between the University of Namibia, Rhodes University (South Africa), the Centre of Environment, Fisheries, and Aquaculture Science (Cefas, UK), South Africa Environmental Research Institute, the Namibia Nature Foundation, and the Overseas Development Institute. These 2 new projects are linked to each other, as well as with the existing One Ocean Hub sociology research team at the University of Namibia.
Collaborator Contribution South Atlantic Environmental Research Institute; Namibia Nature Foundation; Overseas Development Institute This project aims to advance understanding on the value of ecosystem services in Namibia's exclusive economic zone, in order to inform the sustainable implementation of Namibia's Blue Economy plan as well as appropriate marine protected area designation and management. Namibia's maritime and coastal environment fall within the exceptionally biologically rich Benguela current ecosystem. The fisheries sector, which currently constitutes the major commercial activity in the marine environment, contributes an average of 3.5% to real GDP and is the 4th largest foreign currency earner. Within this, the recreational fishery sector in particular is of considerable economic importance in coastal towns in which fishing-based tourism forms a major source of income. UNAM, Cefas, Rhodes University Namibian shore-based marine fisheries are the lifeblood of the coastal communities of central Namibia as they provide a critical source of income (through tourism) and food for the coastal communities in the region. The recreational sector is enormous with foreign and local tourists flocking to this coastal area to enjoy the excellent angling opportunities. The recreational sector provides almost all of the livelihood opportunities for coastal towns such as Henties Bay and in terms of economics, was shown to be far more valuable than the competing commercial fishery (Kirchner et al. 2000)1. Unfortunately, the popularity of this fishery has reduced the fish resources and while these were well monitored and managed in the 1990s, they have been neglected in recent years. The poor management of the recreational fishery in recent times has placed additional pressure on the fish stocks and this has had a considerable impact on other fisheries sectors (including subsistence fishery), whose participants rely directly on the resources for their livelihoods. In addition to concerns around overexploitation, coastal fisheries resources are threatened by the impacts of a rapidly changing climate. Central and northern Namibia have been recognised as an ocean warming hotspot (Potts et al. 2014) and changes in temperature are having a marked impact on the distribution, movement patterns and life history of coastal fishery species (Potts et al. 2014, Pringle 20203). The overall purpose of the project will be to improve the long-term sustainability of the shore-based fishery (recreational and small-scale) along the rapidly changing Namibian coastal ocean. This will be achieved by: 1. Working closely with recreational anglers to understand their catch and effort, levels of compliance, catch-and-release techniques, and develop best-practice to enhance survival and improve compliance. 2. Generating biological knowledge of one of the key species harvested by shore-anglers in Namibia, West coast steenbras, and updating its stock assessment. 3. Provide recommendations for managing a broader range of inshore fisheries and develop best practice. This project creates an opportunity for comparative analysis of the recreational fishing sector, and its management, in Namibia and South Africa, with a view to developing shared learning.
Impact These projects commenced in February 2021. Outputs will be reported from 2022 onwards
Start Year 2020
 
Description Supporting the implementation of a sustainable blue economy in Namibia 
Organisation Overseas Development Institute (ODI)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Early research in the Hub identified the implementation of the Namibia Blue Economy strategy as a high priority area for research, and within this, the value of ecosystem services in key sectors such as the recreational fisheries sector to the economy of Namibia, particularly in coastal towns. The Namibian territorial waters and exclusive economic zone (EEZ) provide enormous scope for further development and this has been recognised in the promotion of a blue economy concept in Namibia's 5th National Development plan, to cover industries and resources such as fisheries and aquaculture, water resources, shipping and transport, tourism, marine renewable energy, minerals, genetic resources, pharmaceutical, blue carbon trading, biotechnology and general sea based products. Within this plan, the blue economy concept is not articulated beyond the need for improved policies to align the various sectors, improved spatial planning and, within that, the identification of Ecologically or Biologically Significant Marine Areas (EBSAs) (to align with Sustainable Development Goal commitments). The government of Namibia is also developing a policy and action plan for the country's Sustainable Blue Economy, and aims to develop and implement an Ecosystems Approach to fisheries management. The implementation of this policy and action plan will require trade-offs that at this stage are at best only partially understood. Significant knowledge gaps must be filled to enhance the understanding of the marine ecosystems in Namibia and how different economic activities rely on them and impact them In response this identified need, a cross-stakeholder, multidisciplinary programme has commenced, comprising 3 collaborative and interconnected collaborations (including 2 Flexible Fund projects, to add to and complement the existing Hub research in Namibia), which combined seek to advance understanding of the value of marine ecosystem services linked to the ecosystem and ecological processes within the Namibian EEZ, in order to sustain key sectors such as the recreational line fishery, and ensure that further implementation of the blue economy considers impacts on community livelihoods. The One Ocean Hub's Flexible Fund enables the Hub to be adaptive and responsive to in-country needs and seek partnerships with organisation with expertise and influence that contribute to the Hub's impact goals. In 2020, two Flexible Fund projects have brought together new collaborations between the University of Namibia, Rhodes University (South Africa), the Centre of Environment, Fisheries, and Aquaculture Science (Cefas, UK), South Africa Environmental Research Institute, the Namibia Nature Foundation, and the Overseas Development Institute. These 2 new projects are linked to each other, as well as with the existing One Ocean Hub sociology research team at the University of Namibia.
Collaborator Contribution South Atlantic Environmental Research Institute; Namibia Nature Foundation; Overseas Development Institute This project aims to advance understanding on the value of ecosystem services in Namibia's exclusive economic zone, in order to inform the sustainable implementation of Namibia's Blue Economy plan as well as appropriate marine protected area designation and management. Namibia's maritime and coastal environment fall within the exceptionally biologically rich Benguela current ecosystem. The fisheries sector, which currently constitutes the major commercial activity in the marine environment, contributes an average of 3.5% to real GDP and is the 4th largest foreign currency earner. Within this, the recreational fishery sector in particular is of considerable economic importance in coastal towns in which fishing-based tourism forms a major source of income. UNAM, Cefas, Rhodes University Namibian shore-based marine fisheries are the lifeblood of the coastal communities of central Namibia as they provide a critical source of income (through tourism) and food for the coastal communities in the region. The recreational sector is enormous with foreign and local tourists flocking to this coastal area to enjoy the excellent angling opportunities. The recreational sector provides almost all of the livelihood opportunities for coastal towns such as Henties Bay and in terms of economics, was shown to be far more valuable than the competing commercial fishery (Kirchner et al. 2000)1. Unfortunately, the popularity of this fishery has reduced the fish resources and while these were well monitored and managed in the 1990s, they have been neglected in recent years. The poor management of the recreational fishery in recent times has placed additional pressure on the fish stocks and this has had a considerable impact on other fisheries sectors (including subsistence fishery), whose participants rely directly on the resources for their livelihoods. In addition to concerns around overexploitation, coastal fisheries resources are threatened by the impacts of a rapidly changing climate. Central and northern Namibia have been recognised as an ocean warming hotspot (Potts et al. 2014) and changes in temperature are having a marked impact on the distribution, movement patterns and life history of coastal fishery species (Potts et al. 2014, Pringle 20203). The overall purpose of the project will be to improve the long-term sustainability of the shore-based fishery (recreational and small-scale) along the rapidly changing Namibian coastal ocean. This will be achieved by: 1. Working closely with recreational anglers to understand their catch and effort, levels of compliance, catch-and-release techniques, and develop best-practice to enhance survival and improve compliance. 2. Generating biological knowledge of one of the key species harvested by shore-anglers in Namibia, West coast steenbras, and updating its stock assessment. 3. Provide recommendations for managing a broader range of inshore fisheries and develop best practice. This project creates an opportunity for comparative analysis of the recreational fishing sector, and its management, in Namibia and South Africa, with a view to developing shared learning.
Impact These projects commenced in February 2021. Outputs will be reported from 2022 onwards
Start Year 2020
 
Description Supporting the implementation of a sustainable blue economy in Namibia 
Organisation Rhodes University
Department Department of Ichthyology and Fisheries Science
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Early research in the Hub identified the implementation of the Namibia Blue Economy strategy as a high priority area for research, and within this, the value of ecosystem services in key sectors such as the recreational fisheries sector to the economy of Namibia, particularly in coastal towns. The Namibian territorial waters and exclusive economic zone (EEZ) provide enormous scope for further development and this has been recognised in the promotion of a blue economy concept in Namibia's 5th National Development plan, to cover industries and resources such as fisheries and aquaculture, water resources, shipping and transport, tourism, marine renewable energy, minerals, genetic resources, pharmaceutical, blue carbon trading, biotechnology and general sea based products. Within this plan, the blue economy concept is not articulated beyond the need for improved policies to align the various sectors, improved spatial planning and, within that, the identification of Ecologically or Biologically Significant Marine Areas (EBSAs) (to align with Sustainable Development Goal commitments). The government of Namibia is also developing a policy and action plan for the country's Sustainable Blue Economy, and aims to develop and implement an Ecosystems Approach to fisheries management. The implementation of this policy and action plan will require trade-offs that at this stage are at best only partially understood. Significant knowledge gaps must be filled to enhance the understanding of the marine ecosystems in Namibia and how different economic activities rely on them and impact them In response this identified need, a cross-stakeholder, multidisciplinary programme has commenced, comprising 3 collaborative and interconnected collaborations (including 2 Flexible Fund projects, to add to and complement the existing Hub research in Namibia), which combined seek to advance understanding of the value of marine ecosystem services linked to the ecosystem and ecological processes within the Namibian EEZ, in order to sustain key sectors such as the recreational line fishery, and ensure that further implementation of the blue economy considers impacts on community livelihoods. The One Ocean Hub's Flexible Fund enables the Hub to be adaptive and responsive to in-country needs and seek partnerships with organisation with expertise and influence that contribute to the Hub's impact goals. In 2020, two Flexible Fund projects have brought together new collaborations between the University of Namibia, Rhodes University (South Africa), the Centre of Environment, Fisheries, and Aquaculture Science (Cefas, UK), South Africa Environmental Research Institute, the Namibia Nature Foundation, and the Overseas Development Institute. These 2 new projects are linked to each other, as well as with the existing One Ocean Hub sociology research team at the University of Namibia.
Collaborator Contribution South Atlantic Environmental Research Institute; Namibia Nature Foundation; Overseas Development Institute This project aims to advance understanding on the value of ecosystem services in Namibia's exclusive economic zone, in order to inform the sustainable implementation of Namibia's Blue Economy plan as well as appropriate marine protected area designation and management. Namibia's maritime and coastal environment fall within the exceptionally biologically rich Benguela current ecosystem. The fisheries sector, which currently constitutes the major commercial activity in the marine environment, contributes an average of 3.5% to real GDP and is the 4th largest foreign currency earner. Within this, the recreational fishery sector in particular is of considerable economic importance in coastal towns in which fishing-based tourism forms a major source of income. UNAM, Cefas, Rhodes University Namibian shore-based marine fisheries are the lifeblood of the coastal communities of central Namibia as they provide a critical source of income (through tourism) and food for the coastal communities in the region. The recreational sector is enormous with foreign and local tourists flocking to this coastal area to enjoy the excellent angling opportunities. The recreational sector provides almost all of the livelihood opportunities for coastal towns such as Henties Bay and in terms of economics, was shown to be far more valuable than the competing commercial fishery (Kirchner et al. 2000)1. Unfortunately, the popularity of this fishery has reduced the fish resources and while these were well monitored and managed in the 1990s, they have been neglected in recent years. The poor management of the recreational fishery in recent times has placed additional pressure on the fish stocks and this has had a considerable impact on other fisheries sectors (including subsistence fishery), whose participants rely directly on the resources for their livelihoods. In addition to concerns around overexploitation, coastal fisheries resources are threatened by the impacts of a rapidly changing climate. Central and northern Namibia have been recognised as an ocean warming hotspot (Potts et al. 2014) and changes in temperature are having a marked impact on the distribution, movement patterns and life history of coastal fishery species (Potts et al. 2014, Pringle 20203). The overall purpose of the project will be to improve the long-term sustainability of the shore-based fishery (recreational and small-scale) along the rapidly changing Namibian coastal ocean. This will be achieved by: 1. Working closely with recreational anglers to understand their catch and effort, levels of compliance, catch-and-release techniques, and develop best-practice to enhance survival and improve compliance. 2. Generating biological knowledge of one of the key species harvested by shore-anglers in Namibia, West coast steenbras, and updating its stock assessment. 3. Provide recommendations for managing a broader range of inshore fisheries and develop best practice. This project creates an opportunity for comparative analysis of the recreational fishing sector, and its management, in Namibia and South Africa, with a view to developing shared learning.
Impact These projects commenced in February 2021. Outputs will be reported from 2022 onwards
Start Year 2020
 
Description Supporting the implementation of a sustainable blue economy in Namibia 
Organisation South Atlantic Environmental Research Institute
Country Falkland Islands (Malvinas) 
Sector Learned Society 
PI Contribution Early research in the Hub identified the implementation of the Namibia Blue Economy strategy as a high priority area for research, and within this, the value of ecosystem services in key sectors such as the recreational fisheries sector to the economy of Namibia, particularly in coastal towns. The Namibian territorial waters and exclusive economic zone (EEZ) provide enormous scope for further development and this has been recognised in the promotion of a blue economy concept in Namibia's 5th National Development plan, to cover industries and resources such as fisheries and aquaculture, water resources, shipping and transport, tourism, marine renewable energy, minerals, genetic resources, pharmaceutical, blue carbon trading, biotechnology and general sea based products. Within this plan, the blue economy concept is not articulated beyond the need for improved policies to align the various sectors, improved spatial planning and, within that, the identification of Ecologically or Biologically Significant Marine Areas (EBSAs) (to align with Sustainable Development Goal commitments). The government of Namibia is also developing a policy and action plan for the country's Sustainable Blue Economy, and aims to develop and implement an Ecosystems Approach to fisheries management. The implementation of this policy and action plan will require trade-offs that at this stage are at best only partially understood. Significant knowledge gaps must be filled to enhance the understanding of the marine ecosystems in Namibia and how different economic activities rely on them and impact them In response this identified need, a cross-stakeholder, multidisciplinary programme has commenced, comprising 3 collaborative and interconnected collaborations (including 2 Flexible Fund projects, to add to and complement the existing Hub research in Namibia), which combined seek to advance understanding of the value of marine ecosystem services linked to the ecosystem and ecological processes within the Namibian EEZ, in order to sustain key sectors such as the recreational line fishery, and ensure that further implementation of the blue economy considers impacts on community livelihoods. The One Ocean Hub's Flexible Fund enables the Hub to be adaptive and responsive to in-country needs and seek partnerships with organisation with expertise and influence that contribute to the Hub's impact goals. In 2020, two Flexible Fund projects have brought together new collaborations between the University of Namibia, Rhodes University (South Africa), the Centre of Environment, Fisheries, and Aquaculture Science (Cefas, UK), South Africa Environmental Research Institute, the Namibia Nature Foundation, and the Overseas Development Institute. These 2 new projects are linked to each other, as well as with the existing One Ocean Hub sociology research team at the University of Namibia.
Collaborator Contribution South Atlantic Environmental Research Institute; Namibia Nature Foundation; Overseas Development Institute This project aims to advance understanding on the value of ecosystem services in Namibia's exclusive economic zone, in order to inform the sustainable implementation of Namibia's Blue Economy plan as well as appropriate marine protected area designation and management. Namibia's maritime and coastal environment fall within the exceptionally biologically rich Benguela current ecosystem. The fisheries sector, which currently constitutes the major commercial activity in the marine environment, contributes an average of 3.5% to real GDP and is the 4th largest foreign currency earner. Within this, the recreational fishery sector in particular is of considerable economic importance in coastal towns in which fishing-based tourism forms a major source of income. UNAM, Cefas, Rhodes University Namibian shore-based marine fisheries are the lifeblood of the coastal communities of central Namibia as they provide a critical source of income (through tourism) and food for the coastal communities in the region. The recreational sector is enormous with foreign and local tourists flocking to this coastal area to enjoy the excellent angling opportunities. The recreational sector provides almost all of the livelihood opportunities for coastal towns such as Henties Bay and in terms of economics, was shown to be far more valuable than the competing commercial fishery (Kirchner et al. 2000)1. Unfortunately, the popularity of this fishery has reduced the fish resources and while these were well monitored and managed in the 1990s, they have been neglected in recent years. The poor management of the recreational fishery in recent times has placed additional pressure on the fish stocks and this has had a considerable impact on other fisheries sectors (including subsistence fishery), whose participants rely directly on the resources for their livelihoods. In addition to concerns around overexploitation, coastal fisheries resources are threatened by the impacts of a rapidly changing climate. Central and northern Namibia have been recognised as an ocean warming hotspot (Potts et al. 2014) and changes in temperature are having a marked impact on the distribution, movement patterns and life history of coastal fishery species (Potts et al. 2014, Pringle 20203). The overall purpose of the project will be to improve the long-term sustainability of the shore-based fishery (recreational and small-scale) along the rapidly changing Namibian coastal ocean. This will be achieved by: 1. Working closely with recreational anglers to understand their catch and effort, levels of compliance, catch-and-release techniques, and develop best-practice to enhance survival and improve compliance. 2. Generating biological knowledge of one of the key species harvested by shore-anglers in Namibia, West coast steenbras, and updating its stock assessment. 3. Provide recommendations for managing a broader range of inshore fisheries and develop best practice. This project creates an opportunity for comparative analysis of the recreational fishing sector, and its management, in Namibia and South Africa, with a view to developing shared learning.
Impact These projects commenced in February 2021. Outputs will be reported from 2022 onwards
Start Year 2020
 
Description Supporting the implementation of a sustainable blue economy in Namibia 
Organisation University of Namibia
Department Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Science
Country Namibia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Early research in the Hub identified the implementation of the Namibia Blue Economy strategy as a high priority area for research, and within this, the value of ecosystem services in key sectors such as the recreational fisheries sector to the economy of Namibia, particularly in coastal towns. The Namibian territorial waters and exclusive economic zone (EEZ) provide enormous scope for further development and this has been recognised in the promotion of a blue economy concept in Namibia's 5th National Development plan, to cover industries and resources such as fisheries and aquaculture, water resources, shipping and transport, tourism, marine renewable energy, minerals, genetic resources, pharmaceutical, blue carbon trading, biotechnology and general sea based products. Within this plan, the blue economy concept is not articulated beyond the need for improved policies to align the various sectors, improved spatial planning and, within that, the identification of Ecologically or Biologically Significant Marine Areas (EBSAs) (to align with Sustainable Development Goal commitments). The government of Namibia is also developing a policy and action plan for the country's Sustainable Blue Economy, and aims to develop and implement an Ecosystems Approach to fisheries management. The implementation of this policy and action plan will require trade-offs that at this stage are at best only partially understood. Significant knowledge gaps must be filled to enhance the understanding of the marine ecosystems in Namibia and how different economic activities rely on them and impact them In response this identified need, a cross-stakeholder, multidisciplinary programme has commenced, comprising 3 collaborative and interconnected collaborations (including 2 Flexible Fund projects, to add to and complement the existing Hub research in Namibia), which combined seek to advance understanding of the value of marine ecosystem services linked to the ecosystem and ecological processes within the Namibian EEZ, in order to sustain key sectors such as the recreational line fishery, and ensure that further implementation of the blue economy considers impacts on community livelihoods. The One Ocean Hub's Flexible Fund enables the Hub to be adaptive and responsive to in-country needs and seek partnerships with organisation with expertise and influence that contribute to the Hub's impact goals. In 2020, two Flexible Fund projects have brought together new collaborations between the University of Namibia, Rhodes University (South Africa), the Centre of Environment, Fisheries, and Aquaculture Science (Cefas, UK), South Africa Environmental Research Institute, the Namibia Nature Foundation, and the Overseas Development Institute. These 2 new projects are linked to each other, as well as with the existing One Ocean Hub sociology research team at the University of Namibia.
Collaborator Contribution South Atlantic Environmental Research Institute; Namibia Nature Foundation; Overseas Development Institute This project aims to advance understanding on the value of ecosystem services in Namibia's exclusive economic zone, in order to inform the sustainable implementation of Namibia's Blue Economy plan as well as appropriate marine protected area designation and management. Namibia's maritime and coastal environment fall within the exceptionally biologically rich Benguela current ecosystem. The fisheries sector, which currently constitutes the major commercial activity in the marine environment, contributes an average of 3.5% to real GDP and is the 4th largest foreign currency earner. Within this, the recreational fishery sector in particular is of considerable economic importance in coastal towns in which fishing-based tourism forms a major source of income. UNAM, Cefas, Rhodes University Namibian shore-based marine fisheries are the lifeblood of the coastal communities of central Namibia as they provide a critical source of income (through tourism) and food for the coastal communities in the region. The recreational sector is enormous with foreign and local tourists flocking to this coastal area to enjoy the excellent angling opportunities. The recreational sector provides almost all of the livelihood opportunities for coastal towns such as Henties Bay and in terms of economics, was shown to be far more valuable than the competing commercial fishery (Kirchner et al. 2000)1. Unfortunately, the popularity of this fishery has reduced the fish resources and while these were well monitored and managed in the 1990s, they have been neglected in recent years. The poor management of the recreational fishery in recent times has placed additional pressure on the fish stocks and this has had a considerable impact on other fisheries sectors (including subsistence fishery), whose participants rely directly on the resources for their livelihoods. In addition to concerns around overexploitation, coastal fisheries resources are threatened by the impacts of a rapidly changing climate. Central and northern Namibia have been recognised as an ocean warming hotspot (Potts et al. 2014) and changes in temperature are having a marked impact on the distribution, movement patterns and life history of coastal fishery species (Potts et al. 2014, Pringle 20203). The overall purpose of the project will be to improve the long-term sustainability of the shore-based fishery (recreational and small-scale) along the rapidly changing Namibian coastal ocean. This will be achieved by: 1. Working closely with recreational anglers to understand their catch and effort, levels of compliance, catch-and-release techniques, and develop best-practice to enhance survival and improve compliance. 2. Generating biological knowledge of one of the key species harvested by shore-anglers in Namibia, West coast steenbras, and updating its stock assessment. 3. Provide recommendations for managing a broader range of inshore fisheries and develop best practice. This project creates an opportunity for comparative analysis of the recreational fishing sector, and its management, in Namibia and South Africa, with a view to developing shared learning.
Impact These projects commenced in February 2021. Outputs will be reported from 2022 onwards
Start Year 2020
 
Description Sustainable and Equitable Fisheries - GHANA 
Organisation Centre For Environment, Fisheries And Aquaculture Science
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Around 10% of Ghana's jobs are directly related to fish production, the vast majority of which are associated with marine wild capture fisheries. Fish products are a primary source of protein to many Ghanaians, with as much as 75% of catches being processed and consumed locally. Annual fisheries production in Ghana currently meets around 45% of the needs of Ghana's population, with a considerable demand for imported products, mainly from countries like Senegal and Mauritania but also from Europe (countries such as Spain). The historic and subsistence importance of fish in Ghana, and the dependence upon fish imports, raises important policy questions relating to food security and the significance of traditional diet and culture. Artisanal fishing overlaps to an undefined extent with subsistence fishing. The artisanal fisheries, which directly support around 107,000 jobs in Ghana are a loosely defined fleet of low- or unpowered wooden canoes whom mainly target small pelagic stocks. These fisheries are widespread and hard to monitor, partly by dint of their 'open access' nature, which has seemingly led to considerable over-capacity. It is thought that present levels of artisanal fishing are unsustainable, as indicated by falls in some catches. However, strain on the artisanal sector could be the result of potential stock catch being taken by other sectors, such as the semi-industrial sector. The so-called 'Saiko' trade, where industrial trawlers sell bycatch to indigenous fishermen therefore illegally landing bycatch from trawl vessels. This seriously undermines efforts to improve sustainability in the legal fishery. In 2017 it was estimated that around 100 kilotonnes of fish product was landed, equivalent to 40% of the production of the artisanal sector, creating a considerable loss of state revenue and fishing opportunities for legal Ghanaian fishers. To address these challenges, Ghana's government is seeking to use an ecosystem-based management approach to recognize the full array of factors (including humans) and interactions (e.g., between organisms) relevant for fisheries development (https://mofad.gov.gh/fisheries-management-plan-of-ghana-2015-2019 , also see Ghana News Agency report, 07.09.2017). As in many developing countries, the legislation (e.g., Ghana Fisheries Act 625) requiring ecosystem-based fisheries management was developed ahead of the science needed to assess fisheries for the combined effect of global change factors. Presently, most studies address issues concerning individual global change factors alone. As a consequence, knowledge, particularly on how feedback interactions between multiple global change factors affect key fish stocks is limited. Our research aims to contribute to this need to help improve the science basis for ecosystem based management targets outlined in Ghana's Fisheries Management Plan. Crucially, we aim to ensure that these are co-developed and implemented with artisanal fisher views, and consideration of the impact on their livelihoods (including consideration to supplementary livelihoods). To achieve this, area based management approaches must be implemented through a pluralistic legal framework accounting for both customary and national law. Towards achieving this, this multidisciplinary partnerships seeks to co-develop in partnership with key stakeholders: 1. A suite of tools to support integrated ecosystem-based marine spatial planning. 2. A pluralistic legal framework that is based on inclusive and participatory processes. 3. 'Solutions' to support the enforcement and compliance of fisheries laws. 4. Participatory approaches/methods for exploring alternative livelihoods to support poverty alleviation and enhanced wellbeing of artisanal fishing communities The One Ocean Hub provides the infrastructure and networks to bring together researchers from University of Cape Coast, (including physical geographers, fisheries scientists, sociologists, and law researchers), together with fisheries and environmental science expertise from the UK (Centre of environment, fisheries, and aquaculture science (Cefas), Scottish Association for Marine Science, Herriot Watt University, University of Strathclyde), and provides the research forum to engage with relevant fisheries authorities in the Government of Ghana, namely the Fisheries Commission, and the Environment Protection Authority. In addition, the One Ocean Hub flexible fund enables the Hub to be adaptive and responsive to in-country needs and seek partnerships with organisations with relevant expertise and influence that contribute to the Hub's impact goals. In addition to the partnerships included in the original Hub proposal, a new flexible fund project has begun (Dec 2020) which brings together researchers from University of Strathclyde (UK), University of Cape Coast (Ghana), and University of Energy and Natural Resources (Ghana), to address current challenges in hydrodynamic and ecosystem modelling capability in Ghana.
Collaborator Contribution The Fishery Management Plan for Ghana (2015-19) explicitly considers the need to establish area-based management tools (ABMTs, including marine protected areas), in line with its obligations to the Convention on Biological Diversity. Our partners in the Environmental Protection Agency and Ghanaian Fisheries Commission have provided insight into the data gaps have necessitated a reliance on a precautionary approach. A precautionary approach is not effective at guiding specific decisions. The specific goals of ABMTs under the current fishery management plan are not clear. Furthermore, marine protected areas are not a panacea for improved fisheries management, without a concomitant decline in fishing effort, improvements to stock status or fisheries yields should not be expected. Our ongoing partnership will mean that we will have access to historic data and an ability to influence fisheries policy. In addition, in 2020, researchers at the University of Cape Coast Ghana, began a partnership with the Ghana Tourism Authority to develop plans and approaches towards using marine tourism as an alternative livelihood strategy, to be responsive to any change in access to fish stocks. In order to inform difference management scenarios, Prof Mike Heath (University of Strathclyde) will bring expertise and experience in ecosystem modelling (including through the application of the Strath E2E modelling method) to Ghana, in order to develop an ecosystem model of the Ghana shelf for use by in-country partners, in particular Ghana Fisheries Commission and Environment Protection Authority, in the management of Ghanaian marine resources. In developing this model, Prof Heath identified a gap in the provision of hydrodynamic data. The One Ocean Hub has provided flexible funds to enable a new collaboration with the University of Energy and Natural Resources (UENR) to address this gap and enable the ongoing development of the ecosystem model for the Ghana shelf system. This new collaboration was developed under the Hub between University of Strathclyde (UK), University of Cape Coast (Ghana), and University of Energy and Natural Resources (Ghana), in response to a need to develop a hydrodynamic and ecosystem modelling capability in Ghana. The capacity to model ocean currents, sea-levels, temperature and salinity, is a key national capability for a maritime nation state. Access to these data is essential for rapid response to pollution events such as oil spills so as to direct resources to tackle the emergency; prediction of storm surges (especially for nations with low-lying coastal terrain); tracking the dispersal of litter; supporting advances in seabed habitat mapping and management; definition of connectivity between marine protected areas, and ecological understanding. Ghana is currently lacking this national capability. Despite the extensive offshore oil industry, only one scientific publication on hydrodynamic modelling in Ghana waters is available - Uba, F. et al. 2020. CFD modelling and analysis of the trajectory and behaviour of oil pollutant particles in the Ghanaian territorial waters. Scientific African 8 (2020) e00411. The 8-day model run reported in this publication was carried out on a borrowed computer which is no longer available, and the raw data are no longer accessible. Re-starting this hydrodynamic modelling capability (with the author of the paper cited above) at the University of Energy and Natural Resources (UENR), Sunyani, and helping to secure it for the future will be a valuable contribution to improving Ghana's national capability in the marine field. Given the extensive offshore oil industry and importance of the marine environment to the Ghana economy it is important that the skills needed to respond to emergencies are available in-country. Re-starting the hydrodynamic modelling capability will contribute essential data products for One Ocean Hub objectives in. These data products (3-dimensional velocity fields) are needed to enable seabed habitat mapping, and specification of proposed marine protected areas. UENR will therefore re-start this hydrodynamic modelling capability and provide the resulting data to be incorporated into the One Ocean Hub ecosystem modelling activity.
Impact Cook, R; Acheampong E; Aggrey-Fynn J; Heath M. A fleet based surplus production model that accounts for increases in fishing power with application to two West African pelagic stocks. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 2021 (in press) Outputs In progress • Metageodatabase of Ghana's marine ecosystem. This database is being developed in partnership between Cefas (UK), University of Cape Coast, and the Environment Protection Authority (Ghana), and once developed will be hosted by the University of Cape Coast. • Ecosystem model of Ghana shelf Progress towards key outcomes In developing the 4 key outputs listed under 'contributions', we aim to increase capacity to implement these outputs to support integrated and sustainable ocean governance and sustainable livelihoods in Ghana. In achieving this, we are developing the networks to support capacity development, and co-developing these outputs with key stakeholders such that they are appropriately designed for immediate deployment. For example, the Environment Protection Authority has provided substantive inputs on 3 occasions to the design and scope of the metageodatabase, and has provided historic data for inclusion. A high level policy dialogue event was planned for April 2020 which sought to bring together relevant Ministries to engage them on the proposed Marine Spatial Plan (MSP) for Ghana, with the specific objectives to: • Seek policy coherence and to promote co-existence among maritime economic activities, as well as the protection of the marine environment • To demonstrate how the proposed MSP will promote a blue economy for Ghana This event will be rescheduled in 2021 provided COVID-19 restrictions allow.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Sustainable and Equitable Fisheries - GHANA 
Organisation Government of Ghana
Country Ghana 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Around 10% of Ghana's jobs are directly related to fish production, the vast majority of which are associated with marine wild capture fisheries. Fish products are a primary source of protein to many Ghanaians, with as much as 75% of catches being processed and consumed locally. Annual fisheries production in Ghana currently meets around 45% of the needs of Ghana's population, with a considerable demand for imported products, mainly from countries like Senegal and Mauritania but also from Europe (countries such as Spain). The historic and subsistence importance of fish in Ghana, and the dependence upon fish imports, raises important policy questions relating to food security and the significance of traditional diet and culture. Artisanal fishing overlaps to an undefined extent with subsistence fishing. The artisanal fisheries, which directly support around 107,000 jobs in Ghana are a loosely defined fleet of low- or unpowered wooden canoes whom mainly target small pelagic stocks. These fisheries are widespread and hard to monitor, partly by dint of their 'open access' nature, which has seemingly led to considerable over-capacity. It is thought that present levels of artisanal fishing are unsustainable, as indicated by falls in some catches. However, strain on the artisanal sector could be the result of potential stock catch being taken by other sectors, such as the semi-industrial sector. The so-called 'Saiko' trade, where industrial trawlers sell bycatch to indigenous fishermen therefore illegally landing bycatch from trawl vessels. This seriously undermines efforts to improve sustainability in the legal fishery. In 2017 it was estimated that around 100 kilotonnes of fish product was landed, equivalent to 40% of the production of the artisanal sector, creating a considerable loss of state revenue and fishing opportunities for legal Ghanaian fishers. To address these challenges, Ghana's government is seeking to use an ecosystem-based management approach to recognize the full array of factors (including humans) and interactions (e.g., between organisms) relevant for fisheries development (https://mofad.gov.gh/fisheries-management-plan-of-ghana-2015-2019 , also see Ghana News Agency report, 07.09.2017). As in many developing countries, the legislation (e.g., Ghana Fisheries Act 625) requiring ecosystem-based fisheries management was developed ahead of the science needed to assess fisheries for the combined effect of global change factors. Presently, most studies address issues concerning individual global change factors alone. As a consequence, knowledge, particularly on how feedback interactions between multiple global change factors affect key fish stocks is limited. Our research aims to contribute to this need to help improve the science basis for ecosystem based management targets outlined in Ghana's Fisheries Management Plan. Crucially, we aim to ensure that these are co-developed and implemented with artisanal fisher views, and consideration of the impact on their livelihoods (including consideration to supplementary livelihoods). To achieve this, area based management approaches must be implemented through a pluralistic legal framework accounting for both customary and national law. Towards achieving this, this multidisciplinary partnerships seeks to co-develop in partnership with key stakeholders: 1. A suite of tools to support integrated ecosystem-based marine spatial planning. 2. A pluralistic legal framework that is based on inclusive and participatory processes. 3. 'Solutions' to support the enforcement and compliance of fisheries laws. 4. Participatory approaches/methods for exploring alternative livelihoods to support poverty alleviation and enhanced wellbeing of artisanal fishing communities The One Ocean Hub provides the infrastructure and networks to bring together researchers from University of Cape Coast, (including physical geographers, fisheries scientists, sociologists, and law researchers), together with fisheries and environmental science expertise from the UK (Centre of environment, fisheries, and aquaculture science (Cefas), Scottish Association for Marine Science, Herriot Watt University, University of Strathclyde), and provides the research forum to engage with relevant fisheries authorities in the Government of Ghana, namely the Fisheries Commission, and the Environment Protection Authority. In addition, the One Ocean Hub flexible fund enables the Hub to be adaptive and responsive to in-country needs and seek partnerships with organisations with relevant expertise and influence that contribute to the Hub's impact goals. In addition to the partnerships included in the original Hub proposal, a new flexible fund project has begun (Dec 2020) which brings together researchers from University of Strathclyde (UK), University of Cape Coast (Ghana), and University of Energy and Natural Resources (Ghana), to address current challenges in hydrodynamic and ecosystem modelling capability in Ghana.
Collaborator Contribution The Fishery Management Plan for Ghana (2015-19) explicitly considers the need to establish area-based management tools (ABMTs, including marine protected areas), in line with its obligations to the Convention on Biological Diversity. Our partners in the Environmental Protection Agency and Ghanaian Fisheries Commission have provided insight into the data gaps have necessitated a reliance on a precautionary approach. A precautionary approach is not effective at guiding specific decisions. The specific goals of ABMTs under the current fishery management plan are not clear. Furthermore, marine protected areas are not a panacea for improved fisheries management, without a concomitant decline in fishing effort, improvements to stock status or fisheries yields should not be expected. Our ongoing partnership will mean that we will have access to historic data and an ability to influence fisheries policy. In addition, in 2020, researchers at the University of Cape Coast Ghana, began a partnership with the Ghana Tourism Authority to develop plans and approaches towards using marine tourism as an alternative livelihood strategy, to be responsive to any change in access to fish stocks. In order to inform difference management scenarios, Prof Mike Heath (University of Strathclyde) will bring expertise and experience in ecosystem modelling (including through the application of the Strath E2E modelling method) to Ghana, in order to develop an ecosystem model of the Ghana shelf for use by in-country partners, in particular Ghana Fisheries Commission and Environment Protection Authority, in the management of Ghanaian marine resources. In developing this model, Prof Heath identified a gap in the provision of hydrodynamic data. The One Ocean Hub has provided flexible funds to enable a new collaboration with the University of Energy and Natural Resources (UENR) to address this gap and enable the ongoing development of the ecosystem model for the Ghana shelf system. This new collaboration was developed under the Hub between University of Strathclyde (UK), University of Cape Coast (Ghana), and University of Energy and Natural Resources (Ghana), in response to a need to develop a hydrodynamic and ecosystem modelling capability in Ghana. The capacity to model ocean currents, sea-levels, temperature and salinity, is a key national capability for a maritime nation state. Access to these data is essential for rapid response to pollution events such as oil spills so as to direct resources to tackle the emergency; prediction of storm surges (especially for nations with low-lying coastal terrain); tracking the dispersal of litter; supporting advances in seabed habitat mapping and management; definition of connectivity between marine protected areas, and ecological understanding. Ghana is currently lacking this national capability. Despite the extensive offshore oil industry, only one scientific publication on hydrodynamic modelling in Ghana waters is available - Uba, F. et al. 2020. CFD modelling and analysis of the trajectory and behaviour of oil pollutant particles in the Ghanaian territorial waters. Scientific African 8 (2020) e00411. The 8-day model run reported in this publication was carried out on a borrowed computer which is no longer available, and the raw data are no longer accessible. Re-starting this hydrodynamic modelling capability (with the author of the paper cited above) at the University of Energy and Natural Resources (UENR), Sunyani, and helping to secure it for the future will be a valuable contribution to improving Ghana's national capability in the marine field. Given the extensive offshore oil industry and importance of the marine environment to the Ghana economy it is important that the skills needed to respond to emergencies are available in-country. Re-starting the hydrodynamic modelling capability will contribute essential data products for One Ocean Hub objectives in. These data products (3-dimensional velocity fields) are needed to enable seabed habitat mapping, and specification of proposed marine protected areas. UENR will therefore re-start this hydrodynamic modelling capability and provide the resulting data to be incorporated into the One Ocean Hub ecosystem modelling activity.
Impact Cook, R; Acheampong E; Aggrey-Fynn J; Heath M. A fleet based surplus production model that accounts for increases in fishing power with application to two West African pelagic stocks. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 2021 (in press) Outputs In progress • Metageodatabase of Ghana's marine ecosystem. This database is being developed in partnership between Cefas (UK), University of Cape Coast, and the Environment Protection Authority (Ghana), and once developed will be hosted by the University of Cape Coast. • Ecosystem model of Ghana shelf Progress towards key outcomes In developing the 4 key outputs listed under 'contributions', we aim to increase capacity to implement these outputs to support integrated and sustainable ocean governance and sustainable livelihoods in Ghana. In achieving this, we are developing the networks to support capacity development, and co-developing these outputs with key stakeholders such that they are appropriately designed for immediate deployment. For example, the Environment Protection Authority has provided substantive inputs on 3 occasions to the design and scope of the metageodatabase, and has provided historic data for inclusion. A high level policy dialogue event was planned for April 2020 which sought to bring together relevant Ministries to engage them on the proposed Marine Spatial Plan (MSP) for Ghana, with the specific objectives to: • Seek policy coherence and to promote co-existence among maritime economic activities, as well as the protection of the marine environment • To demonstrate how the proposed MSP will promote a blue economy for Ghana This event will be rescheduled in 2021 provided COVID-19 restrictions allow.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Sustainable and Equitable Fisheries - GHANA 
Organisation Heriot-Watt University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Around 10% of Ghana's jobs are directly related to fish production, the vast majority of which are associated with marine wild capture fisheries. Fish products are a primary source of protein to many Ghanaians, with as much as 75% of catches being processed and consumed locally. Annual fisheries production in Ghana currently meets around 45% of the needs of Ghana's population, with a considerable demand for imported products, mainly from countries like Senegal and Mauritania but also from Europe (countries such as Spain). The historic and subsistence importance of fish in Ghana, and the dependence upon fish imports, raises important policy questions relating to food security and the significance of traditional diet and culture. Artisanal fishing overlaps to an undefined extent with subsistence fishing. The artisanal fisheries, which directly support around 107,000 jobs in Ghana are a loosely defined fleet of low- or unpowered wooden canoes whom mainly target small pelagic stocks. These fisheries are widespread and hard to monitor, partly by dint of their 'open access' nature, which has seemingly led to considerable over-capacity. It is thought that present levels of artisanal fishing are unsustainable, as indicated by falls in some catches. However, strain on the artisanal sector could be the result of potential stock catch being taken by other sectors, such as the semi-industrial sector. The so-called 'Saiko' trade, where industrial trawlers sell bycatch to indigenous fishermen therefore illegally landing bycatch from trawl vessels. This seriously undermines efforts to improve sustainability in the legal fishery. In 2017 it was estimated that around 100 kilotonnes of fish product was landed, equivalent to 40% of the production of the artisanal sector, creating a considerable loss of state revenue and fishing opportunities for legal Ghanaian fishers. To address these challenges, Ghana's government is seeking to use an ecosystem-based management approach to recognize the full array of factors (including humans) and interactions (e.g., between organisms) relevant for fisheries development (https://mofad.gov.gh/fisheries-management-plan-of-ghana-2015-2019 , also see Ghana News Agency report, 07.09.2017). As in many developing countries, the legislation (e.g., Ghana Fisheries Act 625) requiring ecosystem-based fisheries management was developed ahead of the science needed to assess fisheries for the combined effect of global change factors. Presently, most studies address issues concerning individual global change factors alone. As a consequence, knowledge, particularly on how feedback interactions between multiple global change factors affect key fish stocks is limited. Our research aims to contribute to this need to help improve the science basis for ecosystem based management targets outlined in Ghana's Fisheries Management Plan. Crucially, we aim to ensure that these are co-developed and implemented with artisanal fisher views, and consideration of the impact on their livelihoods (including consideration to supplementary livelihoods). To achieve this, area based management approaches must be implemented through a pluralistic legal framework accounting for both customary and national law. Towards achieving this, this multidisciplinary partnerships seeks to co-develop in partnership with key stakeholders: 1. A suite of tools to support integrated ecosystem-based marine spatial planning. 2. A pluralistic legal framework that is based on inclusive and participatory processes. 3. 'Solutions' to support the enforcement and compliance of fisheries laws. 4. Participatory approaches/methods for exploring alternative livelihoods to support poverty alleviation and enhanced wellbeing of artisanal fishing communities The One Ocean Hub provides the infrastructure and networks to bring together researchers from University of Cape Coast, (including physical geographers, fisheries scientists, sociologists, and law researchers), together with fisheries and environmental science expertise from the UK (Centre of environment, fisheries, and aquaculture science (Cefas), Scottish Association for Marine Science, Herriot Watt University, University of Strathclyde), and provides the research forum to engage with relevant fisheries authorities in the Government of Ghana, namely the Fisheries Commission, and the Environment Protection Authority. In addition, the One Ocean Hub flexible fund enables the Hub to be adaptive and responsive to in-country needs and seek partnerships with organisations with relevant expertise and influence that contribute to the Hub's impact goals. In addition to the partnerships included in the original Hub proposal, a new flexible fund project has begun (Dec 2020) which brings together researchers from University of Strathclyde (UK), University of Cape Coast (Ghana), and University of Energy and Natural Resources (Ghana), to address current challenges in hydrodynamic and ecosystem modelling capability in Ghana.
Collaborator Contribution The Fishery Management Plan for Ghana (2015-19) explicitly considers the need to establish area-based management tools (ABMTs, including marine protected areas), in line with its obligations to the Convention on Biological Diversity. Our partners in the Environmental Protection Agency and Ghanaian Fisheries Commission have provided insight into the data gaps have necessitated a reliance on a precautionary approach. A precautionary approach is not effective at guiding specific decisions. The specific goals of ABMTs under the current fishery management plan are not clear. Furthermore, marine protected areas are not a panacea for improved fisheries management, without a concomitant decline in fishing effort, improvements to stock status or fisheries yields should not be expected. Our ongoing partnership will mean that we will have access to historic data and an ability to influence fisheries policy. In addition, in 2020, researchers at the University of Cape Coast Ghana, began a partnership with the Ghana Tourism Authority to develop plans and approaches towards using marine tourism as an alternative livelihood strategy, to be responsive to any change in access to fish stocks. In order to inform difference management scenarios, Prof Mike Heath (University of Strathclyde) will bring expertise and experience in ecosystem modelling (including through the application of the Strath E2E modelling method) to Ghana, in order to develop an ecosystem model of the Ghana shelf for use by in-country partners, in particular Ghana Fisheries Commission and Environment Protection Authority, in the management of Ghanaian marine resources. In developing this model, Prof Heath identified a gap in the provision of hydrodynamic data. The One Ocean Hub has provided flexible funds to enable a new collaboration with the University of Energy and Natural Resources (UENR) to address this gap and enable the ongoing development of the ecosystem model for the Ghana shelf system. This new collaboration was developed under the Hub between University of Strathclyde (UK), University of Cape Coast (Ghana), and University of Energy and Natural Resources (Ghana), in response to a need to develop a hydrodynamic and ecosystem modelling capability in Ghana. The capacity to model ocean currents, sea-levels, temperature and salinity, is a key national capability for a maritime nation state. Access to these data is essential for rapid response to pollution events such as oil spills so as to direct resources to tackle the emergency; prediction of storm surges (especially for nations with low-lying coastal terrain); tracking the dispersal of litter; supporting advances in seabed habitat mapping and management; definition of connectivity between marine protected areas, and ecological understanding. Ghana is currently lacking this national capability. Despite the extensive offshore oil industry, only one scientific publication on hydrodynamic modelling in Ghana waters is available - Uba, F. et al. 2020. CFD modelling and analysis of the trajectory and behaviour of oil pollutant particles in the Ghanaian territorial waters. Scientific African 8 (2020) e00411. The 8-day model run reported in this publication was carried out on a borrowed computer which is no longer available, and the raw data are no longer accessible. Re-starting this hydrodynamic modelling capability (with the author of the paper cited above) at the University of Energy and Natural Resources (UENR), Sunyani, and helping to secure it for the future will be a valuable contribution to improving Ghana's national capability in the marine field. Given the extensive offshore oil industry and importance of the marine environment to the Ghana economy it is important that the skills needed to respond to emergencies are available in-country. Re-starting the hydrodynamic modelling capability will contribute essential data products for One Ocean Hub objectives in. These data products (3-dimensional velocity fields) are needed to enable seabed habitat mapping, and specification of proposed marine protected areas. UENR will therefore re-start this hydrodynamic modelling capability and provide the resulting data to be incorporated into the One Ocean Hub ecosystem modelling activity.
Impact Cook, R; Acheampong E; Aggrey-Fynn J; Heath M. A fleet based surplus production model that accounts for increases in fishing power with application to two West African pelagic stocks. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 2021 (in press) Outputs In progress • Metageodatabase of Ghana's marine ecosystem. This database is being developed in partnership between Cefas (UK), University of Cape Coast, and the Environment Protection Authority (Ghana), and once developed will be hosted by the University of Cape Coast. • Ecosystem model of Ghana shelf Progress towards key outcomes In developing the 4 key outputs listed under 'contributions', we aim to increase capacity to implement these outputs to support integrated and sustainable ocean governance and sustainable livelihoods in Ghana. In achieving this, we are developing the networks to support capacity development, and co-developing these outputs with key stakeholders such that they are appropriately designed for immediate deployment. For example, the Environment Protection Authority has provided substantive inputs on 3 occasions to the design and scope of the metageodatabase, and has provided historic data for inclusion. A high level policy dialogue event was planned for April 2020 which sought to bring together relevant Ministries to engage them on the proposed Marine Spatial Plan (MSP) for Ghana, with the specific objectives to: • Seek policy coherence and to promote co-existence among maritime economic activities, as well as the protection of the marine environment • To demonstrate how the proposed MSP will promote a blue economy for Ghana This event will be rescheduled in 2021 provided COVID-19 restrictions allow.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Sustainable and Equitable Fisheries - GHANA 
Organisation Scottish Association For Marine Science
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Around 10% of Ghana's jobs are directly related to fish production, the vast majority of which are associated with marine wild capture fisheries. Fish products are a primary source of protein to many Ghanaians, with as much as 75% of catches being processed and consumed locally. Annual fisheries production in Ghana currently meets around 45% of the needs of Ghana's population, with a considerable demand for imported products, mainly from countries like Senegal and Mauritania but also from Europe (countries such as Spain). The historic and subsistence importance of fish in Ghana, and the dependence upon fish imports, raises important policy questions relating to food security and the significance of traditional diet and culture. Artisanal fishing overlaps to an undefined extent with subsistence fishing. The artisanal fisheries, which directly support around 107,000 jobs in Ghana are a loosely defined fleet of low- or unpowered wooden canoes whom mainly target small pelagic stocks. These fisheries are widespread and hard to monitor, partly by dint of their 'open access' nature, which has seemingly led to considerable over-capacity. It is thought that present levels of artisanal fishing are unsustainable, as indicated by falls in some catches. However, strain on the artisanal sector could be the result of potential stock catch being taken by other sectors, such as the semi-industrial sector. The so-called 'Saiko' trade, where industrial trawlers sell bycatch to indigenous fishermen therefore illegally landing bycatch from trawl vessels. This seriously undermines efforts to improve sustainability in the legal fishery. In 2017 it was estimated that around 100 kilotonnes of fish product was landed, equivalent to 40% of the production of the artisanal sector, creating a considerable loss of state revenue and fishing opportunities for legal Ghanaian fishers. To address these challenges, Ghana's government is seeking to use an ecosystem-based management approach to recognize the full array of factors (including humans) and interactions (e.g., between organisms) relevant for fisheries development (https://mofad.gov.gh/fisheries-management-plan-of-ghana-2015-2019 , also see Ghana News Agency report, 07.09.2017). As in many developing countries, the legislation (e.g., Ghana Fisheries Act 625) requiring ecosystem-based fisheries management was developed ahead of the science needed to assess fisheries for the combined effect of global change factors. Presently, most studies address issues concerning individual global change factors alone. As a consequence, knowledge, particularly on how feedback interactions between multiple global change factors affect key fish stocks is limited. Our research aims to contribute to this need to help improve the science basis for ecosystem based management targets outlined in Ghana's Fisheries Management Plan. Crucially, we aim to ensure that these are co-developed and implemented with artisanal fisher views, and consideration of the impact on their livelihoods (including consideration to supplementary livelihoods). To achieve this, area based management approaches must be implemented through a pluralistic legal framework accounting for both customary and national law. Towards achieving this, this multidisciplinary partnerships seeks to co-develop in partnership with key stakeholders: 1. A suite of tools to support integrated ecosystem-based marine spatial planning. 2. A pluralistic legal framework that is based on inclusive and participatory processes. 3. 'Solutions' to support the enforcement and compliance of fisheries laws. 4. Participatory approaches/methods for exploring alternative livelihoods to support poverty alleviation and enhanced wellbeing of artisanal fishing communities The One Ocean Hub provides the infrastructure and networks to bring together researchers from University of Cape Coast, (including physical geographers, fisheries scientists, sociologists, and law researchers), together with fisheries and environmental science expertise from the UK (Centre of environment, fisheries, and aquaculture science (Cefas), Scottish Association for Marine Science, Herriot Watt University, University of Strathclyde), and provides the research forum to engage with relevant fisheries authorities in the Government of Ghana, namely the Fisheries Commission, and the Environment Protection Authority. In addition, the One Ocean Hub flexible fund enables the Hub to be adaptive and responsive to in-country needs and seek partnerships with organisations with relevant expertise and influence that contribute to the Hub's impact goals. In addition to the partnerships included in the original Hub proposal, a new flexible fund project has begun (Dec 2020) which brings together researchers from University of Strathclyde (UK), University of Cape Coast (Ghana), and University of Energy and Natural Resources (Ghana), to address current challenges in hydrodynamic and ecosystem modelling capability in Ghana.
Collaborator Contribution The Fishery Management Plan for Ghana (2015-19) explicitly considers the need to establish area-based management tools (ABMTs, including marine protected areas), in line with its obligations to the Convention on Biological Diversity. Our partners in the Environmental Protection Agency and Ghanaian Fisheries Commission have provided insight into the data gaps have necessitated a reliance on a precautionary approach. A precautionary approach is not effective at guiding specific decisions. The specific goals of ABMTs under the current fishery management plan are not clear. Furthermore, marine protected areas are not a panacea for improved fisheries management, without a concomitant decline in fishing effort, improvements to stock status or fisheries yields should not be expected. Our ongoing partnership will mean that we will have access to historic data and an ability to influence fisheries policy. In addition, in 2020, researchers at the University of Cape Coast Ghana, began a partnership with the Ghana Tourism Authority to develop plans and approaches towards using marine tourism as an alternative livelihood strategy, to be responsive to any change in access to fish stocks. In order to inform difference management scenarios, Prof Mike Heath (University of Strathclyde) will bring expertise and experience in ecosystem modelling (including through the application of the Strath E2E modelling method) to Ghana, in order to develop an ecosystem model of the Ghana shelf for use by in-country partners, in particular Ghana Fisheries Commission and Environment Protection Authority, in the management of Ghanaian marine resources. In developing this model, Prof Heath identified a gap in the provision of hydrodynamic data. The One Ocean Hub has provided flexible funds to enable a new collaboration with the University of Energy and Natural Resources (UENR) to address this gap and enable the ongoing development of the ecosystem model for the Ghana shelf system. This new collaboration was developed under the Hub between University of Strathclyde (UK), University of Cape Coast (Ghana), and University of Energy and Natural Resources (Ghana), in response to a need to develop a hydrodynamic and ecosystem modelling capability in Ghana. The capacity to model ocean currents, sea-levels, temperature and salinity, is a key national capability for a maritime nation state. Access to these data is essential for rapid response to pollution events such as oil spills so as to direct resources to tackle the emergency; prediction of storm surges (especially for nations with low-lying coastal terrain); tracking the dispersal of litter; supporting advances in seabed habitat mapping and management; definition of connectivity between marine protected areas, and ecological understanding. Ghana is currently lacking this national capability. Despite the extensive offshore oil industry, only one scientific publication on hydrodynamic modelling in Ghana waters is available - Uba, F. et al. 2020. CFD modelling and analysis of the trajectory and behaviour of oil pollutant particles in the Ghanaian territorial waters. Scientific African 8 (2020) e00411. The 8-day model run reported in this publication was carried out on a borrowed computer which is no longer available, and the raw data are no longer accessible. Re-starting this hydrodynamic modelling capability (with the author of the paper cited above) at the University of Energy and Natural Resources (UENR), Sunyani, and helping to secure it for the future will be a valuable contribution to improving Ghana's national capability in the marine field. Given the extensive offshore oil industry and importance of the marine environment to the Ghana economy it is important that the skills needed to respond to emergencies are available in-country. Re-starting the hydrodynamic modelling capability will contribute essential data products for One Ocean Hub objectives in. These data products (3-dimensional velocity fields) are needed to enable seabed habitat mapping, and specification of proposed marine protected areas. UENR will therefore re-start this hydrodynamic modelling capability and provide the resulting data to be incorporated into the One Ocean Hub ecosystem modelling activity.
Impact Cook, R; Acheampong E; Aggrey-Fynn J; Heath M. A fleet based surplus production model that accounts for increases in fishing power with application to two West African pelagic stocks. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 2021 (in press) Outputs In progress • Metageodatabase of Ghana's marine ecosystem. This database is being developed in partnership between Cefas (UK), University of Cape Coast, and the Environment Protection Authority (Ghana), and once developed will be hosted by the University of Cape Coast. • Ecosystem model of Ghana shelf Progress towards key outcomes In developing the 4 key outputs listed under 'contributions', we aim to increase capacity to implement these outputs to support integrated and sustainable ocean governance and sustainable livelihoods in Ghana. In achieving this, we are developing the networks to support capacity development, and co-developing these outputs with key stakeholders such that they are appropriately designed for immediate deployment. For example, the Environment Protection Authority has provided substantive inputs on 3 occasions to the design and scope of the metageodatabase, and has provided historic data for inclusion. A high level policy dialogue event was planned for April 2020 which sought to bring together relevant Ministries to engage them on the proposed Marine Spatial Plan (MSP) for Ghana, with the specific objectives to: • Seek policy coherence and to promote co-existence among maritime economic activities, as well as the protection of the marine environment • To demonstrate how the proposed MSP will promote a blue economy for Ghana This event will be rescheduled in 2021 provided COVID-19 restrictions allow.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Sustainable and Equitable Fisheries - GHANA 
Organisation University of Cape Coast
Country Ghana 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Around 10% of Ghana's jobs are directly related to fish production, the vast majority of which are associated with marine wild capture fisheries. Fish products are a primary source of protein to many Ghanaians, with as much as 75% of catches being processed and consumed locally. Annual fisheries production in Ghana currently meets around 45% of the needs of Ghana's population, with a considerable demand for imported products, mainly from countries like Senegal and Mauritania but also from Europe (countries such as Spain). The historic and subsistence importance of fish in Ghana, and the dependence upon fish imports, raises important policy questions relating to food security and the significance of traditional diet and culture. Artisanal fishing overlaps to an undefined extent with subsistence fishing. The artisanal fisheries, which directly support around 107,000 jobs in Ghana are a loosely defined fleet of low- or unpowered wooden canoes whom mainly target small pelagic stocks. These fisheries are widespread and hard to monitor, partly by dint of their 'open access' nature, which has seemingly led to considerable over-capacity. It is thought that present levels of artisanal fishing are unsustainable, as indicated by falls in some catches. However, strain on the artisanal sector could be the result of potential stock catch being taken by other sectors, such as the semi-industrial sector. The so-called 'Saiko' trade, where industrial trawlers sell bycatch to indigenous fishermen therefore illegally landing bycatch from trawl vessels. This seriously undermines efforts to improve sustainability in the legal fishery. In 2017 it was estimated that around 100 kilotonnes of fish product was landed, equivalent to 40% of the production of the artisanal sector, creating a considerable loss of state revenue and fishing opportunities for legal Ghanaian fishers. To address these challenges, Ghana's government is seeking to use an ecosystem-based management approach to recognize the full array of factors (including humans) and interactions (e.g., between organisms) relevant for fisheries development (https://mofad.gov.gh/fisheries-management-plan-of-ghana-2015-2019 , also see Ghana News Agency report, 07.09.2017). As in many developing countries, the legislation (e.g., Ghana Fisheries Act 625) requiring ecosystem-based fisheries management was developed ahead of the science needed to assess fisheries for the combined effect of global change factors. Presently, most studies address issues concerning individual global change factors alone. As a consequence, knowledge, particularly on how feedback interactions between multiple global change factors affect key fish stocks is limited. Our research aims to contribute to this need to help improve the science basis for ecosystem based management targets outlined in Ghana's Fisheries Management Plan. Crucially, we aim to ensure that these are co-developed and implemented with artisanal fisher views, and consideration of the impact on their livelihoods (including consideration to supplementary livelihoods). To achieve this, area based management approaches must be implemented through a pluralistic legal framework accounting for both customary and national law. Towards achieving this, this multidisciplinary partnerships seeks to co-develop in partnership with key stakeholders: 1. A suite of tools to support integrated ecosystem-based marine spatial planning. 2. A pluralistic legal framework that is based on inclusive and participatory processes. 3. 'Solutions' to support the enforcement and compliance of fisheries laws. 4. Participatory approaches/methods for exploring alternative livelihoods to support poverty alleviation and enhanced wellbeing of artisanal fishing communities The One Ocean Hub provides the infrastructure and networks to bring together researchers from University of Cape Coast, (including physical geographers, fisheries scientists, sociologists, and law researchers), together with fisheries and environmental science expertise from the UK (Centre of environment, fisheries, and aquaculture science (Cefas), Scottish Association for Marine Science, Herriot Watt University, University of Strathclyde), and provides the research forum to engage with relevant fisheries authorities in the Government of Ghana, namely the Fisheries Commission, and the Environment Protection Authority. In addition, the One Ocean Hub flexible fund enables the Hub to be adaptive and responsive to in-country needs and seek partnerships with organisations with relevant expertise and influence that contribute to the Hub's impact goals. In addition to the partnerships included in the original Hub proposal, a new flexible fund project has begun (Dec 2020) which brings together researchers from University of Strathclyde (UK), University of Cape Coast (Ghana), and University of Energy and Natural Resources (Ghana), to address current challenges in hydrodynamic and ecosystem modelling capability in Ghana.
Collaborator Contribution The Fishery Management Plan for Ghana (2015-19) explicitly considers the need to establish area-based management tools (ABMTs, including marine protected areas), in line with its obligations to the Convention on Biological Diversity. Our partners in the Environmental Protection Agency and Ghanaian Fisheries Commission have provided insight into the data gaps have necessitated a reliance on a precautionary approach. A precautionary approach is not effective at guiding specific decisions. The specific goals of ABMTs under the current fishery management plan are not clear. Furthermore, marine protected areas are not a panacea for improved fisheries management, without a concomitant decline in fishing effort, improvements to stock status or fisheries yields should not be expected. Our ongoing partnership will mean that we will have access to historic data and an ability to influence fisheries policy. In addition, in 2020, researchers at the University of Cape Coast Ghana, began a partnership with the Ghana Tourism Authority to develop plans and approaches towards using marine tourism as an alternative livelihood strategy, to be responsive to any change in access to fish stocks. In order to inform difference management scenarios, Prof Mike Heath (University of Strathclyde) will bring expertise and experience in ecosystem modelling (including through the application of the Strath E2E modelling method) to Ghana, in order to develop an ecosystem model of the Ghana shelf for use by in-country partners, in particular Ghana Fisheries Commission and Environment Protection Authority, in the management of Ghanaian marine resources. In developing this model, Prof Heath identified a gap in the provision of hydrodynamic data. The One Ocean Hub has provided flexible funds to enable a new collaboration with the University of Energy and Natural Resources (UENR) to address this gap and enable the ongoing development of the ecosystem model for the Ghana shelf system. This new collaboration was developed under the Hub between University of Strathclyde (UK), University of Cape Coast (Ghana), and University of Energy and Natural Resources (Ghana), in response to a need to develop a hydrodynamic and ecosystem modelling capability in Ghana. The capacity to model ocean currents, sea-levels, temperature and salinity, is a key national capability for a maritime nation state. Access to these data is essential for rapid response to pollution events such as oil spills so as to direct resources to tackle the emergency; prediction of storm surges (especially for nations with low-lying coastal terrain); tracking the dispersal of litter; supporting advances in seabed habitat mapping and management; definition of connectivity between marine protected areas, and ecological understanding. Ghana is currently lacking this national capability. Despite the extensive offshore oil industry, only one scientific publication on hydrodynamic modelling in Ghana waters is available - Uba, F. et al. 2020. CFD modelling and analysis of the trajectory and behaviour of oil pollutant particles in the Ghanaian territorial waters. Scientific African 8 (2020) e00411. The 8-day model run reported in this publication was carried out on a borrowed computer which is no longer available, and the raw data are no longer accessible. Re-starting this hydrodynamic modelling capability (with the author of the paper cited above) at the University of Energy and Natural Resources (UENR), Sunyani, and helping to secure it for the future will be a valuable contribution to improving Ghana's national capability in the marine field. Given the extensive offshore oil industry and importance of the marine environment to the Ghana economy it is important that the skills needed to respond to emergencies are available in-country. Re-starting the hydrodynamic modelling capability will contribute essential data products for One Ocean Hub objectives in. These data products (3-dimensional velocity fields) are needed to enable seabed habitat mapping, and specification of proposed marine protected areas. UENR will therefore re-start this hydrodynamic modelling capability and provide the resulting data to be incorporated into the One Ocean Hub ecosystem modelling activity.
Impact Cook, R; Acheampong E; Aggrey-Fynn J; Heath M. A fleet based surplus production model that accounts for increases in fishing power with application to two West African pelagic stocks. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 2021 (in press) Outputs In progress • Metageodatabase of Ghana's marine ecosystem. This database is being developed in partnership between Cefas (UK), University of Cape Coast, and the Environment Protection Authority (Ghana), and once developed will be hosted by the University of Cape Coast. • Ecosystem model of Ghana shelf Progress towards key outcomes In developing the 4 key outputs listed under 'contributions', we aim to increase capacity to implement these outputs to support integrated and sustainable ocean governance and sustainable livelihoods in Ghana. In achieving this, we are developing the networks to support capacity development, and co-developing these outputs with key stakeholders such that they are appropriately designed for immediate deployment. For example, the Environment Protection Authority has provided substantive inputs on 3 occasions to the design and scope of the metageodatabase, and has provided historic data for inclusion. A high level policy dialogue event was planned for April 2020 which sought to bring together relevant Ministries to engage them on the proposed Marine Spatial Plan (MSP) for Ghana, with the specific objectives to: • Seek policy coherence and to promote co-existence among maritime economic activities, as well as the protection of the marine environment • To demonstrate how the proposed MSP will promote a blue economy for Ghana This event will be rescheduled in 2021 provided COVID-19 restrictions allow.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Sustainable and Equitable Fisheries - GHANA 
Organisation University of Energy and Natural Resources
Country Ghana 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Around 10% of Ghana's jobs are directly related to fish production, the vast majority of which are associated with marine wild capture fisheries. Fish products are a primary source of protein to many Ghanaians, with as much as 75% of catches being processed and consumed locally. Annual fisheries production in Ghana currently meets around 45% of the needs of Ghana's population, with a considerable demand for imported products, mainly from countries like Senegal and Mauritania but also from Europe (countries such as Spain). The historic and subsistence importance of fish in Ghana, and the dependence upon fish imports, raises important policy questions relating to food security and the significance of traditional diet and culture. Artisanal fishing overlaps to an undefined extent with subsistence fishing. The artisanal fisheries, which directly support around 107,000 jobs in Ghana are a loosely defined fleet of low- or unpowered wooden canoes whom mainly target small pelagic stocks. These fisheries are widespread and hard to monitor, partly by dint of their 'open access' nature, which has seemingly led to considerable over-capacity. It is thought that present levels of artisanal fishing are unsustainable, as indicated by falls in some catches. However, strain on the artisanal sector could be the result of potential stock catch being taken by other sectors, such as the semi-industrial sector. The so-called 'Saiko' trade, where industrial trawlers sell bycatch to indigenous fishermen therefore illegally landing bycatch from trawl vessels. This seriously undermines efforts to improve sustainability in the legal fishery. In 2017 it was estimated that around 100 kilotonnes of fish product was landed, equivalent to 40% of the production of the artisanal sector, creating a considerable loss of state revenue and fishing opportunities for legal Ghanaian fishers. To address these challenges, Ghana's government is seeking to use an ecosystem-based management approach to recognize the full array of factors (including humans) and interactions (e.g., between organisms) relevant for fisheries development (https://mofad.gov.gh/fisheries-management-plan-of-ghana-2015-2019 , also see Ghana News Agency report, 07.09.2017). As in many developing countries, the legislation (e.g., Ghana Fisheries Act 625) requiring ecosystem-based fisheries management was developed ahead of the science needed to assess fisheries for the combined effect of global change factors. Presently, most studies address issues concerning individual global change factors alone. As a consequence, knowledge, particularly on how feedback interactions between multiple global change factors affect key fish stocks is limited. Our research aims to contribute to this need to help improve the science basis for ecosystem based management targets outlined in Ghana's Fisheries Management Plan. Crucially, we aim to ensure that these are co-developed and implemented with artisanal fisher views, and consideration of the impact on their livelihoods (including consideration to supplementary livelihoods). To achieve this, area based management approaches must be implemented through a pluralistic legal framework accounting for both customary and national law. Towards achieving this, this multidisciplinary partnerships seeks to co-develop in partnership with key stakeholders: 1. A suite of tools to support integrated ecosystem-based marine spatial planning. 2. A pluralistic legal framework that is based on inclusive and participatory processes. 3. 'Solutions' to support the enforcement and compliance of fisheries laws. 4. Participatory approaches/methods for exploring alternative livelihoods to support poverty alleviation and enhanced wellbeing of artisanal fishing communities The One Ocean Hub provides the infrastructure and networks to bring together researchers from University of Cape Coast, (including physical geographers, fisheries scientists, sociologists, and law researchers), together with fisheries and environmental science expertise from the UK (Centre of environment, fisheries, and aquaculture science (Cefas), Scottish Association for Marine Science, Herriot Watt University, University of Strathclyde), and provides the research forum to engage with relevant fisheries authorities in the Government of Ghana, namely the Fisheries Commission, and the Environment Protection Authority. In addition, the One Ocean Hub flexible fund enables the Hub to be adaptive and responsive to in-country needs and seek partnerships with organisations with relevant expertise and influence that contribute to the Hub's impact goals. In addition to the partnerships included in the original Hub proposal, a new flexible fund project has begun (Dec 2020) which brings together researchers from University of Strathclyde (UK), University of Cape Coast (Ghana), and University of Energy and Natural Resources (Ghana), to address current challenges in hydrodynamic and ecosystem modelling capability in Ghana.
Collaborator Contribution The Fishery Management Plan for Ghana (2015-19) explicitly considers the need to establish area-based management tools (ABMTs, including marine protected areas), in line with its obligations to the Convention on Biological Diversity. Our partners in the Environmental Protection Agency and Ghanaian Fisheries Commission have provided insight into the data gaps have necessitated a reliance on a precautionary approach. A precautionary approach is not effective at guiding specific decisions. The specific goals of ABMTs under the current fishery management plan are not clear. Furthermore, marine protected areas are not a panacea for improved fisheries management, without a concomitant decline in fishing effort, improvements to stock status or fisheries yields should not be expected. Our ongoing partnership will mean that we will have access to historic data and an ability to influence fisheries policy. In addition, in 2020, researchers at the University of Cape Coast Ghana, began a partnership with the Ghana Tourism Authority to develop plans and approaches towards using marine tourism as an alternative livelihood strategy, to be responsive to any change in access to fish stocks. In order to inform difference management scenarios, Prof Mike Heath (University of Strathclyde) will bring expertise and experience in ecosystem modelling (including through the application of the Strath E2E modelling method) to Ghana, in order to develop an ecosystem model of the Ghana shelf for use by in-country partners, in particular Ghana Fisheries Commission and Environment Protection Authority, in the management of Ghanaian marine resources. In developing this model, Prof Heath identified a gap in the provision of hydrodynamic data. The One Ocean Hub has provided flexible funds to enable a new collaboration with the University of Energy and Natural Resources (UENR) to address this gap and enable the ongoing development of the ecosystem model for the Ghana shelf system. This new collaboration was developed under the Hub between University of Strathclyde (UK), University of Cape Coast (Ghana), and University of Energy and Natural Resources (Ghana), in response to a need to develop a hydrodynamic and ecosystem modelling capability in Ghana. The capacity to model ocean currents, sea-levels, temperature and salinity, is a key national capability for a maritime nation state. Access to these data is essential for rapid response to pollution events such as oil spills so as to direct resources to tackle the emergency; prediction of storm surges (especially for nations with low-lying coastal terrain); tracking the dispersal of litter; supporting advances in seabed habitat mapping and management; definition of connectivity between marine protected areas, and ecological understanding. Ghana is currently lacking this national capability. Despite the extensive offshore oil industry, only one scientific publication on hydrodynamic modelling in Ghana waters is available - Uba, F. et al. 2020. CFD modelling and analysis of the trajectory and behaviour of oil pollutant particles in the Ghanaian territorial waters. Scientific African 8 (2020) e00411. The 8-day model run reported in this publication was carried out on a borrowed computer which is no longer available, and the raw data are no longer accessible. Re-starting this hydrodynamic modelling capability (with the author of the paper cited above) at the University of Energy and Natural Resources (UENR), Sunyani, and helping to secure it for the future will be a valuable contribution to improving Ghana's national capability in the marine field. Given the extensive offshore oil industry and importance of the marine environment to the Ghana economy it is important that the skills needed to respond to emergencies are available in-country. Re-starting the hydrodynamic modelling capability will contribute essential data products for One Ocean Hub objectives in. These data products (3-dimensional velocity fields) are needed to enable seabed habitat mapping, and specification of proposed marine protected areas. UENR will therefore re-start this hydrodynamic modelling capability and provide the resulting data to be incorporated into the One Ocean Hub ecosystem modelling activity.
Impact Cook, R; Acheampong E; Aggrey-Fynn J; Heath M. A fleet based surplus production model that accounts for increases in fishing power with application to two West African pelagic stocks. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 2021 (in press) Outputs In progress • Metageodatabase of Ghana's marine ecosystem. This database is being developed in partnership between Cefas (UK), University of Cape Coast, and the Environment Protection Authority (Ghana), and once developed will be hosted by the University of Cape Coast. • Ecosystem model of Ghana shelf Progress towards key outcomes In developing the 4 key outputs listed under 'contributions', we aim to increase capacity to implement these outputs to support integrated and sustainable ocean governance and sustainable livelihoods in Ghana. In achieving this, we are developing the networks to support capacity development, and co-developing these outputs with key stakeholders such that they are appropriately designed for immediate deployment. For example, the Environment Protection Authority has provided substantive inputs on 3 occasions to the design and scope of the metageodatabase, and has provided historic data for inclusion. A high level policy dialogue event was planned for April 2020 which sought to bring together relevant Ministries to engage them on the proposed Marine Spatial Plan (MSP) for Ghana, with the specific objectives to: • Seek policy coherence and to promote co-existence among maritime economic activities, as well as the protection of the marine environment • To demonstrate how the proposed MSP will promote a blue economy for Ghana This event will be rescheduled in 2021 provided COVID-19 restrictions allow.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Sustainable and Equitable Fisheries - GHANA 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Department Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences (HaSS)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Around 10% of Ghana's jobs are directly related to fish production, the vast majority of which are associated with marine wild capture fisheries. Fish products are a primary source of protein to many Ghanaians, with as much as 75% of catches being processed and consumed locally. Annual fisheries production in Ghana currently meets around 45% of the needs of Ghana's population, with a considerable demand for imported products, mainly from countries like Senegal and Mauritania but also from Europe (countries such as Spain). The historic and subsistence importance of fish in Ghana, and the dependence upon fish imports, raises important policy questions relating to food security and the significance of traditional diet and culture. Artisanal fishing overlaps to an undefined extent with subsistence fishing. The artisanal fisheries, which directly support around 107,000 jobs in Ghana are a loosely defined fleet of low- or unpowered wooden canoes whom mainly target small pelagic stocks. These fisheries are widespread and hard to monitor, partly by dint of their 'open access' nature, which has seemingly led to considerable over-capacity. It is thought that present levels of artisanal fishing are unsustainable, as indicated by falls in some catches. However, strain on the artisanal sector could be the result of potential stock catch being taken by other sectors, such as the semi-industrial sector. The so-called 'Saiko' trade, where industrial trawlers sell bycatch to indigenous fishermen therefore illegally landing bycatch from trawl vessels. This seriously undermines efforts to improve sustainability in the legal fishery. In 2017 it was estimated that around 100 kilotonnes of fish product was landed, equivalent to 40% of the production of the artisanal sector, creating a considerable loss of state revenue and fishing opportunities for legal Ghanaian fishers. To address these challenges, Ghana's government is seeking to use an ecosystem-based management approach to recognize the full array of factors (including humans) and interactions (e.g., between organisms) relevant for fisheries development (https://mofad.gov.gh/fisheries-management-plan-of-ghana-2015-2019 , also see Ghana News Agency report, 07.09.2017). As in many developing countries, the legislation (e.g., Ghana Fisheries Act 625) requiring ecosystem-based fisheries management was developed ahead of the science needed to assess fisheries for the combined effect of global change factors. Presently, most studies address issues concerning individual global change factors alone. As a consequence, knowledge, particularly on how feedback interactions between multiple global change factors affect key fish stocks is limited. Our research aims to contribute to this need to help improve the science basis for ecosystem based management targets outlined in Ghana's Fisheries Management Plan. Crucially, we aim to ensure that these are co-developed and implemented with artisanal fisher views, and consideration of the impact on their livelihoods (including consideration to supplementary livelihoods). To achieve this, area based management approaches must be implemented through a pluralistic legal framework accounting for both customary and national law. Towards achieving this, this multidisciplinary partnerships seeks to co-develop in partnership with key stakeholders: 1. A suite of tools to support integrated ecosystem-based marine spatial planning. 2. A pluralistic legal framework that is based on inclusive and participatory processes. 3. 'Solutions' to support the enforcement and compliance of fisheries laws. 4. Participatory approaches/methods for exploring alternative livelihoods to support poverty alleviation and enhanced wellbeing of artisanal fishing communities The One Ocean Hub provides the infrastructure and networks to bring together researchers from University of Cape Coast, (including physical geographers, fisheries scientists, sociologists, and law researchers), together with fisheries and environmental science expertise from the UK (Centre of environment, fisheries, and aquaculture science (Cefas), Scottish Association for Marine Science, Herriot Watt University, University of Strathclyde), and provides the research forum to engage with relevant fisheries authorities in the Government of Ghana, namely the Fisheries Commission, and the Environment Protection Authority. In addition, the One Ocean Hub flexible fund enables the Hub to be adaptive and responsive to in-country needs and seek partnerships with organisations with relevant expertise and influence that contribute to the Hub's impact goals. In addition to the partnerships included in the original Hub proposal, a new flexible fund project has begun (Dec 2020) which brings together researchers from University of Strathclyde (UK), University of Cape Coast (Ghana), and University of Energy and Natural Resources (Ghana), to address current challenges in hydrodynamic and ecosystem modelling capability in Ghana.
Collaborator Contribution The Fishery Management Plan for Ghana (2015-19) explicitly considers the need to establish area-based management tools (ABMTs, including marine protected areas), in line with its obligations to the Convention on Biological Diversity. Our partners in the Environmental Protection Agency and Ghanaian Fisheries Commission have provided insight into the data gaps have necessitated a reliance on a precautionary approach. A precautionary approach is not effective at guiding specific decisions. The specific goals of ABMTs under the current fishery management plan are not clear. Furthermore, marine protected areas are not a panacea for improved fisheries management, without a concomitant decline in fishing effort, improvements to stock status or fisheries yields should not be expected. Our ongoing partnership will mean that we will have access to historic data and an ability to influence fisheries policy. In addition, in 2020, researchers at the University of Cape Coast Ghana, began a partnership with the Ghana Tourism Authority to develop plans and approaches towards using marine tourism as an alternative livelihood strategy, to be responsive to any change in access to fish stocks. In order to inform difference management scenarios, Prof Mike Heath (University of Strathclyde) will bring expertise and experience in ecosystem modelling (including through the application of the Strath E2E modelling method) to Ghana, in order to develop an ecosystem model of the Ghana shelf for use by in-country partners, in particular Ghana Fisheries Commission and Environment Protection Authority, in the management of Ghanaian marine resources. In developing this model, Prof Heath identified a gap in the provision of hydrodynamic data. The One Ocean Hub has provided flexible funds to enable a new collaboration with the University of Energy and Natural Resources (UENR) to address this gap and enable the ongoing development of the ecosystem model for the Ghana shelf system. This new collaboration was developed under the Hub between University of Strathclyde (UK), University of Cape Coast (Ghana), and University of Energy and Natural Resources (Ghana), in response to a need to develop a hydrodynamic and ecosystem modelling capability in Ghana. The capacity to model ocean currents, sea-levels, temperature and salinity, is a key national capability for a maritime nation state. Access to these data is essential for rapid response to pollution events such as oil spills so as to direct resources to tackle the emergency; prediction of storm surges (especially for nations with low-lying coastal terrain); tracking the dispersal of litter; supporting advances in seabed habitat mapping and management; definition of connectivity between marine protected areas, and ecological understanding. Ghana is currently lacking this national capability. Despite the extensive offshore oil industry, only one scientific publication on hydrodynamic modelling in Ghana waters is available - Uba, F. et al. 2020. CFD modelling and analysis of the trajectory and behaviour of oil pollutant particles in the Ghanaian territorial waters. Scientific African 8 (2020) e00411. The 8-day model run reported in this publication was carried out on a borrowed computer which is no longer available, and the raw data are no longer accessible. Re-starting this hydrodynamic modelling capability (with the author of the paper cited above) at the University of Energy and Natural Resources (UENR), Sunyani, and helping to secure it for the future will be a valuable contribution to improving Ghana's national capability in the marine field. Given the extensive offshore oil industry and importance of the marine environment to the Ghana economy it is important that the skills needed to respond to emergencies are available in-country. Re-starting the hydrodynamic modelling capability will contribute essential data products for One Ocean Hub objectives in. These data products (3-dimensional velocity fields) are needed to enable seabed habitat mapping, and specification of proposed marine protected areas. UENR will therefore re-start this hydrodynamic modelling capability and provide the resulting data to be incorporated into the One Ocean Hub ecosystem modelling activity.
Impact Cook, R; Acheampong E; Aggrey-Fynn J; Heath M. A fleet based surplus production model that accounts for increases in fishing power with application to two West African pelagic stocks. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 2021 (in press) Outputs In progress • Metageodatabase of Ghana's marine ecosystem. This database is being developed in partnership between Cefas (UK), University of Cape Coast, and the Environment Protection Authority (Ghana), and once developed will be hosted by the University of Cape Coast. • Ecosystem model of Ghana shelf Progress towards key outcomes In developing the 4 key outputs listed under 'contributions', we aim to increase capacity to implement these outputs to support integrated and sustainable ocean governance and sustainable livelihoods in Ghana. In achieving this, we are developing the networks to support capacity development, and co-developing these outputs with key stakeholders such that they are appropriately designed for immediate deployment. For example, the Environment Protection Authority has provided substantive inputs on 3 occasions to the design and scope of the metageodatabase, and has provided historic data for inclusion. A high level policy dialogue event was planned for April 2020 which sought to bring together relevant Ministries to engage them on the proposed Marine Spatial Plan (MSP) for Ghana, with the specific objectives to: • Seek policy coherence and to promote co-existence among maritime economic activities, as well as the protection of the marine environment • To demonstrate how the proposed MSP will promote a blue economy for Ghana This event will be rescheduled in 2021 provided COVID-19 restrictions allow.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Sustaining South Africa's Small Scale Fishing Communities: Balancing multiple fisheries and the blue economy 
Organisation Durban University of Technology
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Small-scale fisheries (SSFs) play a critical role in contributing to food security, poverty alleviation and rural development globally. In South Africa, there exist at least 147 fishing communities, comprising approximating 30,000 households, approximately 53% of which are found to be food insecure (Sowman 2006). Supporting and enabling sustainable subsistence fishing is critical to addressing widespread issues of food insecurity and poverty among South Africa's fishing communities. Work Package Zero (WP0) of the One Ocean Hub identified multiple complex and connected challenges facing small-scale fishers (SSFs) in South Africa, notably: • Access to resources: due to competition with the recreational sector (a sector with 730k participants annually, and which holds disproportionate access to marine resources) and the commercial fishing industry • Access to coast: coastal developments (which have increased in both number and development rate under the South Africa Government's 'Operational Phakisa') have reduced the ability of, or even prevented, SSFs and other coastal communities from accessing the coast • Lack of recognition of customary rights, leading to multiple rights violations • Inadequate public participation in decision-making spaces on marine management, resulting in the rights and views of SSFs and coastal communities being overlooked and dismissed At the root cause of these issues is an apparent disjuncture between policy rhetoric, decision making, and implementation and management of those decision outcomes on the ground. These issues cut across multiple ocean sectors, creating multiple connected tensions between SSFs, coastal communities and recreational fishers, and other blue economy developments, most notably the extractive industries (both onshore coastal mining, and offshore mineral and oil and gas extraction). During WP0, the Hub's Empatheatre project (led by Rhodes University Environmental Learning Research Centre) identified that in the face of these challenges, SSFs and coastal communities lacked the capacity, knowledge and access to support networks to engage and challenge decisions which affected their access to coast and resources, placing them in a position of food insecurity and poverty, as well at times, as being unduly criminalised in attempting to access the coast for food. The Empatheatre project and consultations with civil society partners identified the need and opportunity to develop a Knowledge Action Network (KAN) for citizen monitoring of the Blue Economy in South Africa, and develop a multidisciplinary response to the challenges facing SSFs. The One Ocean Hub provides a forum and infrastructure to bring together cross-sectoral stakeholders together with a multidisciplinary academic network, to work collaboratively to address these challenges. Whilst the academic partners involved were all partners in the original Hub application, most were not proposed to work directly together and collaborate on these issues. The responsive and iterative nature of the Hub work has enabled us to ensure that our research is deeply rooted in the context, and driven by the challenges on the ground at community level. This has also enabled relationships to develop across academic disciplines that, until the Hub, worked in relative isolation in South Africa, and often in conflict with one another (further exacerbating the issue at policy level as recommendations are based on the findings of single disciplines. Bringing together the social sciences, natural science, humanities, and law, the Hub is able to take a holistic multidisciplinary approach to the complex interconnected challenges facing SSFs on the ground in real time, and work directly with the community and civil society groups to build networks of solidarity, and offer solutions that balance conservation, community needs, and economics.
Collaborator Contribution While there are organised groups of fishers responding to fisheries policies and regulations, environmental justice activists responding to extractive industries, conservationists responding to threats to marine biodiversity, these different groups seldom come together, do not all have trusted relationships with researchers, and may even be adversarial towards each other. Lines of race, class, discipline and livelihood concerns are quite firmly entrenched and seldom crossed. The rapid development of the Blue Economy in South Africa, through 'Operation Phakisa', necessitates a more integrated response to ocean governance and health from concerned citizens. An extensive evaluation of a range of KANs found that 'the credibility of knowledge action networks depends to a large extent on the degree to which they include diverse types of knowledge or knowledge systems, the opportunities for these multiple knowledge(s) to interact, and on interactions that distribute power across these multiple knowledge(s). The relevance of KAN for bringing together beneficiaries and academics in addressing the sustainable development challenges of the blue economy was also further discussed at the Port Elizabeth conference on transformed and transformative ocean governance (Jan 2020). To support the KAN development, Durban University of Technology (DUT) have made significant in-kind contributions of time and resources in opening access to civil society networks, data collection and analysis as well as report writing. DUT are now an official project partner of the One Ocean Hub and are continuing to work in-kind towards this initiative, while collaboratively horizon scanning for funding opportunities. This network has grown to include expertise in: • Fisheries law (Nelson Mandela University) directly contributing through Hub resources to understanding the legal tensions between small scale and recreational fisheries in the implementation of the small scale fishing policy in South Africa. • Fisheries science (Rhodes University, Department of Ichthyology and Fisheries Science): examining South Africa's marine recreational fishery, with particular focus on legal tensions with small-scale fishery in the implementation of the South African SSF Policy (in collaboration with NMU), issues of compliance, monitoring and management. • Integrated coastal management and social justice (University of Cape Town): Examining the impacts of the blue economy on coastal communities. Understanding the narratives, strategy and impacts on the ground. • A community-research partnership with 12 fisher leaders (4 women, 8 men) and University of Cape Town (Department of Geography and Environmental Science) has facilitated training of fisher leaders in qualitative research methodologies. Each leader has conducted 10 interviews enabling the team to obtain a snapshot of fishers' views from 120 fishers in all four coastal provinces, and is feeding directly into research under the Hub. Throughout 2020, Rhodes University, Environmental Learning Research Centre, and University of Cape Town (Department of Geography and Environmental Science) have developed a solidarity and learning network with 25 small-scale fisher leaders across multiple provinces and regions of South Africa. This network is supported by the One Ocean Hub through the provision of data to fishers to engage in the network via the social media platform WhatsApp, which is coordinated by Hub researchers. This network was formed in response to the COVID-19 pandemic with the aim to connect fishers and enable sharing of crucial information during the crisis. This network: • Connects fishers across provinces and regions • Provides a deeper understanding of coastal (in)justice • Provides a space for relational networks to grow • Facilitates knowledge flow through informing important meetings, summarising meeting outputs, translating and interpreting information which affects fishers' rights, and access to coast and resource In order to respond to the immediate challenges facing SSFs, this network has connected SSFs with key civil society groups, including legal aid professionals in South Africa. This network effectively acts as a bridge and support mechanism for SSFs in getting the support they need to respond to ongoing challenges. Key civil society organisations contributing to this network include: South Durban Community Environmental Alliance; Centre for Environmental Rights; and Legal Resources Centre.
Impact Key outputs of this collaboration to date: Small Scale Fishing (SSF) Community Capacity building • 12 SSF leaders trained in qualitative research methodologies. A report of the resulting research (based on data from 120 fishers) is currently in development (due mid 2021) • Accessible resources for coastal communities detailing their rights in the context of blue economy developments (these have been produced in both English and isiZulu) • Providing direct support to communities to enable them to respond to written consultations on blue economy developments • Active (ongoing) solidarity and learning network of small -scale fisher leaders from across South Africa. Artistic and Media Outputs • Empatheatre performance Lalela uLwandle (Listen to the Sea): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=apNw1H8CTKY • Lalela uLwandle radio play: https://www.empatheatre.com/listen-to-our-lalela-ulwandle-radio-play • Webinars: o COVID-19 impacts on the South African Small-Scale Fisheries Sectorhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDeJJG3qt0E o Small Scale Fishers and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgdbVNhHf6Q Publication Outputs to date: Cast Out: The Systematic Exclusion of the Kwa-Zulu Natal Subsistence Fishers From The Fishing Rights Regime in South Africa. Sunde, J; Erwin K. Consultancy Policy Research Report for South Durban Community Environmental Alliance. 2021. https://sdcea.co.za/download/cast-out-the-systematic-exclusion-of-the-kwa-zulu-natal-subsistence-fishers-from-the-fishing-rights-regime-in-south-africa/ Sowman, M, and Sunde, J. A Just transition? Navigating the process of policy implementation in small-scale fisheries in South Africa. (in press, Marine Policy) Sunde, J; Pereira, T; Snow, B; Mbatha, P; James, A. Unmasking governance failures: The impact of COVID-19 on small-scale fishing communities in South Africa. (in press, Marine Policy) Van As, H. Poaching of marine living resources: Can the tide be turned? South African Crime Quarterly, 69. 2020. https://doi.org/10.17159/2413-3108/2020/vn69a8351 Van As, H. Admission of guilt fine: a legal shortcut with delayed shock?. South African Crime Quarterly, 69. 2020. https://doi.org/10.17159/2413-3108/2020/vn69a7444 Kevern L. Cochrane, Jessica Eggers, Warwick H.H. Sauer. A diagnosis of the status and effectiveness of marine fisheries management in South Africa based on two representative case studies. Marine Policy, Volume 112, 2020, 103774, ISSN 0308-597X, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpol.2019.103774. Outputs in progress to be completed in 2021 Coastal Justice Network Map: an interactive online map of coastal (in)justice and small scale fishing cooperatives across South Africa and key stakeholder organisations involved Publication on legal tensions between small-scale and recreational fisheries in South Africa Progress towards key outcome goals This collaboration seeks to contribute to the implementation of inclusive, socially & ecologically just participatory processes in marine resource management, Environmental Impact Assessments and climate change mitigation relevant competent South Africa authorities, in partnership with civil society (SDG11.4; 13.3; 14B) Towards achieving this outcome, this collaboration has developed a network of relevant SSF communities across South Africa and civil society partners, whom, together with One Ocean Hub researchers, can make targeted and strategic interventions in policy spaces. Using research findings, the collaborative team will work to make recommendations on: • Redistribution of resources and economic benefits from recreational to subsistence fishing • Methodologies to enable just participation of SSFs in ocean decision making processes • Revision of the South African SSF Policy to facilitate redistribution of resource • Methods for monitoring compliance and management in the recreational fishing sector Through 2021, this collaboration seeks to further strengthen the learning and solidarity networks with SSFs, civil society, and researchers, and progress research in key areas. Innovative methodologies such as Empatheatre will be used through 2022 to facilitate multi-stakeholder dialogues and engage across decision- and policy-making spaces to progress towards transformative ocean governance in South Africa. Disciplines involved: Law; sociology; education; coastal management; fisheries science; art
Start Year 2019
 
Description Sustaining South Africa's Small Scale Fishing Communities: Balancing multiple fisheries and the blue economy 
Organisation Nelson Mandela University
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Small-scale fisheries (SSFs) play a critical role in contributing to food security, poverty alleviation and rural development globally. In South Africa, there exist at least 147 fishing communities, comprising approximating 30,000 households, approximately 53% of which are found to be food insecure (Sowman 2006). Supporting and enabling sustainable subsistence fishing is critical to addressing widespread issues of food insecurity and poverty among South Africa's fishing communities. Work Package Zero (WP0) of the One Ocean Hub identified multiple complex and connected challenges facing small-scale fishers (SSFs) in South Africa, notably: • Access to resources: due to competition with the recreational sector (a sector with 730k participants annually, and which holds disproportionate access to marine resources) and the commercial fishing industry • Access to coast: coastal developments (which have increased in both number and development rate under the South Africa Government's 'Operational Phakisa') have reduced the ability of, or even prevented, SSFs and other coastal communities from accessing the coast • Lack of recognition of customary rights, leading to multiple rights violations • Inadequate public participation in decision-making spaces on marine management, resulting in the rights and views of SSFs and coastal communities being overlooked and dismissed At the root cause of these issues is an apparent disjuncture between policy rhetoric, decision making, and implementation and management of those decision outcomes on the ground. These issues cut across multiple ocean sectors, creating multiple connected tensions between SSFs, coastal communities and recreational fishers, and other blue economy developments, most notably the extractive industries (both onshore coastal mining, and offshore mineral and oil and gas extraction). During WP0, the Hub's Empatheatre project (led by Rhodes University Environmental Learning Research Centre) identified that in the face of these challenges, SSFs and coastal communities lacked the capacity, knowledge and access to support networks to engage and challenge decisions which affected their access to coast and resources, placing them in a position of food insecurity and poverty, as well at times, as being unduly criminalised in attempting to access the coast for food. The Empatheatre project and consultations with civil society partners identified the need and opportunity to develop a Knowledge Action Network (KAN) for citizen monitoring of the Blue Economy in South Africa, and develop a multidisciplinary response to the challenges facing SSFs. The One Ocean Hub provides a forum and infrastructure to bring together cross-sectoral stakeholders together with a multidisciplinary academic network, to work collaboratively to address these challenges. Whilst the academic partners involved were all partners in the original Hub application, most were not proposed to work directly together and collaborate on these issues. The responsive and iterative nature of the Hub work has enabled us to ensure that our research is deeply rooted in the context, and driven by the challenges on the ground at community level. This has also enabled relationships to develop across academic disciplines that, until the Hub, worked in relative isolation in South Africa, and often in conflict with one another (further exacerbating the issue at policy level as recommendations are based on the findings of single disciplines. Bringing together the social sciences, natural science, humanities, and law, the Hub is able to take a holistic multidisciplinary approach to the complex interconnected challenges facing SSFs on the ground in real time, and work directly with the community and civil society groups to build networks of solidarity, and offer solutions that balance conservation, community needs, and economics.
Collaborator Contribution While there are organised groups of fishers responding to fisheries policies and regulations, environmental justice activists responding to extractive industries, conservationists responding to threats to marine biodiversity, these different groups seldom come together, do not all have trusted relationships with researchers, and may even be adversarial towards each other. Lines of race, class, discipline and livelihood concerns are quite firmly entrenched and seldom crossed. The rapid development of the Blue Economy in South Africa, through 'Operation Phakisa', necessitates a more integrated response to ocean governance and health from concerned citizens. An extensive evaluation of a range of KANs found that 'the credibility of knowledge action networks depends to a large extent on the degree to which they include diverse types of knowledge or knowledge systems, the opportunities for these multiple knowledge(s) to interact, and on interactions that distribute power across these multiple knowledge(s). The relevance of KAN for bringing together beneficiaries and academics in addressing the sustainable development challenges of the blue economy was also further discussed at the Port Elizabeth conference on transformed and transformative ocean governance (Jan 2020). To support the KAN development, Durban University of Technology (DUT) have made significant in-kind contributions of time and resources in opening access to civil society networks, data collection and analysis as well as report writing. DUT are now an official project partner of the One Ocean Hub and are continuing to work in-kind towards this initiative, while collaboratively horizon scanning for funding opportunities. This network has grown to include expertise in: • Fisheries law (Nelson Mandela University) directly contributing through Hub resources to understanding the legal tensions between small scale and recreational fisheries in the implementation of the small scale fishing policy in South Africa. • Fisheries science (Rhodes University, Department of Ichthyology and Fisheries Science): examining South Africa's marine recreational fishery, with particular focus on legal tensions with small-scale fishery in the implementation of the South African SSF Policy (in collaboration with NMU), issues of compliance, monitoring and management. • Integrated coastal management and social justice (University of Cape Town): Examining the impacts of the blue economy on coastal communities. Understanding the narratives, strategy and impacts on the ground. • A community-research partnership with 12 fisher leaders (4 women, 8 men) and University of Cape Town (Department of Geography and Environmental Science) has facilitated training of fisher leaders in qualitative research methodologies. Each leader has conducted 10 interviews enabling the team to obtain a snapshot of fishers' views from 120 fishers in all four coastal provinces, and is feeding directly into research under the Hub. Throughout 2020, Rhodes University, Environmental Learning Research Centre, and University of Cape Town (Department of Geography and Environmental Science) have developed a solidarity and learning network with 25 small-scale fisher leaders across multiple provinces and regions of South Africa. This network is supported by the One Ocean Hub through the provision of data to fishers to engage in the network via the social media platform WhatsApp, which is coordinated by Hub researchers. This network was formed in response to the COVID-19 pandemic with the aim to connect fishers and enable sharing of crucial information during the crisis. This network: • Connects fishers across provinces and regions • Provides a deeper understanding of coastal (in)justice • Provides a space for relational networks to grow • Facilitates knowledge flow through informing important meetings, summarising meeting outputs, translating and interpreting information which affects fishers' rights, and access to coast and resource In order to respond to the immediate challenges facing SSFs, this network has connected SSFs with key civil society groups, including legal aid professionals in South Africa. This network effectively acts as a bridge and support mechanism for SSFs in getting the support they need to respond to ongoing challenges. Key civil society organisations contributing to this network include: South Durban Community Environmental Alliance; Centre for Environmental Rights; and Legal Resources Centre.
Impact Key outputs of this collaboration to date: Small Scale Fishing (SSF) Community Capacity building • 12 SSF leaders trained in qualitative research methodologies. A report of the resulting research (based on data from 120 fishers) is currently in development (due mid 2021) • Accessible resources for coastal communities detailing their rights in the context of blue economy developments (these have been produced in both English and isiZulu) • Providing direct support to communities to enable them to respond to written consultations on blue economy developments • Active (ongoing) solidarity and learning network of small -scale fisher leaders from across South Africa. Artistic and Media Outputs • Empatheatre performance Lalela uLwandle (Listen to the Sea): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=apNw1H8CTKY • Lalela uLwandle radio play: https://www.empatheatre.com/listen-to-our-lalela-ulwandle-radio-play • Webinars: o COVID-19 impacts on the South African Small-Scale Fisheries Sectorhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDeJJG3qt0E o Small Scale Fishers and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgdbVNhHf6Q Publication Outputs to date: Cast Out: The Systematic Exclusion of the Kwa-Zulu Natal Subsistence Fishers From The Fishing Rights Regime in South Africa. Sunde, J; Erwin K. Consultancy Policy Research Report for South Durban Community Environmental Alliance. 2021. https://sdcea.co.za/download/cast-out-the-systematic-exclusion-of-the-kwa-zulu-natal-subsistence-fishers-from-the-fishing-rights-regime-in-south-africa/ Sowman, M, and Sunde, J. A Just transition? Navigating the process of policy implementation in small-scale fisheries in South Africa. (in press, Marine Policy) Sunde, J; Pereira, T; Snow, B; Mbatha, P; James, A. Unmasking governance failures: The impact of COVID-19 on small-scale fishing communities in South Africa. (in press, Marine Policy) Van As, H. Poaching of marine living resources: Can the tide be turned? South African Crime Quarterly, 69. 2020. https://doi.org/10.17159/2413-3108/2020/vn69a8351 Van As, H. Admission of guilt fine: a legal shortcut with delayed shock?. South African Crime Quarterly, 69. 2020. https://doi.org/10.17159/2413-3108/2020/vn69a7444 Kevern L. Cochrane, Jessica Eggers, Warwick H.H. Sauer. A diagnosis of the status and effectiveness of marine fisheries management in South Africa based on two representative case studies. Marine Policy, Volume 112, 2020, 103774, ISSN 0308-597X, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpol.2019.103774. Outputs in progress to be completed in 2021 Coastal Justice Network Map: an interactive online map of coastal (in)justice and small scale fishing cooperatives across South Africa and key stakeholder organisations involved Publication on legal tensions between small-scale and recreational fisheries in South Africa Progress towards key outcome goals This collaboration seeks to contribute to the implementation of inclusive, socially & ecologically just participatory processes in marine resource management, Environmental Impact Assessments and climate change mitigation relevant competent South Africa authorities, in partnership with civil society (SDG11.4; 13.3; 14B) Towards achieving this outcome, this collaboration has developed a network of relevant SSF communities across South Africa and civil society partners, whom, together with One Ocean Hub researchers, can make targeted and strategic interventions in policy spaces. Using research findings, the collaborative team will work to make recommendations on: • Redistribution of resources and economic benefits from recreational to subsistence fishing • Methodologies to enable just participation of SSFs in ocean decision making processes • Revision of the South African SSF Policy to facilitate redistribution of resource • Methods for monitoring compliance and management in the recreational fishing sector Through 2021, this collaboration seeks to further strengthen the learning and solidarity networks with SSFs, civil society, and researchers, and progress research in key areas. Innovative methodologies such as Empatheatre will be used through 2022 to facilitate multi-stakeholder dialogues and engage across decision- and policy-making spaces to progress towards transformative ocean governance in South Africa. Disciplines involved: Law; sociology; education; coastal management; fisheries science; art
Start Year 2019
 
Description Sustaining South Africa's Small Scale Fishing Communities: Balancing multiple fisheries and the blue economy 
Organisation Rhodes University
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Small-scale fisheries (SSFs) play a critical role in contributing to food security, poverty alleviation and rural development globally. In South Africa, there exist at least 147 fishing communities, comprising approximating 30,000 households, approximately 53% of which are found to be food insecure (Sowman 2006). Supporting and enabling sustainable subsistence fishing is critical to addressing widespread issues of food insecurity and poverty among South Africa's fishing communities. Work Package Zero (WP0) of the One Ocean Hub identified multiple complex and connected challenges facing small-scale fishers (SSFs) in South Africa, notably: • Access to resources: due to competition with the recreational sector (a sector with 730k participants annually, and which holds disproportionate access to marine resources) and the commercial fishing industry • Access to coast: coastal developments (which have increased in both number and development rate under the South Africa Government's 'Operational Phakisa') have reduced the ability of, or even prevented, SSFs and other coastal communities from accessing the coast • Lack of recognition of customary rights, leading to multiple rights violations • Inadequate public participation in decision-making spaces on marine management, resulting in the rights and views of SSFs and coastal communities being overlooked and dismissed At the root cause of these issues is an apparent disjuncture between policy rhetoric, decision making, and implementation and management of those decision outcomes on the ground. These issues cut across multiple ocean sectors, creating multiple connected tensions between SSFs, coastal communities and recreational fishers, and other blue economy developments, most notably the extractive industries (both onshore coastal mining, and offshore mineral and oil and gas extraction). During WP0, the Hub's Empatheatre project (led by Rhodes University Environmental Learning Research Centre) identified that in the face of these challenges, SSFs and coastal communities lacked the capacity, knowledge and access to support networks to engage and challenge decisions which affected their access to coast and resources, placing them in a position of food insecurity and poverty, as well at times, as being unduly criminalised in attempting to access the coast for food. The Empatheatre project and consultations with civil society partners identified the need and opportunity to develop a Knowledge Action Network (KAN) for citizen monitoring of the Blue Economy in South Africa, and develop a multidisciplinary response to the challenges facing SSFs. The One Ocean Hub provides a forum and infrastructure to bring together cross-sectoral stakeholders together with a multidisciplinary academic network, to work collaboratively to address these challenges. Whilst the academic partners involved were all partners in the original Hub application, most were not proposed to work directly together and collaborate on these issues. The responsive and iterative nature of the Hub work has enabled us to ensure that our research is deeply rooted in the context, and driven by the challenges on the ground at community level. This has also enabled relationships to develop across academic disciplines that, until the Hub, worked in relative isolation in South Africa, and often in conflict with one another (further exacerbating the issue at policy level as recommendations are based on the findings of single disciplines. Bringing together the social sciences, natural science, humanities, and law, the Hub is able to take a holistic multidisciplinary approach to the complex interconnected challenges facing SSFs on the ground in real time, and work directly with the community and civil society groups to build networks of solidarity, and offer solutions that balance conservation, community needs, and economics.
Collaborator Contribution While there are organised groups of fishers responding to fisheries policies and regulations, environmental justice activists responding to extractive industries, conservationists responding to threats to marine biodiversity, these different groups seldom come together, do not all have trusted relationships with researchers, and may even be adversarial towards each other. Lines of race, class, discipline and livelihood concerns are quite firmly entrenched and seldom crossed. The rapid development of the Blue Economy in South Africa, through 'Operation Phakisa', necessitates a more integrated response to ocean governance and health from concerned citizens. An extensive evaluation of a range of KANs found that 'the credibility of knowledge action networks depends to a large extent on the degree to which they include diverse types of knowledge or knowledge systems, the opportunities for these multiple knowledge(s) to interact, and on interactions that distribute power across these multiple knowledge(s). The relevance of KAN for bringing together beneficiaries and academics in addressing the sustainable development challenges of the blue economy was also further discussed at the Port Elizabeth conference on transformed and transformative ocean governance (Jan 2020). To support the KAN development, Durban University of Technology (DUT) have made significant in-kind contributions of time and resources in opening access to civil society networks, data collection and analysis as well as report writing. DUT are now an official project partner of the One Ocean Hub and are continuing to work in-kind towards this initiative, while collaboratively horizon scanning for funding opportunities. This network has grown to include expertise in: • Fisheries law (Nelson Mandela University) directly contributing through Hub resources to understanding the legal tensions between small scale and recreational fisheries in the implementation of the small scale fishing policy in South Africa. • Fisheries science (Rhodes University, Department of Ichthyology and Fisheries Science): examining South Africa's marine recreational fishery, with particular focus on legal tensions with small-scale fishery in the implementation of the South African SSF Policy (in collaboration with NMU), issues of compliance, monitoring and management. • Integrated coastal management and social justice (University of Cape Town): Examining the impacts of the blue economy on coastal communities. Understanding the narratives, strategy and impacts on the ground. • A community-research partnership with 12 fisher leaders (4 women, 8 men) and University of Cape Town (Department of Geography and Environmental Science) has facilitated training of fisher leaders in qualitative research methodologies. Each leader has conducted 10 interviews enabling the team to obtain a snapshot of fishers' views from 120 fishers in all four coastal provinces, and is feeding directly into research under the Hub. Throughout 2020, Rhodes University, Environmental Learning Research Centre, and University of Cape Town (Department of Geography and Environmental Science) have developed a solidarity and learning network with 25 small-scale fisher leaders across multiple provinces and regions of South Africa. This network is supported by the One Ocean Hub through the provision of data to fishers to engage in the network via the social media platform WhatsApp, which is coordinated by Hub researchers. This network was formed in response to the COVID-19 pandemic with the aim to connect fishers and enable sharing of crucial information during the crisis. This network: • Connects fishers across provinces and regions • Provides a deeper understanding of coastal (in)justice • Provides a space for relational networks to grow • Facilitates knowledge flow through informing important meetings, summarising meeting outputs, translating and interpreting information which affects fishers' rights, and access to coast and resource In order to respond to the immediate challenges facing SSFs, this network has connected SSFs with key civil society groups, including legal aid professionals in South Africa. This network effectively acts as a bridge and support mechanism for SSFs in getting the support they need to respond to ongoing challenges. Key civil society organisations contributing to this network include: South Durban Community Environmental Alliance; Centre for Environmental Rights; and Legal Resources Centre.
Impact Key outputs of this collaboration to date: Small Scale Fishing (SSF) Community Capacity building • 12 SSF leaders trained in qualitative research methodologies. A report of the resulting research (based on data from 120 fishers) is currently in development (due mid 2021) • Accessible resources for coastal communities detailing their rights in the context of blue economy developments (these have been produced in both English and isiZulu) • Providing direct support to communities to enable them to respond to written consultations on blue economy developments • Active (ongoing) solidarity and learning network of small -scale fisher leaders from across South Africa. Artistic and Media Outputs • Empatheatre performance Lalela uLwandle (Listen to the Sea): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=apNw1H8CTKY • Lalela uLwandle radio play: https://www.empatheatre.com/listen-to-our-lalela-ulwandle-radio-play • Webinars: o COVID-19 impacts on the South African Small-Scale Fisheries Sectorhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDeJJG3qt0E o Small Scale Fishers and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgdbVNhHf6Q Publication Outputs to date: Cast Out: The Systematic Exclusion of the Kwa-Zulu Natal Subsistence Fishers From The Fishing Rights Regime in South Africa. Sunde, J; Erwin K. Consultancy Policy Research Report for South Durban Community Environmental Alliance. 2021. https://sdcea.co.za/download/cast-out-the-systematic-exclusion-of-the-kwa-zulu-natal-subsistence-fishers-from-the-fishing-rights-regime-in-south-africa/ Sowman, M, and Sunde, J. A Just transition? Navigating the process of policy implementation in small-scale fisheries in South Africa. (in press, Marine Policy) Sunde, J; Pereira, T; Snow, B; Mbatha, P; James, A. Unmasking governance failures: The impact of COVID-19 on small-scale fishing communities in South Africa. (in press, Marine Policy) Van As, H. Poaching of marine living resources: Can the tide be turned? South African Crime Quarterly, 69. 2020. https://doi.org/10.17159/2413-3108/2020/vn69a8351 Van As, H. Admission of guilt fine: a legal shortcut with delayed shock?. South African Crime Quarterly, 69. 2020. https://doi.org/10.17159/2413-3108/2020/vn69a7444 Kevern L. Cochrane, Jessica Eggers, Warwick H.H. Sauer. A diagnosis of the status and effectiveness of marine fisheries management in South Africa based on two representative case studies. Marine Policy, Volume 112, 2020, 103774, ISSN 0308-597X, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpol.2019.103774. Outputs in progress to be completed in 2021 Coastal Justice Network Map: an interactive online map of coastal (in)justice and small scale fishing cooperatives across South Africa and key stakeholder organisations involved Publication on legal tensions between small-scale and recreational fisheries in South Africa Progress towards key outcome goals This collaboration seeks to contribute to the implementation of inclusive, socially & ecologically just participatory processes in marine resource management, Environmental Impact Assessments and climate change mitigation relevant competent South Africa authorities, in partnership with civil society (SDG11.4; 13.3; 14B) Towards achieving this outcome, this collaboration has developed a network of relevant SSF communities across South Africa and civil society partners, whom, together with One Ocean Hub researchers, can make targeted and strategic interventions in policy spaces. Using research findings, the collaborative team will work to make recommendations on: • Redistribution of resources and economic benefits from recreational to subsistence fishing • Methodologies to enable just participation of SSFs in ocean decision making processes • Revision of the South African SSF Policy to facilitate redistribution of resource • Methods for monitoring compliance and management in the recreational fishing sector Through 2021, this collaboration seeks to further strengthen the learning and solidarity networks with SSFs, civil society, and researchers, and progress research in key areas. Innovative methodologies such as Empatheatre will be used through 2022 to facilitate multi-stakeholder dialogues and engage across decision- and policy-making spaces to progress towards transformative ocean governance in South Africa. Disciplines involved: Law; sociology; education; coastal management; fisheries science; art
Start Year 2019
 
Description Sustaining South Africa's Small Scale Fishing Communities: Balancing multiple fisheries and the blue economy 
Organisation South Durban Community Environmental Alliance
Country South Africa 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Small-scale fisheries (SSFs) play a critical role in contributing to food security, poverty alleviation and rural development globally. In South Africa, there exist at least 147 fishing communities, comprising approximating 30,000 households, approximately 53% of which are found to be food insecure (Sowman 2006). Supporting and enabling sustainable subsistence fishing is critical to addressing widespread issues of food insecurity and poverty among South Africa's fishing communities. Work Package Zero (WP0) of the One Ocean Hub identified multiple complex and connected challenges facing small-scale fishers (SSFs) in South Africa, notably: • Access to resources: due to competition with the recreational sector (a sector with 730k participants annually, and which holds disproportionate access to marine resources) and the commercial fishing industry • Access to coast: coastal developments (which have increased in both number and development rate under the South Africa Government's 'Operational Phakisa') have reduced the ability of, or even prevented, SSFs and other coastal communities from accessing the coast • Lack of recognition of customary rights, leading to multiple rights violations • Inadequate public participation in decision-making spaces on marine management, resulting in the rights and views of SSFs and coastal communities being overlooked and dismissed At the root cause of these issues is an apparent disjuncture between policy rhetoric, decision making, and implementation and management of those decision outcomes on the ground. These issues cut across multiple ocean sectors, creating multiple connected tensions between SSFs, coastal communities and recreational fishers, and other blue economy developments, most notably the extractive industries (both onshore coastal mining, and offshore mineral and oil and gas extraction). During WP0, the Hub's Empatheatre project (led by Rhodes University Environmental Learning Research Centre) identified that in the face of these challenges, SSFs and coastal communities lacked the capacity, knowledge and access to support networks to engage and challenge decisions which affected their access to coast and resources, placing them in a position of food insecurity and poverty, as well at times, as being unduly criminalised in attempting to access the coast for food. The Empatheatre project and consultations with civil society partners identified the need and opportunity to develop a Knowledge Action Network (KAN) for citizen monitoring of the Blue Economy in South Africa, and develop a multidisciplinary response to the challenges facing SSFs. The One Ocean Hub provides a forum and infrastructure to bring together cross-sectoral stakeholders together with a multidisciplinary academic network, to work collaboratively to address these challenges. Whilst the academic partners involved were all partners in the original Hub application, most were not proposed to work directly together and collaborate on these issues. The responsive and iterative nature of the Hub work has enabled us to ensure that our research is deeply rooted in the context, and driven by the challenges on the ground at community level. This has also enabled relationships to develop across academic disciplines that, until the Hub, worked in relative isolation in South Africa, and often in conflict with one another (further exacerbating the issue at policy level as recommendations are based on the findings of single disciplines. Bringing together the social sciences, natural science, humanities, and law, the Hub is able to take a holistic multidisciplinary approach to the complex interconnected challenges facing SSFs on the ground in real time, and work directly with the community and civil society groups to build networks of solidarity, and offer solutions that balance conservation, community needs, and economics.
Collaborator Contribution While there are organised groups of fishers responding to fisheries policies and regulations, environmental justice activists responding to extractive industries, conservationists responding to threats to marine biodiversity, these different groups seldom come together, do not all have trusted relationships with researchers, and may even be adversarial towards each other. Lines of race, class, discipline and livelihood concerns are quite firmly entrenched and seldom crossed. The rapid development of the Blue Economy in South Africa, through 'Operation Phakisa', necessitates a more integrated response to ocean governance and health from concerned citizens. An extensive evaluation of a range of KANs found that 'the credibility of knowledge action networks depends to a large extent on the degree to which they include diverse types of knowledge or knowledge systems, the opportunities for these multiple knowledge(s) to interact, and on interactions that distribute power across these multiple knowledge(s). The relevance of KAN for bringing together beneficiaries and academics in addressing the sustainable development challenges of the blue economy was also further discussed at the Port Elizabeth conference on transformed and transformative ocean governance (Jan 2020). To support the KAN development, Durban University of Technology (DUT) have made significant in-kind contributions of time and resources in opening access to civil society networks, data collection and analysis as well as report writing. DUT are now an official project partner of the One Ocean Hub and are continuing to work in-kind towards this initiative, while collaboratively horizon scanning for funding opportunities. This network has grown to include expertise in: • Fisheries law (Nelson Mandela University) directly contributing through Hub resources to understanding the legal tensions between small scale and recreational fisheries in the implementation of the small scale fishing policy in South Africa. • Fisheries science (Rhodes University, Department of Ichthyology and Fisheries Science): examining South Africa's marine recreational fishery, with particular focus on legal tensions with small-scale fishery in the implementation of the South African SSF Policy (in collaboration with NMU), issues of compliance, monitoring and management. • Integrated coastal management and social justice (University of Cape Town): Examining the impacts of the blue economy on coastal communities. Understanding the narratives, strategy and impacts on the ground. • A community-research partnership with 12 fisher leaders (4 women, 8 men) and University of Cape Town (Department of Geography and Environmental Science) has facilitated training of fisher leaders in qualitative research methodologies. Each leader has conducted 10 interviews enabling the team to obtain a snapshot of fishers' views from 120 fishers in all four coastal provinces, and is feeding directly into research under the Hub. Throughout 2020, Rhodes University, Environmental Learning Research Centre, and University of Cape Town (Department of Geography and Environmental Science) have developed a solidarity and learning network with 25 small-scale fisher leaders across multiple provinces and regions of South Africa. This network is supported by the One Ocean Hub through the provision of data to fishers to engage in the network via the social media platform WhatsApp, which is coordinated by Hub researchers. This network was formed in response to the COVID-19 pandemic with the aim to connect fishers and enable sharing of crucial information during the crisis. This network: • Connects fishers across provinces and regions • Provides a deeper understanding of coastal (in)justice • Provides a space for relational networks to grow • Facilitates knowledge flow through informing important meetings, summarising meeting outputs, translating and interpreting information which affects fishers' rights, and access to coast and resource In order to respond to the immediate challenges facing SSFs, this network has connected SSFs with key civil society groups, including legal aid professionals in South Africa. This network effectively acts as a bridge and support mechanism for SSFs in getting the support they need to respond to ongoing challenges. Key civil society organisations contributing to this network include: South Durban Community Environmental Alliance; Centre for Environmental Rights; and Legal Resources Centre.
Impact Key outputs of this collaboration to date: Small Scale Fishing (SSF) Community Capacity building • 12 SSF leaders trained in qualitative research methodologies. A report of the resulting research (based on data from 120 fishers) is currently in development (due mid 2021) • Accessible resources for coastal communities detailing their rights in the context of blue economy developments (these have been produced in both English and isiZulu) • Providing direct support to communities to enable them to respond to written consultations on blue economy developments • Active (ongoing) solidarity and learning network of small -scale fisher leaders from across South Africa. Artistic and Media Outputs • Empatheatre performance Lalela uLwandle (Listen to the Sea): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=apNw1H8CTKY • Lalela uLwandle radio play: https://www.empatheatre.com/listen-to-our-lalela-ulwandle-radio-play • Webinars: o COVID-19 impacts on the South African Small-Scale Fisheries Sectorhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDeJJG3qt0E o Small Scale Fishers and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgdbVNhHf6Q Publication Outputs to date: Cast Out: The Systematic Exclusion of the Kwa-Zulu Natal Subsistence Fishers From The Fishing Rights Regime in South Africa. Sunde, J; Erwin K. Consultancy Policy Research Report for South Durban Community Environmental Alliance. 2021. https://sdcea.co.za/download/cast-out-the-systematic-exclusion-of-the-kwa-zulu-natal-subsistence-fishers-from-the-fishing-rights-regime-in-south-africa/ Sowman, M, and Sunde, J. A Just transition? Navigating the process of policy implementation in small-scale fisheries in South Africa. (in press, Marine Policy) Sunde, J; Pereira, T; Snow, B; Mbatha, P; James, A. Unmasking governance failures: The impact of COVID-19 on small-scale fishing communities in South Africa. (in press, Marine Policy) Van As, H. Poaching of marine living resources: Can the tide be turned? South African Crime Quarterly, 69. 2020. https://doi.org/10.17159/2413-3108/2020/vn69a8351 Van As, H. Admission of guilt fine: a legal shortcut with delayed shock?. South African Crime Quarterly, 69. 2020. https://doi.org/10.17159/2413-3108/2020/vn69a7444 Kevern L. Cochrane, Jessica Eggers, Warwick H.H. Sauer. A diagnosis of the status and effectiveness of marine fisheries management in South Africa based on two representative case studies. Marine Policy, Volume 112, 2020, 103774, ISSN 0308-597X, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpol.2019.103774. Outputs in progress to be completed in 2021 Coastal Justice Network Map: an interactive online map of coastal (in)justice and small scale fishing cooperatives across South Africa and key stakeholder organisations involved Publication on legal tensions between small-scale and recreational fisheries in South Africa Progress towards key outcome goals This collaboration seeks to contribute to the implementation of inclusive, socially & ecologically just participatory processes in marine resource management, Environmental Impact Assessments and climate change mitigation relevant competent South Africa authorities, in partnership with civil society (SDG11.4; 13.3; 14B) Towards achieving this outcome, this collaboration has developed a network of relevant SSF communities across South Africa and civil society partners, whom, together with One Ocean Hub researchers, can make targeted and strategic interventions in policy spaces. Using research findings, the collaborative team will work to make recommendations on: • Redistribution of resources and economic benefits from recreational to subsistence fishing • Methodologies to enable just participation of SSFs in ocean decision making processes • Revision of the South African SSF Policy to facilitate redistribution of resource • Methods for monitoring compliance and management in the recreational fishing sector Through 2021, this collaboration seeks to further strengthen the learning and solidarity networks with SSFs, civil society, and researchers, and progress research in key areas. Innovative methodologies such as Empatheatre will be used through 2022 to facilitate multi-stakeholder dialogues and engage across decision- and policy-making spaces to progress towards transformative ocean governance in South Africa. Disciplines involved: Law; sociology; education; coastal management; fisheries science; art
Start Year 2019
 
Description Sustaining South Africa's Small Scale Fishing Communities: Balancing multiple fisheries and the blue economy 
Organisation University of Cape Town
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Small-scale fisheries (SSFs) play a critical role in contributing to food security, poverty alleviation and rural development globally. In South Africa, there exist at least 147 fishing communities, comprising approximating 30,000 households, approximately 53% of which are found to be food insecure (Sowman 2006). Supporting and enabling sustainable subsistence fishing is critical to addressing widespread issues of food insecurity and poverty among South Africa's fishing communities. Work Package Zero (WP0) of the One Ocean Hub identified multiple complex and connected challenges facing small-scale fishers (SSFs) in South Africa, notably: • Access to resources: due to competition with the recreational sector (a sector with 730k participants annually, and which holds disproportionate access to marine resources) and the commercial fishing industry • Access to coast: coastal developments (which have increased in both number and development rate under the South Africa Government's 'Operational Phakisa') have reduced the ability of, or even prevented, SSFs and other coastal communities from accessing the coast • Lack of recognition of customary rights, leading to multiple rights violations • Inadequate public participation in decision-making spaces on marine management, resulting in the rights and views of SSFs and coastal communities being overlooked and dismissed At the root cause of these issues is an apparent disjuncture between policy rhetoric, decision making, and implementation and management of those decision outcomes on the ground. These issues cut across multiple ocean sectors, creating multiple connected tensions between SSFs, coastal communities and recreational fishers, and other blue economy developments, most notably the extractive industries (both onshore coastal mining, and offshore mineral and oil and gas extraction). During WP0, the Hub's Empatheatre project (led by Rhodes University Environmental Learning Research Centre) identified that in the face of these challenges, SSFs and coastal communities lacked the capacity, knowledge and access to support networks to engage and challenge decisions which affected their access to coast and resources, placing them in a position of food insecurity and poverty, as well at times, as being unduly criminalised in attempting to access the coast for food. The Empatheatre project and consultations with civil society partners identified the need and opportunity to develop a Knowledge Action Network (KAN) for citizen monitoring of the Blue Economy in South Africa, and develop a multidisciplinary response to the challenges facing SSFs. The One Ocean Hub provides a forum and infrastructure to bring together cross-sectoral stakeholders together with a multidisciplinary academic network, to work collaboratively to address these challenges. Whilst the academic partners involved were all partners in the original Hub application, most were not proposed to work directly together and collaborate on these issues. The responsive and iterative nature of the Hub work has enabled us to ensure that our research is deeply rooted in the context, and driven by the challenges on the ground at community level. This has also enabled relationships to develop across academic disciplines that, until the Hub, worked in relative isolation in South Africa, and often in conflict with one another (further exacerbating the issue at policy level as recommendations are based on the findings of single disciplines. Bringing together the social sciences, natural science, humanities, and law, the Hub is able to take a holistic multidisciplinary approach to the complex interconnected challenges facing SSFs on the ground in real time, and work directly with the community and civil society groups to build networks of solidarity, and offer solutions that balance conservation, community needs, and economics.
Collaborator Contribution While there are organised groups of fishers responding to fisheries policies and regulations, environmental justice activists responding to extractive industries, conservationists responding to threats to marine biodiversity, these different groups seldom come together, do not all have trusted relationships with researchers, and may even be adversarial towards each other. Lines of race, class, discipline and livelihood concerns are quite firmly entrenched and seldom crossed. The rapid development of the Blue Economy in South Africa, through 'Operation Phakisa', necessitates a more integrated response to ocean governance and health from concerned citizens. An extensive evaluation of a range of KANs found that 'the credibility of knowledge action networks depends to a large extent on the degree to which they include diverse types of knowledge or knowledge systems, the opportunities for these multiple knowledge(s) to interact, and on interactions that distribute power across these multiple knowledge(s). The relevance of KAN for bringing together beneficiaries and academics in addressing the sustainable development challenges of the blue economy was also further discussed at the Port Elizabeth conference on transformed and transformative ocean governance (Jan 2020). To support the KAN development, Durban University of Technology (DUT) have made significant in-kind contributions of time and resources in opening access to civil society networks, data collection and analysis as well as report writing. DUT are now an official project partner of the One Ocean Hub and are continuing to work in-kind towards this initiative, while collaboratively horizon scanning for funding opportunities. This network has grown to include expertise in: • Fisheries law (Nelson Mandela University) directly contributing through Hub resources to understanding the legal tensions between small scale and recreational fisheries in the implementation of the small scale fishing policy in South Africa. • Fisheries science (Rhodes University, Department of Ichthyology and Fisheries Science): examining South Africa's marine recreational fishery, with particular focus on legal tensions with small-scale fishery in the implementation of the South African SSF Policy (in collaboration with NMU), issues of compliance, monitoring and management. • Integrated coastal management and social justice (University of Cape Town): Examining the impacts of the blue economy on coastal communities. Understanding the narratives, strategy and impacts on the ground. • A community-research partnership with 12 fisher leaders (4 women, 8 men) and University of Cape Town (Department of Geography and Environmental Science) has facilitated training of fisher leaders in qualitative research methodologies. Each leader has conducted 10 interviews enabling the team to obtain a snapshot of fishers' views from 120 fishers in all four coastal provinces, and is feeding directly into research under the Hub. Throughout 2020, Rhodes University, Environmental Learning Research Centre, and University of Cape Town (Department of Geography and Environmental Science) have developed a solidarity and learning network with 25 small-scale fisher leaders across multiple provinces and regions of South Africa. This network is supported by the One Ocean Hub through the provision of data to fishers to engage in the network via the social media platform WhatsApp, which is coordinated by Hub researchers. This network was formed in response to the COVID-19 pandemic with the aim to connect fishers and enable sharing of crucial information during the crisis. This network: • Connects fishers across provinces and regions • Provides a deeper understanding of coastal (in)justice • Provides a space for relational networks to grow • Facilitates knowledge flow through informing important meetings, summarising meeting outputs, translating and interpreting information which affects fishers' rights, and access to coast and resource In order to respond to the immediate challenges facing SSFs, this network has connected SSFs with key civil society groups, including legal aid professionals in South Africa. This network effectively acts as a bridge and support mechanism for SSFs in getting the support they need to respond to ongoing challenges. Key civil society organisations contributing to this network include: South Durban Community Environmental Alliance; Centre for Environmental Rights; and Legal Resources Centre.
Impact Key outputs of this collaboration to date: Small Scale Fishing (SSF) Community Capacity building • 12 SSF leaders trained in qualitative research methodologies. A report of the resulting research (based on data from 120 fishers) is currently in development (due mid 2021) • Accessible resources for coastal communities detailing their rights in the context of blue economy developments (these have been produced in both English and isiZulu) • Providing direct support to communities to enable them to respond to written consultations on blue economy developments • Active (ongoing) solidarity and learning network of small -scale fisher leaders from across South Africa. Artistic and Media Outputs • Empatheatre performance Lalela uLwandle (Listen to the Sea): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=apNw1H8CTKY • Lalela uLwandle radio play: https://www.empatheatre.com/listen-to-our-lalela-ulwandle-radio-play • Webinars: o COVID-19 impacts on the South African Small-Scale Fisheries Sectorhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDeJJG3qt0E o Small Scale Fishers and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgdbVNhHf6Q Publication Outputs to date: Cast Out: The Systematic Exclusion of the Kwa-Zulu Natal Subsistence Fishers From The Fishing Rights Regime in South Africa. Sunde, J; Erwin K. Consultancy Policy Research Report for South Durban Community Environmental Alliance. 2021. https://sdcea.co.za/download/cast-out-the-systematic-exclusion-of-the-kwa-zulu-natal-subsistence-fishers-from-the-fishing-rights-regime-in-south-africa/ Sowman, M, and Sunde, J. A Just transition? Navigating the process of policy implementation in small-scale fisheries in South Africa. (in press, Marine Policy) Sunde, J; Pereira, T; Snow, B; Mbatha, P; James, A. Unmasking governance failures: The impact of COVID-19 on small-scale fishing communities in South Africa. (in press, Marine Policy) Van As, H. Poaching of marine living resources: Can the tide be turned? South African Crime Quarterly, 69. 2020. https://doi.org/10.17159/2413-3108/2020/vn69a8351 Van As, H. Admission of guilt fine: a legal shortcut with delayed shock?. South African Crime Quarterly, 69. 2020. https://doi.org/10.17159/2413-3108/2020/vn69a7444 Kevern L. Cochrane, Jessica Eggers, Warwick H.H. Sauer. A diagnosis of the status and effectiveness of marine fisheries management in South Africa based on two representative case studies. Marine Policy, Volume 112, 2020, 103774, ISSN 0308-597X, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpol.2019.103774. Outputs in progress to be completed in 2021 Coastal Justice Network Map: an interactive online map of coastal (in)justice and small scale fishing cooperatives across South Africa and key stakeholder organisations involved Publication on legal tensions between small-scale and recreational fisheries in South Africa Progress towards key outcome goals This collaboration seeks to contribute to the implementation of inclusive, socially & ecologically just participatory processes in marine resource management, Environmental Impact Assessments and climate change mitigation relevant competent South Africa authorities, in partnership with civil society (SDG11.4; 13.3; 14B) Towards achieving this outcome, this collaboration has developed a network of relevant SSF communities across South Africa and civil society partners, whom, together with One Ocean Hub researchers, can make targeted and strategic interventions in policy spaces. Using research findings, the collaborative team will work to make recommendations on: • Redistribution of resources and economic benefits from recreational to subsistence fishing • Methodologies to enable just participation of SSFs in ocean decision making processes • Revision of the South African SSF Policy to facilitate redistribution of resource • Methods for monitoring compliance and management in the recreational fishing sector Through 2021, this collaboration seeks to further strengthen the learning and solidarity networks with SSFs, civil society, and researchers, and progress research in key areas. Innovative methodologies such as Empatheatre will be used through 2022 to facilitate multi-stakeholder dialogues and engage across decision- and policy-making spaces to progress towards transformative ocean governance in South Africa. Disciplines involved: Law; sociology; education; coastal management; fisheries science; art
Start Year 2019
 
Description Sustaining South Africa's Small Scale Fishing Communities: Balancing multiple fisheries and the blue economy 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Small-scale fisheries (SSFs) play a critical role in contributing to food security, poverty alleviation and rural development globally. In South Africa, there exist at least 147 fishing communities, comprising approximating 30,000 households, approximately 53% of which are found to be food insecure (Sowman 2006). Supporting and enabling sustainable subsistence fishing is critical to addressing widespread issues of food insecurity and poverty among South Africa's fishing communities. Work Package Zero (WP0) of the One Ocean Hub identified multiple complex and connected challenges facing small-scale fishers (SSFs) in South Africa, notably: • Access to resources: due to competition with the recreational sector (a sector with 730k participants annually, and which holds disproportionate access to marine resources) and the commercial fishing industry • Access to coast: coastal developments (which have increased in both number and development rate under the South Africa Government's 'Operational Phakisa') have reduced the ability of, or even prevented, SSFs and other coastal communities from accessing the coast • Lack of recognition of customary rights, leading to multiple rights violations • Inadequate public participation in decision-making spaces on marine management, resulting in the rights and views of SSFs and coastal communities being overlooked and dismissed At the root cause of these issues is an apparent disjuncture between policy rhetoric, decision making, and implementation and management of those decision outcomes on the ground. These issues cut across multiple ocean sectors, creating multiple connected tensions between SSFs, coastal communities and recreational fishers, and other blue economy developments, most notably the extractive industries (both onshore coastal mining, and offshore mineral and oil and gas extraction). During WP0, the Hub's Empatheatre project (led by Rhodes University Environmental Learning Research Centre) identified that in the face of these challenges, SSFs and coastal communities lacked the capacity, knowledge and access to support networks to engage and challenge decisions which affected their access to coast and resources, placing them in a position of food insecurity and poverty, as well at times, as being unduly criminalised in attempting to access the coast for food. The Empatheatre project and consultations with civil society partners identified the need and opportunity to develop a Knowledge Action Network (KAN) for citizen monitoring of the Blue Economy in South Africa, and develop a multidisciplinary response to the challenges facing SSFs. The One Ocean Hub provides a forum and infrastructure to bring together cross-sectoral stakeholders together with a multidisciplinary academic network, to work collaboratively to address these challenges. Whilst the academic partners involved were all partners in the original Hub application, most were not proposed to work directly together and collaborate on these issues. The responsive and iterative nature of the Hub work has enabled us to ensure that our research is deeply rooted in the context, and driven by the challenges on the ground at community level. This has also enabled relationships to develop across academic disciplines that, until the Hub, worked in relative isolation in South Africa, and often in conflict with one another (further exacerbating the issue at policy level as recommendations are based on the findings of single disciplines. Bringing together the social sciences, natural science, humanities, and law, the Hub is able to take a holistic multidisciplinary approach to the complex interconnected challenges facing SSFs on the ground in real time, and work directly with the community and civil society groups to build networks of solidarity, and offer solutions that balance conservation, community needs, and economics.
Collaborator Contribution While there are organised groups of fishers responding to fisheries policies and regulations, environmental justice activists responding to extractive industries, conservationists responding to threats to marine biodiversity, these different groups seldom come together, do not all have trusted relationships with researchers, and may even be adversarial towards each other. Lines of race, class, discipline and livelihood concerns are quite firmly entrenched and seldom crossed. The rapid development of the Blue Economy in South Africa, through 'Operation Phakisa', necessitates a more integrated response to ocean governance and health from concerned citizens. An extensive evaluation of a range of KANs found that 'the credibility of knowledge action networks depends to a large extent on the degree to which they include diverse types of knowledge or knowledge systems, the opportunities for these multiple knowledge(s) to interact, and on interactions that distribute power across these multiple knowledge(s). The relevance of KAN for bringing together beneficiaries and academics in addressing the sustainable development challenges of the blue economy was also further discussed at the Port Elizabeth conference on transformed and transformative ocean governance (Jan 2020). To support the KAN development, Durban University of Technology (DUT) have made significant in-kind contributions of time and resources in opening access to civil society networks, data collection and analysis as well as report writing. DUT are now an official project partner of the One Ocean Hub and are continuing to work in-kind towards this initiative, while collaboratively horizon scanning for funding opportunities. This network has grown to include expertise in: • Fisheries law (Nelson Mandela University) directly contributing through Hub resources to understanding the legal tensions between small scale and recreational fisheries in the implementation of the small scale fishing policy in South Africa. • Fisheries science (Rhodes University, Department of Ichthyology and Fisheries Science): examining South Africa's marine recreational fishery, with particular focus on legal tensions with small-scale fishery in the implementation of the South African SSF Policy (in collaboration with NMU), issues of compliance, monitoring and management. • Integrated coastal management and social justice (University of Cape Town): Examining the impacts of the blue economy on coastal communities. Understanding the narratives, strategy and impacts on the ground. • A community-research partnership with 12 fisher leaders (4 women, 8 men) and University of Cape Town (Department of Geography and Environmental Science) has facilitated training of fisher leaders in qualitative research methodologies. Each leader has conducted 10 interviews enabling the team to obtain a snapshot of fishers' views from 120 fishers in all four coastal provinces, and is feeding directly into research under the Hub. Throughout 2020, Rhodes University, Environmental Learning Research Centre, and University of Cape Town (Department of Geography and Environmental Science) have developed a solidarity and learning network with 25 small-scale fisher leaders across multiple provinces and regions of South Africa. This network is supported by the One Ocean Hub through the provision of data to fishers to engage in the network via the social media platform WhatsApp, which is coordinated by Hub researchers. This network was formed in response to the COVID-19 pandemic with the aim to connect fishers and enable sharing of crucial information during the crisis. This network: • Connects fishers across provinces and regions • Provides a deeper understanding of coastal (in)justice • Provides a space for relational networks to grow • Facilitates knowledge flow through informing important meetings, summarising meeting outputs, translating and interpreting information which affects fishers' rights, and access to coast and resource In order to respond to the immediate challenges facing SSFs, this network has connected SSFs with key civil society groups, including legal aid professionals in South Africa. This network effectively acts as a bridge and support mechanism for SSFs in getting the support they need to respond to ongoing challenges. Key civil society organisations contributing to this network include: South Durban Community Environmental Alliance; Centre for Environmental Rights; and Legal Resources Centre.
Impact Key outputs of this collaboration to date: Small Scale Fishing (SSF) Community Capacity building • 12 SSF leaders trained in qualitative research methodologies. A report of the resulting research (based on data from 120 fishers) is currently in development (due mid 2021) • Accessible resources for coastal communities detailing their rights in the context of blue economy developments (these have been produced in both English and isiZulu) • Providing direct support to communities to enable them to respond to written consultations on blue economy developments • Active (ongoing) solidarity and learning network of small -scale fisher leaders from across South Africa. Artistic and Media Outputs • Empatheatre performance Lalela uLwandle (Listen to the Sea): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=apNw1H8CTKY • Lalela uLwandle radio play: https://www.empatheatre.com/listen-to-our-lalela-ulwandle-radio-play • Webinars: o COVID-19 impacts on the South African Small-Scale Fisheries Sectorhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDeJJG3qt0E o Small Scale Fishers and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgdbVNhHf6Q Publication Outputs to date: Cast Out: The Systematic Exclusion of the Kwa-Zulu Natal Subsistence Fishers From The Fishing Rights Regime in South Africa. Sunde, J; Erwin K. Consultancy Policy Research Report for South Durban Community Environmental Alliance. 2021. https://sdcea.co.za/download/cast-out-the-systematic-exclusion-of-the-kwa-zulu-natal-subsistence-fishers-from-the-fishing-rights-regime-in-south-africa/ Sowman, M, and Sunde, J. A Just transition? Navigating the process of policy implementation in small-scale fisheries in South Africa. (in press, Marine Policy) Sunde, J; Pereira, T; Snow, B; Mbatha, P; James, A. Unmasking governance failures: The impact of COVID-19 on small-scale fishing communities in South Africa. (in press, Marine Policy) Van As, H. Poaching of marine living resources: Can the tide be turned? South African Crime Quarterly, 69. 2020. https://doi.org/10.17159/2413-3108/2020/vn69a8351 Van As, H. Admission of guilt fine: a legal shortcut with delayed shock?. South African Crime Quarterly, 69. 2020. https://doi.org/10.17159/2413-3108/2020/vn69a7444 Kevern L. Cochrane, Jessica Eggers, Warwick H.H. Sauer. A diagnosis of the status and effectiveness of marine fisheries management in South Africa based on two representative case studies. Marine Policy, Volume 112, 2020, 103774, ISSN 0308-597X, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpol.2019.103774. Outputs in progress to be completed in 2021 Coastal Justice Network Map: an interactive online map of coastal (in)justice and small scale fishing cooperatives across South Africa and key stakeholder organisations involved Publication on legal tensions between small-scale and recreational fisheries in South Africa Progress towards key outcome goals This collaboration seeks to contribute to the implementation of inclusive, socially & ecologically just participatory processes in marine resource management, Environmental Impact Assessments and climate change mitigation relevant competent South Africa authorities, in partnership with civil society (SDG11.4; 13.3; 14B) Towards achieving this outcome, this collaboration has developed a network of relevant SSF communities across South Africa and civil society partners, whom, together with One Ocean Hub researchers, can make targeted and strategic interventions in policy spaces. Using research findings, the collaborative team will work to make recommendations on: • Redistribution of resources and economic benefits from recreational to subsistence fishing • Methodologies to enable just participation of SSFs in ocean decision making processes • Revision of the South African SSF Policy to facilitate redistribution of resource • Methods for monitoring compliance and management in the recreational fishing sector Through 2021, this collaboration seeks to further strengthen the learning and solidarity networks with SSFs, civil society, and researchers, and progress research in key areas. Innovative methodologies such as Empatheatre will be used through 2022 to facilitate multi-stakeholder dialogues and engage across decision- and policy-making spaces to progress towards transformative ocean governance in South Africa. Disciplines involved: Law; sociology; education; coastal management; fisheries science; art
Start Year 2019
 
Description UNEP-University of Strathclyde partnership on InforMEA E-learning platform 
Organisation United Nations (UN)
Department United Nations Environment Programme
Country Kenya 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution University of Strathclyde has been awarded a consultancy contract by Hub Project Partner the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) to deliver a package of knowledge products to enhance the content of the UNEP-led InforMEA E-learning platform and the systemically link with the Law and Environment Assistance Platform. InforMEA is the United Nations Information Portal on Multilateral Environmental Agreements. The Hub's contribution will be to connect different sectors of international law on SDG 14, as well as connect human rights and the protection of the marine environment, with regard to all the SDG 14 targets, as well as specific issues related to marine litter. As lead partners in the One Ocean Hub, Strathclyde will coordinate with expertise across the Hub research network, to deliver: 1. a Learning Course on Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 14 This course will survey the full range of SDG 14 targets and how Multilateral Environmental Agreements (MEAs) contribute to their achievement, including marine pollution, marine ecosystem management, ocean acidification, fishing, marine protected areas, fishing subsidies, SIDS and the sustainable use of marine resources, research and technology transfer, small-scale fisheries, and ratification and implementation of the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea and International Environmental Law. The Hub will connect each target with relevant human rights issues, as well as governance issues related to human health, trade, freshwaters, and expand understanding of the connections between SDG 14 and other SDGs. 2. Expansion of the Plastics toolkit to cover key aspects of marine litter This work will build on the recently developed plastics toolkit on the Law and Environment Assistance platform and complement it with broader considerations about marine litter such as marine litter-related legislation, policy and case-studies to inform law-makers of best practices and different approaches. To this end, specific content will be compiled, and integrated in the most intuitive manner to inform legislative work and policymakers when tackling marine litter. This will be co-developed with UNEP by the Hub based on a brainstorming meeting with relevant Hub researchers from different disciplines and countries, so that relevant Hub research and expertise can shape the scope and aims of the toolkit. This will also ensure that the toolkit respond to real-life needs from different disciplines and geographies. Country-level research could be incorporated in the toolkit as case studies. 3. a Learning Course on Marine Litter Building on the outcomes of activity 2, this course will focus in greater depth, and beyond just MEAs, on one subset of land-based marine pollution: marine litter. The course will survey the issue, and look at the international legal and policy framework, as well as regulatory approaches within national legislation. The course will have a strong focus on plastic pollution as an especially important global concern within marine litter. The Hub will ensure mainstreaming of relevant human rights issues, as well as governance issues related to human health, trade, freshwaters, and expand understanding of the connections between marine litter and other SDGs.
Collaborator Contribution Over the past 10 years, UN Environment has supported the InforMEA Initiative to improve coherence in the area of information and knowledge sharing in support of effective implementation of multilateral environmental agreements. The current phase of the InforMEA project seeks to support collective intelligence approaches to International Environmental Governance overall, which includes the enhancement of its unique learning platform and the development of services on the connected Law and Environment Assistance Platform. This included legislative toolkits and in particular the legislative toolkit on plastic pollution which covers single use plastic and increasingly marine litter legislation and policy. UNEP is providing finance to support the development of the content enhancement led by Strathclyde, in line with the Hub's mission to connect different norms for integrated and inclusive ocean management (notably human rights and the marine environment, as well as health, trade, freshwaters, climate change).
Impact This project will start in March 2021 for 6 months. The outputs will be: 1. InforMEA course on SDG 14 2. Toolkit on marine litter (as an expansion of an existing toolkit on ocean plastics) 3. InforMEA course on Marine Litter Outcomes The outputs listed above will be used on the United Nations Information Portal on Multilateral Environmental Agreements. It is a one-stop portal for information on Multilateral Environmental Agreements searchable by key terms across treaty texts, COP decisions, national plans and reports, laws, court decisions etc, used by law makers, policy professionals, and academics, particularly in DAC countries.
Start Year 2021
 
Description UNEP-University of Strathclyde partnership on InforMEA E-learning platform 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution University of Strathclyde has been awarded a consultancy contract by Hub Project Partner the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) to deliver a package of knowledge products to enhance the content of the UNEP-led InforMEA E-learning platform and the systemically link with the Law and Environment Assistance Platform. InforMEA is the United Nations Information Portal on Multilateral Environmental Agreements. The Hub's contribution will be to connect different sectors of international law on SDG 14, as well as connect human rights and the protection of the marine environment, with regard to all the SDG 14 targets, as well as specific issues related to marine litter. As lead partners in the One Ocean Hub, Strathclyde will coordinate with expertise across the Hub research network, to deliver: 1. a Learning Course on Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 14 This course will survey the full range of SDG 14 targets and how Multilateral Environmental Agreements (MEAs) contribute to their achievement, including marine pollution, marine ecosystem management, ocean acidification, fishing, marine protected areas, fishing subsidies, SIDS and the sustainable use of marine resources, research and technology transfer, small-scale fisheries, and ratification and implementation of the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea and International Environmental Law. The Hub will connect each target with relevant human rights issues, as well as governance issues related to human health, trade, freshwaters, and expand understanding of the connections between SDG 14 and other SDGs. 2. Expansion of the Plastics toolkit to cover key aspects of marine litter This work will build on the recently developed plastics toolkit on the Law and Environment Assistance platform and complement it with broader considerations about marine litter such as marine litter-related legislation, policy and case-studies to inform law-makers of best practices and different approaches. To this end, specific content will be compiled, and integrated in the most intuitive manner to inform legislative work and policymakers when tackling marine litter. This will be co-developed with UNEP by the Hub based on a brainstorming meeting with relevant Hub researchers from different disciplines and countries, so that relevant Hub research and expertise can shape the scope and aims of the toolkit. This will also ensure that the toolkit respond to real-life needs from different disciplines and geographies. Country-level research could be incorporated in the toolkit as case studies. 3. a Learning Course on Marine Litter Building on the outcomes of activity 2, this course will focus in greater depth, and beyond just MEAs, on one subset of land-based marine pollution: marine litter. The course will survey the issue, and look at the international legal and policy framework, as well as regulatory approaches within national legislation. The course will have a strong focus on plastic pollution as an especially important global concern within marine litter. The Hub will ensure mainstreaming of relevant human rights issues, as well as governance issues related to human health, trade, freshwaters, and expand understanding of the connections between marine litter and other SDGs.
Collaborator Contribution Over the past 10 years, UN Environment has supported the InforMEA Initiative to improve coherence in the area of information and knowledge sharing in support of effective implementation of multilateral environmental agreements. The current phase of the InforMEA project seeks to support collective intelligence approaches to International Environmental Governance overall, which includes the enhancement of its unique learning platform and the development of services on the connected Law and Environment Assistance Platform. This included legislative toolkits and in particular the legislative toolkit on plastic pollution which covers single use plastic and increasingly marine litter legislation and policy. UNEP is providing finance to support the development of the content enhancement led by Strathclyde, in line with the Hub's mission to connect different norms for integrated and inclusive ocean management (notably human rights and the marine environment, as well as health, trade, freshwaters, climate change).
Impact This project will start in March 2021 for 6 months. The outputs will be: 1. InforMEA course on SDG 14 2. Toolkit on marine litter (as an expansion of an existing toolkit on ocean plastics) 3. InforMEA course on Marine Litter Outcomes The outputs listed above will be used on the United Nations Information Portal on Multilateral Environmental Agreements. It is a one-stop portal for information on Multilateral Environmental Agreements searchable by key terms across treaty texts, COP decisions, national plans and reports, laws, court decisions etc, used by law makers, policy professionals, and academics, particularly in DAC countries.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Vanuatu Deep Fund Project: Netai en Namou Toc (Stories of Mother Ocean) 
Organisation Erromango Cultural Association (ECA)
Country Vanuatu 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub research in ocean art, culture and heritage aims to surface and provide an outlet for the views of those groups that are generally under-represented in more traditional approaches to ocean science and management. This research programme will provide sources of customary law for analysis under the Ocean Governance research programme and insights into traditional knowledge and livelihoods to inform all research themes. This research programme is supported by a "Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund" to commission artistic responses that capture evolving challenges to ocean management, the ocean's multiple contributions to human wellbeing, and Hub findings. The Deep Fund is administered by the University of Strathclyde as lead partners in the One Ocean Hub project. "Netai en Namou Toc (Stories of Mother Ocean)" is a new project initiated under the Deep Fund, led by Erromango Cultural Association, Vanuatu. Glasgow School of Art will provide project management support for the project, as well providing a conduit through which the findings of this project can inform wider Hub research in the Solomon Islands and Fiji.
Collaborator Contribution The project seeks to draw from Erromango's artistic and cultural heritage to produce contemporary artwork and traditional stories that celebrate the indigenous connection to the ocean. Building on the Erromango Cultural Association's decade-long work in cultural and linguistic revival, Netai en Namou Toc will preserve, record and promote Erromangan indigenous knowledge, through engaging and empowering youth to produce illustrated children's storybooks in the vernacular. The project will work closely with the Natmonuk Simanlou (Island Council of Chiefs) to support their engagement and leadership in customary coastal governance at the island level through the power of traditional story-telling.
Impact This project started in February 2021. The project records, preserves and promotes indigenous knowledge of the ocean, capturing custom stories, practices and resource management. The output will be children's books, produced in three languages (Sye, Bislama and English), which will be illustrated by local youth to engage school-aged children and communicate for posterity the significance of relationships with the sea. These publications are shared with chiefly leaders to support coastal governance policies and inform stewardship dialogue with government and the private sector. The anticipated outcomes are: • Preservation and updated records of Erromangan indigenous knowledge (custom stories, custom practices and traditional resource management) of the relationship with the ocean, to inform ocean stewardship led by the Natmonuk Simanlou as it engages with government and private sector stakeholders; • Promotion of Erromangan indigenous connection to the ocean through capturing traditional sea/ocean tales and traditional knowledge of ocean governance/coastal resource management in illustrated children's books in the vernacular (Sye language); • Engagement and empowerment of Erromangan youth in artistic and traditional story-telling workshops to express indigenous connection to the ocean (and contemporary uses/challenges).
Start Year 2021
 
Description Vanuatu Deep Fund Project: Netai en Namou Toc (Stories of Mother Ocean) 
Organisation Glasgow School of Art
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub research in ocean art, culture and heritage aims to surface and provide an outlet for the views of those groups that are generally under-represented in more traditional approaches to ocean science and management. This research programme will provide sources of customary law for analysis under the Ocean Governance research programme and insights into traditional knowledge and livelihoods to inform all research themes. This research programme is supported by a "Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund" to commission artistic responses that capture evolving challenges to ocean management, the ocean's multiple contributions to human wellbeing, and Hub findings. The Deep Fund is administered by the University of Strathclyde as lead partners in the One Ocean Hub project. "Netai en Namou Toc (Stories of Mother Ocean)" is a new project initiated under the Deep Fund, led by Erromango Cultural Association, Vanuatu. Glasgow School of Art will provide project management support for the project, as well providing a conduit through which the findings of this project can inform wider Hub research in the Solomon Islands and Fiji.
Collaborator Contribution The project seeks to draw from Erromango's artistic and cultural heritage to produce contemporary artwork and traditional stories that celebrate the indigenous connection to the ocean. Building on the Erromango Cultural Association's decade-long work in cultural and linguistic revival, Netai en Namou Toc will preserve, record and promote Erromangan indigenous knowledge, through engaging and empowering youth to produce illustrated children's storybooks in the vernacular. The project will work closely with the Natmonuk Simanlou (Island Council of Chiefs) to support their engagement and leadership in customary coastal governance at the island level through the power of traditional story-telling.
Impact This project started in February 2021. The project records, preserves and promotes indigenous knowledge of the ocean, capturing custom stories, practices and resource management. The output will be children's books, produced in three languages (Sye, Bislama and English), which will be illustrated by local youth to engage school-aged children and communicate for posterity the significance of relationships with the sea. These publications are shared with chiefly leaders to support coastal governance policies and inform stewardship dialogue with government and the private sector. The anticipated outcomes are: • Preservation and updated records of Erromangan indigenous knowledge (custom stories, custom practices and traditional resource management) of the relationship with the ocean, to inform ocean stewardship led by the Natmonuk Simanlou as it engages with government and private sector stakeholders; • Promotion of Erromangan indigenous connection to the ocean through capturing traditional sea/ocean tales and traditional knowledge of ocean governance/coastal resource management in illustrated children's books in the vernacular (Sye language); • Engagement and empowerment of Erromangan youth in artistic and traditional story-telling workshops to express indigenous connection to the ocean (and contemporary uses/challenges).
Start Year 2021
 
Description Vanuatu Deep Fund Project: Netai en Namou Toc (Stories of Mother Ocean) 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution One Ocean Hub research in ocean art, culture and heritage aims to surface and provide an outlet for the views of those groups that are generally under-represented in more traditional approaches to ocean science and management. This research programme will provide sources of customary law for analysis under the Ocean Governance research programme and insights into traditional knowledge and livelihoods to inform all research themes. This research programme is supported by a "Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund" to commission artistic responses that capture evolving challenges to ocean management, the ocean's multiple contributions to human wellbeing, and Hub findings. The Deep Fund is administered by the University of Strathclyde as lead partners in the One Ocean Hub project. "Netai en Namou Toc (Stories of Mother Ocean)" is a new project initiated under the Deep Fund, led by Erromango Cultural Association, Vanuatu. Glasgow School of Art will provide project management support for the project, as well providing a conduit through which the findings of this project can inform wider Hub research in the Solomon Islands and Fiji.
Collaborator Contribution The project seeks to draw from Erromango's artistic and cultural heritage to produce contemporary artwork and traditional stories that celebrate the indigenous connection to the ocean. Building on the Erromango Cultural Association's decade-long work in cultural and linguistic revival, Netai en Namou Toc will preserve, record and promote Erromangan indigenous knowledge, through engaging and empowering youth to produce illustrated children's storybooks in the vernacular. The project will work closely with the Natmonuk Simanlou (Island Council of Chiefs) to support their engagement and leadership in customary coastal governance at the island level through the power of traditional story-telling.
Impact This project started in February 2021. The project records, preserves and promotes indigenous knowledge of the ocean, capturing custom stories, practices and resource management. The output will be children's books, produced in three languages (Sye, Bislama and English), which will be illustrated by local youth to engage school-aged children and communicate for posterity the significance of relationships with the sea. These publications are shared with chiefly leaders to support coastal governance policies and inform stewardship dialogue with government and the private sector. The anticipated outcomes are: • Preservation and updated records of Erromangan indigenous knowledge (custom stories, custom practices and traditional resource management) of the relationship with the ocean, to inform ocean stewardship led by the Natmonuk Simanlou as it engages with government and private sector stakeholders; • Promotion of Erromangan indigenous connection to the ocean through capturing traditional sea/ocean tales and traditional knowledge of ocean governance/coastal resource management in illustrated children's books in the vernacular (Sye language); • Engagement and empowerment of Erromangan youth in artistic and traditional story-telling workshops to express indigenous connection to the ocean (and contemporary uses/challenges).
Start Year 2021
 
Description 2020 International Maritime Organisation Week "Sustainable Shipping for A Sustainable Planet". 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact To celebrate the International Maritime Organisation's Week of 'Sustainable Shipping for a Sustainable Planet', the One Ocean Hub partnered with the Indonesian Embassy to deliver a series of online seminars. The seminar series highlighted the voices of a variety of maritime stakeholders at international, national, and local levels on the importance of mainstreaming sustainable principles in the shipping industry, raising awareness of environmental challenges facing our oceans, and devising opportunities to learn more about sustainable shipping practices from States and other key players in the industry.
The seminar series brought together various stakeholders including government officials, businesses, representatives of the United Nations, and civil society members to discuss environmental challenges and changing realities in the economic and environmental dynamics of the shipping industry; and offered solutions to improve sustainable shipping practices.
Over 3 events, the One Ocean Hub seminars explored the connections between a variety of key issues at the interface of shipping and sustainable development: oceans and climate change; marine pollution; and the role of multiple stakeholder perspectives, including local and indigenous knowledge.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MG_CXJ4pe7w
 
Description Algoa Bay, South Africa: Marine Spatial Planning Stakeholder Consultations 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Research on participatory methods and stakeholder involvement in area-based ocean management to inform the design of area-based management tools.

Country: South Africa

Organisations Engaged:
Consultation was carried out via questionnaire and interviews with Algoa Bay stakeholders. Stakeholders engaged: Members of the recreational shore angling community; coastal management consultants; boat-based tourism businesses; Government and public development entities (Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality); Businesses from the events and water sports private sector

Outcomes:
This engagement is informing the design of the next stages in the developed of integrated area based management tools (pilot integrated marine spatial plan) for Algoa Bay, specifically to inform stakeholder inclusion for Marine Spatial Planning, Marine Protected Areas, and Integrated Coastal Zone Management in DAC country contexts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://algoabaydata.wixsite.com/website/community-of-practice
 
Description Blue Economy: Sustainability, Innovation and Our Ocean 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This free MOOC is delivered through a partnership between two internationally recognised institutions: the University of Seychelles (UniSey) (One Ocean Hub Partner) and the Commonwealth of Learning, and is facilitated by Kelly Hoareau, Director of the James Michel Blue Economy Research Institute at UniSey, and One Ocean Hub Co-Director.

This MOOC introduces key blue economy sectors that can be developed, for example, Fisheries, Aquaculture, Marine Renewable Energy, Seabed Mining and Marine Biotechnology. The course also explores some of the key considerations that influence the sustainability of individual sectors and blue economy strategies
as a whole.

Led by University of Seychelles, the course was conceptualised and it's content and individual modules developed by multiple One Ocean Hub partners.

To date, this MOOC (of which 3 of 5 course have been run) has reached over 3000 registered participants in more than 70 countries.

Details of the full partnership (of multiple Hub partners) included in this activity are reported under "Partnerships and Collaborations".

Countries involved:
Course content was developed by researchers in: Seychelles, South Africa, West Indies, and UK
Course reach: 70 countries globally

The course is hosted by the Commonwealth for Learning on their MOOCs for Development site- a dedicated platform that provides a free learning experience at low bandwidth and offline where necessary, particularly targeting DAC countries.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.mooc4dev.org/BlueEconomy3
 
Description Broadcast - Children's Programme SOUTH AFRICA 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Robyn Adams (early-career researcher SANBI) appeared on a South African children's television show called "Ekse" (Afrikaans for ''I say"). It aired on a community television station called Cape Town TV, which is also carried on national cable news network DSTv.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GhttFGqbB64&t=1s
 
Description Cheltnam Science Festival 2020 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Elisa Morgera was invited to give a talk at the Cheltnam Science Festival 2020. In partnership with UKRI, the festival's focus for 2020 was the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Prof Morgera was asked to contribute a talk under SDG14 (Life Below Water).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.facebook.com/events/690120288224276
 
Description Commonwealth Blue Partners Charters Day 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 1Daniela Diz presented on the Hub's contribution to policy-making in a panel discussion entitled "Good Science, Good Policy" during the Commonwealth Blue Charter Partners Day, 20 June 2019 at the Science Museum in London. Led to plans to collaborate on a case study relating to marine spatial planning in South Africa, and further engagement with the Marine Protected Areas Action Plan (led by Seychelles) whereby a best practices guide will be further explored.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Conservation and Sustainable Use of Marine Biological Diversity of Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact The intergovernmental conference on an international legally binding instrument under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea on the Conservation and Sustainable Use of Marine Biological Diversity of Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction (BBNJ) is being convened pursuant to the General Assembly General Assembly resolution 72/249 that was adopted in December 24th, 2017. This resolution was adopted following 14 years of the Ad Hoc Openended Informal Working Group studying issues, possible options, and approaches relating to the conservation and sustainable use of marine biological diversity beyond areas of national jurisdiction.

In November 2020, the One Ocean Hub held a seminar series on the BBNJ proposed treaty in order to build capacity amongst Hub researchers to engage in the BBNJ process.

Invited speakers included the Legal Officer for the UN Division on Ocean Affairs and the Law of the Sea (UNDOALOS); representatives of the Ministry of Fisheries of Fiji; European Commission; World Maritime University. Attendees: One Ocean Hub researchers, South Africa, Ghana, Namibia, UK.

Learning outcomes
1. Enhanced understanding on the purpose, history, and procedural
aspects of the BBNJ negotiation process.
2. Improved awareness on issues being discussed during the negotiations.
3. Increased knowledge to better participate in informing the BBNJ negotiations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m7RdlR3jCaM
 
Description Course on Multilateral Environmental Agreement Negotiations 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Hub Director Prof Elisa Morgera contributed to the 16th edition of the annual Course on Multilateral Environmental Agreement Negotiations organized by the UN Environment Programme and the University of Eastern Finland. Elisa co-facilitated with Charlotte Salpin (UNDOALOS) an interactive session on marine biodiversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction, contributed to panel discussions on emerging Issues in international biodiversity law, and co-designed and co-facilitated a two-day negotiation exercise based on the ongoing UN negotiations on a new legally. In addition, Elisa led an interactive discussion among 30 participants (experienced government officials engaged in international environmental negotiations, as well as such as representatives of NGOs, the private sector, and academia) on the options for protecting marine biodiversity of areas beyond national jurisdiction, and co-designed and co-facilitated a two-day negotiation exercise based on the ongoing UN negotiations on a new legally binding instrument on marine biodiversity of areas beyond national jurisdiction. A publication will be prepared in late 2020 by UNEP for use by other negotiators globally.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.uef.fi/web/unep
 
Description FAO Internal Workshop: Technical Dialogue on the legal protection of Indigenous Peoples' collective rights to land, territories and resources 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Prof Elisa Morgera was invited to attend an internal workshop of the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) titled: Technical Dialogue on the legal protection of Indigenous Peoples' collective rights to land, territories and resources.

This technical dialogue event formed part of an ongoing consultancy with the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) to publish a legislative guide on collective rights of indigenous peoples over natural resources (including marine resources), that will eventually be presented to the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues by FAO.

One Ocean Hub Early Career Researcher, Dr David Wilson, also attended and presented on historical perspectives and legacy of colonisation in these contexts.

This inclusion from Dr Wilson has led to the integration of historical perspectives for the first time in an FAO study, as well as insights from legal anthropology (although some of that was done before for some land-focused publications).

Following on from this event, Dr Wilson together with fellow Hub early career researcher Dr Laura Major, will be co-authors of the study with Prof Morgera.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.strath.ac.uk/research/strathclydecentreenvironmentallawgovernance/news/scelgawardedfaoco...
 
Description Fiji Stakeholder Working Group 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact One Ocean Hub researchers at the University of the South Pacific, Fiji, have established a network of stakeholders and are undertaking ongoing engagement and consultation with this group to inform research design and priorities in country.

Organisations engaged:
3rd Sector
Fiji Locally Managed Marine Areas Network; Fiji Women in Fisheries; IUCN-Oceania; Wildlife Conservation Society-Melanesia Office; Conservation International; Fiji Women in Maritime

Policy Makers
Ministry of Waterways and Environment; Ministry of Forests; Ministry of Fisheries; Ministry of Women and Poverty Alleviation; Ministry of iTaukei Affairs; Ministry of Economy; Ministry of Education, Heritage and Arts

Regional Management Organisations
Office of the Pacific Ocean Commissioner (OPOC)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description First Planning Meeting of the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development in Copenhagen 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Daniela Diz (Strathclyde) contributed expertise to shaping the priorities of the Decade in areas related to inter-disciplinarity, data gaps in deep sea ecosystems, mesopelagic species, and liaised with Hub partners present to collaborate on related projects.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://oceandecade.org/resource/58/Summary-Report-of-the-First-Global-Planning-Meeting-UN-Decade-of...
 
Description GHANA Policy Partner Consultations 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Ongoing meetings in Ghana between our academic partners at the University of Cape Coast and relevant national agencies to discuss the extent to identify the challenges and possible areas of collaboration. The first meeting: (1) examined data and records held by the environmental agenices on projects and research concerning the oceans; (2) established pathways for engagement and communication; (3) co-identified priority research foci. A second meeting which included a new set of government agencies (EPA) confirmed the prioritisation of (1) fisheries and socio-economic issues; and (2) human rights, legal and governance issues surrounding the blue economy.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019,2020
 
Description Intergovernmental Conference on Marine Biodiversity of Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Daniela Diz (Strathclyde) attended the second session of the Intergovernmental Conference to negotiate a new legally binding instrument under the law of the sea convention on marine biodiversity of areas beyond national jurisdiction. Dr Diz contributed expertise to delegates and negotiators in the field of area-based management tools and environmental impact assessments.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.un.org/bbnj/
 
Description Interview: Assessing the feasibility and modalities of setting up a new EU-Africa Task Force for policy cooperation and dialogue on international ocean governance. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Prof Elisa Morgera was interviewed as part of the preparations of a study commissioned by the European Commission, DG MARE (Maritime Affairs and Fisheries), which explores the need for further work in the context of the EU's partnership with Africa to develop a joint ocean governance agenda, including the development of sustainable fisheries and blue economy. The study aims in particular at assessing the feasibility and modalities of setting up a new EU-Africa Task Force for policy cooperation and dialogue on international ocean governance.

Regions Involved: Europe; Africa

Organisations involved: European Commission (DG MARE)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
 
Description Lalela Ulwandle - Empatheatre Tour SOUTH AFRICA 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Empatheatre is a trangressive approach to co-production of research. The process produces a theatrical performance that is based on interviews with research subjects. Their perspectives are then reflected to them and to new audiences through the play. After the play, a discussion is held to recieve audiences' impressions and promts new evidence. The Hub's play, Lalela Ulwandle, developed from initial interviws the first year seeks to gather information about ocean use, ocean heritage and affective connections to the sea that promote wellbeing. The play toured six towns, with a total of 16 performances and 16 post-show discussions and tribunals. On tour we had a total of 349 participants sit with us through the show and tribunals, and in Durban we had a total of 398 participants. Over the two weeks we reached a total of 747 participants in the shows directly. Some of the repeat participants included officials involvled in environmental impact assessments who expressed an interest in having the play included in processes for communicating potential impacts of marine and coastal developments on coastal communities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.iol.co.za/mercury/goodlife/listen-to-the-sea-33807711
 
Description Lalela Ulwandle - Media - Print or Online 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact A total of 17 articles in print were identified and according to a report conducted by Pear Africa, 4 print media for Lalela reached 451,002 people, with an estimated publicity value of R547,149,65. We had 4 online articles with a reach of 425,162, with an estimated publicity value of R18,720.00
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://news.artsmart.co.za/2019/10/empatheatre-presents-lalela-ulwandle.html
 
Description Lalela Ulwandle - Media- Broadcast 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact One radio broadcast interview with Neil Coppen and Rory Booth which reached 171000 people with an estimated publicity value of R67,638.06.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Marine Regions Forum 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Daniela Diz (Strathclyde) ontributed to group debates on area-based management tools, including marine protected areas, climate change and oceans, ecosystem approach and large marine ecosystems, as well as the role of regional organisations in oceans governance. The meeting generated key messages targeted at ocean governance organisations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.prog-ocean.org/marine-regions-forum/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2020/02/MRF2019_Key-Messa...
 
Description NAMIBIA Policy Stakeholder Consultation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Namibia with the Ministry of Fisheries and numerous other government stakeholders to discuss the ocean related challenges that the OOH could tackle. Areas identified
included evaluation of impact on deep water habitat by marine phosphate mining. The meeting spurred a discussion on how to work together and formalise partnership.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Namibia Community Consultations 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact One Ocean Hub sociology researchers conducted a series of field visits in order to undertake consultations with relevant local authorities, community representatives, fisher groups and organisations and small business. The aim was to understand the from a variety of stakeholders their connection to and reliance on the ocean, and their involvement in ocean governance, challenges and experience.
The consultations took the form of 14 focus groups (each lasting 1-1.5 hours), and included representatives from local authorities, the Chief of the Topnaar indigenous community, women's fisher groups, youth groups, fishermen, and fish processors.
In addition, 200 questionnaire responses were received.

Country involved: Namibia

Organisations engaged
Topnaar Community (via Chief of the Topnaar)
Local municipalities of Walvis Bay, Henties Bay, Skakopmund
Woomen's fisher groups
Youth groups
Mussel harvester association
local fishermen

Outcomes
As a result, members of the Topnaar community have been recruited to the research team to facilitate further engagement, including translation of research products to local languages. The team also established partnerships with the main local authorities.
These consultations are informing the design of the next phase of research in Namibia.
Country involved: Namibia

Organisations engaged
Topnaar Community (via Chief of the Topnaar)
Local municipalities of Walvis Bay, Henties Bay, Skakopmund
Woomen's fisher groups
Youth groups
Mussel harvester association
local fishermen

Outcomes
As a result, members of the Topnaar community have been recruited to the research team to facilitate further engagement, including translation of research products to local languages. The team also established partnerships with the main local authorities.
These consultations are informing the design of the next phase of research in Namibia.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description National Geographic Article: The world missed a critical deadline to safeguard biodiversity 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The One Ocean Hub´s director Elisa Morgera has been quoted in the National Geographic article "The world missed a critical deadline to safeguard biodiversity, UN report says". Drawing on a major report published in September, the article discusses how the world has failed to meet the United Nations biodiversity targets (the Aichi targets adopted under the UN Convention on Biological Diversity).

In the article, Morgera highlighted the link between improved biodiversity protection and the formal recognition by lawmakers of biodiversity as the very foundation of human rights.

"Once you bring human rights in and you realize that this is not just a question about this particular plant or microbe, but it's about everybody's [right to health, clean water, and food], the conversation changes and governments have a heavier weight on their shoulders to take these things seriously", Morgera is quoted as saying.

According to this premise, the One Ocean Hub is carrying out legal and inter-disciplinary research on human rights and the marine environment, with a view to enhancing and making more inclusive the science-policy interface on the conservation and sustainable use of marine biodiversity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/article/world-missed-critical-deadline-to-safeguard-biodi...
 
Description Ocean Genome: Challenges and Opportunities 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact South African researcher Prof Rachel Wynberg (University of Cape Town) is the lead author on the publication, "The Ocean Genome and future prospects for ocean governance and equity" https://doi.org/10.1038/s41893-020-0522-9

This publication, was the feature of this webinar. The paper's authors and other experts in the field discuss how the unique genetic diversity of the ocean can be protected, and how the benefits that come from exploring the ocean genome can be more equitably distributed, as well as the implications for policy makers, international cooperation and the new agreement on the conservation and sustainable use of marine biodiversity of areas beyond national jurisdiction (BBNJ).

Organisations involved: World Resources Institute (webinar host), University of Cape Town, South Africa
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.wri.org/events/2020/04/webinar-ocean-genome-challenges-and-opportunities
 
Description One Ocean Hub Solomon Islands: Stakeholder Consultations 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact As part of the One Ocean Hub work package zero activity in the Solomon Islands, a stakeholder consultation event was held in December 2020. The event gathered together stakeholders from Government Ministries, local NGOs, community organisations, development practitioners, and researchers, to discuss the findings of the WP0 research to determine gaps and intersections in ocean policy and research, and inform a roadmap for research in the Solomon Islands under the One Ocean Hub.

Countries involved:
Solomon Islands

Organisations Engaged:
Government
• Solomon Islands Government Ministry of Tourism
• Solomon Islands Government Prime Ministers Office
• Solomon Islands Government Ministry of Provincial Government and Institutional Strengthening
• Solomon Islands Government Ministry of Finance and Treasury
• Solomon Islands Government Ministry of Development Planning and Aid Coordination
• Solomon Islands Government Ministry of Environment, Climate Change, Disaster Management and Meteorology.
• Solomon Islands Government Ministry of Mines, Minerals and Rural Electrification.
• Solomon Islands Government Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources
• Solomon Islands Government Ministry of Justice and Legal Affairs
NGOS and Community Representatives
• Solomon Islands Community Conservation Partnership
• Landowners' Advocacy and Legal Support Unit
• Islands Knowledge Institution
• World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF)
• Wildlife Conservation Society
• WorldFish
Education and Research
• Solomon Islands National University
• University of the South Pacific

Outcomes
Co-designing research plan for next phase with stakeholders involved in this consultation to ensure that research is embedded in local context and with the organisations with agency to implement project outputs for change.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description One Ocean Hub-UNDOALOS Nippon Fellowship Capacity Programme 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact As a result of the COVID19 pandemic, UN Division on Ocean Affairs and the Law of the Sea (UNDOALOS) sought to refocus its capacity-building activities for Nippon Fellows and Alumni. To achieve this, UNDOALOS partnered with the One Ocean Hub to co-develop a series of joint online events to reach out to the ocean governance community during the COVID-19 emergency. This series of online sessions sought to engage with UN/Nippon Fellow alumni network of government officers from 80 countries, with the aim of providing opportunities for continued learning, discussions, and engagement in key ocean-related spheres, including to identify and address the new and additional challenges stemming from the impacts of COVID-19. The programme was also designed to provide a platform to learn about Hub researchers' findings; share their own challenges and ideas for more effective ocean governance; and receive training for international negotiations. These seminars drew on research conducted in the Hub as well as the experiences of Hub researchers more broadly. By opening its network of Nippon Fellows, UNDOALOS facilitated the connection of Hub researchers with government and civil society working on ocean issues from more than 80 countries, creating opportunities for international exposure for DAC and UK researchers, as well as opportunities for small-scale fishing communities leaders to share their views internationally and potentially explore opportunities for cross-national learning and alliances (contributing directly to the Hub's objective of connecting knowledge and dialogue across scales from local to international level).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.un.org/Depts/los/nippon/OnlineAlumniActivities.pdf
 
Description Ongoing engagement with South Africa Government to predict and adapt to changes in fishery ecoystems caused by climate change 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Ongoing engagement with the South Africa Government Department of environment, forestry and fisheries (DEFF). Hub researcher Dr Lynne Shannon (University of Cape Town) is working in ongoing partnership with DEFF Scientific Working Groups, and specific task teams on small pelagic fisheries, climate change, top predator, and the seabird task team. Dr Shannon is developing an ecosystem model of the South Benguela Current ecosystem in order to model and predict the impact of climate change to economically important small pelagic fish stocks.

Country: South Africa

Organisations Engaged: South Africa Government Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries, Small Pelagic Fishery Scientific Working Group, and Seabird Taskteam.

Outcomes:
Shannon provides ecosystem perspectives to fisheries decision making, including tabling of relevant documentation and expression of concerns around non-precautionary management approaches. Shannon and team have developed a prototype ecosystem model of the Southern Benguela ecosystem for use in offshore fisheries management. Shannon engages with the DEFF working group to model management approaches.
Decisions of the Task Team, informed by Shannon's inputs are due first half of 2021 (delayed due to COVID-19).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description PACIFIC ISLANDS Transdisciplinary Workshop and Stakeholder Consultations 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Ongoing consultations with relevant stakeholders including local assemblies, environmental protection agencies, fisheries commission, other researcher and others to determine gaps and intersections in ocean policy and research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019,2020
 
Description Pacific Ocean Alliance Conference PACIFIC ISLANDS 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Four of our academic partners from the University of South Pacific attended the Pacific Ocean Allaince conference in Fiji. Participants sought to build appropriate frameworks that provide the best chances of successfully managing Pacific Island resources in an integrated and sustainable way, drawing on heritage and more recent best practices, standards and limits set by our communities and leaders, and international bodies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.spc.int/events/pacific-ocean-alliance-conference
 
Description SOUTH AFRICA Marine and Coastal Educators Network 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Kerry Sink showcased South Africa's new MPA network and introduced OOH at the Marine and Coastal Educators Network conference in January 2020. A key outcome of this engagement was the assertion by marine educators that they had no understanding of ecosystem diversity in the ocean. This led to a succesful flexible fund proposal to create the Mzansea marine education programme.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Science Shambles 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Kerry Howell participated on Science Shambles (a podcast where world leading scientists just chat about science), on the topic of oceans and climate change.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SKad9waxrLQ
 
Description Skills for the Future Summit - CARIBBEAN 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Alana Maline (University of West Indies) and Kelly Hoareau (University of Seychelles) collaborated on a presentation at the Skills for the Future Summit hosted by the Ministry of Education, Technological and Vocational Training of the Government of Barbados on marine life, eco-friendly development, and creative blue economies which generated interest and support for the One Ocean Hub's programmes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.eventbrite.com/e/skills-for-the-future-summit-registration-75975955127#
 
Description South Africa & Caribbean: Invited Presentations to UNESCO-IOC: Principles for transformative ocean governance 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Hub researchers were invited to present at the the Latin America and Caribbean Regional Workshop on Marine Spatial Planning and Sustainable Blue Economy in the North East Tropical Pacific and Wider Caribbean Regions. The event, organised by The Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO (IOC-UNESCO), took place in October 2020, online.

South African Hub researcher Prof Lombard presented on collaborative work of the One Ocean Hub. Her presentation titled "Principles for transformative ocean governance", was informed by collaborations from across the Hub network (South Africa and Ghana), and with partner projects.

Fellow Hub researcher, Dr Alana Lancaster of University of West Indies (Guyana) presented on "Emerging Opportunities and Challenges within the Blue Economy in the Latin America & Caribbean Region".

Relevant Countries: South Africa; Ghana; Caribbean Region, Latin America (international reach)

Sectors engaged: IOC-UNESCO
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL http://www.mspglobal2030.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/MSProadmap_Presentation_LAC_20201028.pdf
 
Description South Africa: Algoa Bay Marine Spatial Plan (MSP) Project: Ongoing Stakeholder Engagement 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The One Ocean Hub work in South Africa contributes to the Government funded Algoa Bay project. The project seeks to develop and demonstrate a pilot integrated Marine Spatial Plan (MSP), and examine how the IOC-UNESCO ten step MSP process be supported or amended to ensure that the process is socially and environmentally just and inclusive. OOH specifically contributes to systems modelling for the project.

Country: South Africa

Organisations engaged:
The project engages directly and throughout with an active stakeholder group, comprising:

SA Government, Department of Environment, Forestry, and Fisheries (DEFF): Implementing agency for the MSP
National and Provincial authorities (South African National Parks, Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife): Management agencies appointed by DEFF to implement ocean governance policies and plans
Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality: to support integrated ocean management and implementation of MSP at local scale and integration with other area-based management tools
NGOs (WildOceans; WCS; WWF; TNC): To support integrated ocean management
Communities (fishers, recreational users etc): to support inclusion of local and indigenous knowledge and integrated ocean management
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.algoabayproject.com/community-of-practice
 
Description South Africa: Developing a regional marine spatial planning strategy for the Western Indian Ocean Region 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Hub researchers at Nelson Mandela University have been commissioned by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) for the development of a regional Marine Spatial Planning (MS) strategy for the Western Indian Ocean. This project is also reported under 'Further or Additional Funding'.

This engagement is ongoing and will result in the following key outputs: MSP Strategy for the Western Indian Ocean - consultation report, strategy document, and policy brief

Outcome: These outputs will inform the implementation of the regional MSP strategy for the Western Indian Ocean
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.algoabayproject.com/wio-msp
 
Description South Africa: Lalela uLwandle Empatheatre Radio Broadcast 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The Lalela uLwandle play (reported under 'Artistic Outputs') aimed to optimally disrupt and open up public dialogue around ocean decision making in South Africa, particularly along the Kwa-Zulu Natal coastline. At the time the appeal against a decision to go ahead with large offshore Oil and Gas exploration, that had very poor public consultation. At the time Lalela uLwandle was touring 6 towns along the Kwa-Zulu Natal (KZN) coastline, where the team shared findings from 10 months of collaborative practice based research into tangible and intangible heritage of the oceans in KZN, and how these heritages intersect with contemporary and historical economic development of the KZN coastline. Neil Coppen (Director/writer) and Rory Booth (Actor) held a public dialogue on a National Radio station (Lotus FM, 14 October). The following year, Kira Erwin (Co-I) participated in a national SA FM radio interview which became a "For Water For Life" podcast episode and an article in the Daily Maverick news site.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2020-09-28-empatheatre-speaking-about-lalela-ulwandle/
 
Description Sustainable and Equitable Fisheries for Ghana: Ongoing Stakeholder Engagements 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Ongoing engagements with the Tourism Authority, Fisheries Commission and Environment Protection Authority in Ghana on the design and development of a suite of tools to support integrated ecosystem based management of Ghana's marine area, and methods to support supplementary livelihoods. These engagements form part of the Sustainable and Equitable Fisheries partnership (reported under partnerships and collaborations).

Country involved: Ghana

Organisations engaged:
Government of Ghana - Fisheries Commission, Environment Protection Authority, Tourism Authority
Local NGOs: Hen Mpoano
Community Groups: Elmina Fishing community

Outcomes
This is an ongoing engagement, detailed under partnerships and collaboration.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Sustaining South Africa's Small Scale Fishing Communities 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Ongoing engagement with a network of small scale fisher leaders in South Africa and civil society organisations (reported under partnerships and collaborations).

Countries involved: South Africa

Organisations engaged:
Small scale fisher leaders (individuals from local fishing communities)
Eastern Cape Black Fishers Womxns cooperative
Sangoma and Inyanga community

Civil Society Organisations
Olifants Estuary Management Forum
South Durban Community Environmental Alliance
Centre for Environmental Rights
Masifundise Development Trust

Outcomes
Report published by South Durban Community Envionmental Alliance (reported under 'Publications'): https://sdcea.co.za/download/cast-out-the-systematic-exclusion-of-the-kwa-zulu-natal-subsistence-fishers-from-the-fishing-rights-regime-in-south-africa/

Developed a learning and solidarity network of small scale fisher leaders and local civil society, strengthening networks in-country to support small scale fisheries in responding to immediate challenges affecting their access to coast and resources: covid-19, blue economy developments, commercial fishing operations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/small-scale-fisheries-and-blue-justice/
 
Description Towards the Development of an African Strategy for Ocean Governance 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Hub South African Researcher Prof Amanda Lombard was invited to attend the United Nations Environment Programme, African Union Commission and the African Ministerial Conference on the Environment (AMCEN). This was the second consultative meeting on the development of an African strategy for ocean governance.

Output: This meeting will inform recommendations for the African Union as the implementing agent for the regional marine spatial plan strategy for the Western Indian Ocean.

Anticipated Outcome: The implementation of the regional MSP strategy for the Western Indian Ocean using socially and environmentally just and inclusive MSP processes.

Countries involved: Pan Africa (research specifically from South Africa)

Organisations engaged: African Union; United Nations Environment Programme
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Transformed and Transformative Governance Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Conference hosted by academic partners in South Africa and attended by partners from across the Hub to develop principles for ocean governance. The aim of the conference was to provide a forum for a wide range of ocean experts and stakeholders to engage with the latest developments impacting on ocean governance from development, ecosystem-based and human-rights-based approaces, before starting to reflect and give direction on what transformed and transformative ocean governance means and requires. The event contributed to new working relationships with civil society organisation
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://cmr.mandela.ac.za/Events,-Initiatives-and-News/Transformed-and-Transformative-Ocean-Governan...
 
Description UKRI-UNDP GCRF Knowledge Partnership 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Daniela Diz (Strathclyde) and John Ansah (Univsersity of Cape Coast) participated in the UKRI-UNDP GCRF Knowledge Partnership Workshop that sought to explore Hub involvement in the UNDPs development accelerator lab project. Led to a relationship with the UNDP Accelerator Lab in the Pacific.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description UN World Oceans Day: Keynote 'Spotlight' talk 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Elisa Morgera was invited to give keynote speech on UN World Oceans Day Celebratory Event "Innovation for a Sustainable Ocean", under the theme "Spotlight Solutions for the Ocean".

Prof Morgera was formally thanked for her participation and contribution in the event by the Under-Secretary-General for Legal Affairs and United Nations Legal Counsel. The One Ocean Hub have been invited to become an official partner in UN World Oceans Day 2021 (for a second year).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://oneoceanhub.glasscubes.com/share/s/iajucpia2bpi657pmimj9cmvmv
 
Description WKHDR Workshop at ICES 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact One Ocean Hub co-investigator, Kieran Hyder (CEFAS) co-developed and co-chaired a International Council for Exploration of the Seas Workshop on Integrating angler heterogeneity into the management of marine recreational fisheries (WKHDR). Thie research presented is important to ICES in its role of providing advice on fish stocks generally and more specifically in delivery of quality evidence on the impacts of recreational fisheries.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.ices.dk/news-and-events/asc/asc2019/Pages/Theme-session-Q.aspx
 
Description Workshop for Developing and Middle Income Countries On Intellectual Property and Benefit Sharing in the BBNJ agreement 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact On 10th July 2020 Prof Elisa Morgera contributed to an online discussion on intellectual property and fair and equitable benefit-sharing in a new legally binding instrument on biodiversity beyond national jurisdictions (BBNJ), which is currently being negotiated at the UN in New York.

The aim of the seminar was to bring together diverse regional groups of negotiators (notably DAC-country delegates) to develop textual proposals and identify potential alignments on text and substance from a developing/middle-income country perspective.

The seminar was organized by Siva Thambisetty, Associate Professor of Intellectual Property Law, London School of Economics.

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/intellectual-property-and-benefit-sharing-in-the-bbnj-instrument-registration-111331421278.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/intellectual-property-and-benefit-sharing-in-the-bbnj-instrument-regi...
 
Description World Ocean Week 2020: One Ocean Hub Event Series 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In April 2020 the One Ocean Hub was invited to be a partner to the UN World Oceans Day 2020 on the 8th June 2020, which, due to Covid-19, had been converted into an online event and expanded to 'World Oceans Week' (WOW) (running from 9-12 June 2020).
In response to this invitation, the One Ocean Hub organised and hosted a series of 12 events which would take place throughout World Oceans Week (WOW) 2020 (9th-12th June 2020), attracting over 900 participants globally.

This programme of events brought to the international audience early findings from the Hub research, and provided a forum for discussion, and connecting ocean governance issues experienced at a local level, to the international domain. The events included personal experiences and lessons learnt at the ocean science-policy interface, the role of the arts in making ocean research and governance more inclusive, and the legacy of colonization on the law of the sea. Several events are organized by the early-career researchers involved in the Hub

The overall aim of the Hub's presence in WOW was to:
1. Further establish an authoritative and engaging voice for the Hub internationally
2. Share Hub research findings and researcher experiences across a range of topics, and further advance our research and research planning in conversation with government, UN and non-governmental partners across the world.
3. Bring local perspectives into the international conversation on oceans governance
4. Increase the reach of the Hub and Hub Network

The main outcome of the events was a substantial increase in the reach of the Hub and Hub network. The events attracted more than 900 participants, and led to an increase in subscriptions to the Hub newsletter of over 600, as well as 20% increase in our social media following. In addition, through individual event feedback surveys, several requests for additional information were received as well as follow up activity. For example, following on from the event 'Lalela uLwandle' in which South African researchers presented the empatheatre methodology, the researchers were invited to present at the UK Marine Social Science Association.

The One Ocean Hub have been invited to become an official partner in UN World Oceans Day 2021 (for a second year).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/un-world-oceans-day/