GCRF One Ocean Hub

Lead Research Organisation: University of Strathclyde
Department Name: Law

Abstract

Over 70% of the earth's surface is ocean. As a global population, we are entirely reliant upon a healthy ocean: it contributes to the renewal of freshwater; it absorbs over a quarter of global carbon dioxide, and it produces half the oxygen we breathe. The ocean has the potential to make significant contributions to sustainable development. Many developing countries already depend on their ocean resources for food, work and livelihoods. Yet we are reaching an ocean health crisis: cumulative pressures such as over-exploitation of its resources, ocean plastics and pollution and climate change, all compounded by multiple competing uses, are pushing the ocean ecosystem to a tipping point.
There is an urgent need for more integrated ocean governance, to ensure greater balance between ocean conservation and sustainable use (Sustainable Development Goal 14) and realise the ocean's potential to contribute to poverty reduction, human health, healthy ecosystems on land, climate change mitigation and adaptation, equitable economic growth and decent employment.
"We are the sea...we must wake up to this ancient truth...It is time to create things for ourselves, to create established standards of excellence that match those of our ancestors."
It is with this spirit that the ONE OCEAN Hub will transform our response to the urgent challenges facing our ocean. The Hub will weave learning from the ocean, and traditional knowledge of the peoples who rely upon it, with scientific excellence, innovative legal approaches and artistic methods. Our aim is to bridge the disconnections in law, science and policy across all levels from the local to the international. We aim to empower vulnerable communities, woman and youth in the blue economy and catalyse the inclusive and integrated governance approaches required to ensure a healthy ocean and flourishing communities and economies.
The Hub will specifically address the challenges of South Africa, Namibia, Ghana, Fiji and Solomon Islands in realising the economic, socio-cultural and environmental benefits from the ocean. It aims to support these countries' efforts towards developing a sustainable and fair blue economy by providing new scientific data and tools to engage different sectors and groups within society, particularly vulnerable communities, woman and youth, in identifying opportunities, risks and trade-offs to: i) prevent and mitigate negative development impacts connected to the ocean, ii) participate in traditional and emerging ocean activities, and iii) predict the socioeconomic benefits of ocean conservation.
The Hub pioneers integrating law and arts, policy, informatics, education, history, anthropology, and philosophy to provide targeted advice on coherent and flexible, pro-poor and gender- sensitive, climate-proofed and transparent laws and policies across the areas of environmental, human rights, science and technology, trade and investment. The Hub will further integrate biology, physics, chemistry, oceanography, ecology, mathematics, socio-environmental sciences and law to advance understanding of sustainable fisheries in the face of climate change impacts, as well as socio-economic and cultural considerations. The Hub will also increase understanding of conservation and extraction options for deep-sea mineral, biological and freshwater resources, integrating biology, ecology, geology, socio-environmental sciences and law. Through innovative use of arts the hub will transcend traditional boundaries in policy, law, and between ocean stakeholders from local communties to international organisatons, to respectfully and effectively include local communities' traditional knowledge in decision-making at the national and local level on the blue economy. The Hub will develop the integrated governance frameworks and strengthen the capacity within commnities to drive innovative approaches to a fair and sustainable blue economy for South Africa, Namibia, Ghana, Fiji and Solomon Islands

Planned Impact

In coastal and island communities healthy oceans are fundamental to healthy economies and livelihoods. The One Ocean Hub aims to improve the livelihoods of small-scale fishing and indigenous communities that are dependent on the ocean, with particular attention to women and youth in South Africa, Namibia, Ghana, Fiji and the Solomon Islands. The Hub will empower, build capacity within, and learn from, the people who rely on the oceans, and whom are disproportionally impacted by the failure to protect it. It is on this local level that the Hub will have the greatest impact. Community leadership in research and arts-based approaches will enable better understanding of traditional practices. It will build capacity and co-develop new resources for communities, and, in so doing, will support the integration of community views, values and knowledge in scientific assessments, management and decision-making on ocean conservation and the blue economy. Legal empowerment will enhance the capacity of communities, women and youth to fight for their rights and improve, through legal literacy, their livelihoods. Youths will directly benefit from a One Ocean education programme designed to inform, inspire and empower 'Generation 2030' on ocean matters and through the development of legal mechanisms (Youth Ocean Charter) to amplify youth voices at international level.
At national-regional level, governments and inter-governmental organisations will benefit from access to a new scientific evidence base, methods and technologies to underpin integrated ocean assessment and management. Specifically, government entities (eg Namibian Ministry for Fisheries and Marine Resources, will benefit from region-specific integrated assessments of cumulative pressures on ocean ecosystems. Through targeted capacity strengthening, governments and national research institutes will be empowered to undertake integrated marine research and monitoring programmes, and through co-developed decision-making frameworks will be able to implement ocean resource management which balances ocean conservation and sustainable use for fair and equitable benefit sharing. We will work with regional and national governments to implement sustainable, inclusive and collaborative ocean management strategies, such as the ocean dimension of the African Union's Science, Technology and Innovation Strategy for Africa and the Pacific Community Centre for Ocean Science. The above, together with the development of guidance for the coherent implementation of international law at different levels and through a programme of legal capacity building, the negotiating capacity of developing countries will be strengthened within relevant international fora.
The One Ocean Hub is a direct and systematic response to the Call for Action agreed upon at the 2017 UN Ocean Conference on Sustainable Development Goal 14. The Hub's network of international project partners (eg UNEP, UNDP, UNOALOS, FAO) will support national process of implementation of international law on the ocean and sustainable development. These partners have already co-defined the Hub's research to ensure its aligned to key ongoing international processes. Specifically, the Hub will contribute to the preparations of the 2020 UN Ocean Follow-up Conference, an expected mandate in 2019 from the UN Environment Assembly to develop new instruments on ocean plastics, a post-2020 global biodiversity framework, and the 2020-2030 Programme for the Development and Periodic Review of Environmental Law of UNEP. The involvement of the Hub in such processes will ensure that knowledge from across the Hub, from local to regional levels, will influence international process. The Hub network will benefit all partner organisations by bringing together organisations across sectors and scales to tackle institutional disconnects and promote sustainable partnerships from the local-international level.

Organisations

People

ORCID iD

Elisa Morgera (Principal Investigator)
Warwick Sauer (Co-Investigator)
Martin J. Attrill (Co-Investigator)
Emmanuel Acheampong (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-6243-294X
Tobias Schonwetter (Co-Investigator)
Alison Cathcart (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1291-6561
BOLANLE ERINOSHO (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-0734-2383
Hendrik Johannes Van As (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5288-5344
J Murray Roberts (Co-Investigator)
Andrew Kenny (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4944-1221
Pierre MAZZEGA (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-2398-3954
Harrison Kwame Golo (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9805-5477
Philile Nonhlanhla Mbatha (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5705-0330
Tom Baum (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5918-847X
Elaine Webster (Co-Investigator)
Michael Heath (Co-Investigator)
Joseph Aggrey-Fynn (Co-Investigator)
Rosemary Ann Dorrington (Co-Investigator)
Marie Jennifer Boswell (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7099-7713
Amanda Lombard (Co-Investigator)
Kerry Edward Howell (Co-Investigator)
Ann Cheryl Armstrong (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3282-8916
Matthew Harrison (Co-Investigator)
Benjamin Kofi Nyarko (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6560-9613
Stephanie Switzer (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3928-988X
Maria Baker (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-6977-8935
Kitche Magak (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8336-9932
Andrew Sweetman (Co-Investigator)
Catherine Muhoma (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0816-1661
Stuart Jeffrey (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-2084-4174
Tracy Shimmield (Co-Investigator)
Sian Rees (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9606-783X
Matthew Grant Allen (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3490-9960
Lorenzo Cotula (Co-Investigator)
Claire Lajaunie (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-8838-9062
Sylvie Da Lomba (Co-Investigator)
Dylan Kenneth McGarry (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5738-3813
Bernadette Snow (Co-Investigator)
Alexander Claus Winkler (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7864-8243
KERRY SINK (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5051-573X
John Windie Ansah (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-7123-888X
Paul Lusty (Co-Investigator)
Clive James Fox (Co-Investigator)
Mathew Upton (Co-Investigator)
José Adolfo De Oliveira (Co-Investigator)
Alana Malinde Soma Nkese Lancaster (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-8956-7297
Suzanne Jane Painting (Co-Investigator)
Merle Sowman (Co-Investigator)
Warren Potts (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6707-0383
Carol Jacqueline Cotterill (Co-Investigator)
Daniel Oliver Jones (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5218-1649
Bryan John Clark (Co-Investigator)
Georgina Yaa Oduro (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3030-7196
Morgan Wairiu (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-8245-5778
Daniela Diz Pereira Pinto (Co-Investigator)
Matthew Revie (Co-Investigator)
Patrick Vrancken (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9941-4718
Stephen Robin Dye (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-4182-8475
Rachel Paula Wynberg (Co-Investigator)
Sebastian Hennige (Co-Investigator)
Bhavani Narayanaswamy (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5810-9127
Gilianne Brodie (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6896-4696
Derrick Armstrong (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1671-9290
Saskia Anna Filip Vermeylen (Co-Investigator)
Francesco Sindico (Co-Investigator)
Katherine Rebbecca Royse (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5660-2615
Margit R Wilhelm (Co-Investigator)
Lynne Shannon (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7842-0636
Jeremy Maxwell Hills (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9204-2536
Natalia Serpetti (Researcher Co-Investigator)
Robin Cook (Researcher Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9604-0204

Publications

10 25 50
 
Title Lalela Ulwandle - Empatheatre - SOUTH AFRICA 
Description Empatheatre is a research-based, theatre-making methodology. A script is developed and performed, emerging from a social science research process consisting of interviews and ethnogrpahy. Post-analysis the team sets out to shape the data into an engrossing and relevant true-to-life theatrical experience. Such experiences are intended to offer theatrical epiphanies that speak emotively to the realities of the situation, and above all to honour the informants' narratives, narratives which are carefully woven into the messaging fabric of the play. Performances are then played to strategic audiences, often made up of people with diverse, even conflicting, views on the central concern represented in the play. Post-play facilitated dialogues allow for another layer of reflexive data to emerge. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact The play has been performed to audiences that consist of hundreds of people who have reported not only realising the depth of their feeling and connection to the ocean, but also of the imperative to protect it. In South Africa, formal nature conservation has a damaging legacy of exclusion to answer for, given that our conservation policies 'have, to date, almost exclusively reflected Western scientific values and beliefs, with an emphasis on protecting nature from human impacts' (Cocks et al., 2012). South Africa is not alone in grappling with this tension; in many countries, well-meaning biodiversity protection policies have resulted in additional formal exclusions for indigenous and economically marginalized groups (Crandall et al., 2018). Some of the social impacts of Marine Protected Areas in South Africa include weakening of local participatory governance, the loss of tenure rights, access to resources by already marginalised communities, leading to food insecurity and reduced household income, and negative impacts on culture and identity (Sowman and Sunde, 2018). Recognizing how different knowledge systems and programs underpinned by these can lead to disparities and exclusions, environmental researchers have argued for an understanding of the important relationship between biodiversity and cultural diversity in conservation management (Cocks et al., 2012). Representatives of the International Association for Impact Assessment (IAIA) South Africa came to see one of the Durban Shows, and went on to bring more representatives to shows after that. Since the performance they have invited Lalela to two different events, one locally and another abroad. Empatheatre researchers plan to continue to cultivate particular audiences to encourage conversation and strategising around the tradeoffs that lead to conservation wins awarded at the expense of marginal groups, or where marginal groups are awarded socio-economic resources at the expense of environmental conservation. 
URL https://sancor.nrf.ac.za/Documents/Oct%202019%20Emphatheatre.pdf
 
Description The first year of research within the One Ocean Hub has been focused on understanding the key challenges related to sustainable ocean governance in the context of the Hub's focus countries of South Africa and Ghana, and laterally with Fiji, Solomon Islands and Namibia. This work has focused on understanding, from the perspective of different stakeholders in country, the critical concerns in relation to ocean governance that the Hub should seek to address and add value to. This contextualisation work has identified the following common challenges across DAC nations with respect to ocean governance:

1) Many 'blue economy' activities, may undermine key targets of SDG14 and further marginalise coastal communities vulnerable to ocean resource availability for either livelihoods or for the protection of their intangible cultural heritage.
2) There is a pressing need to identify and develop avenues for inclusion of marginalised knowledge and experience in the governance of the blue economy at the national level and for the identification of potential legal remedies.
3) Competition between small-scale fisheries and large scale industrial fisheries is exacerbated by a lack of inclusive marine spatial planning and area-based management, which is a consequence of a lack of scientific data and significant data gaps.
4) DAC countries are disadvantaged in international fora relating to the deep sea due to a lack of capacity to undertake deep-sea research and resulting limited understanding of deep-sea ecosystems and processes.
5) Addressing these challenges requires a novel, truly transdisciplinary approach to research at the country level, with involvement from stakeholders at all levels to enable research to provide a fora for connecting the disconnects in dialogue and knowledge across sectors of ocean use, and across scales of governance from the local to the international level.
Exploitation Route In coastal and island communities healthy oceans are fundamental to healthy economies and livelihoods. The One Ocean Hub aims to improve the livelihoods of small-scale fishing and indigenous communities that are dependent on the ocean, with particular attention to women and youth in South Africa, Namibia, Ghana, Fiji and the Solomon Islands. The Hub will empower, build capacity within, and learn from, the people who rely on the oceans, and whom are disproportionally impacted by the failure to protect it. It is at this local level that the Hub will have the greatest impact. Community leadership in research and arts-based approaches will enable better understanding of traditional practices. It will build capacity and co-develop new resources for communities, and, in so doing, will support the integration of community views, values and knowledge in scientific assessments, management and decision-making on ocean conservation and the blue economy.

Legal empowerment will enhance the capacity of communities, women and youth to fight for their rights and improve, through legal literacy, their livelihoods. Youths will directly benefit from a One Ocean education programme designed to inform, inspire and empower 'Generation 2030' on ocean matters and through the development of legal mechanisms (Youth Ocean Charter) to amplify youth voices at international level. At national-regional level, governments and inter-governmental organisations will benefit from access to a new scientific evidence base, methods and technologies to underpin integrated ocean assessment and management. Specifically, government entities will benefit from region-specific integrated assessments of cumulative pressures on ocean ecosystems. Through targeted capacity strengthening, governments and national research institutes will be empowered to undertake integrated marine research and monitoring programmes, and through co-developed decision-making frameworks will be able to implement ocean resource management that balances ocean conservation and sustainable use for fair and equitable benefit sharing. We will work with regional and national governments to implement sustainable, inclusive and collaborative ocean management strategies, such as the Office of the Pacific Ocean Commissioner. Together with the development of guidance for the coherent implementation of international law at different levels and through a programme of legal capacity building, the negotiating capacity of developing countries will be strengthened within relevant international fora.

The Hub's network of international project partners (eg UNEP, UNDP, UNOALOS, FAO) will support national process of implementation of international law on the ocean and sustainable development. These partners have already co-defined the Hub's research to ensure it is aligned to key ongoing international processes. Specifically, the Hub will contribute to the preparations of the 2020 UN Ocean Follow-up Conference. The involvement of the Hub in such processes will ensure that knowledge from across the Hub, from local to regional levels, will influence international process. The Hub network will benefit all partner organisations by bringing together organisations across sectors and scales to tackle institutional disconnects and promote sustainable partnerships from the local-international level.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Creative Economy,Environment,Government, Democracy and Justice

 
Description Convention on Biological Diversity Thematic Workshop on Marine and Coastal Biodiversity for the Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
Impact OOH Deputy Director, Dr Daniela Diz (Strathclyde), was invited to contribute to the Convention on Biological Diversity Thematic Workshop on Marine and Coastal Biodiversity for the Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework in Montreal, Canada.
 
Description Course on Multilateral Environmental Agreements
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Lalela Ulwandle - Empatheatre- SOUTH AFRICA
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
 
Description SEYCHELLES Ocean's Policy
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
 
Description Knowledge Action Network SOUTH AFRICA 
Organisation Durban University of Technology
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The empatheatre pilot project and consultations with civil society partners identified the need and opportunity to develop a knowledge action network for citizen monitoring of the Blue Economy in South Africa. The infrastructure of the One Ocean Hub provides a venue for various groups to coalesce and share expertise.
Collaborator Contribution While there are organised groups of fishers responding to fisheries policies and regulations, environmental justice activists responding to extractive industries, conservationists responding to threats to marine biodiversity, these different groups seldom come together, do not all have trusted relationships with researchers, and may even be adversarial towards each other. Lines of race, class, discipline and livelihood concerns are quite firmly entrenched and seldom crossed. The rapid development of the Blue Economy in South Africa, through 'Operation Phakisa', necessitates a more integrated response to ocean governance and health from concerned citizens. An extensive evaluation of a range of KANs found that 'the credibility of knowledge action networks depends to a large extent on the degree to which they include diverse types of knowledge or knowledge systems, the opportunities for these multiple knowledge(s) to interact, and on interactions that distribute power across these multiple knowledge(s). The relevance of KAN for bringing together beneficiaries and academics in addressing the sustainable development challenges of the blue economy was also further discussed at the Port Elizabeth conference on transformed and transformative ocean governance (Jan 2020). To support the KAN development Durban University of Technology (DUT) have made significant in-kind contributions of time and resources in opening access to civil society networks, data collection and analysis as well as report writing. DUT are now an official project partner of the One Ocean Hub and are continuing to work in-kind towards this initiative while collaboratively horizon scanning for funding opportunities.
Impact The knowledge action network contributions to Transformed and Transformative Governance Conference. Disciplines involved: Arts, Sociology, Law
Start Year 2019
 
Description Knowledge Action Network SOUTH AFRICA 
Organisation Rhodes University
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The empatheatre pilot project and consultations with civil society partners identified the need and opportunity to develop a knowledge action network for citizen monitoring of the Blue Economy in South Africa. The infrastructure of the One Ocean Hub provides a venue for various groups to coalesce and share expertise.
Collaborator Contribution While there are organised groups of fishers responding to fisheries policies and regulations, environmental justice activists responding to extractive industries, conservationists responding to threats to marine biodiversity, these different groups seldom come together, do not all have trusted relationships with researchers, and may even be adversarial towards each other. Lines of race, class, discipline and livelihood concerns are quite firmly entrenched and seldom crossed. The rapid development of the Blue Economy in South Africa, through 'Operation Phakisa', necessitates a more integrated response to ocean governance and health from concerned citizens. An extensive evaluation of a range of KANs found that 'the credibility of knowledge action networks depends to a large extent on the degree to which they include diverse types of knowledge or knowledge systems, the opportunities for these multiple knowledge(s) to interact, and on interactions that distribute power across these multiple knowledge(s). The relevance of KAN for bringing together beneficiaries and academics in addressing the sustainable development challenges of the blue economy was also further discussed at the Port Elizabeth conference on transformed and transformative ocean governance (Jan 2020). To support the KAN development Durban University of Technology (DUT) have made significant in-kind contributions of time and resources in opening access to civil society networks, data collection and analysis as well as report writing. DUT are now an official project partner of the One Ocean Hub and are continuing to work in-kind towards this initiative while collaboratively horizon scanning for funding opportunities.
Impact The knowledge action network contributions to Transformed and Transformative Governance Conference. Disciplines involved: Arts, Sociology, Law
Start Year 2019
 
Description Knowledge Action Network SOUTH AFRICA 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The empatheatre pilot project and consultations with civil society partners identified the need and opportunity to develop a knowledge action network for citizen monitoring of the Blue Economy in South Africa. The infrastructure of the One Ocean Hub provides a venue for various groups to coalesce and share expertise.
Collaborator Contribution While there are organised groups of fishers responding to fisheries policies and regulations, environmental justice activists responding to extractive industries, conservationists responding to threats to marine biodiversity, these different groups seldom come together, do not all have trusted relationships with researchers, and may even be adversarial towards each other. Lines of race, class, discipline and livelihood concerns are quite firmly entrenched and seldom crossed. The rapid development of the Blue Economy in South Africa, through 'Operation Phakisa', necessitates a more integrated response to ocean governance and health from concerned citizens. An extensive evaluation of a range of KANs found that 'the credibility of knowledge action networks depends to a large extent on the degree to which they include diverse types of knowledge or knowledge systems, the opportunities for these multiple knowledge(s) to interact, and on interactions that distribute power across these multiple knowledge(s). The relevance of KAN for bringing together beneficiaries and academics in addressing the sustainable development challenges of the blue economy was also further discussed at the Port Elizabeth conference on transformed and transformative ocean governance (Jan 2020). To support the KAN development Durban University of Technology (DUT) have made significant in-kind contributions of time and resources in opening access to civil society networks, data collection and analysis as well as report writing. DUT are now an official project partner of the One Ocean Hub and are continuing to work in-kind towards this initiative while collaboratively horizon scanning for funding opportunities.
Impact The knowledge action network contributions to Transformed and Transformative Governance Conference. Disciplines involved: Arts, Sociology, Law
Start Year 2019
 
Description Law, Heritage and the Blue Economy 
Organisation International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The research of One Ocean Hub co-investigators and initial awardees has highlighted the existing disconnect between international and national law on ocean protection and local customs in South Africa and Ghana. Novel questions about insufficient attention to lifestyle needs and intangible cultural heritage in the context of various blue economy activities (offshore oil and gas developments, fisheries, bio-prospecting and seabed mining) have emerged, as well as questions about the degree of evidence of intangible cultural heritage that would stand in courts or in planning processes have been identified among the preliminary findings of social science researchers in Ghana and the empatheatre methodology in South Africa. The clash between modern laws and customary laws has taken centre stage in fishing and ocean governance. Our preliminary report on Ghana demonstrates that distinctive heritage customs impact fishing activities and other ocean related practices. Traditional chains of command which have long adjudicated over observable breaches of customary law are challenged by changed social dynamics that create contexts within which new laws are seen to be necessary. Modern laws, however, have been established without recourse to customary practices, and often privilege large blue economy investments over small-scale livelihood practices thereby creating clashes. In addition, challenges such as poverty, limited employment opportunities create a dilemma about legislating for ocean health and its exploitation for survival. With regard to the long standing perspective which upholds the notion that poverty is a direct precursor of child labour, it was confirmed in preliminary research that some children with poor parents were working for fishermen. Preliminary research has also confirmed the importance of linking research in international investment law with socio-legal research at the national level and local stakeholder engagement about the blue economy. The initial research on international investment law has also underscored that "blue economy narratives" (blue economy policies and promotional activities) may restrict the opportunities for governments and judiciary to protect local communities' interests that may be negatively impacts by blue economy initiatives, because of international obligations to protect foreign investors. In South Africa, foreign investment in offshore oil and gas development has been identified as a threat by coastal communities. In Ghana, local fishermen feel cheated by the low level of law enforcement associated with industrial fish trawling, which features new patterns of capital mobility such as Chinese investment. The protection of foreign investment in both countries may limit the ability of national governemts to respond to the threats of altering livelihoods for artisanal fisherfolk and other coastal communities.
Collaborator Contribution The intuition to focus on the integration of human rights and the environment to tackle socio-cultural issues around the blue economy has been confirmed by engagement with new partners in civil society and grassroots organisations. A transdisciplinary conference in January on Transformed and Transformative Governance that included these partners, generated working principles for the group.
Impact Outputs: Transformed and Transformed Governance Conference Lalela Ulwandle Empatheatre SOUTH AFRICA Successful Flexible Fund Application by Early Career Researchers to plan and host an Culture and Intangible Heritage Workshop in GHANA Disciplines: Law, Sociology, Anthropology, History, Economics, Marine Science.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Law, Heritage and the Blue Economy 
Organisation Nelson Mandela University
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research of One Ocean Hub co-investigators and initial awardees has highlighted the existing disconnect between international and national law on ocean protection and local customs in South Africa and Ghana. Novel questions about insufficient attention to lifestyle needs and intangible cultural heritage in the context of various blue economy activities (offshore oil and gas developments, fisheries, bio-prospecting and seabed mining) have emerged, as well as questions about the degree of evidence of intangible cultural heritage that would stand in courts or in planning processes have been identified among the preliminary findings of social science researchers in Ghana and the empatheatre methodology in South Africa. The clash between modern laws and customary laws has taken centre stage in fishing and ocean governance. Our preliminary report on Ghana demonstrates that distinctive heritage customs impact fishing activities and other ocean related practices. Traditional chains of command which have long adjudicated over observable breaches of customary law are challenged by changed social dynamics that create contexts within which new laws are seen to be necessary. Modern laws, however, have been established without recourse to customary practices, and often privilege large blue economy investments over small-scale livelihood practices thereby creating clashes. In addition, challenges such as poverty, limited employment opportunities create a dilemma about legislating for ocean health and its exploitation for survival. With regard to the long standing perspective which upholds the notion that poverty is a direct precursor of child labour, it was confirmed in preliminary research that some children with poor parents were working for fishermen. Preliminary research has also confirmed the importance of linking research in international investment law with socio-legal research at the national level and local stakeholder engagement about the blue economy. The initial research on international investment law has also underscored that "blue economy narratives" (blue economy policies and promotional activities) may restrict the opportunities for governments and judiciary to protect local communities' interests that may be negatively impacts by blue economy initiatives, because of international obligations to protect foreign investors. In South Africa, foreign investment in offshore oil and gas development has been identified as a threat by coastal communities. In Ghana, local fishermen feel cheated by the low level of law enforcement associated with industrial fish trawling, which features new patterns of capital mobility such as Chinese investment. The protection of foreign investment in both countries may limit the ability of national governemts to respond to the threats of altering livelihoods for artisanal fisherfolk and other coastal communities.
Collaborator Contribution The intuition to focus on the integration of human rights and the environment to tackle socio-cultural issues around the blue economy has been confirmed by engagement with new partners in civil society and grassroots organisations. A transdisciplinary conference in January on Transformed and Transformative Governance that included these partners, generated working principles for the group.
Impact Outputs: Transformed and Transformed Governance Conference Lalela Ulwandle Empatheatre SOUTH AFRICA Successful Flexible Fund Application by Early Career Researchers to plan and host an Culture and Intangible Heritage Workshop in GHANA Disciplines: Law, Sociology, Anthropology, History, Economics, Marine Science.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Law, Heritage and the Blue Economy 
Organisation Rhodes University
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research of One Ocean Hub co-investigators and initial awardees has highlighted the existing disconnect between international and national law on ocean protection and local customs in South Africa and Ghana. Novel questions about insufficient attention to lifestyle needs and intangible cultural heritage in the context of various blue economy activities (offshore oil and gas developments, fisheries, bio-prospecting and seabed mining) have emerged, as well as questions about the degree of evidence of intangible cultural heritage that would stand in courts or in planning processes have been identified among the preliminary findings of social science researchers in Ghana and the empatheatre methodology in South Africa. The clash between modern laws and customary laws has taken centre stage in fishing and ocean governance. Our preliminary report on Ghana demonstrates that distinctive heritage customs impact fishing activities and other ocean related practices. Traditional chains of command which have long adjudicated over observable breaches of customary law are challenged by changed social dynamics that create contexts within which new laws are seen to be necessary. Modern laws, however, have been established without recourse to customary practices, and often privilege large blue economy investments over small-scale livelihood practices thereby creating clashes. In addition, challenges such as poverty, limited employment opportunities create a dilemma about legislating for ocean health and its exploitation for survival. With regard to the long standing perspective which upholds the notion that poverty is a direct precursor of child labour, it was confirmed in preliminary research that some children with poor parents were working for fishermen. Preliminary research has also confirmed the importance of linking research in international investment law with socio-legal research at the national level and local stakeholder engagement about the blue economy. The initial research on international investment law has also underscored that "blue economy narratives" (blue economy policies and promotional activities) may restrict the opportunities for governments and judiciary to protect local communities' interests that may be negatively impacts by blue economy initiatives, because of international obligations to protect foreign investors. In South Africa, foreign investment in offshore oil and gas development has been identified as a threat by coastal communities. In Ghana, local fishermen feel cheated by the low level of law enforcement associated with industrial fish trawling, which features new patterns of capital mobility such as Chinese investment. The protection of foreign investment in both countries may limit the ability of national governemts to respond to the threats of altering livelihoods for artisanal fisherfolk and other coastal communities.
Collaborator Contribution The intuition to focus on the integration of human rights and the environment to tackle socio-cultural issues around the blue economy has been confirmed by engagement with new partners in civil society and grassroots organisations. A transdisciplinary conference in January on Transformed and Transformative Governance that included these partners, generated working principles for the group.
Impact Outputs: Transformed and Transformed Governance Conference Lalela Ulwandle Empatheatre SOUTH AFRICA Successful Flexible Fund Application by Early Career Researchers to plan and host an Culture and Intangible Heritage Workshop in GHANA Disciplines: Law, Sociology, Anthropology, History, Economics, Marine Science.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Law, Heritage and the Blue Economy 
Organisation University of Cape Coast
Country Ghana 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research of One Ocean Hub co-investigators and initial awardees has highlighted the existing disconnect between international and national law on ocean protection and local customs in South Africa and Ghana. Novel questions about insufficient attention to lifestyle needs and intangible cultural heritage in the context of various blue economy activities (offshore oil and gas developments, fisheries, bio-prospecting and seabed mining) have emerged, as well as questions about the degree of evidence of intangible cultural heritage that would stand in courts or in planning processes have been identified among the preliminary findings of social science researchers in Ghana and the empatheatre methodology in South Africa. The clash between modern laws and customary laws has taken centre stage in fishing and ocean governance. Our preliminary report on Ghana demonstrates that distinctive heritage customs impact fishing activities and other ocean related practices. Traditional chains of command which have long adjudicated over observable breaches of customary law are challenged by changed social dynamics that create contexts within which new laws are seen to be necessary. Modern laws, however, have been established without recourse to customary practices, and often privilege large blue economy investments over small-scale livelihood practices thereby creating clashes. In addition, challenges such as poverty, limited employment opportunities create a dilemma about legislating for ocean health and its exploitation for survival. With regard to the long standing perspective which upholds the notion that poverty is a direct precursor of child labour, it was confirmed in preliminary research that some children with poor parents were working for fishermen. Preliminary research has also confirmed the importance of linking research in international investment law with socio-legal research at the national level and local stakeholder engagement about the blue economy. The initial research on international investment law has also underscored that "blue economy narratives" (blue economy policies and promotional activities) may restrict the opportunities for governments and judiciary to protect local communities' interests that may be negatively impacts by blue economy initiatives, because of international obligations to protect foreign investors. In South Africa, foreign investment in offshore oil and gas development has been identified as a threat by coastal communities. In Ghana, local fishermen feel cheated by the low level of law enforcement associated with industrial fish trawling, which features new patterns of capital mobility such as Chinese investment. The protection of foreign investment in both countries may limit the ability of national governemts to respond to the threats of altering livelihoods for artisanal fisherfolk and other coastal communities.
Collaborator Contribution The intuition to focus on the integration of human rights and the environment to tackle socio-cultural issues around the blue economy has been confirmed by engagement with new partners in civil society and grassroots organisations. A transdisciplinary conference in January on Transformed and Transformative Governance that included these partners, generated working principles for the group.
Impact Outputs: Transformed and Transformed Governance Conference Lalela Ulwandle Empatheatre SOUTH AFRICA Successful Flexible Fund Application by Early Career Researchers to plan and host an Culture and Intangible Heritage Workshop in GHANA Disciplines: Law, Sociology, Anthropology, History, Economics, Marine Science.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Law, Heritage and the Blue Economy 
Organisation University of Cape Town
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research of One Ocean Hub co-investigators and initial awardees has highlighted the existing disconnect between international and national law on ocean protection and local customs in South Africa and Ghana. Novel questions about insufficient attention to lifestyle needs and intangible cultural heritage in the context of various blue economy activities (offshore oil and gas developments, fisheries, bio-prospecting and seabed mining) have emerged, as well as questions about the degree of evidence of intangible cultural heritage that would stand in courts or in planning processes have been identified among the preliminary findings of social science researchers in Ghana and the empatheatre methodology in South Africa. The clash between modern laws and customary laws has taken centre stage in fishing and ocean governance. Our preliminary report on Ghana demonstrates that distinctive heritage customs impact fishing activities and other ocean related practices. Traditional chains of command which have long adjudicated over observable breaches of customary law are challenged by changed social dynamics that create contexts within which new laws are seen to be necessary. Modern laws, however, have been established without recourse to customary practices, and often privilege large blue economy investments over small-scale livelihood practices thereby creating clashes. In addition, challenges such as poverty, limited employment opportunities create a dilemma about legislating for ocean health and its exploitation for survival. With regard to the long standing perspective which upholds the notion that poverty is a direct precursor of child labour, it was confirmed in preliminary research that some children with poor parents were working for fishermen. Preliminary research has also confirmed the importance of linking research in international investment law with socio-legal research at the national level and local stakeholder engagement about the blue economy. The initial research on international investment law has also underscored that "blue economy narratives" (blue economy policies and promotional activities) may restrict the opportunities for governments and judiciary to protect local communities' interests that may be negatively impacts by blue economy initiatives, because of international obligations to protect foreign investors. In South Africa, foreign investment in offshore oil and gas development has been identified as a threat by coastal communities. In Ghana, local fishermen feel cheated by the low level of law enforcement associated with industrial fish trawling, which features new patterns of capital mobility such as Chinese investment. The protection of foreign investment in both countries may limit the ability of national governemts to respond to the threats of altering livelihoods for artisanal fisherfolk and other coastal communities.
Collaborator Contribution The intuition to focus on the integration of human rights and the environment to tackle socio-cultural issues around the blue economy has been confirmed by engagement with new partners in civil society and grassroots organisations. A transdisciplinary conference in January on Transformed and Transformative Governance that included these partners, generated working principles for the group.
Impact Outputs: Transformed and Transformed Governance Conference Lalela Ulwandle Empatheatre SOUTH AFRICA Successful Flexible Fund Application by Early Career Researchers to plan and host an Culture and Intangible Heritage Workshop in GHANA Disciplines: Law, Sociology, Anthropology, History, Economics, Marine Science.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Law, Heritage and the Blue Economy 
Organisation University of Plymouth
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research of One Ocean Hub co-investigators and initial awardees has highlighted the existing disconnect between international and national law on ocean protection and local customs in South Africa and Ghana. Novel questions about insufficient attention to lifestyle needs and intangible cultural heritage in the context of various blue economy activities (offshore oil and gas developments, fisheries, bio-prospecting and seabed mining) have emerged, as well as questions about the degree of evidence of intangible cultural heritage that would stand in courts or in planning processes have been identified among the preliminary findings of social science researchers in Ghana and the empatheatre methodology in South Africa. The clash between modern laws and customary laws has taken centre stage in fishing and ocean governance. Our preliminary report on Ghana demonstrates that distinctive heritage customs impact fishing activities and other ocean related practices. Traditional chains of command which have long adjudicated over observable breaches of customary law are challenged by changed social dynamics that create contexts within which new laws are seen to be necessary. Modern laws, however, have been established without recourse to customary practices, and often privilege large blue economy investments over small-scale livelihood practices thereby creating clashes. In addition, challenges such as poverty, limited employment opportunities create a dilemma about legislating for ocean health and its exploitation for survival. With regard to the long standing perspective which upholds the notion that poverty is a direct precursor of child labour, it was confirmed in preliminary research that some children with poor parents were working for fishermen. Preliminary research has also confirmed the importance of linking research in international investment law with socio-legal research at the national level and local stakeholder engagement about the blue economy. The initial research on international investment law has also underscored that "blue economy narratives" (blue economy policies and promotional activities) may restrict the opportunities for governments and judiciary to protect local communities' interests that may be negatively impacts by blue economy initiatives, because of international obligations to protect foreign investors. In South Africa, foreign investment in offshore oil and gas development has been identified as a threat by coastal communities. In Ghana, local fishermen feel cheated by the low level of law enforcement associated with industrial fish trawling, which features new patterns of capital mobility such as Chinese investment. The protection of foreign investment in both countries may limit the ability of national governemts to respond to the threats of altering livelihoods for artisanal fisherfolk and other coastal communities.
Collaborator Contribution The intuition to focus on the integration of human rights and the environment to tackle socio-cultural issues around the blue economy has been confirmed by engagement with new partners in civil society and grassroots organisations. A transdisciplinary conference in January on Transformed and Transformative Governance that included these partners, generated working principles for the group.
Impact Outputs: Transformed and Transformed Governance Conference Lalela Ulwandle Empatheatre SOUTH AFRICA Successful Flexible Fund Application by Early Career Researchers to plan and host an Culture and Intangible Heritage Workshop in GHANA Disciplines: Law, Sociology, Anthropology, History, Economics, Marine Science.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Law, Heritage and the Blue Economy 
Organisation University of Seychelles
Country Seychelles 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research of One Ocean Hub co-investigators and initial awardees has highlighted the existing disconnect between international and national law on ocean protection and local customs in South Africa and Ghana. Novel questions about insufficient attention to lifestyle needs and intangible cultural heritage in the context of various blue economy activities (offshore oil and gas developments, fisheries, bio-prospecting and seabed mining) have emerged, as well as questions about the degree of evidence of intangible cultural heritage that would stand in courts or in planning processes have been identified among the preliminary findings of social science researchers in Ghana and the empatheatre methodology in South Africa. The clash between modern laws and customary laws has taken centre stage in fishing and ocean governance. Our preliminary report on Ghana demonstrates that distinctive heritage customs impact fishing activities and other ocean related practices. Traditional chains of command which have long adjudicated over observable breaches of customary law are challenged by changed social dynamics that create contexts within which new laws are seen to be necessary. Modern laws, however, have been established without recourse to customary practices, and often privilege large blue economy investments over small-scale livelihood practices thereby creating clashes. In addition, challenges such as poverty, limited employment opportunities create a dilemma about legislating for ocean health and its exploitation for survival. With regard to the long standing perspective which upholds the notion that poverty is a direct precursor of child labour, it was confirmed in preliminary research that some children with poor parents were working for fishermen. Preliminary research has also confirmed the importance of linking research in international investment law with socio-legal research at the national level and local stakeholder engagement about the blue economy. The initial research on international investment law has also underscored that "blue economy narratives" (blue economy policies and promotional activities) may restrict the opportunities for governments and judiciary to protect local communities' interests that may be negatively impacts by blue economy initiatives, because of international obligations to protect foreign investors. In South Africa, foreign investment in offshore oil and gas development has been identified as a threat by coastal communities. In Ghana, local fishermen feel cheated by the low level of law enforcement associated with industrial fish trawling, which features new patterns of capital mobility such as Chinese investment. The protection of foreign investment in both countries may limit the ability of national governemts to respond to the threats of altering livelihoods for artisanal fisherfolk and other coastal communities.
Collaborator Contribution The intuition to focus on the integration of human rights and the environment to tackle socio-cultural issues around the blue economy has been confirmed by engagement with new partners in civil society and grassroots organisations. A transdisciplinary conference in January on Transformed and Transformative Governance that included these partners, generated working principles for the group.
Impact Outputs: Transformed and Transformed Governance Conference Lalela Ulwandle Empatheatre SOUTH AFRICA Successful Flexible Fund Application by Early Career Researchers to plan and host an Culture and Intangible Heritage Workshop in GHANA Disciplines: Law, Sociology, Anthropology, History, Economics, Marine Science.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Law, Heritage and the Blue Economy 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Department Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences (HaSS)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research of One Ocean Hub co-investigators and initial awardees has highlighted the existing disconnect between international and national law on ocean protection and local customs in South Africa and Ghana. Novel questions about insufficient attention to lifestyle needs and intangible cultural heritage in the context of various blue economy activities (offshore oil and gas developments, fisheries, bio-prospecting and seabed mining) have emerged, as well as questions about the degree of evidence of intangible cultural heritage that would stand in courts or in planning processes have been identified among the preliminary findings of social science researchers in Ghana and the empatheatre methodology in South Africa. The clash between modern laws and customary laws has taken centre stage in fishing and ocean governance. Our preliminary report on Ghana demonstrates that distinctive heritage customs impact fishing activities and other ocean related practices. Traditional chains of command which have long adjudicated over observable breaches of customary law are challenged by changed social dynamics that create contexts within which new laws are seen to be necessary. Modern laws, however, have been established without recourse to customary practices, and often privilege large blue economy investments over small-scale livelihood practices thereby creating clashes. In addition, challenges such as poverty, limited employment opportunities create a dilemma about legislating for ocean health and its exploitation for survival. With regard to the long standing perspective which upholds the notion that poverty is a direct precursor of child labour, it was confirmed in preliminary research that some children with poor parents were working for fishermen. Preliminary research has also confirmed the importance of linking research in international investment law with socio-legal research at the national level and local stakeholder engagement about the blue economy. The initial research on international investment law has also underscored that "blue economy narratives" (blue economy policies and promotional activities) may restrict the opportunities for governments and judiciary to protect local communities' interests that may be negatively impacts by blue economy initiatives, because of international obligations to protect foreign investors. In South Africa, foreign investment in offshore oil and gas development has been identified as a threat by coastal communities. In Ghana, local fishermen feel cheated by the low level of law enforcement associated with industrial fish trawling, which features new patterns of capital mobility such as Chinese investment. The protection of foreign investment in both countries may limit the ability of national governemts to respond to the threats of altering livelihoods for artisanal fisherfolk and other coastal communities.
Collaborator Contribution The intuition to focus on the integration of human rights and the environment to tackle socio-cultural issues around the blue economy has been confirmed by engagement with new partners in civil society and grassroots organisations. A transdisciplinary conference in January on Transformed and Transformative Governance that included these partners, generated working principles for the group.
Impact Outputs: Transformed and Transformed Governance Conference Lalela Ulwandle Empatheatre SOUTH AFRICA Successful Flexible Fund Application by Early Career Researchers to plan and host an Culture and Intangible Heritage Workshop in GHANA Disciplines: Law, Sociology, Anthropology, History, Economics, Marine Science.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Law, Heritage and the Blue Economy 
Organisation University of the West Indies
Country Barbados 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The research of One Ocean Hub co-investigators and initial awardees has highlighted the existing disconnect between international and national law on ocean protection and local customs in South Africa and Ghana. Novel questions about insufficient attention to lifestyle needs and intangible cultural heritage in the context of various blue economy activities (offshore oil and gas developments, fisheries, bio-prospecting and seabed mining) have emerged, as well as questions about the degree of evidence of intangible cultural heritage that would stand in courts or in planning processes have been identified among the preliminary findings of social science researchers in Ghana and the empatheatre methodology in South Africa. The clash between modern laws and customary laws has taken centre stage in fishing and ocean governance. Our preliminary report on Ghana demonstrates that distinctive heritage customs impact fishing activities and other ocean related practices. Traditional chains of command which have long adjudicated over observable breaches of customary law are challenged by changed social dynamics that create contexts within which new laws are seen to be necessary. Modern laws, however, have been established without recourse to customary practices, and often privilege large blue economy investments over small-scale livelihood practices thereby creating clashes. In addition, challenges such as poverty, limited employment opportunities create a dilemma about legislating for ocean health and its exploitation for survival. With regard to the long standing perspective which upholds the notion that poverty is a direct precursor of child labour, it was confirmed in preliminary research that some children with poor parents were working for fishermen. Preliminary research has also confirmed the importance of linking research in international investment law with socio-legal research at the national level and local stakeholder engagement about the blue economy. The initial research on international investment law has also underscored that "blue economy narratives" (blue economy policies and promotional activities) may restrict the opportunities for governments and judiciary to protect local communities' interests that may be negatively impacts by blue economy initiatives, because of international obligations to protect foreign investors. In South Africa, foreign investment in offshore oil and gas development has been identified as a threat by coastal communities. In Ghana, local fishermen feel cheated by the low level of law enforcement associated with industrial fish trawling, which features new patterns of capital mobility such as Chinese investment. The protection of foreign investment in both countries may limit the ability of national governemts to respond to the threats of altering livelihoods for artisanal fisherfolk and other coastal communities.
Collaborator Contribution The intuition to focus on the integration of human rights and the environment to tackle socio-cultural issues around the blue economy has been confirmed by engagement with new partners in civil society and grassroots organisations. A transdisciplinary conference in January on Transformed and Transformative Governance that included these partners, generated working principles for the group.
Impact Outputs: Transformed and Transformed Governance Conference Lalela Ulwandle Empatheatre SOUTH AFRICA Successful Flexible Fund Application by Early Career Researchers to plan and host an Culture and Intangible Heritage Workshop in GHANA Disciplines: Law, Sociology, Anthropology, History, Economics, Marine Science.
Start Year 2019
 
Description PACIFIC ISLANDS Transdisciplinary Initiative 
Organisation British Geological Survey
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In the region University of the South Pacific promoted co-development of research with a holistic Pacific Island approach to research through a series of stakeholder engagement workshops. USP seeks to develop an approach which shifts away from previous interventionist thinking towards collaborative action led by Pacific Islanders. Stakeholders reported that they were happy with the approach especially for its valuing of traditional knowledge; that transdisciplinarity feels authentic to the Pacific region and that transdisciplinarity and sustainability could be merged to bring positive changes. They considered it vital to scrutinize regional and national policies and consider the involvement of communities in policy-making processes.
Collaborator Contribution Partners in this case are the research insitutions from the One Ocean Hub. They have advised on how the approach could be integrated into wider research and existing Hub activities.
Impact Outputs: Work Package 0 report. Disciplines: Sociology, Education, Marine Science.
Start Year 2019
 
Description PACIFIC ISLANDS Transdisciplinary Initiative 
Organisation Centre For Environment, Fisheries And Aquaculture Science
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution In the region University of the South Pacific promoted co-development of research with a holistic Pacific Island approach to research through a series of stakeholder engagement workshops. USP seeks to develop an approach which shifts away from previous interventionist thinking towards collaborative action led by Pacific Islanders. Stakeholders reported that they were happy with the approach especially for its valuing of traditional knowledge; that transdisciplinarity feels authentic to the Pacific region and that transdisciplinarity and sustainability could be merged to bring positive changes. They considered it vital to scrutinize regional and national policies and consider the involvement of communities in policy-making processes.
Collaborator Contribution Partners in this case are the research insitutions from the One Ocean Hub. They have advised on how the approach could be integrated into wider research and existing Hub activities.
Impact Outputs: Work Package 0 report. Disciplines: Sociology, Education, Marine Science.
Start Year 2019
 
Description PACIFIC ISLANDS Transdisciplinary Initiative 
Organisation Maseno University
Country Kenya 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In the region University of the South Pacific promoted co-development of research with a holistic Pacific Island approach to research through a series of stakeholder engagement workshops. USP seeks to develop an approach which shifts away from previous interventionist thinking towards collaborative action led by Pacific Islanders. Stakeholders reported that they were happy with the approach especially for its valuing of traditional knowledge; that transdisciplinarity feels authentic to the Pacific region and that transdisciplinarity and sustainability could be merged to bring positive changes. They considered it vital to scrutinize regional and national policies and consider the involvement of communities in policy-making processes.
Collaborator Contribution Partners in this case are the research insitutions from the One Ocean Hub. They have advised on how the approach could be integrated into wider research and existing Hub activities.
Impact Outputs: Work Package 0 report. Disciplines: Sociology, Education, Marine Science.
Start Year 2019
 
Description PACIFIC ISLANDS Transdisciplinary Initiative 
Organisation National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM)
Country France 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In the region University of the South Pacific promoted co-development of research with a holistic Pacific Island approach to research through a series of stakeholder engagement workshops. USP seeks to develop an approach which shifts away from previous interventionist thinking towards collaborative action led by Pacific Islanders. Stakeholders reported that they were happy with the approach especially for its valuing of traditional knowledge; that transdisciplinarity feels authentic to the Pacific region and that transdisciplinarity and sustainability could be merged to bring positive changes. They considered it vital to scrutinize regional and national policies and consider the involvement of communities in policy-making processes.
Collaborator Contribution Partners in this case are the research insitutions from the One Ocean Hub. They have advised on how the approach could be integrated into wider research and existing Hub activities.
Impact Outputs: Work Package 0 report. Disciplines: Sociology, Education, Marine Science.
Start Year 2019
 
Description PACIFIC ISLANDS Transdisciplinary Initiative 
Organisation Nelson Mandela University
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In the region University of the South Pacific promoted co-development of research with a holistic Pacific Island approach to research through a series of stakeholder engagement workshops. USP seeks to develop an approach which shifts away from previous interventionist thinking towards collaborative action led by Pacific Islanders. Stakeholders reported that they were happy with the approach especially for its valuing of traditional knowledge; that transdisciplinarity feels authentic to the Pacific region and that transdisciplinarity and sustainability could be merged to bring positive changes. They considered it vital to scrutinize regional and national policies and consider the involvement of communities in policy-making processes.
Collaborator Contribution Partners in this case are the research insitutions from the One Ocean Hub. They have advised on how the approach could be integrated into wider research and existing Hub activities.
Impact Outputs: Work Package 0 report. Disciplines: Sociology, Education, Marine Science.
Start Year 2019
 
Description PACIFIC ISLANDS Transdisciplinary Initiative 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In the region University of the South Pacific promoted co-development of research with a holistic Pacific Island approach to research through a series of stakeholder engagement workshops. USP seeks to develop an approach which shifts away from previous interventionist thinking towards collaborative action led by Pacific Islanders. Stakeholders reported that they were happy with the approach especially for its valuing of traditional knowledge; that transdisciplinarity feels authentic to the Pacific region and that transdisciplinarity and sustainability could be merged to bring positive changes. They considered it vital to scrutinize regional and national policies and consider the involvement of communities in policy-making processes.
Collaborator Contribution Partners in this case are the research insitutions from the One Ocean Hub. They have advised on how the approach could be integrated into wider research and existing Hub activities.
Impact Outputs: Work Package 0 report. Disciplines: Sociology, Education, Marine Science.
Start Year 2019
 
Description PACIFIC ISLANDS Transdisciplinary Initiative 
Organisation University of the South Pacific
Country Fiji 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In the region University of the South Pacific promoted co-development of research with a holistic Pacific Island approach to research through a series of stakeholder engagement workshops. USP seeks to develop an approach which shifts away from previous interventionist thinking towards collaborative action led by Pacific Islanders. Stakeholders reported that they were happy with the approach especially for its valuing of traditional knowledge; that transdisciplinarity feels authentic to the Pacific region and that transdisciplinarity and sustainability could be merged to bring positive changes. They considered it vital to scrutinize regional and national policies and consider the involvement of communities in policy-making processes.
Collaborator Contribution Partners in this case are the research insitutions from the One Ocean Hub. They have advised on how the approach could be integrated into wider research and existing Hub activities.
Impact Outputs: Work Package 0 report. Disciplines: Sociology, Education, Marine Science.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Participatory Governance SOUTH AFRICA 
Organisation Durban University of Technology
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This collaboration explores alternative approaches to public participation in decision-making in environmental protection. Lack of meaningful engagement of citizens in decision-making processes not only creates citizen apathy with respect to environmental responsibility but it also leads to low understanding of how these decisions impact livelihood activities. This collaboration develops methodologies for inclusive decision-making and also aims to include overlooked knowledge areas. Our preliminary research in South Africa has identified specific questions among coastal communities about how theirl needs can be included in the creation of marine protected areas, as well as how overall public participation can be ensured in Marine Protected Area management. These questions will inform future inter- and trans-disciplinary marine and social science research on the need and process for the designation of new marine protected areas in South Africa. The pilot emphatheatre research sought to demonstrate what meaningful, robust participatory decision- making forums could and should look like, as a counter-process to the superficial 'tick-box' approach to public consultation that characterises many ocean governance processes in South Africa. Researchers are careful not to take a particular stand on whether developments/exploration/protection measures should go ahead or not - instead, we provide the forum for unheard interests to come to the fore. A test case emerged from the pilot that led to a petition for review of an environmental impact assessment (EIA) that approved exploratory deep-sea drillingoffshore oil and gas drilling licenses in South Africa. Through this activity we have been able to identify specific research questions about how local-level needs can be included in decision-making over extractives and the creation of marine protected areas. Namely, the integration of intangible cultural heritage, protection of livelihoods.
Collaborator Contribution A series of meetings with local NGOs, community representatives and international NGOs provided an opportunity for OOH Co-Is to learn aboutt 1) the law-related needs of the NGOs appealing the decision, as well as about the variety of legal arguments that could be explored in the appeal (NGO appellants focused on international climate change law and constitutional human rights law, for instance).OOH Co-I's from a range of disciplines were requested to share their expertise with regards to the EIA's technical reports on fisheries impact marine ecology impact/heritage impact. International investment law experts from the OOH (IIED) discussed international investment law perspectives, which have implications at the national and local level. All Hub Co-Is who wished to do so, were invited to contribute to the appeal in their personal capacity.
Impact This collaboration has produced: The Lalela Ulwandle production The disciplines involved are: Law and Sociology
Start Year 2019
 
Description Participatory Governance SOUTH AFRICA 
Organisation International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This collaboration explores alternative approaches to public participation in decision-making in environmental protection. Lack of meaningful engagement of citizens in decision-making processes not only creates citizen apathy with respect to environmental responsibility but it also leads to low understanding of how these decisions impact livelihood activities. This collaboration develops methodologies for inclusive decision-making and also aims to include overlooked knowledge areas. Our preliminary research in South Africa has identified specific questions among coastal communities about how theirl needs can be included in the creation of marine protected areas, as well as how overall public participation can be ensured in Marine Protected Area management. These questions will inform future inter- and trans-disciplinary marine and social science research on the need and process for the designation of new marine protected areas in South Africa. The pilot emphatheatre research sought to demonstrate what meaningful, robust participatory decision- making forums could and should look like, as a counter-process to the superficial 'tick-box' approach to public consultation that characterises many ocean governance processes in South Africa. Researchers are careful not to take a particular stand on whether developments/exploration/protection measures should go ahead or not - instead, we provide the forum for unheard interests to come to the fore. A test case emerged from the pilot that led to a petition for review of an environmental impact assessment (EIA) that approved exploratory deep-sea drillingoffshore oil and gas drilling licenses in South Africa. Through this activity we have been able to identify specific research questions about how local-level needs can be included in decision-making over extractives and the creation of marine protected areas. Namely, the integration of intangible cultural heritage, protection of livelihoods.
Collaborator Contribution A series of meetings with local NGOs, community representatives and international NGOs provided an opportunity for OOH Co-Is to learn aboutt 1) the law-related needs of the NGOs appealing the decision, as well as about the variety of legal arguments that could be explored in the appeal (NGO appellants focused on international climate change law and constitutional human rights law, for instance).OOH Co-I's from a range of disciplines were requested to share their expertise with regards to the EIA's technical reports on fisheries impact marine ecology impact/heritage impact. International investment law experts from the OOH (IIED) discussed international investment law perspectives, which have implications at the national and local level. All Hub Co-Is who wished to do so, were invited to contribute to the appeal in their personal capacity.
Impact This collaboration has produced: The Lalela Ulwandle production The disciplines involved are: Law and Sociology
Start Year 2019
 
Description Participatory Governance SOUTH AFRICA 
Organisation Nelson Mandela University
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This collaboration explores alternative approaches to public participation in decision-making in environmental protection. Lack of meaningful engagement of citizens in decision-making processes not only creates citizen apathy with respect to environmental responsibility but it also leads to low understanding of how these decisions impact livelihood activities. This collaboration develops methodologies for inclusive decision-making and also aims to include overlooked knowledge areas. Our preliminary research in South Africa has identified specific questions among coastal communities about how theirl needs can be included in the creation of marine protected areas, as well as how overall public participation can be ensured in Marine Protected Area management. These questions will inform future inter- and trans-disciplinary marine and social science research on the need and process for the designation of new marine protected areas in South Africa. The pilot emphatheatre research sought to demonstrate what meaningful, robust participatory decision- making forums could and should look like, as a counter-process to the superficial 'tick-box' approach to public consultation that characterises many ocean governance processes in South Africa. Researchers are careful not to take a particular stand on whether developments/exploration/protection measures should go ahead or not - instead, we provide the forum for unheard interests to come to the fore. A test case emerged from the pilot that led to a petition for review of an environmental impact assessment (EIA) that approved exploratory deep-sea drillingoffshore oil and gas drilling licenses in South Africa. Through this activity we have been able to identify specific research questions about how local-level needs can be included in decision-making over extractives and the creation of marine protected areas. Namely, the integration of intangible cultural heritage, protection of livelihoods.
Collaborator Contribution A series of meetings with local NGOs, community representatives and international NGOs provided an opportunity for OOH Co-Is to learn aboutt 1) the law-related needs of the NGOs appealing the decision, as well as about the variety of legal arguments that could be explored in the appeal (NGO appellants focused on international climate change law and constitutional human rights law, for instance).OOH Co-I's from a range of disciplines were requested to share their expertise with regards to the EIA's technical reports on fisheries impact marine ecology impact/heritage impact. International investment law experts from the OOH (IIED) discussed international investment law perspectives, which have implications at the national and local level. All Hub Co-Is who wished to do so, were invited to contribute to the appeal in their personal capacity.
Impact This collaboration has produced: The Lalela Ulwandle production The disciplines involved are: Law and Sociology
Start Year 2019
 
Description Participatory Governance SOUTH AFRICA 
Organisation Rhodes University
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This collaboration explores alternative approaches to public participation in decision-making in environmental protection. Lack of meaningful engagement of citizens in decision-making processes not only creates citizen apathy with respect to environmental responsibility but it also leads to low understanding of how these decisions impact livelihood activities. This collaboration develops methodologies for inclusive decision-making and also aims to include overlooked knowledge areas. Our preliminary research in South Africa has identified specific questions among coastal communities about how theirl needs can be included in the creation of marine protected areas, as well as how overall public participation can be ensured in Marine Protected Area management. These questions will inform future inter- and trans-disciplinary marine and social science research on the need and process for the designation of new marine protected areas in South Africa. The pilot emphatheatre research sought to demonstrate what meaningful, robust participatory decision- making forums could and should look like, as a counter-process to the superficial 'tick-box' approach to public consultation that characterises many ocean governance processes in South Africa. Researchers are careful not to take a particular stand on whether developments/exploration/protection measures should go ahead or not - instead, we provide the forum for unheard interests to come to the fore. A test case emerged from the pilot that led to a petition for review of an environmental impact assessment (EIA) that approved exploratory deep-sea drillingoffshore oil and gas drilling licenses in South Africa. Through this activity we have been able to identify specific research questions about how local-level needs can be included in decision-making over extractives and the creation of marine protected areas. Namely, the integration of intangible cultural heritage, protection of livelihoods.
Collaborator Contribution A series of meetings with local NGOs, community representatives and international NGOs provided an opportunity for OOH Co-Is to learn aboutt 1) the law-related needs of the NGOs appealing the decision, as well as about the variety of legal arguments that could be explored in the appeal (NGO appellants focused on international climate change law and constitutional human rights law, for instance).OOH Co-I's from a range of disciplines were requested to share their expertise with regards to the EIA's technical reports on fisheries impact marine ecology impact/heritage impact. International investment law experts from the OOH (IIED) discussed international investment law perspectives, which have implications at the national and local level. All Hub Co-Is who wished to do so, were invited to contribute to the appeal in their personal capacity.
Impact This collaboration has produced: The Lalela Ulwandle production The disciplines involved are: Law and Sociology
Start Year 2019
 
Description Participatory Governance SOUTH AFRICA 
Organisation University of Cape Town
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This collaboration explores alternative approaches to public participation in decision-making in environmental protection. Lack of meaningful engagement of citizens in decision-making processes not only creates citizen apathy with respect to environmental responsibility but it also leads to low understanding of how these decisions impact livelihood activities. This collaboration develops methodologies for inclusive decision-making and also aims to include overlooked knowledge areas. Our preliminary research in South Africa has identified specific questions among coastal communities about how theirl needs can be included in the creation of marine protected areas, as well as how overall public participation can be ensured in Marine Protected Area management. These questions will inform future inter- and trans-disciplinary marine and social science research on the need and process for the designation of new marine protected areas in South Africa. The pilot emphatheatre research sought to demonstrate what meaningful, robust participatory decision- making forums could and should look like, as a counter-process to the superficial 'tick-box' approach to public consultation that characterises many ocean governance processes in South Africa. Researchers are careful not to take a particular stand on whether developments/exploration/protection measures should go ahead or not - instead, we provide the forum for unheard interests to come to the fore. A test case emerged from the pilot that led to a petition for review of an environmental impact assessment (EIA) that approved exploratory deep-sea drillingoffshore oil and gas drilling licenses in South Africa. Through this activity we have been able to identify specific research questions about how local-level needs can be included in decision-making over extractives and the creation of marine protected areas. Namely, the integration of intangible cultural heritage, protection of livelihoods.
Collaborator Contribution A series of meetings with local NGOs, community representatives and international NGOs provided an opportunity for OOH Co-Is to learn aboutt 1) the law-related needs of the NGOs appealing the decision, as well as about the variety of legal arguments that could be explored in the appeal (NGO appellants focused on international climate change law and constitutional human rights law, for instance).OOH Co-I's from a range of disciplines were requested to share their expertise with regards to the EIA's technical reports on fisheries impact marine ecology impact/heritage impact. International investment law experts from the OOH (IIED) discussed international investment law perspectives, which have implications at the national and local level. All Hub Co-Is who wished to do so, were invited to contribute to the appeal in their personal capacity.
Impact This collaboration has produced: The Lalela Ulwandle production The disciplines involved are: Law and Sociology
Start Year 2019
 
Description Participatory Governance SOUTH AFRICA 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Department Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences (HaSS)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This collaboration explores alternative approaches to public participation in decision-making in environmental protection. Lack of meaningful engagement of citizens in decision-making processes not only creates citizen apathy with respect to environmental responsibility but it also leads to low understanding of how these decisions impact livelihood activities. This collaboration develops methodologies for inclusive decision-making and also aims to include overlooked knowledge areas. Our preliminary research in South Africa has identified specific questions among coastal communities about how theirl needs can be included in the creation of marine protected areas, as well as how overall public participation can be ensured in Marine Protected Area management. These questions will inform future inter- and trans-disciplinary marine and social science research on the need and process for the designation of new marine protected areas in South Africa. The pilot emphatheatre research sought to demonstrate what meaningful, robust participatory decision- making forums could and should look like, as a counter-process to the superficial 'tick-box' approach to public consultation that characterises many ocean governance processes in South Africa. Researchers are careful not to take a particular stand on whether developments/exploration/protection measures should go ahead or not - instead, we provide the forum for unheard interests to come to the fore. A test case emerged from the pilot that led to a petition for review of an environmental impact assessment (EIA) that approved exploratory deep-sea drillingoffshore oil and gas drilling licenses in South Africa. Through this activity we have been able to identify specific research questions about how local-level needs can be included in decision-making over extractives and the creation of marine protected areas. Namely, the integration of intangible cultural heritage, protection of livelihoods.
Collaborator Contribution A series of meetings with local NGOs, community representatives and international NGOs provided an opportunity for OOH Co-Is to learn aboutt 1) the law-related needs of the NGOs appealing the decision, as well as about the variety of legal arguments that could be explored in the appeal (NGO appellants focused on international climate change law and constitutional human rights law, for instance).OOH Co-I's from a range of disciplines were requested to share their expertise with regards to the EIA's technical reports on fisheries impact marine ecology impact/heritage impact. International investment law experts from the OOH (IIED) discussed international investment law perspectives, which have implications at the national and local level. All Hub Co-Is who wished to do so, were invited to contribute to the appeal in their personal capacity.
Impact This collaboration has produced: The Lalela Ulwandle production The disciplines involved are: Law and Sociology
Start Year 2019
 
Description Sustainable and Equitable Fisheries - GHANA 
Organisation Centre For Environment, Fisheries And Aquaculture Science
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Our research has determined that Ghanaian fisheries are under considerable threat, but remain a highly important sector for economic opportunities, food security and cultural norms. Around 10% of Ghana's jobs are directly related to fish production, the vast majority of which are associated with marine wild capture fisheries. Fish products are a primary source of protein to many Ghanaians, with as much as 75% of catches being processed and consumed locally. Annual fisheries production in Ghana currently meets around 45% of the needs of Ghana's population, with a considerable demand for imported products, mainly from countries like Senegal and Mauritania but also from Europe (countries such as Spain). It is important that we obtain a clearer picture of the value and fish characteristics of fish imports. The historic and subsistence importance of fish in Ghana, and the dependence upon fish imports, raises important policy questions relating to food security and the significance of traditional diet and culture. Artisanal fishing overlaps to an undefined extent with subsistence fishing. The artisanal fisheries, which directly support around 107,000 jobs in Ghana are a loosely defined fleet of low- or unpowered wooden canoes whom mainly target small pelagic stocks. These fisheries are widespread and hard to monitor, partly by dint of their 'open access' nature, which has seemingly led to considerable over-capacity. It is thought that present levels of artisanal fishing are unsustainable, as indicated by falls in some catches. However, strain on the artisanal sector could be the result of potential stock catch being taken by other sectors, such as the semi-industrial sector. The so-called 'Saiko' trade, where industrial trawlers sell bycatch to indigenous fishermen therefore illegally landing bycatch from trawl vessels. This seriously undermines efforts to improve sustainability in the legal fishery. In 2017 it was estimated that around 100 kilotonnes of fish product was landed, equivalent to 40% of the production of the artisanal sector, creating a considerable loss of state revenue and fishing opportunities for legal Ghanaian fishers.
Collaborator Contribution The Fishery Management Plan for Ghana (2015-19) explicitly considers the need to establish area-based management tools (ABMTs, including marine protected areas), in line with its obligations to the Convention on Biological Diversity. Our partners in the government, namely the Environmental Protection agency and Ghanian Fisheries Commission have provided insight into the data gaps have necessitated a reliance on a precautionary approach. A precautionary approach is not effective at guiding specific decisions. The specific goals of ABMTs under the current fishery management plan are not clear. Furthermore, marine protected areas are not a panacea for improved fisheries management, without a concomitant decline in fishing effort, improvements to stock status or fisheries yields should not be expected. Our ongoing partnership will mean that we will have access to historic data and an ability to influence fisheries policy.
Impact Ouputs: The report output of the planning workshop guides our research strategies and our interaction with the relevant government agencies. Successful Flexible Fund application to plan and host an expert dialogue with all the relevant government agencies in GHANA on data gaps and developing data-limited fisheries stock assessment tools Disciplines: Fisheries science, Law
Start Year 2019
 
Description Sustainable and Equitable Fisheries - GHANA 
Organisation Government of Ghana
Country Ghana 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Our research has determined that Ghanaian fisheries are under considerable threat, but remain a highly important sector for economic opportunities, food security and cultural norms. Around 10% of Ghana's jobs are directly related to fish production, the vast majority of which are associated with marine wild capture fisheries. Fish products are a primary source of protein to many Ghanaians, with as much as 75% of catches being processed and consumed locally. Annual fisheries production in Ghana currently meets around 45% of the needs of Ghana's population, with a considerable demand for imported products, mainly from countries like Senegal and Mauritania but also from Europe (countries such as Spain). It is important that we obtain a clearer picture of the value and fish characteristics of fish imports. The historic and subsistence importance of fish in Ghana, and the dependence upon fish imports, raises important policy questions relating to food security and the significance of traditional diet and culture. Artisanal fishing overlaps to an undefined extent with subsistence fishing. The artisanal fisheries, which directly support around 107,000 jobs in Ghana are a loosely defined fleet of low- or unpowered wooden canoes whom mainly target small pelagic stocks. These fisheries are widespread and hard to monitor, partly by dint of their 'open access' nature, which has seemingly led to considerable over-capacity. It is thought that present levels of artisanal fishing are unsustainable, as indicated by falls in some catches. However, strain on the artisanal sector could be the result of potential stock catch being taken by other sectors, such as the semi-industrial sector. The so-called 'Saiko' trade, where industrial trawlers sell bycatch to indigenous fishermen therefore illegally landing bycatch from trawl vessels. This seriously undermines efforts to improve sustainability in the legal fishery. In 2017 it was estimated that around 100 kilotonnes of fish product was landed, equivalent to 40% of the production of the artisanal sector, creating a considerable loss of state revenue and fishing opportunities for legal Ghanaian fishers.
Collaborator Contribution The Fishery Management Plan for Ghana (2015-19) explicitly considers the need to establish area-based management tools (ABMTs, including marine protected areas), in line with its obligations to the Convention on Biological Diversity. Our partners in the government, namely the Environmental Protection agency and Ghanian Fisheries Commission have provided insight into the data gaps have necessitated a reliance on a precautionary approach. A precautionary approach is not effective at guiding specific decisions. The specific goals of ABMTs under the current fishery management plan are not clear. Furthermore, marine protected areas are not a panacea for improved fisheries management, without a concomitant decline in fishing effort, improvements to stock status or fisheries yields should not be expected. Our ongoing partnership will mean that we will have access to historic data and an ability to influence fisheries policy.
Impact Ouputs: The report output of the planning workshop guides our research strategies and our interaction with the relevant government agencies. Successful Flexible Fund application to plan and host an expert dialogue with all the relevant government agencies in GHANA on data gaps and developing data-limited fisheries stock assessment tools Disciplines: Fisheries science, Law
Start Year 2019
 
Description Sustainable and Equitable Fisheries - GHANA 
Organisation Heriot-Watt University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our research has determined that Ghanaian fisheries are under considerable threat, but remain a highly important sector for economic opportunities, food security and cultural norms. Around 10% of Ghana's jobs are directly related to fish production, the vast majority of which are associated with marine wild capture fisheries. Fish products are a primary source of protein to many Ghanaians, with as much as 75% of catches being processed and consumed locally. Annual fisheries production in Ghana currently meets around 45% of the needs of Ghana's population, with a considerable demand for imported products, mainly from countries like Senegal and Mauritania but also from Europe (countries such as Spain). It is important that we obtain a clearer picture of the value and fish characteristics of fish imports. The historic and subsistence importance of fish in Ghana, and the dependence upon fish imports, raises important policy questions relating to food security and the significance of traditional diet and culture. Artisanal fishing overlaps to an undefined extent with subsistence fishing. The artisanal fisheries, which directly support around 107,000 jobs in Ghana are a loosely defined fleet of low- or unpowered wooden canoes whom mainly target small pelagic stocks. These fisheries are widespread and hard to monitor, partly by dint of their 'open access' nature, which has seemingly led to considerable over-capacity. It is thought that present levels of artisanal fishing are unsustainable, as indicated by falls in some catches. However, strain on the artisanal sector could be the result of potential stock catch being taken by other sectors, such as the semi-industrial sector. The so-called 'Saiko' trade, where industrial trawlers sell bycatch to indigenous fishermen therefore illegally landing bycatch from trawl vessels. This seriously undermines efforts to improve sustainability in the legal fishery. In 2017 it was estimated that around 100 kilotonnes of fish product was landed, equivalent to 40% of the production of the artisanal sector, creating a considerable loss of state revenue and fishing opportunities for legal Ghanaian fishers.
Collaborator Contribution The Fishery Management Plan for Ghana (2015-19) explicitly considers the need to establish area-based management tools (ABMTs, including marine protected areas), in line with its obligations to the Convention on Biological Diversity. Our partners in the government, namely the Environmental Protection agency and Ghanian Fisheries Commission have provided insight into the data gaps have necessitated a reliance on a precautionary approach. A precautionary approach is not effective at guiding specific decisions. The specific goals of ABMTs under the current fishery management plan are not clear. Furthermore, marine protected areas are not a panacea for improved fisheries management, without a concomitant decline in fishing effort, improvements to stock status or fisheries yields should not be expected. Our ongoing partnership will mean that we will have access to historic data and an ability to influence fisheries policy.
Impact Ouputs: The report output of the planning workshop guides our research strategies and our interaction with the relevant government agencies. Successful Flexible Fund application to plan and host an expert dialogue with all the relevant government agencies in GHANA on data gaps and developing data-limited fisheries stock assessment tools Disciplines: Fisheries science, Law
Start Year 2019
 
Description Sustainable and Equitable Fisheries - GHANA 
Organisation Scottish Association For Marine Science
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our research has determined that Ghanaian fisheries are under considerable threat, but remain a highly important sector for economic opportunities, food security and cultural norms. Around 10% of Ghana's jobs are directly related to fish production, the vast majority of which are associated with marine wild capture fisheries. Fish products are a primary source of protein to many Ghanaians, with as much as 75% of catches being processed and consumed locally. Annual fisheries production in Ghana currently meets around 45% of the needs of Ghana's population, with a considerable demand for imported products, mainly from countries like Senegal and Mauritania but also from Europe (countries such as Spain). It is important that we obtain a clearer picture of the value and fish characteristics of fish imports. The historic and subsistence importance of fish in Ghana, and the dependence upon fish imports, raises important policy questions relating to food security and the significance of traditional diet and culture. Artisanal fishing overlaps to an undefined extent with subsistence fishing. The artisanal fisheries, which directly support around 107,000 jobs in Ghana are a loosely defined fleet of low- or unpowered wooden canoes whom mainly target small pelagic stocks. These fisheries are widespread and hard to monitor, partly by dint of their 'open access' nature, which has seemingly led to considerable over-capacity. It is thought that present levels of artisanal fishing are unsustainable, as indicated by falls in some catches. However, strain on the artisanal sector could be the result of potential stock catch being taken by other sectors, such as the semi-industrial sector. The so-called 'Saiko' trade, where industrial trawlers sell bycatch to indigenous fishermen therefore illegally landing bycatch from trawl vessels. This seriously undermines efforts to improve sustainability in the legal fishery. In 2017 it was estimated that around 100 kilotonnes of fish product was landed, equivalent to 40% of the production of the artisanal sector, creating a considerable loss of state revenue and fishing opportunities for legal Ghanaian fishers.
Collaborator Contribution The Fishery Management Plan for Ghana (2015-19) explicitly considers the need to establish area-based management tools (ABMTs, including marine protected areas), in line with its obligations to the Convention on Biological Diversity. Our partners in the government, namely the Environmental Protection agency and Ghanian Fisheries Commission have provided insight into the data gaps have necessitated a reliance on a precautionary approach. A precautionary approach is not effective at guiding specific decisions. The specific goals of ABMTs under the current fishery management plan are not clear. Furthermore, marine protected areas are not a panacea for improved fisheries management, without a concomitant decline in fishing effort, improvements to stock status or fisheries yields should not be expected. Our ongoing partnership will mean that we will have access to historic data and an ability to influence fisheries policy.
Impact Ouputs: The report output of the planning workshop guides our research strategies and our interaction with the relevant government agencies. Successful Flexible Fund application to plan and host an expert dialogue with all the relevant government agencies in GHANA on data gaps and developing data-limited fisheries stock assessment tools Disciplines: Fisheries science, Law
Start Year 2019
 
Description Sustainable and Equitable Fisheries - GHANA 
Organisation University of Cape Coast
Country Ghana 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our research has determined that Ghanaian fisheries are under considerable threat, but remain a highly important sector for economic opportunities, food security and cultural norms. Around 10% of Ghana's jobs are directly related to fish production, the vast majority of which are associated with marine wild capture fisheries. Fish products are a primary source of protein to many Ghanaians, with as much as 75% of catches being processed and consumed locally. Annual fisheries production in Ghana currently meets around 45% of the needs of Ghana's population, with a considerable demand for imported products, mainly from countries like Senegal and Mauritania but also from Europe (countries such as Spain). It is important that we obtain a clearer picture of the value and fish characteristics of fish imports. The historic and subsistence importance of fish in Ghana, and the dependence upon fish imports, raises important policy questions relating to food security and the significance of traditional diet and culture. Artisanal fishing overlaps to an undefined extent with subsistence fishing. The artisanal fisheries, which directly support around 107,000 jobs in Ghana are a loosely defined fleet of low- or unpowered wooden canoes whom mainly target small pelagic stocks. These fisheries are widespread and hard to monitor, partly by dint of their 'open access' nature, which has seemingly led to considerable over-capacity. It is thought that present levels of artisanal fishing are unsustainable, as indicated by falls in some catches. However, strain on the artisanal sector could be the result of potential stock catch being taken by other sectors, such as the semi-industrial sector. The so-called 'Saiko' trade, where industrial trawlers sell bycatch to indigenous fishermen therefore illegally landing bycatch from trawl vessels. This seriously undermines efforts to improve sustainability in the legal fishery. In 2017 it was estimated that around 100 kilotonnes of fish product was landed, equivalent to 40% of the production of the artisanal sector, creating a considerable loss of state revenue and fishing opportunities for legal Ghanaian fishers.
Collaborator Contribution The Fishery Management Plan for Ghana (2015-19) explicitly considers the need to establish area-based management tools (ABMTs, including marine protected areas), in line with its obligations to the Convention on Biological Diversity. Our partners in the government, namely the Environmental Protection agency and Ghanian Fisheries Commission have provided insight into the data gaps have necessitated a reliance on a precautionary approach. A precautionary approach is not effective at guiding specific decisions. The specific goals of ABMTs under the current fishery management plan are not clear. Furthermore, marine protected areas are not a panacea for improved fisheries management, without a concomitant decline in fishing effort, improvements to stock status or fisheries yields should not be expected. Our ongoing partnership will mean that we will have access to historic data and an ability to influence fisheries policy.
Impact Ouputs: The report output of the planning workshop guides our research strategies and our interaction with the relevant government agencies. Successful Flexible Fund application to plan and host an expert dialogue with all the relevant government agencies in GHANA on data gaps and developing data-limited fisheries stock assessment tools Disciplines: Fisheries science, Law
Start Year 2019
 
Description Sustainable and Equitable Fisheries - GHANA 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Department Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences (HaSS)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Our research has determined that Ghanaian fisheries are under considerable threat, but remain a highly important sector for economic opportunities, food security and cultural norms. Around 10% of Ghana's jobs are directly related to fish production, the vast majority of which are associated with marine wild capture fisheries. Fish products are a primary source of protein to many Ghanaians, with as much as 75% of catches being processed and consumed locally. Annual fisheries production in Ghana currently meets around 45% of the needs of Ghana's population, with a considerable demand for imported products, mainly from countries like Senegal and Mauritania but also from Europe (countries such as Spain). It is important that we obtain a clearer picture of the value and fish characteristics of fish imports. The historic and subsistence importance of fish in Ghana, and the dependence upon fish imports, raises important policy questions relating to food security and the significance of traditional diet and culture. Artisanal fishing overlaps to an undefined extent with subsistence fishing. The artisanal fisheries, which directly support around 107,000 jobs in Ghana are a loosely defined fleet of low- or unpowered wooden canoes whom mainly target small pelagic stocks. These fisheries are widespread and hard to monitor, partly by dint of their 'open access' nature, which has seemingly led to considerable over-capacity. It is thought that present levels of artisanal fishing are unsustainable, as indicated by falls in some catches. However, strain on the artisanal sector could be the result of potential stock catch being taken by other sectors, such as the semi-industrial sector. The so-called 'Saiko' trade, where industrial trawlers sell bycatch to indigenous fishermen therefore illegally landing bycatch from trawl vessels. This seriously undermines efforts to improve sustainability in the legal fishery. In 2017 it was estimated that around 100 kilotonnes of fish product was landed, equivalent to 40% of the production of the artisanal sector, creating a considerable loss of state revenue and fishing opportunities for legal Ghanaian fishers.
Collaborator Contribution The Fishery Management Plan for Ghana (2015-19) explicitly considers the need to establish area-based management tools (ABMTs, including marine protected areas), in line with its obligations to the Convention on Biological Diversity. Our partners in the government, namely the Environmental Protection agency and Ghanian Fisheries Commission have provided insight into the data gaps have necessitated a reliance on a precautionary approach. A precautionary approach is not effective at guiding specific decisions. The specific goals of ABMTs under the current fishery management plan are not clear. Furthermore, marine protected areas are not a panacea for improved fisheries management, without a concomitant decline in fishing effort, improvements to stock status or fisheries yields should not be expected. Our ongoing partnership will mean that we will have access to historic data and an ability to influence fisheries policy.
Impact Ouputs: The report output of the planning workshop guides our research strategies and our interaction with the relevant government agencies. Successful Flexible Fund application to plan and host an expert dialogue with all the relevant government agencies in GHANA on data gaps and developing data-limited fisheries stock assessment tools Disciplines: Fisheries science, Law
Start Year 2019
 
Description Broadcast - Children's Programme SOUTH AFRICA 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Robyn Adams (early-career researcher SANBI) appeared on a South African children's television show called "Ekse" (Afrikaans for ''I say"). It aired on a community television station called Cape Town TV, which is also carried on national cable news network DSTv.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GhttFGqbB64&t=1s
 
Description Commonwealth Blue Partners Charters Day 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 1Daniela Diz presented on the Hub's contribution to policy-making in a panel discussion entitled "Good Science, Good Policy" during the Commonwealth Blue Charter Partners Day, 20 June 2019 at the Science Museum in London. Led to plans to collaborate on a case study relating to marine spatial planning in South Africa, and further engagement with the Marine Protected Areas Action Plan (led by Seychelles) whereby a best practices guide will be further explored.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Course on Multilateral Environmental Agreement Negotiations 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Hub Director Prof Elisa Morgera contributed to the 16th edition of the annual Course on Multilateral Environmental Agreement Negotiations organized by the UN Environment Programme and the University of Eastern Finland. Elisa co-facilitated with Charlotte Salpin (UNDOALOS) an interactive session on marine biodiversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction, contributed to panel discussions on emerging Issues in international biodiversity law, and co-designed and co-facilitated a two-day negotiation exercise based on the ongoing UN negotiations on a new legally. In addition, Elisa led an interactive discussion among 30 participants (experienced government officials engaged in international environmental negotiations, as well as such as representatives of NGOs, the private sector, and academia) on the options for protecting marine biodiversity of areas beyond national jurisdiction, and co-designed and co-facilitated a two-day negotiation exercise based on the ongoing UN negotiations on a new legally binding instrument on marine biodiversity of areas beyond national jurisdiction. A publication will be prepared in late 2020 by UNEP for use by other negotiators globally.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.uef.fi/web/unep
 
Description First Planning Meeting of the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development in Copenhagen 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Daniela Diz (Strathclyde) contributed expertise to shaping the priorities of the Decade in areas related to inter-disciplinarity, data gaps in deep sea ecosystems, mesopelagic species, and liaised with Hub partners present to collaborate on related projects.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://oceandecade.org/resource/58/Summary-Report-of-the-First-Global-Planning-Meeting-UN-Decade-of...
 
Description GHANA Policy Partner Consultations 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Ongoing meetings in Ghana between our academic partners at the University of Cape Coast and relevant national agencies to discuss the extent to identify the challenges and possible areas of collaboration. The first meeting: (1) examined data and records held by the environmental agenices on projects and research concerning the oceans; (2) established pathways for engagement and communication; (3) co-identified priority research foci. A second meeting which included a new set of government agencies (EPA) confirmed the prioritisation of (1) fisheries and socio-economic issues; and (2) human rights, legal and governance issues surrounding the blue economy.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019,2020
 
Description Intergovernmental Conference on Marine Biodiversity of Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Daniela Diz (Strathclyde) attended the second session of the Intergovernmental Conference to negotiate a new legally binding instrument under the law of the sea convention on marine biodiversity of areas beyond national jurisdiction. Dr Diz contributed expertise to delegates and negotiators in the field of area-based management tools and environmental impact assessments.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.un.org/bbnj/
 
Description Lalela Ulwandle - Empatheatre Tour SOUTH AFRICA 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Empatheatre is a trangressive approach to co-production of research. The process produces a theatrical performance that is based on interviews with research subjects. Their perspectives are then reflected to them and to new audiences through the play. After the play, a discussion is held to recieve audiences' impressions and promts new evidence. The Hub's play, Lalela Ulwandle, developed from initial interviws the first year seeks to gather information about ocean use, ocean heritage and affective connections to the sea that promote wellbeing. The play toured six towns, with a total of 16 performances and 16 post-show discussions and tribunals. On tour we had a total of 349 participants sit with us through the show and tribunals, and in Durban we had a total of 398 participants. Over the two weeks we reached a total of 747 participants in the shows directly. Some of the repeat participants included officials involvled in environmental impact assessments who expressed an interest in having the play included in processes for communicating potential impacts of marine and coastal developments on coastal communities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.iol.co.za/mercury/goodlife/listen-to-the-sea-33807711
 
Description Lalela Ulwandle - Media - Print or Online 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact A total of 17 articles in print were identified and according to a report conducted by Pear Africa, 4 print media for Lalela reached 451,002 people, with an estimated publicity value of R547,149,65. We had 4 online articles with a reach of 425,162, with an estimated publicity value of R18,720.00
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://news.artsmart.co.za/2019/10/empatheatre-presents-lalela-ulwandle.html
 
Description Lalela Ulwandle - Media- Broadcast 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact One radio broadcast interview with Neil Coppen and Rory Booth which reached 171000 people with an estimated publicity value of R67,638.06.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Marine Regions Forum 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Daniela Diz (Strathclyde) ontributed to group debates on area-based management tools, including marine protected areas, climate change and oceans, ecosystem approach and large marine ecosystems, as well as the role of regional organisations in oceans governance. The meeting generated key messages targeted at ocean governance organisations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.prog-ocean.org/marine-regions-forum/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2020/02/MRF2019_Key-Messa...
 
Description NAMIBIA Policy Stakeholder Consultation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Namibia with the Ministry of Fisheries and numerous other government stakeholders to discuss the ocean related challenges that the OOH could tackle. Areas identified
included evaluation of impact on deep water habitat by marine phosphate mining. The meeting spurred a discussion on how to work together and formalise partnership.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description PACIFIC ISLANDS Transdisciplinary Workshop and Stakeholder Consultations 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Ongoing consultations with relevant stakeholders including local assemblies, environmental protection agencies, fisheries commission, other researcher and others to determine gaps and intersections in ocean policy and research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019,2020
 
Description Pacific Ocean Alliance Conference PACIFIC ISLANDS 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Four of our academic partners from the University of South Pacific attended the Pacific Ocean Allaince conference in Fiji. Participants sought to build appropriate frameworks that provide the best chances of successfully managing Pacific Island resources in an integrated and sustainable way, drawing on heritage and more recent best practices, standards and limits set by our communities and leaders, and international bodies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.spc.int/events/pacific-ocean-alliance-conference
 
Description SOUTH AFRICA Marine and Coastal Educators Network 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Kerry Sink showcased South Africa's new MPA network and introduced OOH at the Marine and Coastal Educators Network conference in January 2020. A key outcome of this engagement was the assertion by marine educators that they had no understanding of ecosystem diversity in the ocean. This led to a succesful flexible fund proposal to create the Mzansea marine education programme.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Skills for the Future Summit - CARIBBEAN 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Alana Maline (University of West Indies) and Kelly Hoareau (University of Seychelles) collaborated on a presentation at the Skills for the Future Summit hosted by the Ministry of Education, Technological and Vocational Training of the Government of Barbados on marine life, eco-friendly development, and creative blue economies which generated interest and support for the One Ocean Hub's programmes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.eventbrite.com/e/skills-for-the-future-summit-registration-75975955127#
 
Description Transformed and Transformative Governance Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Conference hosted by academic partners in South Africa and attended by partners from across the Hub to develop principles for ocean governance. The aim of the conference was to provide a forum for a wide range of ocean experts and stakeholders to engage with the latest developments impacting on ocean governance from development, ecosystem-based and human-rights-based approaces, before starting to reflect and give direction on what transformed and transformative ocean governance means and requires. The event contributed to new working relationships with civil society organisation
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://cmr.mandela.ac.za/Events,-Initiatives-and-News/Transformed-and-Transformative-Ocean-Governan...
 
Description UKRI-UNDP GCRF Knowledge Partnership 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Daniela Diz (Strathclyde) and John Ansah (Univsersity of Cape Coast) participated in the UKRI-UNDP GCRF Knowledge Partnership Workshop that sought to explore Hub involvement in the UNDPs development accelerator lab project. Led to a relationship with the UNDP Accelerator Lab in the Pacific.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description WKHDR Workshop at ICES 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact One Ocean Hub co-investigator, Kieran Hyder (CEFAS) co-developed and co-chaired a International Council for Exploration of the Seas Workshop on Integrating angler heterogeneity into the management of marine recreational fisheries (WKHDR). Thie research presented is important to ICES in its role of providing advice on fish stocks generally and more specifically in delivery of quality evidence on the impacts of recreational fisheries.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.ices.dk/news-and-events/asc/asc2019/Pages/Theme-session-Q.aspx