GCRF One Ocean Hub

Lead Research Organisation: University of Strathclyde
Department Name: Law

Abstract

Over 70% of the earth's surface is ocean. As a global population, we are entirely reliant upon a healthy ocean: it contributes to the renewal of freshwater; it absorbs over a quarter of global carbon dioxide, and it produces half the oxygen we breathe. The ocean has the potential to make significant contributions to sustainable development. Many developing countries already depend on their ocean resources for food, work and livelihoods. Yet we are reaching an ocean health crisis: cumulative pressures such as over-exploitation of its resources, ocean plastics and pollution and climate change, all compounded by multiple competing uses, are pushing the ocean ecosystem to a tipping point.
There is an urgent need for more integrated ocean governance, to ensure greater balance between ocean conservation and sustainable use (Sustainable Development Goal 14) and realise the ocean's potential to contribute to poverty reduction, human health, healthy ecosystems on land, climate change mitigation and adaptation, equitable economic growth and decent employment.
"We are the sea...we must wake up to this ancient truth...It is time to create things for ourselves, to create established standards of excellence that match those of our ancestors."
It is with this spirit that the ONE OCEAN Hub will transform our response to the urgent challenges facing our ocean. The Hub will weave learning from the ocean, and traditional knowledge of the peoples who rely upon it, with scientific excellence, innovative legal approaches and artistic methods. Our aim is to bridge the disconnections in law, science and policy across all levels from the local to the international. We aim to empower vulnerable communities, woman and youth in the blue economy and catalyse the inclusive and integrated governance approaches required to ensure a healthy ocean and flourishing communities and economies.
The Hub will specifically address the challenges of South Africa, Namibia, Ghana, Fiji and Solomon Islands in realising the economic, socio-cultural and environmental benefits from the ocean. It aims to support these countries' efforts towards developing a sustainable and fair blue economy by providing new scientific data and tools to engage different sectors and groups within society, particularly vulnerable communities, woman and youth, in identifying opportunities, risks and trade-offs to: i) prevent and mitigate negative development impacts connected to the ocean, ii) participate in traditional and emerging ocean activities, and iii) predict the socioeconomic benefits of ocean conservation.
The Hub pioneers integrating law and arts, policy, informatics, education, history, anthropology, and philosophy to provide targeted advice on coherent and flexible, pro-poor and gender- sensitive, climate-proofed and transparent laws and policies across the areas of environmental, human rights, science and technology, trade and investment. The Hub will further integrate biology, physics, chemistry, oceanography, ecology, mathematics, socio-environmental sciences and law to advance understanding of sustainable fisheries in the face of climate change impacts, as well as socio-economic and cultural considerations. The Hub will also increase understanding of conservation and extraction options for deep-sea mineral, biological and freshwater resources, integrating biology, ecology, geology, socio-environmental sciences and law. Through innovative use of arts the hub will transcend traditional boundaries in policy, law, and between ocean stakeholders from local communties to international organisatons, to respectfully and effectively include local communities' traditional knowledge in decision-making at the national and local level on the blue economy. The Hub will develop the integrated governance frameworks and strengthen the capacity within commnities to drive innovative approaches to a fair and sustainable blue economy for South Africa, Namibia, Ghana, Fiji and Solomon Islands

Planned Impact

In coastal and island communities healthy oceans are fundamental to healthy economies and livelihoods. The One Ocean Hub aims to improve the livelihoods of small-scale fishing and indigenous communities that are dependent on the ocean, with particular attention to women and youth in South Africa, Namibia, Ghana, Fiji and the Solomon Islands. The Hub will empower, build capacity within, and learn from, the people who rely on the oceans, and whom are disproportionally impacted by the failure to protect it. It is on this local level that the Hub will have the greatest impact. Community leadership in research and arts-based approaches will enable better understanding of traditional practices. It will build capacity and co-develop new resources for communities, and, in so doing, will support the integration of community views, values and knowledge in scientific assessments, management and decision-making on ocean conservation and the blue economy. Legal empowerment will enhance the capacity of communities, women and youth to fight for their rights and improve, through legal literacy, their livelihoods. Youths will directly benefit from a One Ocean education programme designed to inform, inspire and empower 'Generation 2030' on ocean matters and through the development of legal mechanisms (Youth Ocean Charter) to amplify youth voices at international level.
At national-regional level, governments and inter-governmental organisations will benefit from access to a new scientific evidence base, methods and technologies to underpin integrated ocean assessment and management. Specifically, government entities (eg Namibian Ministry for Fisheries and Marine Resources, will benefit from region-specific integrated assessments of cumulative pressures on ocean ecosystems. Through targeted capacity strengthening, governments and national research institutes will be empowered to undertake integrated marine research and monitoring programmes, and through co-developed decision-making frameworks will be able to implement ocean resource management which balances ocean conservation and sustainable use for fair and equitable benefit sharing. We will work with regional and national governments to implement sustainable, inclusive and collaborative ocean management strategies, such as the ocean dimension of the African Union's Science, Technology and Innovation Strategy for Africa and the Pacific Community Centre for Ocean Science. The above, together with the development of guidance for the coherent implementation of international law at different levels and through a programme of legal capacity building, the negotiating capacity of developing countries will be strengthened within relevant international fora.
The One Ocean Hub is a direct and systematic response to the Call for Action agreed upon at the 2017 UN Ocean Conference on Sustainable Development Goal 14. The Hub's network of international project partners (eg UNEP, UNDP, UNOALOS, FAO) will support national process of implementation of international law on the ocean and sustainable development. These partners have already co-defined the Hub's research to ensure its aligned to key ongoing international processes. Specifically, the Hub will contribute to the preparations of the 2020 UN Ocean Follow-up Conference, an expected mandate in 2019 from the UN Environment Assembly to develop new instruments on ocean plastics, a post-2020 global biodiversity framework, and the 2020-2030 Programme for the Development and Periodic Review of Environmental Law of UNEP. The involvement of the Hub in such processes will ensure that knowledge from across the Hub, from local to regional levels, will influence international process. The Hub network will benefit all partner organisations by bringing together organisations across sectors and scales to tackle institutional disconnects and promote sustainable partnerships from the local-international level.

Organisations

People

ORCID iD

Elisa Morgera (Principal Investigator)
Bryan Clark (Co-Investigator)
Georgina Oduro (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3030-7196
Lynne Shannon (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7842-0636
Lorenzo Cotula (Co-Investigator)
Merle Sowman (Co-Investigator)
Rosemary Dorrington (Co-Investigator)
Michael Heath (Co-Investigator)
Tracy Shimmield (Co-Investigator)
Morgan Wairiu (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-8245-5778
Margit Wilhelm (Co-Investigator)
Sebastian Hennige (Co-Investigator)
Francesco Sindico (Co-Investigator)
Daniela Diz Pereira Pinto (Co-Investigator)
Sian Rees (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9606-783X
Emmanuel Acheampong (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-6243-294X
Rachel Wynberg (Co-Investigator)
Kitche Magak (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8336-9932
Alexander Winkler (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7864-8243
Andrew Kenny (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4944-1221
J Roberts (Co-Investigator)
Warren Potts (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6707-0383
Tom Baum (Co-Investigator)
Andrew Sweetman (Co-Investigator)
Gilianne Brodie (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6896-4696
Stuart Jeffrey (Co-Investigator)
Alison Cathcart (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1291-6561
Catherine Muhoma (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0816-1661
Philile Mbatha (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5705-0330
Sylvie Da Lomba (Co-Investigator)
Kerry Sink (Co-Investigator)
Ann Cheryl Armstrong (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3282-8916
Matthew Harrison (Co-Investigator)
Matthew Grant Allen (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3490-9960
Mathew Upton (Co-Investigator)
Patrick Vrancken (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9941-4718
Claire Lajaunie (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-8838-9062
Saskia Anna Filip Vermeylen (Co-Investigator)
José De Oliveira (Co-Investigator)
Tobias Schonwetter (Co-Investigator)
Alana Lancaster (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-8956-7297
Martin J. Attrill (Co-Investigator)
Warwick Sauer (Co-Investigator)
Bernadette Snow (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-1598-4511
Bhavani Narayanaswamy (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5810-9127
Kate Royse (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5660-2615
Daniel Jones (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5218-1649
Pierre MAZZEGA (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-2398-3954
Joseph Aggrey-Fynn (Co-Investigator)
Kerry Howell (Co-Investigator)
Marie Boswell (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7099-7713
Elaine Webster (Co-Investigator)
Paul Lusty (Co-Investigator)
John Ansah (Co-Investigator)
Benjamin Kofi Nyarko (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6560-9613
Clive Fox (Co-Investigator)
Carol Cotterill (Co-Investigator)
Jeremy Hills (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9204-2536
Amanda Lombard (Co-Investigator)
BOLANLE ERINOSHO (Co-Investigator)
Suzanne Jane Painting (Co-Investigator)
Stephanie Switzer (Co-Investigator)
Hendrik Van As (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5288-5344
Derrick Armstrong (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1671-9290
Dylan McGarry (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5738-3813
Stephen Dye (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-4182-8475
Harrison Golo (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9805-5477
Matthew Revie (Co-Investigator)
Maria Baker (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-6977-8935
Natalia Serpetti (Researcher Co-Investigator)
Robin Cook (Researcher Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9604-0204

Publications

10 25 50
 
Title "Dolphin " 
Description Dolphin is an acrylic ink, watercolours and fineliner pens on paper (38×27 cm) produced by Hub Director Prof Elisa Morgera (University of Strathclyde, UK). This painting is part of 'Marine Portraits', the first series of paintings Elisa Morgera has created. They were conceived and made during the first lockdown in the UK (2020) and loosely inspired by Dylan McGarry's artwork for the One Ocean Hub's website. They are both a way to celebrate the uniqueness and allure of marine life, and to feel personally connected to marine biodiversity as the centre of gravity of Elisa's lifework as a scholar. Marine portraits is the second exhibition on the One Ocean Learn platform, launched on 15 December 2022. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact No notable impacts to be reported 
URL https://www.oneoceanlearn.org/exhibitions/marine-portraits/
 
Title "Hammerhead sharks " 
Description Hammerhead sharks is an acrylic ink, watercolours and fineliner pens on paper painting (38×27 cm) produced by Hub Director Prof Elisa Morgera (University of Strathclyde, UK). This painting is part of 'Marine Portraits', the first series of paintings Elisa Morgera has created. They were conceived and made during the first lockdown in the UK (2020) and loosely inspired by Dylan McGarry's artwork for the One Ocean Hub's website. They are both a way to celebrate the uniqueness and allure of marine life, and to feel personally connected to marine biodiversity as the centre of gravity of Elisa's lifework as a scholar. Marine portraits is the second exhibition on the One Ocean Learn platform, launched on 15 December 2022. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact No notable impacts to be reported at this stage. 
URL https://www.oneoceanlearn.org/exhibitions/marine-portraits/
 
Title "Manta ray " 
Description Manta ray is an acrylic ink, watercolours and fineliner pens on paper painting, (38×27 cm) produced by Hub Director, Prof Elisa Morgera (University of Strathclyde, UK). This painting is part of 'Marine Portraits', the first series of paintings Elisa Morgera has created. They were conceived and made during the first lockdown in the UK (2020) and loosely inspired by Dylan McGarry's artwork for the One Ocean Hub's website. They are both a way to celebrate the uniqueness and allure of marine life, and to feel personally connected to marine biodiversity as the centre of gravity of Elisa's lifework as a scholar. Marine portraits is the second exhibition on the One Ocean Learn platform, launched on 15 December 2022. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact No notable impacts to be reported at this stage. 
URL https://www.oneoceanlearn.org/exhibitions/marine-portraits/
 
Title "Ultra-black deep-sea fish " 
Description Ultra-black deep-sea fish is an ccrylic ink, watercolours and fineliner pens on paper painting (38×27 cm) produced by Hub Director Prof Elisa Morgera (University of Strathclyde, UK). This painting is part of 'Marine Portraits', the first series of paintings Elisa Morgera has created. They were conceived and made during the first lockdown in the UK (2020) and loosely inspired by Dylan McGarry's artwork for the One Ocean Hub's website. They are both a way to celebrate the uniqueness and allure of marine life, and to feel personally connected to marine biodiversity as the centre of gravity of Elisa's lifework as a scholar. Marine portraits is the second exhibition on the One Ocean Learn platform, launched on 15 December 2022. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact No notable impacts to be reported at this stage. 
URL https://www.oneoceanlearn.org/exhibitions/marine-portraits/
 
Title A Brother's Bond 
Description Oral history produced by Riaz for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthed partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Noteable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/a-brothers-bond-riazs-story/
 
Title A Dwindling Species 
Description Oral history produced by Tamlynn for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/a-dwindling-species/
 
Title A Family that Fishes Together Stays Together 
Description Edited story produced by Thabisile Gumede for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for author Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/a-family-that-fishes-together-stays-together/
 
Title A Fishers Tale 
Description Digital illustration produced by Kevin Ngwenya to accompany the oral history Hook, Line and Sinker for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for artist Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthed partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/hook-line-and-sinker-snowys-story/
 
Title A Fishing Heritage in Peril 
Description Edited story produced by Thabisile Gumede for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for author Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/a-fishing-heritage-in-peril/
 
Title A Violation of the Sea 
Description Oral history produced by Riaz for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/a-violation-of-the-sea-riazs-story/
 
Title An Unusual Catch 
Description Oral history produced by Tamlynn for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/an-unusual-catch-tamlynns-story/
 
Title Being Outdoors 
Description Oral history produced by Monty for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/being-outdoors-montys-story/
 
Title Between Worlds (A Poetry Book) 
Description The poetry book is written by Hub researcher Professor Rose Boswell (Nelson Mandela University). Because of the climate crisis and declining ocean health, humans are increasingly in a liminal space between this world and imaginary, alien worlds to come. The poems raise the issue of climate change by foregrounding the centrality, beauty, and significance of the ocean, and of marine life to humanity. They suggest that all species live 'between worlds': between fantasy and reality, dreaming and wakefulness, intuition and consciousness, water and air. We need all worlds to survive. Serendipitously, the poems were composed between dusk and dawn. They are both part-thoughts and whole thoughts that come to inspire my ethnographic writing. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact The poetry book has only been published in February 2022. There is no notable impacts yet. 
URL https://www.africanbookscollective.com/books/between-worlds
 
Title Brotherhood 
Description Oil on canvas produced by Kenneth Shandu to accompany the oral history You Live by the Sea; You Die by the Sea for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for artist Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/andre-and-williams-story-you-live-by-the-sea-you-die-by-the-sea/
 
Title Close Encounter 
Description Oral history produced by Riaz for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/riazs-close-encounter/
 
Title Cold water corals in a changing ocean: Short Film 
Description As a contribution to the Climate Conference, scientists at University of Edinburgh have produced a short film explaining how cold-water corals are particularly vulnerable to the rapid acidification of the oceans caused by carbon dioxide emissions - a largely hidden impact of fossil fuel use. Narrated by the COP26 People's Advocate Sir David Attenborough, this video features research from the H2020 iAtlantic (Grant Agreement No 818123) and One Ocean Hub projects. The film highlights the central role of the ocean when considering climate change impacts and mitigation. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact The new film premiered at a special evening event hosted by iAtlantic at Dynamic Earth in Edinburgh on Saturday 6 November 2021, which highlighted the crucial role that the ocean plays in the climate crisis. It was also shown during a Poster Exhibitition hosted by the One Ocean Hub at COP26 Green Zone, Glasgow Science Centre on 12th November 2021. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4iPY-9mGVg
 
Title Community mapping of fishing areas and priorities at St Helena Bay, South Africa 
Description "Community mapping of fishing areas and priorities at St Helena Bay" is based on several workshops and focus groups co-organised by Hub researcher Prof Merle Sowman (University of Cape Town, South Africa). This is part of process of documenting fisher knowledge to facilitate knowledge sharing with scientists involved in the South Africa Marine Spatial Planning process. This work is ongoing. The maps and narratives that support the map have been shared at one fishers and scientists meeting in 2022 - more to follow. Currently, Prof Sowman is exploring ways of integrating this knowledge onto a Geographic Information System (GIS) based map. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2023 
Impact Scientists participating in the fisher-scientist exchange workshop were amazed at the depth of knowledge held by fishers and the understanding of local reefs and other environmental features that they were unaware of. This has led to a request for further meetings and exchanges. There have been shifts in perceptions regarding the value of fisher knowledge amongst some scientists. 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/focus-on-south-africa/
 
Title DiepRespek: Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems 
Description Diep Respek is music video which aims to promote empathy for vulnerable marine ecosystems (VME) within South Africa's trawling community, and to provide a resource for deckhands and skippers to better identify the VME indicator taxa so that move-on fishing practices can operate more smoothly and with motivation from within the community whose livelihoods directly depend on healthy oceans. The video included spoken word in a combination of English and Afrikaans as the main audience is majority Afrikaans. It also includes subtitles. The film is available for download, so fishermen will be able to circulate it on Whatsapp and have it as a resource on their phones. Diep Respek is an ode to the deep sea and hopes to more deeply connect fishermen with the mysterious worlds below, notably the Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems - or VMEs. These are parts of the ocean floor that are fundamental to the sustainability of our fisheries. They constitute a wide diversity of organisms that provide habitats for young fish and eggs, and other creatures. These ecosystems are highly sensitive to disturbance from trawling operations as the organisms are slow-growing and long-lived, and once trawled, may take two to three generations to recover, at least. To limit disturbance, trawlers off the coast of South Africa are adopting a system where they stop fishing and move to another area if they catch too many VME indicator taxa. For this system to work efficiently, crew members must have a good understanding of the indicator taxa and ultimately a personal desire to preserve these ecosystems. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Video was featured in a blog of the South Africa Deep-Sea Trawling Industry Association, which noted that the video was "spreading quickly among fishing crews working in South Africa's trawl fishery for hake." Link to blog: https://www.sadstia.co.za/news/dieprespek-shines-a-fresh-light-on-vulnerable-marine-ecosystems/ 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n6kdnR2eXmg
 
Title Documentary film set in Ghana: "Cocooned in Harmony" 
Description Cocooned in Harmony, a documentary film by Dr Eric Debrah Otchere (University of Cape Coast, Ghana), details how the songs of indigenous Ghanaian artisanal fisher-folk serve multiple purposes, ranging from providing reference points for coordinated activity to containing insights into issues of identity, power/inequality, agency, gender, and emotional connections to the ocean, among others. The documentary shows how through music, fishermen create and inhabit spaces where they find their (often sidelined) voice. The film has been screened within local communities in Ghana on 2 August 2022. A short video of the community screenings has also been produced and can be viewed here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6WL1b7VNXfQ 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact Positive comments were received on YouTube page after the documentary was premiered on 31 August 2022 and during community screening in Ghana on 2 August 2022. The documentary has been shown on National Television in Ghana (News Channel - DSTV Channel 421, Ghana) for two days in a row on 28-29 January 2022, sparking discussion on identity and emotional connections to the ocean. The documentary has also been screened in Aarhus, Denmark on 17-28 August 2022. Audience who attended the film screening in Ghana and Denmark in 2022, provided very positive accounts about the documentary. The fishing communities in Ghana where data was taken were pleased with the film produced and research process conducted by the Hub. This was because in addition to recording their art, Hub researchers led by Dr Otchere have given copies of the documentary back to them and backed them up in the University repository. There are a few requests to screen the documentary at other places within and outside of Ghana and engage in discussions about it. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BQgti_t34PU
 
Title Dugong 
Description Dugong is an acrylic ink, watercolours and fineliner pens on paper painting (38×27 cm) produced by Hub Director Prof Elisa Morgera (University of Strathclyde, UK). This painting is part of 'Marine Portraits', the first series of paintings Elisa Morgera has created. They were conceived and made during the first lockdown in the UK (2020) and loosely inspired by Dylan McGarry's artwork for the One Ocean Hub's website. They are both a way to celebrate the uniqueness and allure of marine life, and to feel personally connected to marine biodiversity as the centre of gravity of Elisa's lifework as a scholar. Marine portraits is the second exhibition on the One Ocean Learn platform, launched on 15 December 2022. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact No notable impacts to be reported at this stage. 
URL https://www.oneoceanlearn.org/exhibitions/marine-portraits/
 
Title Durban Harbour 
Description Oil on canvas produced by Kenneth Shandu to accompany the oral history A Brother's Bond for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for artist Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthed partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/a-brothers-bond-riazs-story/
 
Title Elaine Maepio for Vae Tailor Nautilus Eh'a Dress wearable art, Solomon Islands 
Description Elaine Maepio created the Eh'a Dress wearable art for the Vae Tailor Nautilus in Solomon Islands. The wearable art was created as part of the Ocean's Lens project in Solomon Islands funded by the Hub's Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund. The project was led by the Association of Solomon Islanders in Creative Fashion. It brought together female fashion designers, tailors, and young models to create wearable art that communicates customary relationships with the sea. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact Paid employment and training, promotion of practice. Alongside knowledge exchange, the project provided practical training to increase the technical abilities of fashion practitioners. By way of strengthening skills in areas such as design, sewing, modelling, marketing and advocacy, the project provided opportunities for financial, creative and professional empowerment. 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/new-deep-fund-projects/
 
Title Elaine Maepio for Vae Tailor Valusa Inspired Casual Wear 2022 wearable art, Solomon Islands 
Description In 2022 Elaine Maepio created 'Inspired Casual Wear' wearable art for Vae Tailor Valusa in Solomon Islands. The wearable art was created as part of the Ocean's Lens project in Solomon Islands funded by the Hub's Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund. The project was led by the Association of Solomon Islanders in Creative Fashion. It brought together female fashion designers, tailors and young models to create wearable art that communicates customary relationships with the sea. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact Paid employment and training, promotion of practice. Alongside knowledge exchange, the project provided practical training to increase the technical abilities of fashion practitioners. By way of strengthening skills in areas such as design, sewing, modelling, marketing and advocacy, the project provided opportunities for financial, creative and professional empowerment. 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/new-deep-fund-projects/
 
Title Empatheatre Play: Umkhosi Wenala 
Description The Empatheatre team in South Africa (that recently performed at COP27) has embarked on a new journey to use restorative public storytelling to address issues of fairness and inclusion in the creation and management of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs), through a new theatre-based research project co-developed with 13 young artists (Mbazwana Creative Arts) in northern KwaZulu-Natal region. The project, titled "Umkhosi Wenala" (is Zulu for "Festival of Abundance") aims to create an innovative participatory decision-making space where rural youth can have a voice in the creation and management of MPAs that exclude cultural, spiritual and other local perspectives, concerns and questions. The musical tells the story of two twins, a brother Nkosana and sister Makhosazana, who inherit a kingdom after the disappearance of their grandmother, a queen, said to have drowned in the ocean. The two Nkosi's, destined to rule together, are divided by circumstance and political forces beyond their control. After two decades of betrayal and conflict between their competing kingdoms, the situation further escalates with the arrival of a fence which cuts the communities off from their village and resources and resurfaces past tensions and new resentments. The production weaves together many relevant moments from the last century of Northern Zululand's history and uses humour, pathos, satire, puppetry, ritual and music to tell its story. The musical deepens some of the Hub research findings, from across the South African research team, on gender and inter-generational dialogue, indigenous and local communities' customary laws, cultural and religious connections to the ocean, exclusionary practices in spatial planning and conservation, and fair and equitable benefit-sharing within communities and between communities, researchers and public authorities. As such, it also reveals multiple issues related to human rights, that will be further explored in 2023. At the conclusion of each performance, audiences are invited to join into a facilitated conversation with the performers and creative team, with a view to advancing understanding of these issues and explore generative opportunities for more inclusive ocean governance. The new Empatheatre Play: Umkhosi Wenala was created in Kwa-Zulu-Natal, with 13 young activists and eight elders, and other citizens. It was developed over 2021 and 2022, with final performances scheduled to take place in September 2023. For more information about the play watch here: https://vimeo.com/791847743/b95e473231. To learn more about the innovative partnerships behind this project and how the restorative public storytelling method is contributing to making ocean governance more inclusive in post-Apartheid South Africa read this blogpost here: https://oneoceanhub.org/fairer-and-more-inclusive-marine-protected-areas-through-restorative-public-storytelling/ The Umkhosi Wenala play has fostered collaboration between Hub researchers that are at different stages of their careers. Hub early career researcher, Dr. Philile Mbata (University of Cape Town, South Africa) for exampled has contributed to the play by sharing the stories that she had collected during her PhD over a decade ago in the Kosi Bay by working with indigenous knowledge holders, many of whom would have been the grandparents of the participants, and had subsequently passed away. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact The Umkhosi Wenala brought many different knowledge holders together, who participated in post-show discussions. Including local Indigenous authorities and leaders, who engaged and offered feedback on the performance, the ethics of representation, and the text itself. This first iteration of the play has allowed the team to adapt it, to have even more significant impact on how audiences can work with the complexity of addressing the past injustices in how decisions are made in contemporary governance. The Empatheatre Team, with the support of the One Ocean Hub and the Coastal Justice Network, aims to extend the play further with a tour across Kwa-Zulu Natal, with a particular focus on a public consultation process underway in a neighbouring MPA further down the coast in 2023. Alongside this extend tour, the team aims to work with Hub researchers, community leaders and other knowledge holders, to use the post-show discussion as a think tank to draft a peoples' charter on marine protection. A documentary of this research collaborations will be launched at the closing events of the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries and Aquaculture, which the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation is organising in mid March 2023 in Rome, Italy, where early insights from the extend tour and the draft peoples' charter on marine conservation will be shared internationally with policy makers and practitioners involved in sustainable fisheries and marine conservation. The engagement at the international level is expected to further co-develop the Hub research and policy contributions on how to make marine protection more inclusive, just and support multi-species flourishing (human and more-than-human alike). 
URL https://vimeo.com/791847743/b95e473231
 
Title Erhardt 
Description Oral history produced by Tamlynn for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/erhardt-tamlyns-story/
 
Title Evangeline Aravoha'a Molo wearable art Solomon Islands 
Description n 2022 Evangeline Aravoha'a Molo created a wearable art in Solomon Islands. The wearable art was created as part of the Ocean's Lens project in Solomon Islands funded by the Hub's Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund. The project was led by the Association of Solomon Islanders in Creative Fashion. It brought together female fashion designers, tailors and young models to create wearable art that communicates customary relationships with the sea. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact Paid employment and training, promotion of practice. Alongside knowledge exchange, the project provided practical training to increase the technical abilities of fashion practitioners. By way of strengthening skills in areas such as design, sewing, modelling, marketing and advocacy, the project provided opportunities for financial, creative and professional empowerment. 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/new-deep-fund-projects/
 
Title Fisher voices must be heard. Pamphlet by Coastal Justice Network 
Description This pamphlet is designed by Hub researchers involved in the Coastal Justice Network including Anna James, Taryn Pereira, Dr Jackie Sunde and Dr Kira Erwin. It is produced in response to the South Africa Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries approach to reverse and review the process of allocating Small Scale Fisher (SSF) rights in the Western Cape following multiple complaints about the fairness and accuracy of the process in 2021. The pamphlet highlighted the need for the South Africa Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries to consult with small-scale fishers themselves about how they have been excluded from the past and present policy regimes, and ensure that any policy interventions that take place treats fishers fairly. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact The pamphlet has served as a useful piece of reading for fishers or someone interested in the policy, research and regulations that apply to small-scale fishers (including subsistence fishers) in South Africa. See here: https://fisherstales.org/useful-tackle/ 
URL https://fisherstales.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/SSF-pamphlet-_-2-page-printable-version-_-Englis...
 
Title Fishers Tales Exhibition and public engagement activities in 2022 
Description The Kwa Zulu Natal South Africa Gallery ran the Fishers' Tales (https://fisherstales.org/) exhibition in the Park Gallery, South Africa from 2nd March - 3rd April 2022. Fishers' Tales is an arts-based storytelling project that collects the wondrous tales that fishers enjoy telling about their ocean adventures. This project explores fishers' connections and emotional bonds to the ocean using a visual storytelling approach. Each story is accompanied by a unique artwork. The Fishers' Tales exhibition also provides a platform to showcase the work done by young and emerging artists in Durban, as the project is specifically aimed to support creative students studying in the city. The stories and accompanying artwork seek to highlight the similarities and differences in fishers' engagements with the ocean from subsistence to recreational, provoking reflection, empathy, and dialogue. In this sense, the project hopes to build both awareness and solidarity with subsistence and small-scale fishers, who have enormous knowledge and care for the ocean that sustains them. The history of fishing in KwaZulu-Natal is where this project originates. Looking into the history of the diverse people who live along this coastal province, the daily moments captured by the artists offers insight into these experiences of connecting with the ocean, and the complex permitting regulations that impacts negatively on the livelihoods of fishers and their ability to practice fishing as part of their cultural heritage. The exhibition also highlights how climate change has affected marine life in the ocean and how that has negatively impacted the lives of small-scale and subsistence fisherfolk. Increasingly fishers along our coast line are joining the struggle for ocean wellbeing. The project contributes towards a bigger One Ocean Hub project for inclusive and transformative approaches to ocean governance. The project is managed by the Urban Futures Centre in partnership with the South Durban Community Environmental Alliance (SDCEA), and it is funded through the Deep Emotional Engagement Programme (DEEP) Fund (administered by the One Ocean Hub programme). 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact Fishers Tales ExhibitionZNSA Gallery ran the Fishers' Tales exhibition in the Park Gallery from 2nd March-3rd April 2022 and public engagement activities in 2022 has sparked nation-wide conversation on fishers' connections and emotional bonds to the ocean. The exhibition in March 2022 was accompanied by a public programme: - 2nd March - Public Opening; - 18th March - School tour; - 19th March - Storytelling with Fishers; - 2nd April - Exhibition walkabout and ocean educational talk (Ocean Wellbeing with invited guest speaker). Other media and activities post the exhibition are listed as follow: National Media: Real Life on the "dolossea" by Duncan Guy. Independent Online written, Mar 12, 2022 (https://www.iol.co.za/ios/news/real-life-on-the-dolosse-ab2b9754-48c3-47ca-84c6-a78e65e6107b). Local and community Newspapers: Activism meets art at Fisher's Tale exhibition. Rising Sun Overport. April 21, 2022 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AWlcJWXqDYc). Art exhibition centers around Durban's fishermen. The Berea Mail. March 13, 2022. Fisherfolk take central stage. The Post. 23rd March 2022 (https://bereamail.co.za/282549/art-exhibition-centers-around-durbans-fishermen/). Blogposts: Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea by Kira Erwin 31st January 2022 (https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/) The art of engagement: The Fishers Tales Exhibition by Kira Erwin 29th March 2022 (https://oneoceanhub.org/the-art-of-engagement-the-fishers-tales-exhibition/). The Urban Futures Centre at DUT Partners with the SDCEA to showcase Fishers'tales at the KZNSA Gallery (https://www.dut.ac.za/the-urban-futures-centre-at-dut-partners-with-the-sdcea-to-showcase-fishers-tales-at-the-kznsa-gallery/) The Fishers Tales postcards were handed out to audiences on the Durban tour of the Lalela uLwandle in Phoenix and at the South African Marine Science Symposium, as well as at the Port Alfred national workshop with small-scale fishers and civil society on oil and gas. 
URL https://www.kznsagallery.co.za/Exhibitions/View/1005/fishers-tales
 
Title Fishers Unite 
Description Oral history produced by Tozi Mthiyane for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/fishers-unite/
 
Title Fishertales website 
Description Subsistence and small-scale fishers in KwaZulu-Natal practice a livelihood that holds deep spiritual and cultural meaning. In this coastal province of South Africa fishers make up a dynamic and diverse group that has vast intergenerational knowledge of the ocean, yet their voices are seldom heard in the rush for the Blue Economy. Hub researchers in South Africa, in partnership with the South Durban Community Environmental Alliance have developed a website titled The Fishers Tales which showcases some of the everyday and extraordinary stories of these fisher men and women; from their earliest memories of learning to fish, how this gives their life meaning, enables them to put their children through school, and the political struggles they face. Each story on the website is paired with a unique artwork inspired by these tales with the sea. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact The Fishertales website is co-developed by One Ocean Hub researchers and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance (SDCEA). The SDCEA is an environmental justice organisation based in South Durban, South Africa that made up of 19 affiliate organisations and has been active since its formation in 1995. This partnership ensure that creative writing and art products published in the website to be widely shared among SDCEA networks. Links, pamphlets, and stories shared in Fishertales website also serve as useful resources for fishers and others who are interested on small-scale fisheries in South Africa. 
URL https://fisherstales.org/
 
Title Fishing Dreams 
Description Watercolour and ink produced by Elisa Morgera to accompany the oral history Erhardt for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/erhardt-tamlyns-story/
 
Title Fishing Like a Girl 
Description Ink on paper produced by Kira Erwin to accompany the oral history Fishing Like a Girl for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/fishing-as-a-girl/
 
Title Fishing Like a Girl 
Description Oral history produced by Tamlynn for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/fishing-as-a-girl/
 
Title Following Eddie: Short film exploring the challenges of small-scale fishers accessing the ocean 
Description One Ocean Hub researchers in South Africa have been working on a film exploring the challenges of small-scale fishers accessing the ocean and coasts in Tsitsikamma, South Africa after the area was established as a Marine Protected Area (MPA). The film, entitled Following Freddie, documents the complexities of sustainable ocean and coastal management in an area that forms a part of national conservation efforts in South Africa. In this case, the aim is to sustainably manage marine fauna and flora. The film was made together with filmmakers Senzo Xulu and Francois du Plessis, who are funded by the South Africa National Research Foundation (NRF) Community of Practice: Oceans Account Framework Project, researching the complexities of cultural heritage management at the coast of South Africa. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact The film has only been released in January 2022. There is no notable impacts yet. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_r_swTOhlA
 
Title Highlights from Shell Wild Coast judgement 
Description "Highlights from Shell Wild Coast judgement" is infographic Infographics about the most pertinent and significant extracts of the Shell Wild Coast judgement in the Makhanda High Court. In September 2022 these were shared to the SSF National Leaders Whatsapp group, as well as other environmental justice whatsapp groups, and shared on the Coastal Justice instagram page where they were widely re-shared. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact "Highlights from Shell Wild Coast judgement" have contributed to a deepened, more empowered, more nuanced and more plural engagement with complex socio-ecological-political aspects of ocean relationships and governance. 
URL https://www.instagram.com/p/CiAH2JWqWw9/?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y=
 
Title Hilleina Hilly's Lagoon Affair wearable art Solomon Islands 
Description In 2022 Hilleina Hilly created 'Lagoon Affair' wearable art in Solomon Islands. The wearable art was created as part of the Ocean's Lens project in Solomon Islands funded by the Hub's Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund. The project was led by the Association of Solomon Islanders in Creative Fashion. It brought together female fashion designers, tailors and young models to create wearable art that communicates customary relationships with the sea. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact Paid employment and training, promotion of practice. Alongside knowledge exchange, the project provided practical training to increase the technical abilities of fashion practitioners. By way of strengthening skills in areas such as design, sewing, modelling, marketing and advocacy, the project provided opportunities for financial, creative and professional empowerment. 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/new-deep-fund-projects/
 
Title Hook, Line and Sinker 
Description Oral history produced by Snowy for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthed partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/hook-line-and-sinker-snowys-story/
 
Title I Got Hooked 
Description Oral history produced by PJ for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/i-got-hooked-jps-story/
 
Title Images from the use of photovoice method as part of the project titled 'indigenous knowledge and ocean management practices in Axim, Ghana'. 
Description Under the supervision of Hub researcher Dr Georgina Yaa Oduro a team of graduate students at the University of Cape Coast, Ghana, have used of photovoice and other creative methodologies to document socio-culturally sensitive and relevant qualitative data on 'indigenous knowledge and ocean management practices in Axim, Ghana'. From the use of photovoice method the research team has produced an array of images. 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2023 
Impact The students are intrigued by the novelty of the method while the participants also found it captiviating. 
 
Title In a Perfect World, Fishing Has No Gender 
Description Edited story produced by Thabisile Gumede for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for author Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/in-a-perfect-world-fishing-has-no-gender/
 
Title Indigenous Fishing 
Description Edited story produced by Thomas for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/indigenous-fishing/
 
Title Indigenous Peoples & the Ocean 
Description This short film highlights the voices of Indigenous peoples and local communities from Ghana, Namibia, and South Africa in ocean-climate action. The film was first shown at the High-Level Ocean Dialogue - United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Bonn Climate Meeting in June 2022. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact The film was first shown at the High-Level Ocean Dialogue - UNFCCC Bonn Climate Meeting in June 2022. It brought for the first time the voice of Indigenous Peoples and local communities at the High-Level Ocean Dialogue. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kRzNMXiAz7I
 
Title Indlela Yokuphila (the soul's journey) 
Description Indlela Yokuphila is a transdisciplinary project that brought together a range of artists, traditional healers, marine sociologists and deep-sea marine ecologists to collaborate on a more holistic alternative to ocean mapping and decision making. According to the ancestral beliefs of the isiZulu people, the deep sea is a resting place of ancestors, where, after death, the soul travels to, through streams, rivers, estuaries and eventually into the sea. The animation film offers a dazzling digital storytelling experience led by animator/director Marc Moynihan, Empatheatre co-founders Dr Dylan McGarry and award-winning performer and theatre-maker Mpume Mthombeni and composer Braam Du Toit. The soul's journey in isiZulu traditional belief systems is remarkably similar to the scientific idea of the water lifecycle. The animation film is based on an interview with a traditional Zulu historian and a traditional Zulu healer. The interview was part of the One Ocean Hub research on transformative ocean governance in South Africa. The social scientists and artists working on this project use storytelling to illustrate how - if we are willing to listen closely - scientific knowledge and indigenous knowledge can at times align. Please find a password-protected link to Indlela Yokuphila film (6 min 12 sec) below. The animation has not premiered yet, so please do not share this link outside of your organisation. https://vimeo.com/794877550 password: Indlela2023 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact The non-colured version of the animation film was first screened at Climate COP26 in Glasgow, UK at an event that the One Ocean Hub co-organised with the Green Climate Fund titled "Climate-Related Conflict: Arts-Based Mediation and Recourse to Redress" on 10 November 2021, and two Hydrofeminsim events. Indlela Yokuphila film will be launched on 8 June 2023 at the UN World Ocean Day, UN headquarter, New York. 
URL https://vimeo.com/794877550
 
Title Julie Pelomo for JP Arty Design Kaftan Dress wearable art, Solomon Islands 
Description In 2022, Julie Pelomo for JP Arty Design created a Kaftan Dress wearable art. The wearable art was created as part of the Ocean's Lens project in Solomon Islands funded by the Hub's Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund. The project was led by the Association of Solomon Islanders in Creative Fashion. It brought together female fashion designers, tailors and young models to create wearable art that communicates customary relationships with the sea. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact Paid employment and training, promotion of practice. Alongside knowledge exchange, the project provided practical training to increase the technical abilities of fashion practitioners. By way of strengthening skills in areas such as design, sewing, modelling, marketing and advocacy, the project provided opportunities for financial, creative and professional empowerment. 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/new-deep-fund-projects/
 
Title Julie Pelomo for JP Arty Design Mandarin Dress 2022 wearable art, Solomon Islands 
Description In 2022, Julie Pelomo for JP Arty Design created a Mandarin Dress wearable art.The wearable art was created as part of the Ocean's Lens project in Solomon Islands funded by the Hub's Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund. The project was led by the Association of Solomon Islanders in Creative Fashion. It brought together female fashion designers, tailors and young models to create wearable art that communicates customary relationships with the sea. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact Paid employment and training, promotion of practice. Alongside knowledge exchange, the project provided practical training to increase the technical abilities of fashion practitioners. By way of strengthening skills in areas such as design, sewing, modelling, marketing and advocacy, the project provided opportunities for financial, creative and professional empowerment. 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/new-deep-fund-projects/
 
Title Keiskamma Art Project: Our Sacred Ocean 2022 tapestry, South Africa 
Description Our Sacred Ocean is a monumental tapestry created by the Keiskamma Art Project, South Africa. The circular tapestry is 3.5 metres in diameter. Production of the tapestry was facilitated by the Hub's Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund - a collaborative programme of international research that supports community-based art projects that communicate emotional bonds with the ocean. The Keiskamma Art Project convened intergenerational knowledge exchange workshops and storytelling sessions to collect local memories, prayers and rituals that express ancestral connections to the sea. The intricately embroidered motifs of the tapestry reveal the centrality of the ocean to the Eastern Cape communities of Hamburg and Bodium. Alongside imagery that depicts the ocean as a sacred space for cleansing and healing to ensure sustained good-health and wellbeing, the sea is also represented as a space for traditional modes of fishing and harvesting to ensure food and financial security. The tapestry emphasises the value and benefits of international research that embraces the principles of inclusivity, equity and respect. Our Sacred Ocean brought together diverse knowledge holders to give rise to marginalised voices that are underrepresented in conventional approaches to marine science and management. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact Paid employment and training, promotion of practice. 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/our-ocean-is-sacred-you-cant-mine-heaven/
 
Title Lalela Ulwandle - Empatheatre - SOUTH AFRICA 
Description Empatheatre is a research-based, theatre-making methodology. A script is developed and performed, emerging from a social science research process consisting of interviews and ethnogrpahy. Post-analysis the team sets out to shape the data into an engrossing and relevant true-to-life theatrical experience. Such experiences are intended to offer theatrical epiphanies that speak emotively to the realities of the situation, and above all to honour the informants' narratives, narratives which are carefully woven into the messaging fabric of the play. Performances are then played to strategic audiences, often made up of people with diverse, even conflicting, views on the central concern represented in the play. Post-play facilitated dialogues allow for another layer of reflexive data to emerge. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact The play has been performed to audiences that consist of hundreds of people who have reported not only realising the depth of their feeling and connection to the ocean, but also of the imperative to protect it. In South Africa, formal nature conservation has a damaging legacy of exclusion to answer for, given that our conservation policies 'have, to date, almost exclusively reflected Western scientific values and beliefs, with an emphasis on protecting nature from human impacts' (Cocks et al., 2012). South Africa is not alone in grappling with this tension; in many countries, well-meaning biodiversity protection policies have resulted in additional formal exclusions for indigenous and economically marginalized groups (Crandall et al., 2018). Some of the social impacts of Marine Protected Areas in South Africa include weakening of local participatory governance, the loss of tenure rights, access to resources by already marginalised communities, leading to food insecurity and reduced household income, and negative impacts on culture and identity (Sowman and Sunde, 2018). Recognizing how different knowledge systems and programs underpinned by these can lead to disparities and exclusions, environmental researchers have argued for an understanding of the important relationship between biodiversity and cultural diversity in conservation management (Cocks et al., 2012). Representatives of the International Association for Impact Assessment (IAIA) South Africa came to see one of the Durban Shows, and went on to bring more representatives to shows after that. Since the performance they have invited Lalela to two different events, one locally and another abroad. Empatheatre researchers plan to continue to cultivate particular audiences to encourage conversation and strategising around the tradeoffs that lead to conservation wins awarded at the expense of marginal groups, or where marginal groups are awarded socio-economic resources at the expense of environmental conservation. 
URL https://sancor.nrf.ac.za/Documents/Oct%202019%20Emphatheatre.pdf
 
Title Lalela uLwandle (illustrated short film) 
Description Lalela uLwandle is a research-based theatre project that makes visible stories of living with the ocean that are seldom seen or heard in the public domain. Lalela uLwandle means "Listen to the Sea" in isiZulu. This short illustrated film, works with extracts from two characters from the radio play: Nowandle an isiZulu woman who comes from a long line of healers, and Niren and Indian eco-activist who comes from a long line of fishers. Their particular reflections speak to the history of forced removals and impact of extractive oil, gas and minerals along our coast line. Lalela weaves stories, histories and contemporary concerns of diverse South African coastal communities into an Empatheatre production, Lalela uLwandle explores themes of intergenerational environmental injustices, tangible and intangible ocean heritage, marine science and the myriad threats to ocean health. Lalela uLwandle is an invitation to a participatory public conversation on ocean governance in South Africa. This film is a key output of the One Ocean Hub research focussed on participatory and democratic methods of engagement in ocean governance. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact This short film was released on 21 September 2021 at a public tribunal led by a non-governmental organisation Green Connection as part of their "Who Stole Our Oceans?" environmental campaign in South Africa. The film and tribunal were also covered in online print media outlet The Daily Maverick (https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2021-09-29-the-true-custodians-of-our-seas-who-is-stealing-south-africas-ocean-heritage/). The short film was also shown during the One Ocean Hub exhibition at COP26 Green Zone on 12 November 2021. The short film was played throughout the exhibition to communicate the Hub's transdisciplinary research approach in uniting diverse stakeholders, including researchers, civil society, youth and Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities (IPLCs) to promote an inclusive approach to climate change adaptation and mitigation. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p_W3QBz9cPY
 
Title Lorna Tewa'ani Ghai Tangi's wearable art, Solomon Islands 
Description In 2022 Lorna Tewa'ani Ghai Tangi's wearable art was produced in Solomon Islands. The wearable art was created as part of the Ocean's Lens project in Solomon Islands funded by the Hub's Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund. The project was led by the Association of Solomon Islanders in Creative Fashion. It brought together female fashion designers, tailors and young models to create wearable art that communicates customary relationships with the sea. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact Paid employment and training, promotion of practice. Alongside knowledge exchange, the project provided practical training to increase the technical abilities of fashion practitioners. By way of strengthening skills in areas such as design, sewing, modelling, marketing and advocacy, the project provided opportunities for financial, creative and professional empowerment. 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/new-deep-fund-projects/
 
Title Maama Water and the Apam Youth song and video 
Description In Ghana, Straight Family Entertainment has convened a collective of marginalised yet highly creative youth to realise the project Maama Water and the Apam Youth. The project was funded by the Hub's Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund. Conceived in response to the tragic death of 12 children who drowned in the sea off Apam in March 2021, the project explores the legend of Maame Water - a spirit variously regarded as a sea goddess, mother of the ocean and African mermaid. The Collective - consisting of young musicians, poets, designers and producers - is examining relationships between Ghanaian folklore and the ocean that will result in the production of a song recorded in local languages and an associated video. Engaging with traditional knowledge holders, community elders and area council members, the sharing of intergenerational knowledge about customary practices and traditional rites is a key feature of the project. The conventions of African story-telling are adopted to record narratives that reveal the history, significance and relevance of Maame Water. In November 2022 the recording of Maame Water and the Apam Youth was launched. Watch the recording here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lu0NHoagk-U 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact Paid employment and training, promotion of practice. 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/new-deep-fund-projects/
 
Title Manatee 
Description Manatee is an acrylic ink, watercolours and fineliner pens on paper (38×27 cm) produced by Hub Drector, Prof Elisa Morgera (University of Strathclyde, UK). This painting is part of 'Marine Portraits', the first series of paintings Elisa Morgera has created. They were conceived and made during the first lockdown in the UK (2020) and loosely inspired by Dylan McGarry's artwork for the One Ocean Hub's website. They are both a way to celebrate the uniqueness and allure of marine life, and to feel personally connected to marine biodiversity as the centre of gravity of Elisa's lifework as a scholar. Marine portraits is the second exhibition on the One Ocean Learn platform, launched on 15 December 2022. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact No notable impacts to be reported at this stage. 
URL https://www.oneoceanlearn.org/exhibitions/marine-portraits/
 
Title Marine Portraits Exhibition 
Description The knowledge exchange platform One Ocean Learn's second art exhibition featured artworks by the Hub's Director, Prof Elisa Morgera. The online exhibition titled "Marine portraits" includes eight ink and watercolour paintings that Elisa created during the first lockdown in the UK in 2020. The artwork 'celebrates the uniqueness and allure of marine life' according to Elisa and allowed her to feel personally connected to marine biodiversity. The artwork is loosely inspired by Dylan McGarry's artwork for the One Ocean Hub's website. The exhibition is accompanied by personal memories of the sea and reflections on ocean research and governance. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact Marine portraits are exhibited in One Ocean Learn (OOL) that is co-developed by the Hub and UN Institute of Training and Research to inspire more artists to exhibit their works in this platform to reach more audience. 
URL https://www.oneoceanlearn.org/exhibitions/marine-portraits/
 
Title Marylyn Bae for MB Collection Coral Dress wearable art Solomon Islands 
Description In 2022 Marylyn Bae created Coral Dress wearable art for MB Collection in Solomon Islands. The wearable art was created as part of the Ocean's Lens project in Solomon Islands funded by the Hub's Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund. The project was led by the Association of Solomon Islanders in Creative Fashion. It brought together female fashion designers, tailors and young models to create wearable art that communicates customary relationships with the sea. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact Paid employment and training, promotion of practice. Alongside knowledge exchange, the project provided practical training to increase the technical abilities of fashion practitioners. By way of strengthening skills in areas such as design, sewing, modelling, marketing and advocacy, the project provided opportunities for financial, creative and professional empowerment. 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/new-deep-fund-projects/
 
Title Marylyn Bae for MB Collection Kwairabu Dress wearable art, Solomon Islands 
Description In 2022 Marylyn Bae created Kwairabu Dress wearable art for MB Collection in Solomon Islands. The wearable art was created as part of the Ocean's Lens project in Solomon Islands funded by the Hub's Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund. The project was led by the Association of Solomon Islanders in Creative Fashion. It brought together female fashion designers, tailors and young models to create wearable art that communicates customary relationships with the sea. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact Paid employment and training, promotion of practice. Alongside knowledge exchange, the project provided practical training to increase the technical abilities of fashion practitioners. By way of strengthening skills in areas such as design, sewing, modelling, marketing and advocacy, the project provided opportunities for financial, creative and professional empowerment. 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/new-deep-fund-projects/
 
Title Net Fishers 
Description Oil on canvas produced by Kenneth Shandu to accompany the edited story The Opressed Fishermen for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for artist Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/the-oppressed-fisherman/
 
Title Netai en Namou Toc (Stories of Mother Ocean) illustrated book 
Description In 2022 the Erromango Cultural Association produced an illustrated book titled Netai en Namou Toc (Stories of Mother Ocean). Led by the Erromango Cultural Association in Vanuatu, the project foregrounds indigenous knowledge of the sea through an illustrated children's book. Customary stories and oral histories are presented alongside information about centuries old rock art, trade routes, fishing methods, poisoning remedies, wind names and maritime navigation. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact Our community-led art-based research project Netai en Namou Toc (Stories of Mother Ocean) was showcased at the Moana Blue Pacific Pavilion at Climate Conference COP27, Sharm el Sheikh, Egypt on 17 November 2022. The project also resulted in paid employment and training and promotion of transdiciplinary research practice in Vanuatu. 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/indigenous-knowledge-and-inclusive-ocean-governance-a-case-study-from-vanuat...
 
Title Netai en Namou Toc - Stories of Mother Ocean 
Description his short film presents Netai en Namou Toc (Stories of Mother Ocean), a newly published illustrated children's book produced by the Erromango Cultural Association in collaboration with One Ocean Hub's Deep Emotional Engagement Programme (DEEP) Fund. The book harnesses the rich artistic and cultural heritage of Erromango, a southern island of Vanuatu, to record, preserve and promote indigenous knowledge, custom stories and oral histories relating to the ocean. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact The book was recently presented at Climate COP27, Moana Blue Pacific Pavilion (Blue Zone) in Sharm-el Sheik, Egypt. The event was attended by Hon. Ralph Regenvanu, the Vanuatu's Minister of Climate Change, academia, and civil society. 
URL https://vimeo.com/763057594?fbclid=IwAR1vqBPdaBWILRAf1sdNPLol9Xa5cK1v78EoTOtzgijN_ZWd1vaLrywwKdw
 
Title Nibela River 
Description Oil on canvas produced by Kenneth Shandu to accompany the edited story Indigenous Fishing for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for artist Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/indigenous-fishing/
 
Title Ocean & Women 
Description This One Ocean Hub's short film presents the story of a Ghanaian fish worker, Peace Gavour Abla, and discusses the challenges faced by Ghanaian women living in coastal communities. The film highlights the importance of improving the protection of women's human rights in small-scale fisheries and holding governments and businesses accountable. Around the world, women play a critical role along the entire economic value chain in small-scale fisheries, but their voice is often not heard. In Ghana, the One Ocean Hub together with civil society partners organises a series of workshops, aiming to better understand the barriers and opportunities to protecting the human rights of women in small-scale fisheries (read more here: https://oneoceanhub.org/opening-a-platform-for-women-in-small-scale-fisheries-in-ghana/ The film celebrates women in small-scale fisheries who strive for genuine participation in ocean-related decision-making. Produced by: What Took You So Long? 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact This short-documentary film on women small scale fishers in Ghana was premiered at the Hub's led in-person side-event titled 'The future and ocean WE (ALL) want: Inclusion and integration for strong, sustainable and equitable blue economies' at the UN Ocean Conference on 28th June 2022 in Lisbon, Portugal. The screening of the five-minute film Ocean and Women that gives voice to Ghanaian women fishers and their engagement with the blue economy sparked discussion between Hub, partners, and attendees including representatives from the Nippon Foundation Ocean Nexus Center, the World Wide Fund for Nature, Association of Commonwealth Universities, the Danish Institute for Human Rights and UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) on opportunities and challenges women small-scale fishers face. It provided a starting point for the discussion to distil relevant lessons learnt for innovative approaches to inclusivity, human rights protection and non-discrimination in transformative ocean knowledge co-production and sustainable ocean-based economies. Excerpts from the film was also used during the Hub led panel titled "Indigenous Peoples, traditional knowledge, and ocean-climate action" at the Climate COP27 Virtual Ocean Pavilion on 10th November 2022 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tGLY0jwzllU&t=1744s). The documentary was also shared with women fishers in Ghana for feedback and engagement. Their responses mirrored the sentiments expressed in the documentary. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDCyjRznGEA
 
Title Ocean Connections in Algoa Bay. An arts-based participatory research project 
Description This video provides a snapshot from an arts-based participatory research work with Indigenous and local knowledge holders in Algoa Bay, South Africa. The project forms part of a PhD project by Mia Strand, and a postdoctoral project led by Dr Nina Rivers. These are nested within the Algoa Bay Project, the SA/Norway Joint Research Programme on Ocean Research (SANOCEAN) project and the One Ocean Hub work on moving towards more inclusive ocean governance. You can read more about the project here: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.crsust.2022.100178 and here: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2022.886632 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact Hub researchers who organised the exhibition, Dr Nina Rivers and Mia Strand (Nelson Mandela University, South Africa) received positive feedback from co-researchers and government officials who attended the exhibition. The exhibition made co-researchers, that also include local Xhoi and San community, so proud to share their work and stories with representatives of the government of South Africa who attended the exhibition. This event has helped to inform the government representatives on the different and alternative uses of the ocean and coast in South Africa. Government officials involved in marine spatial planning in South Africa has said they have learned things they did not know about people's cultural connections to the ocean and coast. Representatives of coastal management and conservation authorities have highlighted that they need to work closer with Indigenous and local knowledge holders in the future. The workshop following the exhibition in March 2022 also informed specific pathways to ensure this. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-499UAZC3d0
 
Title Ocean Connections: a multimedia exhibition from Algoa Bay, South Africa 
Description Indigenous and local knowledge is important for how we use and care for our ocean and coasts. Too often, these knowledge systems and knowledge holders are excluded from how the ocean is used and managed. Working with Indigenous and local knowledge holders in Algoa Bay, South Africa, this project explores ways of using photography and storytelling to convey peoples' personal relationship with the ocean. The multimedia exhibition is the result of the research led by Mia Strand, and a postdoctoral project led by Dr Nina Rivers (Nelson Mandela University, South Africa) to develop an integrated marine spatial plan for the Bay that will inform the national Marine Spatial Planning process. The research also forms part of the SANOCEAN Project and One Ocean Hub work on moving towards more inclusive ocean governance. The film is produced by: Amehlo Productions. In 2022 the multimedia exhibition had taken place at the South End Museum in Gqeberha in March 2022, at the Our Ocean is Sacred exhibition in Cape Town in November 2022, and at the South African Environmental Observation Network (SAEON) marine science exhibition in Cape Town in December 2022. For more information see here: https://www.algoabayproject.com/ocean-connections. Follow link to virtual exhibition here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AsavQOxyLFw&t=17s and to the documentary here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-499UAZC3d0&t=40s 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact Hub researchers who organised the exhibition, Dr Nina Rivers and Mia Strand (Nelson Mandela University, South Africa) received positive feedback from co-researchers and government officials who attended the exhibition. The exhibition made co-researchers, that also include local Xhoi and San community, so proud to share their work and stories with representatives of the government of South Africa who attended the exhibition. This event has helped to inform the government representatives on the different and alternative uses of the ocean and coast in South Africa. Government officials involved in marine spatial planning in South Africa has said they have learned things they did not know about people's cultural connections to the ocean and coast. Representatives of coastal management and conservation authorities have highlighted that they need to work closer with Indigenous and local knowledge holders in the future. The workshop following the exhibition in March 2022 also informed specific pathways to ensure this. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AsavQOxyLFw&t=579s
 
Title Our Ocean Our Identity: Papua New Guinea 
Description Mural produced by Pax Jakupa for the DEEP Fund project Our Ocean Our Identity. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment and capacity development for lead artist Paid employment and training for two youth artists Further mural commission for artist (University of Goroka) Notable Engagements: Project Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/search/top?q=our%20ocean%20our%20identity One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/
 
Title Our Ocean Our Identity: Solomon Islands 
Description Mural produced by Lloyd Newton for the DEEP Fund project Our Ocean Our Identity. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment and capacity development for lead artist Paid employment and training for three youth artists Further mural commissions for artist (Coronation High School; National University of Solomon Islands) Notable Engagements: Project Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/search/top?q=our%20ocean%20our%20identity One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ Newspaper article 'Local Artist Wins Award', Solomon Star News, 13 March 2021, https://www.solomonstarnews.com/index.php/news/national/item/25266-local-artist-wins-award 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/
 
Title Our Ocean Our Identity: Vanuatu 
Description Mural produced by Alvaro Sumaki Kuautonga for the DEEP Fund project Our Ocean Our Identity. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment and capacity development for lead artist Art training and capacity building for 40 women and youth Market of textiles produced by women and youth raised 66,000 vatu Further mural commissions for artist (private residence; Pikinini Play Time) Notable Engagments: Project Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/search/top?q=our%20ocean%20our%20identity One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ Newspaper article 'Local Artist Wins Award', Vanuatu Daily Post, 13 March 2021, https://dailypost.vu/news/local-artist-wins-award/article_15db1e24-8519-11eb-8138-1bad3ed14307.html Meeting with Mrs Karen Bell, UK High Commissioner to the Republic of Vanuatu, June 2021 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/
 
Title Our Ocean, Our Identity: Papua New Guinea 2021 mural 
Description The mural 'Our Ocean, Our Identity: Papua New Guinea 2021' was developed as part of the Hub's Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund project titled 'Our Ocean Our Identity' by Pax Jakupa with Derrick Lendu and Georgina Woti. This project 'Our Ocean, Our Identity' was initiated in 2021 under the Deep Fund, led by Pax Jakupa (Papua New Guinea), in collaboration with artists in Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu. An initiative of three local artists - Lloyd Newton in the Solomon Islands, Pax Jakupa in Papua New Guinea and Alvaro Sumaki Kuautonga in Vanuatu - the project is a rare opportunity for artistic cross-country engagement in a region often overlooked by global art markets. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment and training, promotion of practice. 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/
 
Title Our Ocean, Our Identity: Solomon Islands 2021 mural, Solomon Islands 
Description Our Ocean Our Identity: Solomon Islands mural was produced by Lloyd Newton with Stanley Biriau, Allen Makana, Walex Raeti, Siru Tana, George Tino, and Susan Vivi in Solomon Islands. The mural was developed as part of the Hub's Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund project titled 'Our Ocean Our Identity'. This project "Our Ocean, Our Identity " was initiated in 2021 under the Deep Fund, led by Pax Jakupa (Papua New Guinea), in collaboration with artists in Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu. An initiative of three local artists - Lloyd Newton in the Solomon Islands, Pax Jakupa in Papua New Guinea and Alvaro Sumaki Kuautonga in Vanuatu - the project is a rare opportunity for artistic cross-country engagement in a region often overlooked by global art markets 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment and training, promotion of practice 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/
 
Title Our Ocean, Our Identity: Vanuatu 2021 mural 
Description The mural 'Our Ocean, Our Identity: Vanuatu 2021' was developed as part of the Hub's Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund project titled 'Our Ocean Our Identity' by Alvaro Sumaki Kuautonga with Jean Yves Bihu, Rapsin Bihu, Jimmal Kuautonga, and Marisha Kuautonga This project "Our Ocean, Our Identity " was initiated in 2021 under the Deep Fund, led by Pax Jakupa (Papua New Guinea), in collaboration with artists in Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu. An initiative of three local artists - Lloyd Newton in the Solomon Islands, Pax Jakupa in Papua New Guinea and Alvaro Sumaki Kuautonga in Vanuatu - the project is a rare opportunity for artistic cross-country engagement in a region often overlooked by global art markets. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment and training, promotion of practice. 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/
 
Title Paddles without boats, Lamps without Paraffin 
Description "Paddles without boats, Lamps without Paraffin" is a playback theatre script and process to facilitate discussion around negotiating of fair and favourable contracts with private fishing companies. This play back theatre and related discussion was part of the Eastern Cape Small Scale Fishers workshop in June 2022, and videos of the play were shared on the Small-Scale Fishers National Leaders Whatsapp group. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact The play has contributed to a deepened, more empowered, more nuanced and more plural engagement with complex socio-ecological-political aspects of ocean relationships and governance. 
 
Title Pele Moonsamy: A Fisher to Remember 
Description Edited story produced by Kira Erwin for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/pele-moonsamy-a-fisher-to-remember/
 
Title Pele and Bina 
Description Oil on canvas produced by Bandile Gumede to accompany the edited story Pele Moonsamy: A Fisher to Remember for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for artist Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/pele-moonsamy-a-fisher-to-remember/
 
Title Privilege in the Distance 
Description Watercolour produced by Rohini Amratlal to accompany the oral history Segregated for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for artist Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/segregated-jps-story/
 
Title Project Facebook page: Our Ocean, Our Identity 
Description The Facebook page of 'Our Ocean, Our Identity' provides information on activities and outputs related to this project. The project "Our Ocean, Our Identity " was initiated in 2021 under the Hub's Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund, led by Pax Jakupa (Papua New Guinea), in collaboration with artists in Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu. An initiative of three local artists - Lloyd Newton in the Solomon Islands, Pax Jakupa in Papua New Guinea and Alvaro Sumaki Kuautonga in Vanuatu - the project is a rare opportunity for artistic cross-country engagement in a region often overlooked by global art markets. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment and training, promotion of practice 
URL https://www.facebook.com/search/top?q=our%20ocean%20our%20identity
 
Title Reflecting on social impacts of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) on MPA Day 
Description "Reflecting on social impacts of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) on MPA Day" is infographics reflecting on the history and ongoing impacts of Marine Protected Areas in South Africa. The inforgraphics was shared to the Small-Scale Fishers National Leaders Whatsapp group in August 2022, as well as on the Coastal Justice Network instagram page. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact "Reflecting on social impacts of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) on MPA Day" infographics have contributed to a deepened, more empowered, more nuanced and more plural engagement with complex socio-ecological-political aspects of ocean relationships and governance. 
URL https://www.instagram.com/p/Cgzs7w8KtWA/?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y=
 
Title Risks 
Description Photograph produced by Rohini Amratlal to accompany the oral history Fishers Unite for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for artist Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/fishers-unite/
 
Title Sea Undertaker 
Description Acrylic on canvas produced by Derrick Lendu for the DEEP Fund project Our Ocean Our Identity. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment and training for artist Notable Engagements: Project Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/search/top?q=our%20ocean%20our%20identity One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/
 
Title Sea Undertaker painting 
Description 'Sea Undertaker' is an acrylic on canvas painting produced by Derrick Lendu in 2021 in Papua New Guinea. This painting is produced as part of the 'Our Ocean Our Identity' project. The project "Our Ocean, Our Identity " was initiated in 2021 under the Hub's Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund, led by Pax Jakupa (Papua New Guinea), in collaboration with artists in Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu. An initiative of three local artists - Lloyd Newton in the Solomon Islands, Pax Jakupa in Papua New Guinea and Alvaro Sumaki Kuautonga in Vanuatu - the project is a rare opportunity for artistic cross-country engagement in a region often overlooked by global art markets. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment and training, promotion of practice. 
 
Title Seahorse 
Description Seahorse is an acrylic ink, watercolours and fineliner pens on paper painting (38×27 cm) produced by Hub Director, Prof Elisa Morgera (University of Strathclyde, UK). This painting is part of 'Marine Portraits', the first series of paintings Elisa Morgera has created. They were conceived and made during the first lockdown in the UK (2020) and loosely inspired by Dylan McGarry's artwork for the One Ocean Hub's website. They are both a way to celebrate the uniqueness and allure of marine life, and to feel personally connected to marine biodiversity as the centre of gravity of Elisa's lifework as a scholar. Marine portraits is the second exhibition on the One Ocean Learn platform, launched on 15 December 2022. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact No notable impacts to be reported at this stage. 
URL https://www.oneoceanlearn.org/exhibitions/marine-portraits/
 
Title Segregated 
Description Oral history produced by PJ for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/segregated-jps-story/
 
Title Short animation film: Defenders of the Ocean 
Description Launched on 10th December 2022 (International Human Rights Day), this short animation film tells the story of a South African small-scale fisherwoman, Hilda Adams, who poignantly talks about the challenges small-scale fisher communities face. The film explains how the One Ocean Hub works with small-scale fishers, UN agencies and other partners to protect small-scale fishers and their communities' human rights during the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries (IYAFA) and beyond. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact The film was premiered at Climate COP27 in November 2022 at an event that the Hub co-organised with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, United Nations Office for Human Rights Commissioner, and Blue Ventures for the COP27 Virtual Ocean Pavilion. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=agb9LCYhmWY&t=2s
 
Title Solidarity Map of Eastern Cape Small Scale Fishers 
Description "Solidarity Map of Eastern Cape Small Scale Fishers" is a participatory map of the Eastern Cape coastline, rivers and location of small scale fisher cooperatives in relation to one another, to catalyse discussions about building greater cooperation and solidarity between different fisherfolk communities. The map was created in real time / real life together with fishers at the Eastern Cape small scale fishers workshop in June 2022. A framed print of this map was exhibited at the 'Our Ocean is Sacred' exhibition in Cape Town, South Africa from September to November 2022. A version of this map is also available on the Coastal Justice Network instagram page: 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact The map has contributed to a deepened, more empowered, more nuanced and more plural engagement with complex socio-ecological-political aspects of ocean relationships and governance. 
URL https://www.instagram.com/p/CeVibOhKeM0/?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y=
 
Title St Helena Bay photovoice exhibition 
Description St Helena Bay photovoice project has used photovoice method to document hidden activities in the fisheries value chain. Images and audio recordings generated from this project will be used as part of exhibition material that Hub researchers at the University of Cape Town, South Africa will co-organise with fishers in 2023. 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2023 
Impact The project is still in development but will provide the opportunity for the direct contribution of fishers to the mapping of their fishery activities. 
 
Title Stained Memories 
Description Watercolour and found object produced by Rohini Amratlal to accompany the oral history I Got Hooked for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for artist Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/i-got-hooked-jps-story/
 
Title The Art of Fishing 
Description Oral history produced by Riaz for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/the-art-of-fishing/
 
Title The Battle for the Piers 
Description Edited story produced by Thabisile Gumede for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for author Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/battle-for-the-piers/
 
Title The Blue Blanket: An Illustrated Poem 
Description The Blue Blanket is an illustrated poem spoken from Ulwandle (Ocean) as a response to ongoing oil and gas prospecting and developments along the South Africa coast. The isiXhosa word for ocean, uLwandle, falls in the same noun class as 'ubuntu' - in Nguni languages, the ocean is not a thing, not an object, like ubuntu - we are, because the ocean is. Therefore a poem written from the oceans perspective would be a We, not and I. This poem challenges developers to feel from the perspective of the ocean. The film is directed, illustrated and edited by Hub researcher Dylan McGarry. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact The film was released on 25 of November 2021, few days before Shell's seismic survey on the Wild Coast in South Africa began. The film reached over 1868 viewers within the first 12 hours release. The film has been shared widely on social media and has reached nearly 10,000 views on YouTube. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4UBubIpCWuk
 
Title The Human Chain 
Description Oral history produced by Snowy for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/the-human-chain-snowys-story/
 
Title The Ocean and Climate Change 
Description This short film introduces the One Ocean Hub's research efforts and approach at the ocean-climate nexus. It explains why integrated and inclusive ocean governance is essential in tackling climate change and ensuring a just transition to a low-carbon future in the face of the rapid and vast changes that climate change is causing to the ocean, ocean life and the lives of the people reliant upon it. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact The film was played at Climate Change COP26 Green Zone Exhibition in November 2021, in Glasgow, UK. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IGqWCd9UR2Y&t=3s
 
Title The Opressed Fishermen 
Description Edited story produced by Thabisile Gumede for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for author Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/the-oppressed-fisherman/
 
Title The Sea is My Farm: Roy's Story 
Description Edited story produced by Doung Jahangeer for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for author Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/the-sea-is-my-farm-roys-story-by-doung/
 
Title The Treacherous South Pier 
Description Oral history produced by Snowy for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/the-treacherous-south-pier-snowys-story/
 
Title The nexus between tangible and intangible cultural heritage and ocean governance in Ghana: The Case of Canoe Inscriptions, Festivals and Asafo Companies 
Description The One Ocean Hub's research in Ghana contributes to bridging the disconnection between legal, scientific and socio-cultural dimensions of ocean governance and cultural heritage drawing on the voices and perspectives of local people. In this short documentary we take a look at the symbolism of canoes among coastal people in Ghana and its relationship with Asafo* groups and local festivals. Through local knowledge systems, the researchers demonstrated how canoe inscriptions and the political economy of Asafo companies draws attention to the nexus between the tangible and intangible cultural heritage of coastal people and communities and its implications for fisheries management and ocean governance. *Asafo companies were the traditional warriors in local communities in Ghana involved in both defence and rescue missions until the evolution of the modern military. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact This documentary was first shown during the 'Canoe Culture and Heritage in Ghana' webinar by Dr. Georgina Yaa Oduro and Dr. John Windie Ansah of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology of the University of Cape Coast. The webinar was part of the Hub's programme of events during the United Nations World Oceans Week in June 2021. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Opi9ejkLjT0
 
Title Umkhosi Wenala Empatheatre play 
Description Umkhosi Wenala Empatheatre play is an Empatheatre and Mbazwana Creative Arts production related to the history of Isimangaliso Wetland Park. Hub researcher Dr Dylan McGarry (Rhodes University, South Africa) is one of the co-founder of Empatheatre. Hub early career researcher Taryn Pereira (Rhodes University) contributed some research towards the development of the script. The play was performed in Northern Kwa Zulu Natal in September 2022. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact Umkhosi Wenala Empatheatre play has contributed to a deepened, more empowered, more nuanced and more plural engagement with complex socio-ecological-political aspects of ocean relationships and governance. 
URL https://www.empatheatre.com/umkhosi-wenala
 
Title Untitled acrylic on canvas painting 
Description The untitled acrylic on canvas painting was produced by Georgina Woti in 2021 in Papua New Guinea. This painting is produced as part of the 'Our Ocean Our Identity' project. The project "Our Ocean, Our Identity " was initiated in 2021 under the Hub's Deep Emotional Engagement (DEEP) Fund, led by Pax Jakupa (Papua New Guinea), in collaboration with artists in Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu. An initiative of three local artists - Lloyd Newton in the Solomon Islands, Pax Jakupa in Papua New Guinea and Alvaro Sumaki Kuautonga in Vanuatu - the project is a rare opportunity for artistic cross-country engagement in a region often overlooked by global art markets. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment and training, promotion of practice 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/
 
Title Untitled1 
Description Photograph produced by Casey Pratt to accompany the oral history An Unusual Catch for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for artist Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/an-unusual-catch-tamlynns-story/
 
Title Untitled10 
Description Photograph produced by Nompilo Mthethwa to accompany the edited story A Family that Fishes Together Stays Together for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for artist Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/a-family-that-fishes-together-stays-together/
 
Title Untitled11 
Description Photograph produced by Nompilo Mthethwa to accompany the edited story The Battle for the Piers for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for artist Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/battle-for-the-piers/
 
Title Untitled12 
Description Photograph produced by Zimvo Nonjola to accompany the oral history A Dwindling Species for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for artist Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/a-dwindling-species/
 
Title Untitled13 
Description Photograph produced by Kira Erwin to accompany the oral history Being Outdoors for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/being-outdoors-montys-story/
 
Title Untitled14 
Description Acrylic on canvas produced by Georgina Woti for the DEEP Fund project Our Ocean Our Identity. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment and training for artist Notable Engagements: Project Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/search/top?q=our%20ocean%20our%20identity One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/
 
Title Untitled2 
Description Photograph produced by Casey Pratt to accompany the oral history Where Have All the Fish Gone for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for artist Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/where-have-all-the-bait-fish-gone/
 
Title Untitled3 
Description Photograph produced by Doung Jahangeer to accompany the edited story The Sea is My Farm: Roy's Story for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for artist Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/the-sea-is-my-farm-roys-story-by-doung/
 
Title Untitled4 
Description Photograph produced by Ezami Molefe to accompany the edited story A Fishing Heritage in Peril for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for artist Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/a-fishing-heritage-in-peril/
 
Title Untitled5 
Description Photograph produced by Ezami Molefe to accompany the oral history A Violation of the Sea for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for artist Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/a-violation-of-the-sea-riazs-story/
 
Title Untitled6 
Description Photograph produced by Ezami Molefe to accompany the oral history The Human Chain for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for artist Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/the-human-chain-snowys-story/
 
Title Untitled7 
Description Photograph produced by Lina Macanhe to accompany the oral history Close Encounters for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for artist Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/riazs-close-encounter/
 
Title Untitled8 
Description Photograph produced by Lina Macanhe to accompany the edited story In a Perfect World, Fishing Has No Gender for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for artist Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/in-a-perfect-world-fishing-has-no-gender/
 
Title Untitled9 
Description Photograph produced by Nompilo Mthethwa to accompany the oral history The Art of Fishing for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for artist Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/the-art-of-fishing/
 
Title View from the South Pier 
Description Photograph produced by Kira Erwin to accompany the oral history A Treacherous South Pier for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Image 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/the-treacherous-south-pier-snowys-story/
 
Title Whale 
Description Whale is an acrylic ink, watercolours and fineliner pens on paper painting (38×27 cm) produced by Hub Director Prof Elisa Morgera (University of Strathclyde, UK). This painting is part of 'Marine Portraits', the first series of paintings Elisa Morgera has created. They were conceived and made during the first lockdown in the UK (2020) and loosely inspired by Dylan McGarry's artwork for the One Ocean Hub's website. They are both a way to celebrate the uniqueness and allure of marine life, and to feel personally connected to marine biodiversity as the centre of gravity of Elisa's lifework as a scholar. Marine portraits is the second exhibition on the One Ocean Learn platform, launched on 15 December 2022. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact No notable impacts to be reported at this stage. 
URL https://www.oneoceanlearn.org/exhibitions/marine-portraits/
 
Title What is Empatheatre: Short Documentary Film 
Description This short documentary film introduces Empatheatre as a methodology in sculpting new social spaces that act as amphitheaters for empathy. A space for reflexive deep listening in society over a public concern, that contributes to participatory justice in decision making, meaning making and solidarity building across societal spheres. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact The documentary as published in December 2020 with the aim to engage a range of stakeholders, in particular researchers, policy makers, and practitioners responsible for undertaking public dialogues and consultation in policy and planning processes. The documentary seeks to introduce new approaches to participation in decision making. 
URL https://www.empatheatre.com/
 
Title Where Have All the Bait Fish Gone 
Description Oral history produced by Grant for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/where-have-all-the-bait-fish-gone/
 
Title You Live by the Sea; You Die by the Sea 
Description Oral history produced by Andre and William for the DEEP Fund project Fishers Tales. 
Type Of Art Creative Writing 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact Paid employment for project manager Training and capacity building of fieldworks Strengthened partnership between Durban University of Technology and South Durban Community Environmental Alliance Notable Engagements: Project website https://fisherstales.org/ Artwork shared via social media One Ocean Hub blog post Artfully Sustaining the Sea, 27 January 2021, https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/ One Ocean Hub blog post Fishers Tales: Stories with the Sea, 31 January 2022, https://oneoceanhub.org/fishers-tales-stories-with-the-sea/ Exhibition and associated public programmes, KwaZulu-Natal Society of the Arts, March-April 2022 Art(iv)istic Storytelling for Social Change workshop, May 2021, 37 participants 
URL https://fisherstales.org/andre-and-williams-story-you-live-by-the-sea-you-die-by-the-sea/
 
Description Our findings indicate that current approaches to ocean governance are both insufficiently integrated, thereby undermining ocean health, and that they are not inclusive of different needs in society, thereby undermining economic and socio-cultural wellbeing. Findings continue to confirm, at different scales and from different stakeholders, that a human rights-based approach to ocean governance supports more integrated and inclusive decision making, to the benefit of those whose lives and livelihoods are most closely connected to the ocean, helping to ensure that interventions and approaches are more likely to succeed in the long run. Our pioneering approach centres on a human rights-based approach to integrating marine and social science findings, as well as informing innovative (i.e. arts-based) transdisciplinary research methods, has continued to receive growing international recognition for demonstrable impact in enabling marginalized actors to voice their demands and exercise their rights. It has also the potential to support public authorities in recognising their responsibility to act upon our findings.

In Ghana, our gap analysis determined that the highest levels of social impact could be achieved from evidence and interventions that positively impact on small-scale fishing (SSF) communities (60% of whom are women and youth). Our findings from stock assessments suggest that key fisheries are under high fishing pressure, including potential collapse of the seabream fishery. We have also found evidence of reduced production in spite of increased fisher effort, and potential differences in temperature responses affecting the vulnerability of species important to ecosystem functioning. In addition to providing new evidence, we have also developed new tools, such as a geodatabase, to enhance data integration and accessibility for more holistic decisions on the marine environment. In parallel, to support sustainable livelihoods and cultural heritage of SSF, our legal, social sciences and art-based research findings serve to ensure that SSFs' human rights(as well as the distinctive human rights of women and children) are taken into account in the analysis of evidence and ensuing decisions, both nationally and internationally (notably with regard to the 2023 WTO Agreement on Fisheries Subsidies). We also provided findings and developing new partnerships with civil society to legally empower SSFs to obtain protection of their human rights through, for example, a series of regional workshops with women in SSF communities, which included innovative pop-up legal clinics providing much needed legal support and advice. We are now in the process of developing innovative ways to integrate these varied datasets and tools developed, to support different sectors of government in balancing multiple and competing fisheries and other marine sectors (e.g. oil and gas) with a view to protecting the most vulnerable (SDG 14b).

In Namibia, we have worked to develop trusted relationships with 14 different groups of actors, advancing understanding of the relationships with the ocean and access to marine benefits. We have developed new protocols for the first independent fish age determination laboratory in the country, allowing differentiated management for different fish species. We are also advancing understanding of the value of other aspects of "blue" natural capital (notably blue carbon potential and coastal tourism), to ensure that decisions at the national level take a more integrated approach to the ocean and its benefits to society. In addition, we have co-developed a novel youth-led project on the rapidly disappearing and largely unrecognized ocean-related cultural heritage of the Topnaar, an Indigenous community that has been displaced from the coast, with a view to supporting the Topnaar's voice in future decisions on the ocean. Preliminary research findings and direct representation of the Topnaar's views have already been fed into the development of Namibia's first policy on small-scale fisheries, through our cooperation with the UN Food and Agriculture Organization. We are now integrating fisheries science, socio-legal research and arts (including through a new partnership with the National Theatre of Namibia), combining legal empowerment and research co-development, so that the integrated understanding of the needs and human rights of different actors can feed into a constructive and integrated critique of proposed blue economy initiatives.

In South Africa, we continue to document, and support multi-stakeholder responses, to violations of SSFs' human rights, in the application of policy and legislation on fisheries, blue economy developments, marine conservation and land-based developments negatively impacting on the ocean, with new findings on women's culture, wellbeing and livelihoods. Researchers continue to document exclusion of SSF communities from relevant policy and decision-making processes and undue enforcement action . We have also developed innovative approaches to support SSF communities to come together to collectively strategize nation-wide and across scales on multiple challenges through the Coastal Justice Network (CJN), and have enhanced our support through new project partnerships with local legal-aid organizations. Through the CJN, we are also co-developing innovative principles and practices for solidarity in transdisciplinary research between academic researchers and community based environmental justice activists. Furthermore, our arts-based methodologies have supported the integration of indigenous and local knowledge and of environmental and socio-cultural injustices in public debates, directly contributing to authorities recognising their responsibility and co-identifying solutions at the national and provincial legal. A new Empatheatre play titled "Umkhosi Wenala" (isZulu for "Festival of Abundance") embodies new findings and methods (counter-hegemonic mapping, participatory rural appraisals) for inter-generational dialogue on exclusionary marine conservation, gender inequity and indigenous communities' customary laws. In addition, photo-voice stories have been co-developed with Indigenous and local knowledge-holders with a view to integrating cultural data layers in marine spatial planning in Algoa Bay and for marine protected area management.

Internationally, our research has clarified how more comprehensive protection of SSFs' human rights can support the realization of multiple SDGs, in collaboration with the UN Food and Agriculture Organization and the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. We have also clarified the relevance of a healthy ocean for the protection of children's human rights, and the negative impacts on cultural rights of unsustainable and exclusionary blue economy initiatives. We have also successfully advocated that SSFs and other "ocean defenders" should be recognized and protected as "environmental human rights defenders", both nationally and internationally. All these findings have been co-developed with a variety of UN bodies and international civil-society networks: these partnerships add to the legitimacy of our research findings, contributing to and amplifying impact in our focus countries.
Exploitation Route In coastal and island communities healthy oceans are fundamental to healthy economies and livelihoods. The One Ocean Hub aims to improve the livelihoods of small-scale fishing and indigenous communities that are dependent on the ocean, with particular attention to women and youth in South Africa, Namibia, and Ghana, and to share learning and methods in the South Pacific and the Caribbean. The Hub is empowering, building capacity within, and learning from, the people who rely on the oceans, and whom are disproportionally impacted by the failure to protect it. It is at this local level that the Hub will have the greatest impact. Community leadership in research and arts-based approaches is enabling better understanding of traditional practices. It is building capacity and co-developing new resources for communities, thereby supporting the integration of community views, values and knowledge in scientific assessments, management and decision-making on ocean conservation and the blue economy. Legal empowerment will enhance the capacity of communities, women and youth to fight for their rights and improve, through legal literacy, their livelihoods at different levels. At national level, governments and inter-governmental organisations will benefit from access to a new scientific evidence base, methods and technologies to underpin integrated ocean assessment and management. Specifically, government entities will benefit from region-specific integrated assessments of cumulative pressures on ocean ecosystems. Through targeted capacity strengthening, governments and national research institutes will be empowered to undertake integrated marine research and monitoring programmes, and through co-developed decision-making frameworks will be able to implement ocean resource management that balances ocean conservation and sustainable use for fair and equitable benefit sharing. We will work with regional and national governments to implement sustainable, inclusive and collaborative ocean management strategies. Together with the co-development of international guidance for the coherent implementation of international law with our UN partners, and through an innovative programme of legal capacity building at the country and local levels, we will support national process of implementation of international law on the ocean and sustainable development, as well as influence international process to be more attended to national needs in the Global South. In doing so, the Hub is also benefitting international partners to better connect their own initiatives across the UN System, as well as across scales, tackling institutional disconnects and relying on innovative ways to connect to local communities in promoting sustainable partnerships.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Creative Economy,Environment,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

URL https://oneoceanhub.org/
 
Description Ocean governance is a complex and contested multilevel arena: but its impacts are felt most strongly by local communities, not least as ocean resources are essential for human wellbeing (SDG14). To enhance the social and economic wellbeing of ocean-reliant communities for real, lasting change, we are creating the networks and enabling conditions to facilitate their equal participation in ocean decision-making arenas (SDG10&16). To this end, we connect research on human rights and the environment (including women's and children's rights), to the production of an integrated (social and natural) scientific evidence base to support socially and economically just, and ecologically sustainable, ocean management (SDG 1-3,5,8,10,13). We are also developing practical tools and arts-based methods, and supporting the capacity to implement them, for different actors to relate constructively and take action on this evidence. In Ghana, the fishery ecosystems that support the ways of life of artisanal fishing communities are under intense pressure. We are collaborating with the Environment Protection Authority and the Fisheries Commission to provide the tools and capacity to implement area-based management to sustainably manage multiple competing fisheries and other ocean uses to reduce negative disruption to coastal livelihoods (SDG16&2). In addition, we collaborate with the coastal communities of Elmina and Winneba, legal and environmental NGOs, and judicial services, exploring how supplementary livelihoods can support the alleviation of poverty, and implementing fisheries laws to achieve ecological sustainability. We explore with them the need to acknowledge local communities' customary laws and respect their human rights, including the rights of children and women that represent 60% of those working in the artisanal fishing sector. In South Africa, using a case-study approach (Algoa Bay, Eastern Cape), we developed in partnership with Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality and industry sector representatives, an integrated and inclusive approach to Marine Spatial Planning (MSP) informing four larger marine area plans. We have piloted arts-based methodologies to integrate cultural knowledge held by indigenous and local knowledge holders, that also provides a platform for dialogue with decision makers (national and local) through an iterative process, and developed an interactive decision-support tool for the tourism sector on how to build resilience and mitigate negative impacts through scenario planning. These innovations have been upscaled at the regional level in partnership with UNEP and the regional seas convention for the Western Indian Ocean, in the form of an Ocean MSP strategic framework. In addition, the Coastal Justice Network (CJN) that Hub researchers established to connect SSF leaders to information and resources offered by local civil society organisations and legal aid professionals, continues to add to a body of evidence that small-scale fisher (SSF) communities are often excluded (directly or indirectly) in ocean management, with decisions often detrimental to their livelihoods. The CJN have now supported three successful cases before South African courts to protect the rights of small-scale fishers to participate in decisions affecting their livelihoods and their culture, and to protect the marine environment from seismic surveys for offshore oil and gas exploration, thereby also protecting everyone's human right to a healthy environment and safe climate. They have also supported community integration in the management of two marine protected areas and in accessing the squid market, and contributed to a successful judicial case related to squid fishing. The CJN has been invited to share internationally its art-based and knowledge-solidarity approaches, at the UN Climate COP in November 2022 and the FAO closing event for the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries and Aquaculture (March 2023), showing their relevance across scales and sectors. In Namibia, we have contributed to the inclusion of the displaced indigenous group, the Topnaar, in the development process of a new national policy on SSF, through pioneering researcher-community collaborations led by UNAM and our partnership with FAO. This has also led to the development of a new youth empowerment initiative, through the co-development of a youth-led research project on the Topnaar's ocean cultural heritage. We have also co-identified the need for legal empowerment from different 14 stakeholder groups that depend on the ocean, and are developing new data to assess the value of fisheries, blue carbon potential and coastal tourism, including from a cultural perspective, to empower civil society to influence future decisions on the blue economy, and to support the Ministry of Fisheries in taking more integrated decisions. At the international level, our human rights-related outcomes have been incorporated in the first-ever joint policy brief by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization and the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights on SDG synergies. We have also been extensively cited in the 2022 report by the UN Special Rapporteur on Cultural Rights in sustainable development. We have secured reference to biodiversity and the ocean in the draft UN General Comment on Children's Human Rights and the Environment (Nov 2022). The UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food has requested support and expertise from the Hub to develop his global report on fisheries and human rights and to prepare for a planned country mission to South Africa to support the protection of small-scale fishers' human rights.
First Year Of Impact 2011
Sector Creative Economy,Education,Environment,Government, Democracy and Justice
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description 4th Capacity-building Hub Summary Report
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
Impact The inclusion of the Empatheatre (Lalela Ulwandle) in the UNFCCC report document has spotlighted the role of transdiciplinary approach and arts-based participatory methods in building capacity for climate adaptation and mitigation. The Empatheatre team has received invitation by the UNFCCC Capacity Building Hub to perform at the next Climate Conference (COP28) in Dubai.
URL https://unfccc.int/documents/626647
 
Description A Regional Marine Spatial Planning Strategy for the Western Indian Ocean
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
URL https://nairobiconvention.org/clearinghouse/sites/default/files/05_Lombard%20et%20al_WIO%20MSP%20Str...
 
Description A regional Marine Spatial Planning strategy for the Western Indian Ocean
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
 
Description Advising on global biodiversity framework
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a guidance/advisory committee
Impact The advice provided by Dr Lynne Shannon has been published by the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity Secretariat as an official information document to support inter-governmental negotiations at the UN Biodiversity Conference to be held in Kunming, China, later in 2022. The advice has been covered by international press, including Guardian, Le Monde, Macau Business, Globe and Mail, as well as on Nature. It focuses on transformative change through a variety of inter-linked goals, with action being coordinated at every scale. Dr Shannon was quoted explaining that "there is no one-to-one linkage from any action target to a specific milestone or goal; instead, 'many-to-many' relationships exist among them. We need to recognize, therefore, the complex relationships among targets, milestones and goals and undertake our planning and actions in an integrated manner." Dr Shannon is co-chair of Future Earth's bioDISCOVERY programme, one of the two renowned international science bodies leading the Expert group initiative. Her biodiversity work is conducted under the auspices of the One Ocean Hub, which provides the ideal framework for bridging the science-policy gap to realize uptake of scientific research by global (and national) policy/decision-makers.
URL https://www.cbd.int/doc/c/16b6/e126/9d46160048cfcf74cadcf46d/wg2020-03-inf-11-en.pdf
 
Description Assessing the feasibility and modalities of setting up a new EU-Africa Task Force for policy cooperation and dialogue on international ocean governance.
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a guidance/advisory committee
Impact The European Commission published their final report 'Feasibility Study on establishing an EU-Africa Task Force for policy cooperation and dialogue on International Ocean Governance' in January 2022. The purpose of the study is to further the EU's cooperation with Africa in a joint ocean governance agenda. The One Ocean Hub Director, Professor Elisa Morgera, was interviewed as part of the development of this report by the European Commission, DG MARE (Maritime Affairs and Fisheries), in September 2020. The report published reflected Hub's contribution to the report on: - The need for the inclusion of marine and social scientists, together with lawyers and economists, in the proposed task force. The report explicitly noted the need for the Task Force to engage expertise in 'international law, including expertise on the UN Convention on the Law of the sea and other ocean-related international instruments, value chain expertise for maritime products and social sciences' as part of the partnership (European Commission, 2022: 44). -For the task force to focus on science that can strengthen the science-policy interface for international ocean governance. Science-policy interface had been named as key strength of the Task force (European Commission 2022: 43). Given the emphasis on the science-policy interface, the report also outlined that stakeholder balance will be taken into consideration in the development of Task Force. At a minimum, the Task Force would include policy experts (e.g. European Commission services, African Union Agencies), academic and technical experts and civil society (e.g. non-governmental organisations, representatives of local communities, and private sector) (European Commission, 2022: 57). -The connectivity across various ocean challenges and land-based activities. The report mentioned land-ocean linkages as a possible thematic theme for the proposed work streams for the Task Force (European Commission, 2022: 119-120). It also underscored the need for mutually supportive collaborative framework across policy, science and market, and utilising governance tools such as Marine Spatial Planning (European Commission, 2022: 101). -The inter-dependency of ocean health and human rights, with a view to integrating relevant considerations in joint initiatives or coordination in international negotiations on the ocean, human rights and the environment. The European Commission report acknowledges that 'promoting rules-based good governance at sea and tackling safety and security issues will also help to achieve other priorities of the EU, including enhance human rights, freedom and democracy, create a level playing field for business and improve working conditions worldwide' (European Commission, 2022: 21). -The need for the task force to be "inclusive" in terms of connecting directly with local-level stakeholders and rights-holders in a meaningful way. The report adopted 'inclusiveness' as one of the key principles for the Task Force to operate under. The term inclusiveness in the report is understood as 'the engagement of a broad variety of relevant stakeholders, and a partnership of equals between the EU and Africa' (European Commission, 2022: 88). -Ensuring complementarity and value added of any new proposed EU-Africa initiatives with ongoing and planned initiatives on ocean governance in Africa. The point about value added is incorporated in the report as key principle guiding the operation of the Task Force. To quote the report, 'Added value: The Task Force should add value to existing cooperation initiatives and mechanisms and be complementary to them rather than overlapping with them' (European Commission, 2022: 55). See the full report here: https://op.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/13da3881-7cc6-11ec-8c40-01aa75ed71a1/language-en
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/contributing-to-the-eu-africa-joint-ocean-governance-agenda/
 
Description Biodiversity as a Human Right and its implications for the EU's External Action
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Contribution to a national consultation/review
URL https://www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/document.html?reference=EXPO_STU(2020)603491
 
Description Blue Pacific Ocean Report' of the Office of the Pacific Ocean Commissioner
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
URL https://opocbluepacific.net/publications/#blue-pacific-ocean-report
 
Description Co-development of a programme of collaboration with the United Nations Environment Programme on marine litter
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Professor Elisa Morgera involvement in the co-development of initiatives on marine plastics with United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) has led to the award of multiple consultancies by UNEP in 2021 to develop: 1) develop an e-learning course on Sustainable Development Goal 14 (life below water) and international law; 2) a legal toolkit and e-learning course on marine litter and ocean plastics; and 3) awareness-raising materials on environmental justice, human rights and ocean plastics (90.000 USD, March-November 2021). In 2022 as a result of this partnership UNEP has also 1) invited the One Ocean Hub to participate in Global Partnership on Marine Litter Action Track 5 and Digital Platform phase 3 release: Environmental Justice, Digital Transformation and Accessibility that will take place on 17 February 2022 and 2) further committed to provide 90,000 USD to the Hub to support the development of awareness raising materials on ocean plastics, including for production of a short video.
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/partnering-with-unep-on-sdg-14-marine-litter-and-environmental-justice/
 
Description Collaborating with UNDP on SDG 14-16 synergies
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a guidance/advisory committee
Impact The study provides a great opportunity to deepen both the United Nations and Hub's own reflection on Sustainable Development Goal synergies from an ocean research and governance perspective and its various streams of research on human rights as an essential pre-condition for justice and strong institutions.
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/collaborating-with-undp-on-sdg-14-16-synergies/
 
Description Concept Note Submission to the United Nations Environment Programme Nairobi Convention Western Indian Ocean Regional Science to Policy Meeting
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a guidance/advisory committee
URL https://nairobiconvention.org/clearinghouse/sites/default/files/WIO%20MSP%20Policy%20Brief_6%20Oct20...
 
Description Convention on Biological Diversity Thematic Workshop on Marine and Coastal Biodiversity for the Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
Impact OOH Deputy Director, Dr Daniela Diz (Strathclyde), was invited to contribute to the Convention on Biological Diversity Thematic Workshop on Marine and Coastal Biodiversity for the Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework in Montreal, Canada.
 
Description Course on Multilateral Environmental Agreements
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Hub evidence relied upon by the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Cultural Rights
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
Impact In her 2022 report, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Cultural Rights, Alexandra Xanthaki sought to: addresses the role of culture in sustainable development, with a view to assessing how cultural diversity and cultural rights have been mainstreamed in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development so far; taking stock of the experiences in leveraging cultural resources and cultural rights in the pursuit of a more sustainable development, as well as the weaknesses encountered in doing so; and highlighting areas where increased cultural awareness may contribute to reaching the Sustainable Development Goals during the second half of the implementation timeline of the 2030 Agenda. The report also states at the outset the premise (para 1) that: "Cultural rights are indispensable to sustainable development. Development will only be sustainable if it is shaped by the values of the people that it involves and the meaning that they ascribe to it, protects their resources and uses their heritage in all its dimensions - tangible, living and natural. A human rights approach with a strong consideration for cultural rights is both a framework for and a guarantee of success for any development agenda." The Rapporteur also underscored that cultural rights and cultural diversity are essential to ensure that development is sustainable and gives a voice to marginalised people affected by development processes (para 5). She also emphasised that respect for cultural rights is part and parcel of "leaving no-one behind", recalling that (paras 9-10): "Cultural rights protect the right of each person individually, in community with others and collectively, to develop and express their humanity, their world views and the meanings they give to their existence and their development, including through, inter alia, values, beliefs, convictions, languages, knowledge and the arts, institutions and ways of life. Cultural rights also protect the cultural heritage of the individual and groups and the resources that enable such identification and development processes." Evidence from the One Ocean Hub was then cited by the Rapporteur in stating that "sustainable development cannot be separated from the recognition of individual and collective cultural rights, including spiritual and heritage rights" (para 20), although the prevailing development practices are lacking consideration of cultural rights, different values and worldviews, due to inequalities and stereotypes that prevent transformative change and are based on colonial legacies that have shaped dominant conceptions of development imposing a paradigm of "progress" that is not compatible with affected communities' understandings (para 21 and 25-26). She thus called for decolonising and democratising sustainable development, including by unearthing and acknowledging historical injustices committed in the name of progress and in violation of the cultural rights of local populations (paras 25-25).
URL https://documents-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/N22/461/66/PDF/N2246166.pdf?OpenElement
 
Description Hub researcher, Prof Lynne Shannon (University of Cape Town, South Africa) spotlighted the Hub as a key example of ocean research initiative at European Marine Board workshop
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a guidance/advisory committee
Impact Dr Lynne Shannon's talk on the Ocean and Biodiversity spotlighted the One Ocean Hub as a key example of an ocean research initiative that builds connections between disciplines in achieving global biodiversity targets (see also here: https://oneoceanhub.org/hub-emerging-researchers-reflect-on-transdisciplinarity-in-transformative-ocean-governance-research/, here: https://oneoceanhub.org/towards-transdisciplinarity-which-route-to-take/ and here: https://oneoceanhub.org/towards-transdisciplinarity-which-route-to-take-part-ii/). This is by virtue of One Ocean Hub's transdisciplinary approach to knowledge co-production for sustainable ocean action. The European Marine Board later convened an expert group to write a foresight document on the marine science needed in the next 5 years - the "Navigating the Future Series," which is expected to be published in 2024.
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/navigating-the-future/
 
Description Including the ocean in international guidance on children's right to a healthy environment
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/including-the-ocean-in-international-guidance-on-childrens-right-to-a-health...
 
Description Lalela Ulwandle - Empatheatre- SOUTH AFRICA
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Contribution to a national consultation/review
 
Description Namibia National Plan of Action for Small-Scale Fisheries 2022-2026 (NPOA-SSF)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Contribution to a national consultation/review
Impact Namibia National Plan of Action on Small-Scale Fisheries was launched in June 2022 and mentioned about the One Ocean Hub in the list of acronyms and referred to video recording of FAO and One Ocean Hub webinar on Namibia's Experience in the Implementation of Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries. The National Plan of Action on Small-Scale Fisheries is developed against the backdrop of the Global FAO Umbrella Programme "enhancing the contribution of small-scale fisheries to food security and sustainable livelihoods" which supports the promotion, application, and subsequent implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries in the context of food security and poverty alleviation (SSF Guidelines) giving emphasis to empowering vulnerable and marginalised small-scale fisheries actors and their organizations to engage in relevant processes that affect their livelihoods.
URL https://namibia.un.org/en/207292-national-plan-action-small-scale-fisheries-2022-2026-npoa-ssf
 
Description National Ocean Policy of Fiji
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a guidance/advisory committee
URL https://www.economy.gov.fj/images/CCIC/uploads/Ocean/NOP_2020_Print01.pdf
 
Description New United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)'s e-learning course on gender and the environment
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact The e-learning course on gender and the environment course explores the extent to which gender equality has been addressed under international environmental agreements, as well as international human rights processes, with regard to: land and terrestrial biodiversity, ocean, climate change, chemicals and freshwaters. It looks, each thematic area, at access to resources, participation in relevant decisions, mainstreaming, and access to support. By promoting gender equality, this course can help deliver better environmental outcomes. It is also served as a valuable training tool for students, practitioners, and policy makers.
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/new-un-e-learning-course-on-gender-and-the-environment/
 
Description On going engagement as part of the Children Environmental Rights Initiative (CERI)
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a guidance/advisory committee
Impact As part of CERI partnership, the One Ocean Hub has contributed on social media to a 'twitterstorm' calling for the right to a healthy environment to be recognised by the Human Rights Council. The governments of Costa Rica, Maldives, Morocco, Slovenia and Switzerland, or the "Core Group," formally introducef the resolution for the global recognition of the right to a safe, clean, healthy and sustainable environment at the Human Rights Council session on 13 September - 8 October 2021. On 8 October 2021, the United Nations Human Rights Council adopted a resolution recognising the human right to a clean, healthy and sustainable environment as an important human right. Following of the signing of MOU with CERI in September 2021 the Hub is co-developing an e-learning course for 13-15 year-old on children's rights to a healthy environment including the ocean and providing contributions to a new process for the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child to develop a General Comment on child rights, environment and climate change, as well as the UN Joint Commitment to promote the right of children, youth and future generations to a healthy environment and their meaningful participation in decision-making at all levels.
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/hub-becomes-official-partner-of-the-childrens-environmental-rights-initiativ...
 
Description Policy brief: Applying coherently the human rights approach to small-scale fisheries for achieving multiple Sustainable Development Goals
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
Impact This policy brief is one of the concrete evidence of Hub's efforts in bringing together different UN bodies to raise awareness and build alliances for the protection of small-scale fishers' human rights. Following the co-development of the policy brief the Hub, FAO, and OHCHR have been working closely in planning a series of events for the closing of celebration of the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries and Aquaculture in March 2023 in Rome, Italy. These include virtual dialogue series on the role of national human rights institutions and international human rights mechanisms to advance protection of small-scale fishers' human rights on 1-2 February 2023 and a series of hybrid workshops (in-person in Rome and virtual) on fisheries subsidies, capacity building session on small-scale fishers' human rights, arts-based participatory research, as well as Empatheatre performance.
URL https://www.fao.org/documents/card/en/c/cc3251en
 
Description Reflecting on women's rights to a healthy ocean, based on the 2023 report of the UN Special Rapporteur on Human Rights and the Environment
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
Impact "Urgent, gender-transformative, rights-based climate and environmental action" is required to achieve gender equality and ecological sustainability- recently said the UN Special Rapporteur on Human Rights and the Environment in his thematic report on women's and girls' human right to a healthy environment (A/HRC/52/33). Although the report does not refer often to women's and girls' human right to a healthy environment in the marine context, there are a few references to fisheries as a context in which particular human rights issues arise for women and girls. In addition, the vast majority of the points and recommendations formulated in the report are relevant for women's and girls' human rights and a healthy ocean, in particular women and girls in small-scale fishing communities.
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/reflecting-on-womens-rights-to-a-healthy-ocean-based-on-the-2023-report-of-t...
 
Description Regional framework for ecosystem monitoring in the Western Indian Ocean
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
URL https://www.dropbox.com/s/8vdo0fwmljwq5fe/WIO%20Science%20to%20Policy%20Platform%20Series_FV2.pdf?dl...
 
Description SEYCHELLES Ocean's Policy
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
 
Description Sans frontières - Ocean and Coastal Sustainability of the Western Indian Ocean
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
 
Description Scientific Advisory Group (SAGE) Sub-committee on Marine Ecology and Risk Mitigation's Advisory on the Use of Deep-Sea Seismic Surveys to Explore for Oil and Gas Deposits in South African Waters
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
URL https://www.assaf.org.za/files/2022/SAGE/SAGE%20Advisory%20on%20Shell%20Seismic%20Survey.pdf
 
Description Sharing transferable findings for a new World Health Organization (WHO) pandemic treaty
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a guidance/advisory committee
Impact The inputs provided by the One Ocean Hub at the workshop informed the development of a progress report to the 76th World Health Assembly in 2023, with the aim to adopt the development of a future international pandemic treaty by 2024.
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/sharing-transferable-findings-for-a-new-who-pandemic-treaty/
 
Description South Africa Government Marine Spatial Planning Working Group
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a guidance/advisory committee
 
Description South Africa Government Scientific Working Group and Task Team
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a guidance/advisory committee
 
Description Submission to the United Nations Environment Programme Nairobi Convention: Sans frontières - Ocean and Coastal Sustainability of the Western Indian Ocean
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a guidance/advisory committee
URL https://www.nairobiconvention.org/clearinghouse/sites/default/files/Provisional%20Agenda_Science%20t...
 
Description Submissions on mining prospecting and exploration applications under the auspices of the Blue Economy highlighting the impacts on small-scale fishing communities
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Contribution to a national consultation/review
 
Description The Hub's direct contribution to the 2020-20221 Roadmap to Oceans and Climate Action (ROCA) Initiative Report
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
URL https://rocainitiative.files.wordpress.com/2021/11/roca-progress-report-2020-2021.final_.pdf
 
Description UK Government Biodiversity and Ecosystems Enquiry
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Contribution to a national consultation/review
URL https://committees.parliament.uk/committee/62/environmental-audit-committee/publications/oral-eviden...
 
Description UK Government Biodiversity and Ecosystems Enquiry
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Contribution to a national consultation/review
URL https://committees.parliament.uk/committee/62/environmental-audit-comm
 
Description UKRI Final Report on Global Challenges Research Fund Evaluation Module: Research Fairness
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
Impact The Hub approaches on fairness of opportunity, process, and benefits in research have provided guideliness and benchmarks to assess how UKRI funded international collaborative programme is treating partners, stakeholders and communities in the global South fairly, and contributing to the emergence of equitable and sustainable collaborations. The report published by the UKRI is crucial to asess fairness in research in relation to: strategy, vision and decision making; the commissioning process; programme-level partnership with key institutions in the global South; award-level partnerships; and broader stakeholder engagement. It considers the way in which GCRF as a whole interacts with research ecosystems in the global South ('contextual fairness') as a cross-cutting lens. This assessment report could serve as a useful toolkit not only for UKRI but also to other funders to guide their research fairness and equity review.
URL https://www.itad.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/12/GCRF-Fairness-Stage-1a_Full-report_formatted-version...
 
Description UN Committee on the Rights of the Child consultation for the general comment on children's rights and the environment with a special focus on climate change
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a guidance/advisory committee
URL https://oneoceanhub.glasscubes.com/share/s/2rmqn43m0nul1aohvd4ttr65eh
 
Description UN Food and Agriculture Organisation: Guide on Legislating for Small Scale Fisheries
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a guidance/advisory committee
URL http://www.fao.org/documents/card/en/c/cb0885en
 
Description UNEP consulation on Environmental Defenders
Geographic Reach Africa 
Policy Influence Type Contribution to new or Improved professional practice
Impact The meeting brought together experts from across the world with the purpose of discussing and sharing practices such as defense activities, livelihood projects as well as prevention of and protection against attacks. They aimed to identify gaps in existing UN guidance with a view to putting forward practical recommendations to relevant bodies and mechanisms of the UN. The outcomes will inform a compilation of good practices and recommendations, that will be made available through a report and an online interactive tool, accessible via www.environment-rights.org. The global consultation was attended by the former and current UN Special Rapporteurs on Human rights and the Environment, and the UN Special Rapporteur on Human Rights Defenders, as well as several representatives of UN agencies. UNEP has included the Hub policy recommendations on "ocean defenders" in forthcoming UN Guidance on the Protection of Environmental Human Rights Defenders, addressed to UN Resident Coordinators (who can mobilise at country level financial, legal and logistic resources to protect defenders).
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/one-ocean-hub-highlights-role-and-needs-of-small-scale-fishers-at-un-consult...
 
Description Workshop 2: International Sharing of Pathogens, Genetic Sequence Data (GSD), and Benefits: What are the options? 25 November 2022
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a guidance/advisory committee
Impact Hub contributions and future participation in the workshop series will contribute to the development of the new pandemic treaty that is led by the World Health Organization (WHO).
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/sharing-transferable-findings-for-a-new-who-pandemic-treaty/
 
Description (MISSION ATLANTIC) - Towards the Sustainable Development of the Atlantic Ocean: Mapping and Assessing the present and future status of Atlantic marine ecosystems under the influence of climate change and exploitation
Amount € 11,564,093 (EUR)
Funding ID 862428 
Organisation European Commission 
Sector Public
Country European Union (EU)
Start 09/2020 
End 08/2025
 
Description Amagagasi -Tides - Mbazwana Public Storytelling Project
Amount R125,000 (ZAR)
Organisation National Arts Council of South Africa 
Sector Public
Country South Africa
Start 02/2022 
End 02/2023
 
Description Community of Practice (CoP): Marine Spatial Plan for Algoa Bay; Phase II Algoa Bay, South Africa
Amount R7,000,000 (ZAR)
Organisation South African National Research Foundation (NRF) 
Sector Public
Country South Africa
Start 10/2020 
End 09/2022
 
Description Community of Practice in "Western Indian Ocean: Assessing the applicability of the ocean-accounts framework (OAF)"
Amount R7,000,000 (ZAR)
Funding ID UID: 125455 
Organisation South African National Research Foundation (NRF) 
Sector Public
Country South Africa
Start 01/2020 
End 12/2022
 
Description Deep Connections
Amount R1,246,950 (ZAR)
Funding ID ACEP200210502862 - Grant Number: 129216 
Organisation South African National Research Foundation (NRF) 
Sector Public
Country South Africa
Start 01/2021 
End 12/2023
 
Description ECO-ACE Research Grant funded by the National Research Foundation (South Africa) under the Global Change Grand Challenge
Amount R3,636,936 (ZAR)
Organisation South African National Research Foundation (NRF) 
Sector Public
Country South Africa
Start 01/2022 
End 12/2024
 
Description EU Horizon 2020 Food, Bioeconomy Natural Resources, Agriculture and Environment
Amount £217,973 (GBP)
Funding ID 101083922 
Organisation European Union 
Sector Public
Country European Union (EU)
Start 11/2022 
End 10/2027
 
Description Ecosystem Change, Offshore Wind, Net Gain and Seabirds (ECOWINGS)
Amount £473,159 (GBP)
Funding ID NE/X008983/1 
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2022 
End 08/2026
 
Description Ecosystem-based adaptive capacity through community engagement (Eco-ACE)
Amount R3,600,000 (ZAR)
Organisation South African National Research Foundation (NRF) 
Sector Public
Country South Africa
Start 01/2022 
End 12/2024
 
Description Extension on COVID-Tourism Impact Study
Amount R70,000 (ZAR)
Organisation Nelson Mandela University 
Sector Academic/University
Country South Africa
Start 01/2022 
End 03/2022
 
Description Food and Agriculture Organization's in-kind match funding for developmemt of e-learning course
Amount $37,450 (USD)
Organisation United Nations, Food and Agriculture Organisation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country Italy
Start 04/2021 
End 04/2022
 
Description Global Change Grand Challenge - Belmont Forum
Amount R540,078 (ZAR)
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Department Belmont Forum
Sector Public
Country Global
Start 08/2020 
End 12/2023
 
Description Grant to fund the training of fisheries law enforcement training in Walvis Bay, Namibia
Amount € 10,000 (EUR)
Organisation Konrad Adenauer Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country Germany
Start 11/2022 
End 12/2022
 
Description Grant to organise fisheries law enforcement training in Walvis Bay, Namibia
Amount £59,000 (NAD)
Organisation University of Namibia 
Sector Academic/University
Country Namibia
Start 11/2022 
End 12/2022
 
Description Harnessing natural product diversity to combat multidrug-resistant pathogens
Amount £1,900,000 (GBP)
Funding ID MC_PC_MR/T029579/1 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2020 
End 03/2023
 
Description High-Seas Alliance/Deep-Ocean Stewardship Initiative Travel Grant for Deep-Sea Scientist
Amount $840 (USD)
Organisation Ocean Foundation 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United States
Start 10/2022 
End 10/2022
 
Description In-kind contribution to South Africa Deep Emotional Engagement Programme (DEEP) Fund Project: Fishers' Tales
Amount R10,000 (ZAR)
Organisation Durban University of Technology 
Sector Academic/University
Country South Africa
Start 02/2022 
End 03/2024
 
Description Marine Research and Innovation for a Sustainable management of Coasts and Oceans (MARISCO)
Amount $250,000 (USD)
Funding ID https://www.belmontforum.org/projects/marine-research-and-innovation-for-a-sustainable-management-of-coasts-and-oceans/ 
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Department Belmont Forum
Sector Public
Country Global
Start 02/2020 
End 02/2023
 
Description National Arts Council of South Africa Research Grant
Amount R15,000 (ZAR)
Organisation National Arts Council of South Africa 
Sector Public
Country South Africa
Start 02/2022 
End 02/2023
 
Description National Research Foundation Research Grant
Amount R400,000 (ZAR)
Organisation South African National Research Foundation (NRF) 
Sector Public
Country South Africa
Start 01/2020 
End 12/2022
 
Description OCEAN Sustainability Pathways for Achieving Conflict Transformation
Amount R900,000 (ZAR)
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Department Belmont Forum
Sector Public
Country Global
Start 08/2020 
End 08/2023
 
Description Outreach and Engagement Grant - Champions Public Engagement Grant
Amount £300 (GBP)
Organisation Society for Applied Microbiology 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2022 
End 01/2023
 
Description SANBI's African Coelacanth Ecosystem Programme - DEEP CONNECTIONS - The African Coelacanth Ecosystem Programme
Amount R200,000 (ZAR)
Organisation South African National Biodiversity Institute 
Sector Public
Country South Africa
Start 11/2021 
End 11/2022
 
Description South African National Research Foundation's Marine Research Call: Towards the Development of Catch-And-Release Zones for Resilient Shore-based Marine Fisheries in South Africa
Amount R2,078,200 (ZAR)
Organisation South African National Research Foundation (NRF) 
Sector Public
Country South Africa
Start 01/2022 
End 12/2024
 
Description Stronger Shores - Flood and Coastal Resilience Programme
Amount £6,000,000 (GBP)
Organisation Environment Agency 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2023 
End 12/2027
 
Description TRIATLAS (EU-H2020)
Amount R6,900,000 (ZAR)
Funding ID 817578 
Organisation European Union 
Sector Public
Country European Union (EU)
Start 08/2019 
End 07/2023
 
Description The African Coelacanth Ecosystem Programme (ACEP) Deep Connections Project
Amount R1,550,000 (ZAR)
Funding ID 129216 
Organisation South African National Research Foundation (NRF) 
Sector Public
Country South Africa
Start 01/2021 
End 12/2023
 
Description United Nations Environment Programme - Capacity Building
Amount $95,375 (USD)
Organisation United Nations (UN) 
Department United Nations Environment Programme
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country Kenya
Start 05/2021 
End 11/2021
 
Description Vulnerability Assessments for Small Island Developing States
Amount R900,000 (ZAR)
Organisation Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country Italy
Start 02/2022 
End 11/2022
 
Description Western Indian Ocean Marine Spatial Planning Strategy
Amount $31,500 (USD)
Organisation United Nations (UN) 
Department United Nations Environment Programme
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country Kenya
Start 10/2020 
End 08/2021
 
Description World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) Research Grant
Amount $43,500 (USD)
Organisation World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF UK) 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2022 
End 03/2023
 
Title A blueprint for integrating scientific approaches and international communities to assess basin-wide ocean ecosystem status 
Description The blueprint is developed by Hub researchers, Prof Murray Roberts (University of Edinburgh, UK) and Prof Andrew Sweetman (Heriot-Watt, UK) in collaboration with other researchers. The Blueprint is founded on whole-ocean observations implemented by (1) an autonomous floating sensor fleet with funding and participation by an international consortium (ARGO floats), (2) coordinated transatlantic oceanographic monitoring arrays, and (3) innovative cost-effective technologies and ocean models to expand the spatio-temporal scales of observations and so provide the physical oceanographic framework for ecosystem studies. To overcome disparities in research and equipment capacity, detailed research co-design between North and South Atlantic must include shared access to offshore vessels, data, training, and supporting infrastructure. It must include effective capacity building and wider engagement, and be completed in parallel with science planning. Barriers created by limitations in funding structure, travel restrictions, or more recently, pandemic-related regulations mean this remains challenging. The Blueprint advances six priorities that target fundamental gaps in our understanding of basin and regional-scale oceanography (Priority 1) and ecosystem resilience (distribution, connectivity, responses to climate change and multiple stressors; Priorities 2-4). It allows us both to deliver an integrated assessment of ecosystem status and dynamics and to understand resilience to global change in the deep and open Atlantic Ocean. These four research priorities must be grounded in close collaboration, capacity development and meaningful engagement with key stakeholders (Priority 6) to inform management priorities, aggregate, standardise and disseminate research data and products through regional and global platforms (Priority 5) and by embedding work at the science-policy interface throughout (Priority 6). 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2023 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact This Blueprint results from Hub research on deep-sea ecosystems and other collaborative research programmes that focus on the Atlantic Ocean (e.g. iAtlantic). It directly supports the UN Ocean Decade of Science for Sustainable Development Goal to facilitate capacity development and technology transfer solutions toward a more equitable world. Ocean ecosystems are at the forefront of the climate and biodiversity crises, yet we lack a unified approach to assess their state and inform sustainable policies. This blueprint is designed around research capabilities and cross-sectoral partnerships. It highlights priorities including integrating basin-scale observation, modelling and genomic approaches to understand Atlantic oceanography and ecosystem connectivity; improving ecosystem mapping; identifying potential tipping points in deep and open ocean ecosystems; understanding compound impacts of multiple stressors including warming, acidification and deoxygenation; enhancing spatial and temporal management and protection. These goals are best achieved through partnerships with policy-makers and community stakeholders, and promoting research groups from the South Atlantic through investment and engagement. Given the high costs of such research (€800k to €1.7M per expedition and €30-40M for a basin-scale programme), international cooperation and funding are integral to supporting science-led policies to conserve ocean ecosystems that transcend jurisdictional borders. 
URL https://doi.org/10.1038/s43247-022-00645-w
 
Title A new counter-hegemonic mapping tool and instrument 
Description In South Africa a growing network of small-scale fisher leaders, environmental justice organisations and researchers from the One Ocean Hub, currently called the Coastal Justice Network (CJN), has been responding collaboratively over the past two years to a range of injustices - social, environmental, economic - experienced by coastal communities and environments. We have worked collaboratively to respond to the expected negative impacts of proposed offshore oil and gas expansion, lack of participation and other human rights issues around the creation and planning of marine protected areas, policy and management failures towards small-scale fisheries, water crises in coastal communities, COVID lockdown-related limitations to public participation, and others. One significant area of work, with noteworthy recent impact, is the development of a new counter-hegemonic mapping tool and instrument aimed at linking up, mobilising capacity, and facilitating popular education processes for small-scale fisher leaders, traditional leaders, coastal youth and other coastal citizens who have been negatively affected by the expansion of the network of Marine Protected Areas (MPA). The historical and contemporary human rights issues related to MPA expansion include, but are not limited to, communities being forcibly displaced from coastal ancestral land, experiencing heavy restrictions to their access and livelihood practices along the coastline in disregard of their sustainable customary practices, exclusion from MPA planning, zonation and other decision making, and culturally inappropriate and ineffective participatory processes on these issues. The development of the new counter hegemonic mapping tool and instrument is expanding through the CJN based on a collaborative project between the One Ocean Hub and the Deep Connections project at Mbazwana in Kwa Zulu Natal. The counter-hegemonic mapping tool is developed by CJN closely with small-scale fishers' communities to: 1. Map their concerns; 2. Support efforts for small-scale fishers and other leaders to participate in online consultations around the country; 3. Document their capacity mobilization needs, and; 4. Continue ethnographic research (oral histories, interviews, focus groups, archival analysis) with small-scale fishers and other coastal groups. The CJN used novel creative methods in participatory research (Empatheatre, Public Storytelling, Counter-hegemonic mapping, transgressive learning, popular education) to translate the MPA draft management plan into isiXhosa (the local language), deciphering the complex language and research page by page with the leaders. CJN also used an 'embodied mapping' constellation process in which leaders paced out the draft maps and zonation of the MPA across the hall, using their bodies as reference points for land-marks and noticeable boundaries of the MPA. In 2022 the CJN used Counter Hegemonic Mapping and Empatheatre methodology ("Umkhosi Wenala" play) to create a new process of working that was co-developed by 13 young activities and 8 elders , who brought stories over a period of 200 years and iterated the resulting timeline over 18 months near Isimangaliso MPA (see: https://oneoceanhub.org/fairer-and-more-inclusive-marine-protected-areas-through-restorative-public-storytelling/). The CJN then also created relational maps of these, which were then through "call and response" methods added to a theatre production and living map of these stories and concerns. The play and maps were performed to communities and traditional authorities with feedback and further iteration. See this link for more detail: https://vimeo.com/791847743/b95e473231. The Counter Hegemonic Mapping using Empatheatre methdology has been captured in the "Umkhosi Wenala" script and manuscript, but not yet published. Hub researcher, Dr Dylan McGarry (Rhodes University, South Africa) and early-career researcher, Jen Whittingham (University of Cape Town) are preparing a joint publication on this mapping method, which has shifted the ways in which traditional authorities can reflect on their decision-making systems around MPAs and other coastal decisions, and which allows the voices of women and youth to be heard despite embedded power, age and gender dynamics within these communities. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2021 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Through the use of counter-hegemonic mapping process a new tool has been developed by the CJN that contributed significantly to the inclusion of small-scale fishers in the Amathole MPA consultation in 2021 and can be used or adapted by anyone. Counter hegemonic mapping tool offered more nuanced and detailed understanding of the implications of the draft management plan, enabled the small-scale leaders to document their questions and concerns, and align their concerns to the specific page number of the management plan in preparation for the meeting to discuss the Amathole MPA with South Africa Department of Forestry Fisheries and Environment (DFFE) on 10 June 2021. On the day of the meeting, the three nominated small-scale fishers cooperative leaders expressed their concerns and questioned aspects of the management plan. Although the atmosphere/agenda/tone of day was still very much in the control of government leaders, the meeting was held mainly in isiXhosa and our team were able to facilitate an interactive participatory mapping and public storytelling process. This allowed for rich, nuanced, place-based accountability to the impact of the management plan, and for dynamic dialogue - and associated tensions, to be expressed with generative engagement on both sides. This can be considered a watershed moment in MPA consultation, where past inequalities and exclusions from ocean-related decision making, could be discussed in communities' own language and on the basis of understandable maps and documentation. As a result, the authorities at the meting expressed a commitment to include small-scale fishers cooperatives in the decision-making forum for the Amathole MPA moving forward. The insights and oral histories from the new dataset will be shared at the closing events of the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries and Aquaculture, which the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation is co-organising with the Hub on 27-31 March 2023 in Rome, Italy, with policy makers and practitioners involved in sustainable fisheries and marine conservation. The engagement at the international level is expected to further co-develop the Hub research and policy contributions on how to make marine protection more inclusive, just and support multi-species flourishing (human and more-than-human alike). 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/the-unexpected-impact-of-a-letter-to-the-minister-from-one-ocean-hub-researc...
 
Title Arts-based participatory methods 
Description Hub early-career researchers based at Nelson Mandela University in South Africa, Dr Nina Rivers and Mia Strands, have piloted the use of arts-based participatory approaches to (1) document knowledge, stories, and lived experience of Indigenous peoples and local communities and (2) identify culturally significant areas in marine and coastal environment. They have then adapted arts-based participatory methods (see: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CTzCTnQNoD4&t=3122s) to suit the South African context by contextualising these methods in the form of storytelling and photography that researchers co-developed with indigenous and local community members of Algoa Bay as co-researchers. Using arts-based participatory research, the Hub team of researchers in South Africa has also been looking at ways to identify culturally significant areas along the coastline. The objectives of identifying culturally significant areas are to: build understanding of current research on coastal and marine socio-cultural values in South Africa; evaluate synergies between research initiatives and potential for collaboration; and develop a framework for identifying, mapping and assessing marine socio-cultural values in South Africa and work towards a potential collaborative peer-reviewed paper. One of the art-based approaches that Dr Rivers and Strands piloted in their research is the use of photovoice. It is arts-based participatory research methodology where co-researchers (research participants) are the authors of their own work and use photos and voice recordings to document their cultural connections with the ocean and coast. As part of the methods to map culturally significant areas in Algoa Bay, Dr Nina Rivers and Mia Strand have asked co-researchers, including local Xhoi and San communities that they work with, to mark places on a map of Algoa Bay and its coastline that are culturally significant to them. Out of this, they identified different categories of culturally significant areas. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2021 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The development of arts-based participatory methods has led to the collaboration between Hub researchers based at Nelson Mandela University and the South Africa National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI). SANBI had been working towards a national framework for identifying and mapping Culturally Significant Areas (CSAs) in the marine and coastal environment of South Africa. Hub researchers based at Nelson Mandela University developed methodologies to identify and map CSAs in the marine and coastal environment of Algoa Bay to support the development of South Africa national framework for mapping CSAs. The co-researchers, that include Indigenous Peoples and the local community, enjoyed it and the overall product (a multi-media photo exhibition: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AsavQOxyLFw&t=579s; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-499UAZC3d0) was something different for not only policy makers and coastal managers to engage with but also for civil society and coastal users in Algoa Bay. The co-researchers and coastal managers contributed to the development of a policy and academic paper: Rivers, N., Strand, M., Fernandes, M., Metuge, D., Lemahieu, A., Nonyane, C.L., Benkenstein, A. and Snow, B. (2023). "Pathways to integrate Indigenous and local knowledge in ocean governance processes: Lessons from the Algoa Bay Project, South Africa." Frontiers in Marine Science, https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2022.1084674. As the research outputs have been published, Dr Nina Rivers and Mia Strand have been able to reach a broader audience. The arts-based participatory methods piloted by Dr Rivers and Strand are assisting the local Xhoi and San community to declare a culturally significant area (ancient fish traps) as a national heritage site in the Algoa Bay. Mia Strand has also contributed to Hub-wide reflections on the role of these art-based approaches for the protection of the human rights of Indigenous peoples, small-scale fishers and children, and is collaborating in a number of inter-disciplinary research papers. For more information see the recording of the Ocean Frontiers Institute Webinar: People and the Ocean (https://www.ofi.ca/event/social-science-and-humanities-seminar-series-webinar-7), blogpost "How art can support the advancement of human rights and the ocean" (https://oneoceanhub.org/how-art-can-support-the-advancement-of-human-rights-and-the-ocean/), and blogpost "Sharing learnings on the role of arts in transdisciplinary ocean research" (https://oneoceanhub.org/sharing-learnings-on-the-role-of-arts-in-transdisciplinary-ocean-research/). 
URL https://doi.org/10.1016/j.crsust.2022.100
 
Title DEEP Fund Community Art-Based Research Methodology 
Description This is an innovative research methodology that occupies the space between direct commissioning of an artwork from a community group or artistic collective and ethnographic observation of indigenous art practice. The DEEP Fund methodology is a collaborative working model that moves towards decolonising research funding. Decision making, from inception, to production, to outcomes, is led by grantees in Indigenous and local communities in collaboration with the research team. Counter to conventional commissioning processes, the DEEP Fund adopts a process whereby: a) only general thematic direction is given to participants, allowing maximal artistic freedom and giving space for local priorities to emerge b) project focus is on documenting the production process and the meaning making in addition to the final outcome. Support in development is given to participants unfamiliar with standard application processes and a two-stage selection process allows projects to be worked up collaboratively developed between researchers and participants. A key aspect of the methodology is the rigorous assignment of ownership and copyright of the final product(s) to the originating artist(s) (again counter to conventional commissioning processes), with the researchers retaining a non-exclusive right to share outcomes for agreed purposes. This greatly enhances the value of the research outcomes in terms of capacity building and creative economies. Funding is awarded in two tranches, an initial 80% to allow communities/artists with no access to alternative funds or reserves to undertake the work immediately without expenditure/invoicing after completion - which is simply not possible for many of the groups with whom the DEEP Fund wish to work. A second tranche of 20% is paid on delivery of agreed outcomes (which may or may not be the final physical outcome of the project). Monthly reporting - which is intended to be manageable for projects rather than document/bureaucracy-heavy is used to ensure that the artwork development process is being captured in audio-visual formats. Research outputs from DEEP Fund projects are co-written with participants and detail both the project development process, project impact/outcomes and research outcomes. The DEEP Fund methodology also includes a potential third tranche of funding for impact activities identified throughout the project's development or as a consequence of the projects potential impact activities. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The DEEP Fund method has so far funded 10 community lead art/research projects. Each project has had multiple local impacts, e.g. in terms of capacity building, creative economies, evidencing the value of indigenous knowledge for understanding climate change and the impact of industrial fishing practices on local communities. A digital version of an exhibition of DEEP Fund works (held Glasgow, April 2023, https://www.gsa.ac.uk/life/gsa-events/events/u/undercurrents-art-and-ocean-in-africa-and-the-pacific/) will be launched on World Ocean Day 2023 and remain available via One Ocean Hub and provide content for UNITAR's One Ocean Learn platform. In addition, the impact, as shared by the project leaders will be shared in a book. The Pacific story and method were shared (chaired by the Vanuatu Minister for Climate Change, Ralph Regenvanu) at COP27 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hQ-VvDVt5xM). This methodology was first made available others through: - 2020 (DEEP Fund Call) - See also the Association of Critical Heritage Studies (2022): Session "Tensions in Intangible Indigenous Cultural Heritage Practices And Knowledge" https://www.achs2022santiago.com/. - McDonald, L. 2021. 'Artfully Sustaining the Sea.' One Ocean Hub blog post. https://oneoceanhub.org/artfully-sustaining-the-sea/. 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/deep-fund/
 
Title Deep-sea ecosystem services (ES) framework 
Description This ecosystem services framework is combined with already published frameworks (Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, Common International Classification of Ecosystem Service and the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services) and integrates deep-sea ecological knowledge that has been neglected. This can support the integration of considerations related to the need to conserve deep-sea ecosystems and the potential implications for human well-being of the potential loss or degradation of the services/benefits provided by these ecosystems in decision-making at the national and international levels. An article on the Ecosystem Services Framework has been submitted by Hub early-career researcher, Giulia La Bianca (University of Plymouth, UK), to the Ecosystem Services journal on 26 May 2022 and is being reviewed. In addition, Giulia is collaborating on a science-legal inter-disciplinary journal article on the ocean-climate nexus for a Hub-led special issue of The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2023 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact No notable impacts to be reported. The method does have the potential to support management of deep ocean and contribute valuable data towards the protection of critical deep-sea habitats. 
 
Title Global online interest assessment using google trends to determine the extent of technological creep in recreational fisheries globally 
Description Due to reports from concerned members of the recreational fishing community and from social media threads we decided to investigate the potential effects and size of marine recreational drone fishing in South Africa. Due to the limit knowledge and active monitoring of marine recreational fisheries in South Africa we had to come up with new techniques to estimate both the extent of the issue in South Africa and globally. While there was considerable evidence from social media groups that the practice was widespread globally and in South Africa it was hard to quantify easily. We therefore turned to Google Trends (https://trends.google.com/trends/explore?date=all&q=%22drone%20fishing%22) to evaluate standardised interest into the topic globally. While Google Trends has been used for research purposes, to our knowledge this is first time that it has been used to detect, monitor and quantify interest into rapidly evolving fishing techniques. Luckily the techniques are easily reproducible and therefore it would be possible to revaluate interest into topic if management and policy changes to counter the effects of this new fishery are implemented. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2021 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact This new method provides the ability to identify global trends remotely using openly available free data sources online 
URL https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13280-021-01578-y
 
Title Justice and small-scale fisheries map 
Description Researchers from the Hub's Coastal Justice Network have created the new online 'justice and small-scale fisheries map' on the Coastal Justice Network website. Derived from the Coastal Justice Network research the map visualised marine protected areas, ocean mining and small scale fisheries in relation to each other. This map has been used in public communication around ocean mining projects and in support of small-scale fishers struggles in South Africa. The map is particularly important in the light of efforts made by civil society organisations (e.g. Coastal Justice Network researchers from Rhodes University and University of Cape Town, the Legal Resources Centre, Natural Justice, Green Connection) to raise public awareness on the negative impact of an exploratory seismic survey on the fishing communities' food and economic security, as well as heritage and identity. Since 2021 until now the Coastal Justice Network and other civil society organisations have assisted small scale fishing communities on the West Coast and the East Coast of South Africa to prevent the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy (DMRE), Searcher Seismic, and Shell from conducting seismic survey that could affected their livelihood and well-being. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2021 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The research driven network and the production of the map has opened discussions between the policy makers and small scale fishers, enabling a more indepth engagement between these stakeholders. The impact of the Coastal Justice Network research, engagement activities, and the map that they have produced have been recognised through publications of two press releases which were then cited in local media articles listed below. 1. 'Another fishing community in limbo as west coast seismic survey loom', 23 January 2022 in The Citizen. Available from https://www.citizen.co.za/news/south-africa/courts/2984959/fishing-community-in-limbo-west-coast-seismic-survey/ 2.'Fishers and civic organisations take legal action against West Coast seismic surveying,' 21 January 2022 in Daily Maveric. Available from https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2022-01-21-fishers-and-civic-organisations-take-legal-action-against-west-coast-seismic-surveying/ 3. 'West Coast community prepares for a court battle over a new seismic survey', 19 January 2022 in Cape Town Etc. Available from https://www.capetownetc.com/news/west-coast-community-prepares-for-a-court-battle-over-a-new-seismic-survey/ These media articles have contributed in raising public awareness about blue economy developments in South Africa. 
URL https://coastaljusticenetwork.co.za/mapping/
 
Title Lalela uLwandle: An Experiment in Plural Governance Discussions 
Description Lalela uLwandle is a research-based theatre performance and public dialogue developed by a South African collective called Empatheatre, who are part of the One Ocean Hub. From the inception phase of the One Ocean Hub, Lalela uLwandle was initially used to co-design Hub research to co-identify community concerns to guide and inform Hub research and public engagement. Hub researchers conducted 7 months of social science research into the lives of citizens who live along the Kwa-Zulu Natal coast, including groups of small-scale fishers (SSF), traditional healers, civil society and marine science researchers. The data was gathered through oral histories, interviews, focus-group discussions, archival research and collection of mythologies. These findings fed into a scripted play where fictional characters portray diverse hopes and concerns at community level for the ocean. A "call and response" approach for iterative research co-design is inspired by African singing tradition: community representatives collaborate in reviewing various drafts of the play, confirming the accuracy of the research findings and making further suggestions. Such a process allows for ongoing ethical engagement between researchers and community representatives. helps practitioners and decision-makers to "see" which communities depend on the ocean and why, and therefore should have a voice in decisions, and to "hear" more effectively and empathically communities' views, needs, customary norms and knowledge about the ocean (2019). Throughout 2019-2021, Lalela uLwandle was performed across South Africa to support collaborative examination of research findings and data with diverse publics (other communities, researchers, civil society, and decision-makers). Through a 6-town tour, the live performances attracted 747 participants, approximately 56% were women. Media impact (print, online and broadcast) reached an approximate total of 1047164 people, broadening public dialogue around ocean decision making in the Kwa-Zulu Natal (KZN) coastline - an area targeted in blue economy developments and on the intersection of tangible and intangible heritage and economic development. Recurrent themes of discussion were the pressures on the ocean arising from South Africa's blue economy plan 'Operation Phakisa', as well as the national fisheries policy, and exclusion from decision-making. In 2022, Lalela uLwandle (Empatheatre) ran again for a series of key performances in Durban and the Eastern Cape, and for the first time in Cape Town, South Africa in 2022. What was a new method was to perform at national strategic workshops in South Africa that brought together fishers from across the coastline, and civil society actors (including NGOs, researchers and lawyers). These were performed in the Eastern Cape and Cape Town. Bringing in these performances to a workshop space offered fishers the chance to express their hurt and pain from the apartheid past, and how they feel it is still shaping their present. The audience feedback from the 2022 Lalela ulwandle have been captured and added to the Lalela uLwandle feedback forms dataset. Whilst grounded in South African experiences, the inter-generational stories of the sea performed in Lalela uLwandle resonate strongly with an international audience. In November 2022, we were invited to perform Lalela uLwandle at the UN Climate COP and in March 2023 at the headquarters of FAO in Rome for the high-level closing of the International Year of Fisheries and Aquaculture. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Lalela uLwandle provided workshop participants a chance to express their emotions and emotional responses to each other's stories. While other workshop activities focused on political awareness and strategies for resistance and engagement, making a space for the recognition of emotions and experiences is equally important for building solidarity between and among groups. The audience are involved in identifying implications of the research in relation to their lived experience after each performance, through a discussion facilitated by researchers - as opposed to usual public debates where both the speaker and the audience are already primed to take a stand for or against a position in a critical debate. The play supports: a) changing practitioners' and decision-makers' understandings of ocean-dependent communities' diverse needs, knowledge and legitimate claims (human rights). This is a significant change compared to current practices, whereby communities are "bundled up" as one uniform group focused on opposing development/conservation. Instead through empathy, practitioners' and decision-makers may come to appreciate the value of communities' experiences and knowledge for contributing to better decisions (contributing to a larger evidence base and fuller understanding of trade-offs at stake); and b) changing practitioners' and decision-makers' processes for public engagement / public consultation into a more imaginative and collaborative space for mutual learning and co-development of solutions. This is a significant change compared to current practices whereby public engagement focuses on pre-determined options presented in a non-accessible way. Even when communities may be invited to the decision-making table, they may not express themselves effectively if they can't do so in their own terns or if the counterpart is not fully aware of the multiple injustices communities have experienced over time and across sectors Lalela uLwandle also performed at the UN Climate COP27 Capacity Building Hub in Sharm el Sheikh, Egypt, on 14 November 2022 which was the first international performance for the play. There was good media coverage of Lalela uLwandle at COP27. • "Cop27 bulletin: Waiting for a sign from Bali," 16 November 2022. Available from https://www.climatechangenews.com/2022/11/16/cop27-bulletin-waiting-for-a-sign-from-bali/. • "Cycle power and gender rights: days eight and nine at Cop27 - in pictures," 15-16 November 2022, available from https://www.theguardian.com/environment/gallery/2022/nov/15/cycle-power-and-gender-rights-days-eight-and-nine-at-cop27-in-pictures • United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change UNFCCC Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/unfccc/52500936723/in/photostream. • "One ocean: the power of storytelling at COP27," https://www.newton-gcrf.org/impact/stories-of-change/one-ocean-the-power-of-storytelling-at-cop27/. 
URL https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-99347-4_20
 
Title Lexicometric content analysis of Pacific ocean policies 
Description The methodology has been developed by One Ocean Hub researcher, Pierre Mazzega (INSERM, France), the author of the mathematical models, in association with researchers from different disciplines. The approach used to analyse the policies is based on lexicometric content analysis, which measures the frequency of use of words within the studied texts. From these usage frequencies, mathematical and statistical indices can be derived which allow the interlinkages between texts to be interrogated and emergent perspectives to emerge. The specific methods used and described here have been designed and coded specifically for the particular requirements of the analysis rather than using proprietary lexicometric software. The application of the employed lexicometric analyses are novel for ocean policy and for the Pacific, but lexicometric analyses have been widely used in other studies including law and public policy (Boulet et al., 2019). The extraction of the information for the analysis from the corpus of 18 policy texts into a structured hierarchical classification involved the following 6 steps (a set of definitions, a list of themes and further technical detail on steps 2, 5, and 6 are all provided in the Supplementary Material here: https://bit.ly/3uMgAtl): • Step 1: convert documents from .PDF to.txt format and cleaning up the files; • Step 2: extract noun phrases (or "expressions") from the corpus of policy texts; • Step 3: edit and filter the list of all the distinct expressions extracted from the corpus. The list obtained forms the vocabulary of the corpus; • Step 4: identify the main themes of interest for the characterisation and analysis of the content of policies. Partition of all themes into domains; • Step 5: each word of each expression is put in its canonical form, its lemma, and each lemma is assigned to one and only one theme. The hierarchy lemmas < themes < domains form the taxonomy; • Step 6: for each policy, for each theme, counting the number of distinct lemmas assigned to the theme and found in the expressions of the text. The distribution of the number of lemmas by theme constitutes the profile of the policy. Estimation of the similarity between the policies taken by pairs. Step 1 is commonly performed in natural language processing (NLP) of textual corpora but it is not a fully automated process. It includes the homogenisation of texts (UTF08 encoding), the elimination of layout markers and references to figures, etc. For this reason, text tables have been omitted unless they presented useful information in textual form. Step 2 uses algorithms for the automatic extraction of noun phrases. However, this extraction is a relatively complex task which requires in particular the parsing of the text into sentences, then their parsing into tokens (most of them being words), followed by a syntactic analysis making it possible to identify the noun phrases through the grammatical function they occupy in each sentence. In order to ensure a good recall of this step, we use three free- or share-wares as detailed in the Supplementary Material. The lists of expressions produced by these three approaches are then merged into a single list, keeping both any nested expressions and the phrases into which they fit (e. g. "environmental impact assessment" is nested in "application of environmental impact assessment"). This resultant single list is then analysed (Step 3) to remove all expressions that have an indeterminate or too general meaning when they are detached from the sentences in which they were used. Reading them in a list, outside the textual context, does not allow to link them to a theme or policy sector (e. g. "annual growth rate," "potential earnings"). After this lexical filtering, more than 13,500 distinct expressions endowed with an autonomous meaning (independent of the context), form the vocabulary of the corpus of 18 policies. Each expression or noun phrase is made up of one or more words. A set of themes is then formed from the vocabulary. The approach chosen in this fourth step (Step 4) is based on the differentiated and complementary expertise of the co-authors to identify these themes rather than on a purely lexical-semantic analysis or a clustering statistic. In this way the identified themes are meaningful in the context of the making of policies and regulations related to the oceans and marine resources, socio-ecological changes and development, in particular in the specific context of the Pacific region. The 34 themes thus obtained were divided into 5 domains, "activities," "development," "environmental changes," "governance," and "law, policy, and politics". In Step 5 (see Supplementary Material for details), each word entering the composition of an expression of the vocabulary, except stop-words, is lemmatised. More than 3,800 of such lemmas were obtained and each lemma is then assigned to a theme. The hierarchy formed by the list of lemmas assigned to the 34 themes themselves partitioned into five domains. This constitutes the taxonomy of the corpus of policies analysed. By construction, an expression comprising several lemmas can be linked to more than one theme, for example, "advocacy for low carbon development" is related to the themes "law" [label: LAW], "environment and climate change" [ENCC] and "development" [DEVe] via the lemmas "advocacy," "carbon," and "development," respectively. Acronyms and frozen expressions are not lemmatized but directly related to a theme. The policy texts are taken one by one in Step 6, to search for each expression. For each policy, the number of distinct lemmas assigned to each theme is counted. The presentation of this result in the form of a histogram constitutes the profile of policy. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2021 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Hub researchers have contributed to the long-awaited Blue Pacific Ocean Report launched by the Pacific Ocean Commissioner in 2021. The Report provides a stocktake of the progress of ocean policy implementation and proposes forward-looking strategies to improve ocean governance and sustainability. A team drawn from the Hub contributed a section called "Lessons from a Research on the analysis of regional ocean policy inter-linkages". This analysis used a lexicometric content analysis of regional ocean policies and identified opportunity for policy retirement, embedding of expanding sectors to reduce fragmentation and increased coherence of the Ocean with key regional development themes. This analysis was carried out by Pierre Mazzega (CNRS, University Jean Jaurès, France), Claire Lajaunie (INSERM, University Aix-Marseille, France), Jeremy Hills (USP) and Payal Maharaj (USP). The work was carried out in collaboration with the Office of the Pacific Ocean Commissioner who are the Hub's project partners. See the Blue Pacific Ocean Report here: https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/blue-pacific-ocean-report%E2%80%AF/ 
URL https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2021.676944/full
 
Title Methodologies for collecting microplastics that is relatively inexpensive 
Description Methodologies for the collection of plastics have been devised by a student in another project that involved One Ocean Hub researcher, Professor Bhavani Narayanaswamy from the Scottish Association for Marine Science (see Paradinas et al. (2021) A New Collection Tool-Kit to Sample Microplastics From the Marine Environment (Sediment, Seawater, and Biota) Using Citizen Science. Frontiers in Marine Science https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2021.657709). Under the One Ocean Hub these methodologies are being refined to be used in Ghana. Details about these methodologies are explained below. We developed a simple, cost-effective and practical tool-kit to collect microplastics from the coastal environment and engaged the public in scientific research. The tool-kit was designed to take into account the latest recommendations for sampling each environmental substrate, whilst being practical for citizen scientists to use. This research demonstrates that using a semi-structured to structured project with a defined sampling approach including the participation of the public with local knowledge can be an effective way to monitor microplastics in the marine environment along the Scottish coastline. This approach, can be adapted to other projects monitoring microplastics to increase the use of citizen science in projects, allowing more studies to take place, more samples to be collected, and a greater understanding of the occurrence and the potential impact of microplastics in the environment. Sampling kits were designed to be simple tool-kits, easily used by all volunteers. The tool-kit consisted of a pole-water sampler, glass jars (15 of 7 ml), plastic bottles (5 of 500 ml), sealable plastic bags, filter paper already placed in Petri dishes, aluminum foil, deionised water (1l), electrical tape, water-resistant pencil, ice blocks (3) and a cool box (Figure 2). The water-sampler, bottles, bags and jars were rinsed and cleaned with deionised water and 70% ethanol prior to being sealed. The filter papers and Petri dishes were examined using a stereomicroscope 37.5× magnification prior to sealing with electrical tape to ensure no contamination. Bottles, bags and jars were partially labeled to facilitate the work in the field by the volunteers. All materials were stored in an insulated cool-box immediately after collection and during transport of samples to the laboratory, which allowed safe transportation of materials. The cool-box provided thermal insulation for the samples, resulting in slower development of organic matter, as well as a convenient way to transfer materials to and from the site. The volunteers were asked to take a knife (Swiss army type knife) prior to going into the field, to be able to remove the mussels from their substrate. At all research locations, intertidal sediment (i.e., sand), coastal water and benthic organisms (i.e., M. edulis) were collected four times during the year (every 13 weeks) to investigate seasonal variability in microplastic abundances, polymer types and shapes. All the sites were sampled at the same time (e.g., over the same weekend) to avoid large weather and tidal disparities between locations. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2021 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact We are using a methodology for collecting microplastics that is relatively inexpensive and hence can be used by a developing country to undertake microplastic collection. 
URL https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2021.657709/full
 
Title Methods for investigating coralporosis in coral skeletons 
Description Methods are adapted for ocean sciences from the field of osteoporosis. Ocean acidification is a threat to the net growth of tropical and deep-sea coral reefs, due to gradual changes in the balance between reef growth and loss processes. Here we go beyond identification of coral dissolution induced by ocean acidification and identify a mechanism that will lead to a loss of habitat in cold-water coral reef habitats on an ecosystem-scale. To quantify this, we present in situ and year-long laboratory evidence detailing the type of habitat shift that can be expected (in situ evidence), the mechanisms underlying this (in situ and laboratory evidence), and the timescale within which the process begins (laboratory evidence). Through application of engineering principals, we detail how increased porosity in structurally critical sections of coral framework will lead to crumbling of load-bearing material, and a potential collapse and loss of complexity of the larger habitat. Importantly, in situ evidence highlights that cold-water corals can survive beneath the aragonite saturation horizon, but in a fundamentally different way to what is currently considered a biogenic cold-water coral reef, with a loss of the majority of reef habitat. The shift from a habitat with high 3-dimensional complexity provided by both live and dead coral framework, to a habitat restricted primarily to live coral colonies with lower 3-dimensional complexity represents the main threat to cold-water coral reefs of the future and the biodiversity they support. Ocean acidification can cause ecosystem-scale habitat loss for the majority of cold-water coral reefs. There are few papers in press and in submission derived from the development of the methods (see https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2020.00668/full and https://www.researchgate.net/publication/355093148_Multiscale_Mechanical_Consequences_of_Ocean_Acidification_for_Cold-Water_Corals). 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The new methods are being used in working towards modelling when reefs of the future will lose habitat. The new methods were presented at COP26 side-event "The Ocean and Climate Justice: Impact, Adaptation and Mitigation," the Scottish Government Climate Ambition Zone, 5 November 2021 in Glasgow, improving our understanding of climate impacts on cold water corals and subsequent loss in ecosystem functioning and associated services humans rely on globally (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2145wf54XI). The Economist launched a film titled 'Climate change: what is ocean acidification?' (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OVWZyDz--30) on 2 February 2023 that reported the new methods in the film (from 6 minutes on). Since the film was released on 2 February 2023 it has been viewed 114,958 times. The methods also have the potential to identify critical cold water coral habitat for restoration and in need of protection. 
URL https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2020.00668/full
 
Title Methods for preparing thin sections of steenbras and kob otoliths for chronologies 
Description Hub researcher, Dr Margit Wilhelm (University of Namibia, Namibia), has developed new methods in preparing thin sections of steenbras and kob otoliths to examine age and growth chronologies of fish. From the removal of the otolith in the field to the final mounting and photographing for analysis, Dr Wilhem and her research team have tested out the protocols for otolith removal, storage, embedding, slicing and mounting. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2023 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact No notable impacts to be reported at this stage, but it is expected that fish age determination laboratory and protocols established at UNAM will allow for the first independent sampling in Namibia resulting in chronologies and genetics for different target fish species that can lead to differentiated management for fish species. 
 
Title Methods for vulnerability assessment and identification of adaptation options for large scale fisheries (small pelagics and Namibian rock lobster fisheries) 
Description One Ocean Hub researchers at Rhodes University led by Profesor Kevern L. Cochrane, Professor Warren Potts and Professor Warwick Sauer have developed a tool to measure vulnerability of fisheries to climate change. The tool developed in assessing vulnerability and identifying adaptation options is consistent with the standard vulnerability assessment (VA) framework applied by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). In accordance with that framework, vulnerability is split into two components, ecological vulnerability and social and economic vulnerability (e.g. Marshall et al., 2009). In addition, for the purposes of this project a third component is also included, referred to as National Economy and Governance. The new tool is new and novel because it takes into account social and economic vulnerability data. In contrast to the availability of reliable information on the impacts of climate change on the ecology of Benguela ecosystem and ecological vulnerabilities, there has been little work done, and hence there is only limited information, on the social and economic vulnerabilities of the fisheries of the Benguela countries. Any such information that is available will be examined and used where appropriate but the primary method for this component will be to collect information through consultation with stakeholders, particularly those stakeholders who are directly dependent on the fisheries for their livelihoods, as well as the responsible government agencies. National workshops will be held in each country as a primary tool for consultation but follow-up consultations will also be held with specific stakeholders as required. This will include visits to processing factories to consult directly with factory workers and fishing crews. In accordance with the standard IPCC practice, social and economic vulnerability is determined as the combination of exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity. These three indicators are defined as (Sowman et al. 2018): • Sensitivity: the degree to which a system is affected, either adversely or beneficially, by climate related stimuli; • Exposure: the nature and degree to which a system is exposed to significant climatic variations; • Adaptive capacity: the ability of systems, institutions, humans, and other organisms to adjust to potential damage, to take advantage of opportunities, or to respond to consequences. For further information on this method please read here: https://oneoceanhub.glasscubes.com/share/s/nkheb8n1mt7e37it6561rd3k2o 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2021 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The method allows communities, companies and managers to make informed decisions on fisheries in the future. The Food and Agriculture Organizationis is going to publish the method as part of its publication. 
URL https://oneoceanhub.glasscubes.com/share/s/nkheb8n1mt7e37it6561rd3k2o
 
Title Participatory rural appraisal methods 
Description Participatory rural appraisal (PRA) methods have been piloted by Hub early career researcher, Dr Philile Mbatha (University of Cape Town, South Africa) in her research on critical blue economy in Kosi Bay and Richards Bay, South Africa. These are the two case studies areas of Dr Mbatha research as part of the One Ocean Hub. The PRA consists of a suite of data collection techniques that are useful when data collection is conducted in marginalised contexts. The techniques involved include timelines, Venn diagrams, participatory mapping as well as oral history interviews collected in focus groups and with individuals. The use of these methods in Dr Mbatha research has started before she joined the One Ocean Hub. With funding from the Hub, Dr Mbatha has continued to use the methods in Kosi Bay and Richards Bay. Findings from Dr Mbatha research in Kosi Bay informed her current research with the Empatheatre team within iSimangaliso UNESCO site. Together, with the Empatheatre team, Dr Mbatha ran a series of workshops in the Mbazwana area in iSimangaliso with youth and elderly indigenous knowledge holders. In the workshops the research team collected data through focus groups, storytelling, participatory mapping - all of which are inspired by PRA methods. Dr Mbatha also shared her research findings with the Empatheatre team which, in triangulation with the data from the workshops, informed the development of Umkhosi Wenala play. The play, titled "Umkhosi Wenala" (is Zulu for "Festival of Abundance") aims to create an innovative participatory decision-making space where rural youth can have a voice in the creation and management of MPAs that exclude cultural, spiritual and other local perspectives, concerns and questions (https://oneoceanhub.org/fairer-and-more-inclusive-marine-protected-areas-through-restorative-public-storytelling/). 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2023 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The use of participatory rural appraisal methods has informed the development of the Empatheatre's new play "Umkhosi Wenala" (is Zulu for "Festival of Abundance") that will be shared at the closing events of the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries and Aquaculture, which the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation is co-organising with the Hub on 27-31 March 2023 in Rome, Italy, with policy makers and practitioners involved in sustainable fisheries and marine conservation. The engagement at the international level is expected to further co-develop the Hub research and policy contributions on how to make marine protection more inclusive, just and support multi-species flourishing (human and more-than-human alike). 
 
Title Piloting recreation specialisation theory to the South African Marine Shore-Based Fishery (MSBF) 
Description Hub early career researcher, Kyle Hewett (Doctoral Student at Nelson Mandela University, South Africa) is piloting recreation specialisation theory to the South African Marine Shore-Based Fishery (MSBF) to identify angler heterogeneity. Although angler specialisation itself is not a new a tool, it is novel to piloting this method in the context of the South African MSBF, is novel. The crux of the specialisation theory argues that that outdoor recreational fishery participants can be placed on a continuum from general interest and low involvement to specialised interest and high involvement. Each level of specialisation is associated with distinctive behaviours and orientations, such as equipment preference, type of experience sought, desired setting for the activity, attitudes toward resource management, preferred social context, and vacation patterns (Bryan, 2020, pp.18-21. available here: bit.ly/3ZjR4HK). No publications have been produced from piloting recreation specialisation theory to the South Africa MSBF as the research is still at data collection phase. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2023 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Findings generated from piloting recreation specialisation theory to the South African Marine Shore-Based Fishery (MSBF) will be used to aid in management of the fisheries in South Africa. It is expected that outputs produced from this method will be able to shape the recreational fishery in a well-managed and sustainable manner. 
 
Title Policy Text Mining Tool 
Description Hub researcher, Pierre Mazegga (Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), France and the Strathclyde Centre for Environmental Law & Governance, University of Strathclyde, UK) has developed 'Natural Language Processing Tool' for the representation and analysis (using mathematical graph theory) of policy and legal texts. In addition to the production of appropriate evidence from analysis of very large textual corpora (composed of billions of words), two additional objectives are pursued from this new tool: (a) to design an approach capable of highlighting idiosyncratic uses of terms from a restricted textual corpus; (b) identify a first essential property of policy or legal texts that an analysis in context of the linguistic material can reveal, and outline the consequences on the normative level. On a technical level, the purpose of using conceptual graphs is generally to build up a knowledge base that can then be queried (to answer questions or produce new knowledge) via machines. Our posture is different: the work of formalising legal proposals, sentences or articles via conceptual graphs creates the conditions for an interrogation in direct contact with the legal matter (data), on mechanisms, artifices and techniques-implicit or explicit, intentional or unconscious, known or hidden-used by "the legislator" in the production of normative texts. Even if the theory of conceptual graphs cannot claim the universality of its capacities to transcribe any text into natural language and therefore presents limits of applicability, the formalisation exercise offers the opportunity to explain a part of the latent cognitive options which govern the choice of expressions in natural language and their conceptual underpinning. In this process, the nature of these revealed choices makes it possible to question the clarity and distinction of the concepts used and, admittedly a more adventurous step, to try to understand the consequences of these choices. Pierre's publications related to the policy mining text tool include: 1. Mazegga P. (2021). "Conceptual Graphs and Terminological Idiosyncrasy in UNCLOS and CBD." Frontiers in Marine Science. https://doi.org/10.3389/fphy.2021.664621 and 2. Hills JM., Lajaunie C, Maharaj PN., Mazzega P. (2021). "Orchestrating the Ocean Using a National Ocean Policy: The Case of the Solomon Islands." Frontiers in Marine Science https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2021.676944. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2021 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The text mining tool developed by Hub researcher Pierre Mazegga has contributed to the development and finalisation of Fiji's first National Ocean Policy in 2021. The National Ocean Policy has been endorsed by the Cabinet and is a significant milestone for Fiji's sustainable ocean governance. The mining tool developed by Pierre Mazegga was used by Hub research team in the South Pacific to undertake textual content and network analysis on the existing ocean related development policies of Fiji and identified their linkages with Fiji's National Development Plan. See the letter of acknowledgment from the Fiji's Ministry of Economy here: https://oneoceanhub.glasscubes.com/share/s/3ud67lnoq8h52ggf9tgls045p9. The text mining tool was presented by Dr Jeremy Hills (University of the South Pacific, Fiji) at the MARE conference panel 'Exploring (and subverting) the appropriation of blue economy aspirations' in June 2020, by Dr Jeremy Hills, Dr Bernadette Snow (University of Strathclyde, UK), and Kelly Hoareau (University of Seychelles, Seychelles) at COP26 side-event 'The Ocean and Climate Justice: Impact, Adaptation and Mitigation,' Scottish Government Climate Ambition Zone on 5 November 2021 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2145wf54XI), and Dr Bernadette Snow at COP26 Virtual Ocean Pavilion Live Event on 'SBSTA Ocean and Climate Change Dialogue Theme: Strengthening cooperation and collaboration among relevant UN bodies in tackling ocean and climate change' on 1 November 2021 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_kEMOrIYswA). 
URL https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2021.676944
 
Title Principles and Practices for Solidarity in Transdisciplinary Research between academic researchers and community based environmental justice activists 
Description These practices and principles have been co-developed within the Coastal Justice Network's engagements between scholar activists and small-scale fishers and other coastal justice activists. They are principles for relationships based on reflexive, situated solidarity, in which academic research is orientated towards being accessible, useful and responsive to the justice struggles of community-based activists and the social movements they are part of. The Coastal Justice Network (CJN) brings together SSF leaders from 13 cooperatives and other fisher organisations with researchers, local civil society organisations and legal professionals, to build and mobilize capacity of SSFs to engage in ocean governance processes that affect their lives and livelihoods, by: 1. Building support networks of and for SSFs to coordinate nation-wide and strategise as a sector; 2. Providing training, access to knowledge and practical resources, and networking; 3. Supporting fishers and other civil society organisations in responding to ongoing developments and issues as they arise;. 4. Working with civil society supporting ocean-dependent communities to change practices to promote community empowerment and leadership; and 5. Working with national and local public authorities to change behaviours and practices to enhance the inclusiveness of public participation, consultation and co-management. The Network has created a structure to understand the needs of under-resourced coastal peoples addressing multiple, inter-connected, threats to their wellbeing. It then makes available legal, scientific, capacity-building, financial and logistic resources to communities, so that they can approach these issues in a strategic and coordinated way. This new tool/method is not published or made available to others yet. Hub early-career researcher, Taryn Pereira (Rhodes University, South Africa) is writing up a number of publications this year, in the form of papers, and her PhD thesis). 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2023 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Principles and practices of solidarity in transdiciplinary research have enabled a core group of One Ocean Hub researchers to contribute towards efforts of community-based activists to stand up to un-democratic ocean governance related to deep-sea oil and gas exploration, coastal and seabed mining, human rights violations in marine protected areas, fisheries resource management, and other aspects of ocean governance in South Africa. A series of successful judicial challenges have been brought before national courts as a result of this approach, which have been praised by the UN Special Rapporteur on Human Rights and the Environment as good practice of environmental human rights defenders. For further explanation on the Hub researchers' contributions to stand up to un-democratic practices of ocean governance read a blogpost written by Taryn Pereira titled 'The court has a duty to step in and protect those who are offended and the environment' Judge rules in the Shell Seismic Survey case in October 2022. This is available here: https://oneoceanhub.org/the-outcome-of-the-shell-seismic-survey-case/. This method has been shared with other environmental justice and human rights practitioners around the world through engagement in the Global Network for Human Rights and the Environmental (GNHRE) /UNEP Winter/Summer School from 2020 to 2022. For more information see the recordings of 2021 GNHRE/UNEP Summer/Winter School sessions on "Environmental defenders in times of pandemic" (https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-environmental-defenders-in-times-of-pandemic/) and "Participation as Resistance" (https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-participation-as-resistance/) as well as the Hub led event for the UN World Ocean Week 2022 titled "Exploring Challenges, Opportunities and Alliances for the Protection of Small-scale Fishers' Human Rights" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JaBnVZQS6_o&t=768s). 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/the-outcome-of-the-shell-seismic-survey-case/
 
Title SMarTaR-ID Web Portal and South Atlantic species catalogue 
Description SMarTaR-ID Web Portal and South Atlantic species catalogue serves as a tool from which to develop standards in image analysis. The use of image-based data in marine ecology is now routine. However, there are challenges in the identification of marine animals from imagery, and the taxonomic level it is possible to achieve in the field. To support field identification of marine animals, many different organisations have developed their own in-house reference image libraries. Some have published their libraries as websites, apps, or papers. These reference libraries have proved a valuable source of information in supporting interpretation of image-based data. However, there are currently no standards around the identification of taxa from imagery. The aim of SMarTaR-ID is to provide a reference standard to which image-based data can be annotated. Our intention is to make it easier to combine image-based datasets for analysis by ensuring some commonality in how animal morphotypes are named (e.g. my anemone 1 is the same morphology as your anemone 1). In support of existing efforts, we have tried to align as far as possible with the CATAMI classification in our morphological filter. Standardisation is very important to marine biodiversity survey and monitoring. In addition, SMarTaR-ID aims to provide the tools to support training of researchers in the field-based identification of marine animals. Taxonomists within the SMarTaR-ID family have developed field keys to some taxa and we hope to develop more over time. We have also begun the development of field-based multi-access keys to marine animals in the form of filters on the database. This is a first step and we recognise there is much more to be done. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact This tool supports the aims of the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development, particularly capacity development, ocean literacy and technology transfer for implementing Sustainable Development Goal 14 - Life below water. The production of this new and novel tool paved the way for the formal endorsement of the One Ocean Hub research on deep-sea ecosystems as a new Decade Action on 3 June 2022 from the UN Decade of Ocean Science. Significance of this tool has been recognised internationally through an invited presentation at the International Seabed Authority in September 2020 (https://isa.org.jm/files/files/documents/WS%20Report_Taxonomic%20Standardization.pdf) and a publication (https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0218904) in 2019. 
URL https://smartar-id.app/
 
Title St Helena Hidden Harvest Survey Tool 
Description St Helena Hidden Harvest Survey Tool is developed by Hub researchers at the University of Cape Town, South Africa, based on the hidden harvest surveys by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). This instrument seeks to quantify the contribution of undocumented small-scale fisheries to the local economy and livelihood of St Helena Bay, South Africa. By doing so this new tool aids the efforts in protecting small-scale fishers' livelihoods from increasing threats arising from Blue Economy initiatives. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2023 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Surveys were conducted in the second half of 2022. The Hub research team at the University of Cape Town, South Africa, is still processing the data, but it has yielded incredibly important preliminary data quantifying the contribution of small-scale fisheries. This has been fed into national legal and policy process in South Africa and the development of the FAO SSF-LEX. The impact of the survey to the legal and policy process in South Africa is reported under the section New Model, Database and Dataset titled 'St Helena Bay (South Africa) Small-scale Fisheries Database'. SSF-LEX is FAO's free online legal and policy database entirely dedicated to small-scale fisheries that supports the implementation of the SSF Guidelines. SSF-LEX provides country profiles with information about national small-scale fisheries socioeconomic data, international and regional commitments, constitutional provisions, institutional arrangements, definition(s) of 'small-scale fisheries' and related terms, and a list of national legislation and policies relevant to small-scale fisheries. The database helps identify good State practices and needs for improvements. 
 
Title The 'Oceans for Life: a Coastal Community Blue Justice resource process' methodology and tools 
Description One Ocean Hub research team in South Africa lead by Dr Jackie Sunde and Professor Merle Sowman (University of Cape Town) is using and developing a methodology named the 'Oceans for Life: a Coastal Community Blue Justice resource process' that is relevant for a developing country context. It is a human rights-based, participatory research methodology that aims to simultaneously recognise local communities' local ecological knowledge and build their advocacy capacities to ensure their rights are protected. It is a community and human-rights based approach to assessing and transforming Blue Economy development initiatives into life-affirming processes that are equitable and sustainable. Hub researchers are in the process of applying and refining an "oceans for life" assessment tool and "oceans for life" action tool which they have developed over the past year. The tool has been applied in one of the University of Cape Town research team case study sites thus far. The purpose of this community-based tool is to provide an understanding of community vulnerability to ocean economy projects and ascertain the knowledge, skills and resources and actions needed to build resilience. This resource process includes two inter-linked components: 1. Oceans for Life Assessment Tool which is a dynamic, participatory, human- rights based assessment tool that enables coastal communities to assess Blue Economy developments from a human rights-based perspective to check whether the development complies with international and national human rights laws and policies and will contribute to sustaining their lives and that of the ocean upon which they depend; and 2. Oceans for life action tool, which equips coastal communities with the information and an array of resources that will assist them in ensuring that Blue Economy policies, developments and processes comply with relevant human rights and environmental legislation and strategies and activities to transform these development processes into actions that will contribute towards equitable and sustainable oceans and coastal life and livelihoods. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2023 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact This is work in progress. The Hub research team has developed a draft Tool and Methodology for Assessing the impact of Blue Economy projects on small-scale fisheries in South Africa. The tool and methodology have been piloted in one fisheries site but now requires additional testing and refinement during the course of 2023. One Ocean Hub's "Oceans for Life" are a community-based assessment and action tool aimed at supporting coastal communities to assess the impacts of Blue Growth on their lives and livelihoods and to act in order to promote equitable, sustainable and socially just oceans. It is being developed by Hub researchers at the University of Cape Town's Department of Environmental and Geographical Science and One Ocean Hub Small-scale Fisheries research team through their partnership with coastal and small-scale fisher communities with whom it works in South Africa. Most notably, it is a human-rights based methodology. It is still in the piloting phase and has not been published. Hub researchers are noting that the methodology is having impacts within the communities with whom they are working, where the communities are demonstrating their awareness of their rights and the importance of combining their local ecological knowledge with marine science and spatial mapping tools in order to defend their rights and livelihoods. 
 
Title Transdisciplinary audit tool 
Description The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development sets out a transformative vision which has yet to be realised for Sustainable Development Goal 14 and the ocean. Recognition of the "indivisibility" of the Goals and enhanced integration of ocean governance support this transformation, but require at least multidisciplinary, or probably transdisciplinary, approaches. For regions which are highly dependent on development finance, a powerful leverage point for a transdisciplinary transformation is in the design of development investments. The tool developed by Hub researchers Prof Jeremy Hills and Payal Maharaj (University of South Pacific, Fiji) identifies design features of ocean development-financed projects involving substantial amounts of research in two Pacific Small Island Developing States (SIDS): Fiji and the Solomon Islands. Transdisciplinary approaches were closely aligned to what is established as Mode 2 research modalities which focus on participation and multi-knowledge systems, as opposed to Mode 1 which have a predominantly scientific basis. From the literature, an analytical indicator framework was developed which scored projects on their modes of research within four categories: People, Process, Policy and Product. This framework was applied to five development-financed projects, and permitted the balance of Mode 1 and Mode 2 to be assessed and significant differences between projects identified. The work surfaces project features which can be embedded in the design of ocean investments that promote transdisciplinary. The tool can analyse development projects to determine to assess the research and knowledge production mode of the project. Literature recognises mode 1 which is based around sectoral scientist approaches and mode 2 which is more context-driven, inclusive and multidisciplinary process. From literature indicators of mode 1 and 2 were devised under categories of People, Policy, Process and Product which reflected the different dimensions of the knowledge research process. This analytical frame was applied to a number of ocean-related development projects in the Pacific. The results demonstrated that the indicators captured the different approaches used in the projects. Transdisciplinary approaches are only feasible within mode 2 research modalities, thus, the indicators provide insight into how to design research in terms of People, Policy, Process and Product. These results provide insight into the project design required for allow transdisciplinary approaches to develop. With integrated and transdisciplinary outcomes being required to deliver the SDGs, as fully recognised by GCRF, this work is a significant step for designing appropriate interventions. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact This tractable and practical recognition of transdisciplinarity has connotations to the UN Ocean Decade, in its ability to deliver on its transformation rhetoric. With capacity weaknesses and constrained financial resources in developing countries, and urgent ocean-related challenges especially in SIDS, moving to designed-in transdisciplinary and transformational outcomes remains a priority. This new and novel method serves as a pilot work to identify transdisciplinary design for ocean development - for potential use in other projects or the UN Decade of Ocean Science and Sustainable Development. 
URL https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2023.1075759
 
Title Age and growth data and chronologies of steenbras from northern and southern Namibia 
Description Hub researcher, Dr Margit Wilhelm (University of Namibia, Namibia) and her research team is developing a new dataset containing age and growth data and chronologies of steenbras from northern and southern Namibia. The dataset has not been completed yet. Some otoliths have been analysed but there is some missing data that will need to be collected. Age and growth data from this new dataset can be used in an updated stock assessment model. Data about chronology from the otoliths can be used for climate change and tipping point analyses. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2023 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact No notable impacts to be reported at this stage, but it is expected that fish age determination laboratory and protocols established at UNAM will allow for the first independent sampling in Namibia resulting in chronologies and genetics for different target fish species that can lead to differentiated management for fish species. 
 
Title Broad-scale benthic habitat classification of the South Atlantic 
Description Broad-scale benthic habitat classification of the South Atlantic is a seafloor habitat classification model predicting the distribution of habitats across the South Atlantic, produced by clustering environmental variables using two different methods. In December 2022 Hub early-career researcher, Dr Kirsty McQuaid (University of Plymouth, UK) submitted a response and revised manuscript based on reviewers' comments to journal Progress in Oceanography. She is awaiting a response from the journal. When the manuscript is published, the model will be made available online, open-access. 
Type Of Material Computer model/algorithm 
Year Produced 2023 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact There is no notable impact to date. However, the model has been compared with national level mapping by co-authors in Uruguay and shows good performance for use in data poor environments such as deep-water habitats and open ocean. 
 
Title Combine impact of global change factors on marine organisms model 
Description This model is developed by Hub researcher, Dr Emmanuel Acheampong (University of Cape Coast, Ghana). It is derived from microcosm experiments that Dr Acheampong conducted to investigate functional responses of marine plankton to cadmium (proxy for heavy metal pollution) and sea surface warming (proxy for global climate change) in Ghana. A manuscript focusing on this model has been submitted for review. 
Type Of Material Data analysis technique 
Year Produced 2023 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The model has not been published or made available to the public. No notable impacts to be reported at this stage. Anticipated impact is to aid in adaptation and mitigation measures in light of climate changes and pollution. 
 
Title Dataset on small-scale fisheries in Ghana 
Description In 2022 Hub researcher Dr Wisdom Akpalu (University of Cape Coast, Ghana) carried out two surveys for data collection on (1) the enforcement of fishing regulations and (2) multidimensional poverty among artisanal fishers in Ghana. The data has been analysed and is being used to write two papers. Data collection on the enforcement of fishing regulations was conducted by Dr Akpalu from October 2021 to January 2022 in Greater Accra, Western Region and Central Region, Ghana. Data collection on multidimensional poverty was carried out by Dr Akpalu in November 2022 in various areas in Ghana, including Greater Accra (Awudun and Ashamang Fishing District) Central Region (Abandze, Aboadze, Biriwa Fishing Districts), and Western Region (Shama, Axim). 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2023 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact No notable impacts to be reported at this stage. 
 
Title Fleet based surplus production model: a new fish stock assessment model 
Description One Ocean Hub researchers including Dr Robin Cook and Professor Michael Heath (University of Strathclyde, UK) and Dr Emmanuel Acheampong and Professor Joseph Aggrey-Fynn (University of Cape Coast, Ghana) have developed a new fish stock assessment modelling tool suited to catch and effort data available by fleet. This is a Bayesian statistical model that uniquely accounts for technological creep and therefore corrects for bias in existing methods that use fishery dependent data. It provides estimates of maximum sustainable yield which offers fishery managers advice on sustainable exploitation of coastal resources. 
Type Of Material Data analysis technique 
Year Produced 2021 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Assessments of many West African fish stocks rely on fishery-dependent catch and effort data. Typically, these treat the catch data as error free and some assume that fishing power does not change over time. To address these issues, One Ocean Hub researchers Dr Robin Cook, Professor Michael Heath, Dr Emmanuel Acheampong and Professor Josep Aggrey-Fynn develop a fleet-based surplus production model that accounts for increases in fishing power. It allows errors both in effort and catch data so avoiding the assumption that catch data are exact. Mean annual fleet fishing power increase can be estimated when data from multiple fleets are available, provided it can be specified for at least one fleet. The model is tested using simulated data and then applied to western stocks of anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) and bonga shad (Ethmalosa fimbriata) in the Fishery Committee for the Eastern Central Atlantic (CECAF) area. Both stocks appear to be over-exploited and near to collapse. Corrections for fishing power are important in the anchovy assessment and help to explain conflicting trends in the data. Uncertainty in the assessments is explored with a range of sensitivity tests. This model has enabled the detailed and robust assessment of the status of all fish stocks in Ghanaian waters for the first time. 
URL https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fishres.2021.106048
 
Title Lalela uLwandle Audience Feedback Dataset 
Description This research dataset is developed through Lalela uLwandle performance and post-performance dialogue. Lalela uLwandle is a research-based theatre performance and public dialogue event developed by a South African collective called Empatheatre, who are part of the One Ocean Hub. As part of the Empatheatre methodology, the performance was followed by a facilitated public-discussion with researchers, performers, decision-makers, and the audience on the themes that emerge from the play. In 2022 Lalela uLwandle had been performed 15 times throughout its tour across South Africa (Durban, Western Cape, and Eastern Cape) and once at Climate COP27 Capacity Building Hub (Blue Zone), Sharm el Sheikh, Egypt. For details see artistic product entry on Empatheatre Lalela uLwanldle. At all performance a short feedback form is completed by the audience. The feedback form asks three questions from audience members: How did the play make you feel?; Are there any characters in the play you felt you could relate to? If so, why?; How should we make decisions about the oceans?. The feedback form data from the 2022 Lalela ulwandle performances in KwaZulu-Natal, Eastern Cape and the Western Cape in South Africa have been added to this dataset. The dataset now holds audience feedback data spanning three years of performances. In 2022 another 438 audience feedback forms were captured. Parts of the 2019 and 2020 dataset have been analysed and published as findings in the book chapter: Erwin, K., Pereira, T., McGarry, D., Coppen, N. (2022). Lalela uLwandle: An Experiment in Plural Governance Discussions. In: Boswell, R., O'Kane, D., Hills, J. (eds). The Palgrave Handbook of Blue Heritage. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-99347-4_20. The full dataset that includes the 2022 and 2023 performances will be used as data for a research report on arts-based methodologies for more inclusive ocean governance, which will also be submitted as a journal article in early 2024. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Previous impacts in 2019/2020 include the use of data in litigation led by NGOs against offshore oil & gas exploration applications by ENI energy company in South Africa. The data was included in the appeal as evidence of ocean-related intangible cultural heritage, which received very little, if any, consideration in current decision-making processes on the ocean. In 2022 results that have been interpreted and analysed were presented to marine scientists at the South African Marine Science Symposium to show how cultural and spiritual understandings of the ocean are important to consider in marine planning and conservation efforts. Lastly, the findings from the book chapter published in 2022 that analyses some of this dataset was presented at the UN World Ocean Week event "Blue Heritage: The Role of Ocean Art and Culture in Ocean Science and Management" on the 7 June 2022 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pGYDqEuAdj0) and Climate COP27 Capacity Building Hub on 14 November 2022, in Sharm el Sheikh, Egypt (See the recording of Land & Ocean Day of Capacity Building Hub here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k7Vxk043HzY - Watch Lalela uLwandle from 09:10:27). 
URL https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-99347-4_20
 
Title Richards Bay (South Africa) Small-Scale Fisheries Dataset 
Description Hub early-career researcher Aphiwe Moshani (University of Cape Town, South Africa) has developed the 'Richards Bay (South Africa) small-scale fisheries dataset' as part of her doctoral research. This dataset consists of two sets of household survey data, oral history interview data, and focus group data that she has collected during a series of field trips in Richards Bay. Aphiwe Moshani's data collection has specifically focused at two coastal communities in Richards Bay, South Africa. These include Gubethuka and Ndindima communities. Methodologies used and lesson learnt in the development of this dataset will be published in early 2024. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2023 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Although the dataset has not been published, it has informed the intervention made by Hub early-career researchers Dr Philile Mbatha and Aphiwe Moshani (Cape Town University, South Africa) at the first session of the UN Environment Programme global consultation, titled "Towards a common understanding of the support to Environmental Human Rights Defenders (EHRDs) concept" in May 2021. Dr Mbatha and Ms Moshani shared their research findings on the role of small-scale fishing communities as EHRDs, bringing in perspectives also on traditional knowledge and customary rights, including in the context of the creation of marine protected areas. Dr Mbatha and Moshani began their presentation by providing an overview of the expansion of blue economy interventions of the coast, and how their implementation tends to focus on neoliberal objectives at the expense of social ones. The displacement and disempowerment of many traditional fishers on the northern parts of KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), Dube and Mkhwanazi, due to the continuation of a mining lease in the Zulti South Mining Lease Area in 2019, was used as an example. The mining lease covers the coastal area between the south of Richards Bay and the uMhlathuze river and the north of Port Dunford extending 20km of this coast and has destroyed small-scale fishing grounds, displaced 645 people and 79 households, and further displaced additional 586 households. They also drew attention to the harassment and killing of EHRDs (https://oneoceanhub.org/one-ocean-hub-highlights-role-and-needs-of-small-scale-fishers-at-un-consultations-on-environmental-human-rights-defenders/). 
URL https://oneoceanhub.org/one-ocean-hub-highlights-role-and-needs-of-small-scale-fishers-at-un-consult...
 
Title Sampling Effort Metadata for the Central and South Atlantic Offshore and Deep-Sea Benthos 
Description Biological sampling effort in the South Atlantic dataset is composed of historical records of where biological sampling has been carried out in the South Atlantic. The biological sampling effort in the South Atlantic dataset carried out under the One Ocean Hub fed into a larger dataset titled 'Sampling Effort Metadata for the Central and South Atlantic Offshore and Deep-Sea Benthos' (https://zenodo.org/record/7381493#.Y_jKrXbP2uV). The metadata has been published, with an initial embargo period until 31 May 2023. Thereafter, the database will be open access. Metadata containing information on the sampling of benthic taxa in =>30 m water depth in the Central and South Atlantic. This data was compiled as part of a baseline review of the science, policy and management of the region (Bridges et al. in press). Metadata was compiled from sources identified through a literature search and information provided by members of the Challenger 150 Central and South Atlantic Regional Scientific Research Working Group. The database has been included in a paper reviewing the science, policy and management of the Central and South Atlantic (Bridges et al. in press).T he full reference of the paper is as follow: Bridges. A.E.H., Howell, K.L., Amaro, T., Atkinson, L., Barnes, D.K.A., Bax, N., Bell, J.B., Bernardino, A.F., Beuck, L., Braga-Henriques, A., Brandt, A., Bravo, M.E., Brix, S., Butt, S., Carranza, A., Doti, B.L., Elegbede, I.O., Esquete, P., Freiwald, A., Gaudron, S.M., Guilhon, M., Hebbeln, D., Horton, T., Kainge, P., Kaiser, S., Lauretta, D., Limongi, P., Mcquaid, K.A., Milligan, R.J., Miloslavich, P., Narayanaswamy, B.E., Orejas, C., Paulus, S., Pearman, T.R.R., Perez, J.A., Ross, R.E., Saeedi, H., Shimabukuro, M., Sink, K., Stevenson, A., Taylor, M., Titschack, J., Vieira, R.P., Vinha, B. & Wienberg, C. "Review of the Central and South Atlantic Shelf and Deep-Sea." in Benthos: Science, Policy and Management. Oceanography and Marine Biology: An Annual Review. In press. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2023 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The development of this dataset supports the aims of the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development, particularly capacity development, ocean literacy and technology transfer for implementing Sustainable Development Goal 14 - Life below water. The production of this new and novel tool paved the way for the formal endorsement of the One Ocean Hub research on deep-sea ecosystems as a new Decade Action under Challenger 150 on 3 June 2022 from the UN Decade of Ocean Science. 
URL https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7381493
 
Title St Helena Bay (South Africa) Small-Scale Fisheries Database 
Description This database is developed by Hub researchers based at the University of Cape Town, South Africa in partnership with a local small-scale fisher community. It includes data on small-scale fishers' fishing areas and practices, livelihoods, ecological knowledge and cultural heritage, arising from the on-going, community-based participatory research process in St. Helena Bay, South Africa and comprises both quantitative and qualitative data obtained through a range of methods including a household survey, focus groups, fisher individual and group mapping and individual interviews and observation. The database has not been published yet. A technical report is in progress (Sunde, Sowman, Nthane and Lambrecht, 2023). Methodology used and lessons learnt will be published in early 2024. Although the database has not been published yet but fisher geo-referenced maps and the methodology used to develop these has been shared with selected scientists as part of an on-going national research process to ensure that small-scale fishers are represented in the National Marine Spatial Planning database. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2023 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Information from the database was used by Hub researcher Dr Jackie Sunde (University of Cape Town, South Africa), to inform two affidavits submitted as part of the Application for an interdict against the company SEARCHER GEODATA, asking the High Court to withdraw the authorization granted to SEARCHER to conduct a seismic survey off the West Coast of South Africa for offshore oil and gas exploration. In the environmental management report submitted by the environmental consultants acting for SEARCHER, the 'Expert Fisheries Report' failed to identify the impacts of the proposed survey on the small-scale fishers of the West Coast. It failed to include key data about the key species that they catch, as well as their fisheries-related cultural heritage. Using the data gathered in the One Ocean Hub's St Helena Bay project, Hub researcher, Dr Jackie Sunde, assisted one of the fisher leaders in developing the founding affidavit (Christian Adams and Others versus the Minister and Others 1306/2022 available at https://cer.org.za/virtual-library/judgments/high-courts/christian-john-adams-others-v-minister-of-mineral-resources-and-energy-others-west-coast-seismic-blasting-part-a-interdict-march-2022). In the second affidavit ((Sunde 2022), the researcher outlined information on the small-scale fisheries on the West Coast, drawing considerable information from the information collected as part of the process of building the database. The applicants were successful in this case and this point made about the expert reports failing to address the issue of a specific species called snoek, was one of the grounds for the application for an interdict being granted. Further indication of the impact of intervention could be found in a new 2022 application for oil and gas exploration off the West Coast, where the same fisheries expert has written a new 'Fisheries Expert Report (TEEPSA 567 Capmarine 2022)' in which he references Dr Sunde's publication (Sunde 2016), which was cited in the affidavit (Sunde 2022). This indicated clearly that the expert was informed by the affidavit. Further, in the new 'Expert Report', the expert changes the approach to the distance travelled by small-scale fishers that was used in the first report, provides extensive information on the key species of the small-scale fishers that was raised in Sunde 2022, and Adams affidavit, and the expert notes the cultural importance of small-scale fisheries and the need to adopt a precautionary approach, noting that there is new information about small-scale fisheries. This clearly shows the impact of Hub researcher' interventions using data from this new, albeit as yet unpublished, database. As yet unpublished SSF geo-referenced spatial maps in the growing dataset are also being used to inform transdisciplinary research conducted with the South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI), to develop a methodology to include small-scale fisheries data in the national marine spatial and biodiversity planning dataset. For more information about the affidavits and expert reports please see the following documents that are available here: https://oneoceanhub.glasscubes.com/share/s/bqog6s4mgmack63rm3j5m9ajlj. 
 
Title StrathE2E Model 
Description StrathE2E is a marine food web and fisheries model for shelf seas. It has been published as an R package in 2021 and an online app in 2022. This is an end-to-end model which (1) represents the entire marine food web and the associated abiotic environment, (2) involves the integration of physical and biological processes at different scales, (3) implements two-way interaction between ecosystem components and (4) accounts for the dynamic forcing effect of climate change and human impacts at multiple trophic levels. It allows users to investigate potential impact of management decisions on marine ecosystem health and production. A model for the Ghana ecosystem is available online, see here: https://outreach.mathstat.strath.ac.uk/apps/StrathE2EApp/. Read more about StrathE2E here: https://www.marineresourcemodelling.maths.strath.ac.uk/strathe2e/articles/Implementation_The_Ghanaian_Shelf.html. 
Type Of Material Computer model/algorithm 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The aim of the model is to represent the entire interconnected marine ecosystem from physics and chemistry through microbes and plankton, to whales and fisheries in continental shelf regions. StrathE2E simplifies ecology and space to be accessible. This means the model is speedy, versatile, and easily changed and could be used by relevant stakeholders to develop fisheries management policy. 
URL https://outreach.mathstat.strath.ac.uk/apps/StrathE2EApp/
 
Title The Algoa Marine Systems Analysis Tool (AlgoaMSAT): an exploratory framework and simulation model 
Description One Ocean Hub early-career researcher Estee Vermeulen has developed the Algoa Marine Systems Analysis Tool (AlgoaMSAT). AlgoaMSAT is an exploratory framework and simulation model that uses system dynamics modelling (SDM) to facilitate and support marine spatial planning (MSP). SDMs incorporate temporal dimensions, and thereby can support MSP processes by evaluating changes in human use dynamics and interconnections, possible synergies and conflicts between human uses, as well as between human uses and requirements for marine health. As a management framework, the exploratory tool provides a holistic, cross-sectoral overview of human use dynamics in terms of sustainable management, and as a simulation model, it provides a platform for scenario and trade-off analyses in relation to sustainable use of the bay. Moreover, the framework and the model provide a communication tool, which can be used to facilitate collaborative stakeholder engagement and provide strategic guidance and decision-support to MSP. The model boundary of AlgoaMSAT consists of six sub-models. Five of these represent selected marine uses in Algoa Bay, whereas the sixth sub-model integrates the outputs from each marine use in terms of sustainable management outputs. An additional output of the AlgoaMSAT is the Visual User Interface (VUI). The VUI has been developed for the purpose of providing a 'user-friendly' portal to engage with the model, specifically for users who are unfamiliar with the method of system dynamics modeling or do not have access to the model software. Decision-makers or stakeholders can therefore investigate model scenarios by tweaking the inclusive model levers. The VUI can additionally be applied in a multi-sectoral stakeholder setting, whereby stakeholders in the different marine sectors can implement alternative management interventions and thereby compare scenarios. The VUI has been developed to provide a user-friendly portal to engage with the model. Decision-makers or stakeholders can therefore investigate model scenarios by adjusting the inclusive model variables through levers on the interface. The VUI can additionally be used in a collaborative stakeholder setting, whereby stakeholders representing different institutions or areas of the problem can implement alternative management interventions to investigate tourism recovery strategies in Nelson Mandela Bay, similar to what was demonstrated during the group stakeholder workshop. The Nelson Mandela Bay COVID-Tourism interface has been published online on the isee systems model exchange platform in 2022. For further details read the following articles: Vermeulen-Miltz et. al. (2023). A system dynamics model to support marine spatial planning in Algoa Bay, South Africa. Model & Online user interface. Journal of Environmental Modelling and Software. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsoft.2022.105601. Vermeulen-Miltz et.al. (2022). A System Dynamics Model and Online User Interface to support tourism management, by specifically investigating the impacts of COVID on tourism in Nelson Mandela Bay. the MDPI journal. https://doi.org/10.3390/systems10040120. 
Type Of Material Computer model/algorithm 
Year Produced 2021 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The Algoa Marine Systems Analysis model received first place in two prestigious competitions including the 4th Annual South African System Dynamics competition and the Global Challenges University Alliance (GCUA 2030) Award in 2021. The system dynamics model quantitatively measures the interactions among five industries in the bay and their relationships with marine health, marine wealth and marine labour. Local authorities including Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality and the tourism sector have expressed interest about the use of the model. 
URL https://www.algoabayproject.com/abcodym
 
Title The dataset on microplastics 
Description The dataset on microplastics is currently being worked on and added to by Hub researchers based at the Scottish Association for Marine Science, UK and the University of Cape Coast, Ghana. The dataset contains number of particles and the polymer type of these particles. Once it is completed the data will be published with Hub colleagues from Ghana and will be made available to all. Colleagues at the University of Cape Coast, Ghana will also have access to this data and can use it within Ghana to support additional grant capture, or to demonstrate to policymakers/stakeholders the levels of plastics and types during different time points. The database is based on best practices developed to standardise the classification of microplastics in the environment. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2023 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact No notable impacts to be reported at this stage. Anticipated impact is the availability of data for fisheries-human health research and potential impacts on livelihoods. In addition, knowledge will help inform future research needs on micro and nano plastics. 
 
Title The trophic model of Algoa Bay - Modeling climate change impacts on the South African marine system and fisheries 
Description The marine fisheries sector in South Africa plays an important role in food security for small-scale and subsistence fishers. Climate-driven impacts have resulted in distribution shifts and declines in abundance of important fisheries targets, with negative consequences to the users dependent on these resources (reviewed in Ortega-Cisneros et al., 2021). Hub researchers from the University of Cape Town and Nelson Mandela University, Dr Lynnne Shannon and Dr Kelly Ortega Cisneros, developed ecosystem models to predict the impacts of climate change on fisheries and develop and test adaptation scenarios. They used the Ecopath with Ecosim (EwE, version 6.6.6) and Atlantis modelling frameworks to develop and test scenarios for climate change fisheries adaptation. These models allow for the creation of simple or complex models of the trophic flows of an ecosystem, providing an overview of feeding interactions and resources contained in the system. Both the Atlantis and EwE modelling frameworks have been used for strategic purposes, e.g. to test what if? scenarios. These models and scenarios are critical for adaptation since they can predict the potential impacts of climate change and other stressors to marine ecosystems and resource users. These predictions can be used to inform users of potential future scenarios, that can in turn help them prepare to these impacts and increase their readiness to adapt. These models and scenarios are innovative because they produce a novel application of the temporally dynamic Ecosim model for Algoa Bay, as well as spatio-temporal dynamic model (Ecospace), by gathering recent advancements in our understanding of the dynamics and available data series from research in Algoa Bay. The models and scenarios show promise in improving the understanding of cumulative pressures in Algoa Bay, including climate change, as well as the predicted impacts of climate change in the southern Benguela system using two different ecosystem models. This is important in reconciling knowledge needed to manage fisheries and to protect marine biodiversity by means of ecosystem-based management in South Africa, and to advance management advice under future scenarios of climate change (Shannon et.al 2020). 
Type Of Material Computer model/algorithm 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact An Ecopath with Ecosim model of Algoa Bay was developed and fitted to catch and abundance time series for the period 2010-2019. Model simulations were run to explore the ecosystem benefits of the Addo Elephant National Park Marine Protected Area. The model serves as a basis for future spatialised trophic modelling of the Algoa Bay, in support of spatial management. Significance of the models and scenarios developed by Hub researchers has been recognised at the regional and international levels, through invited policy brief and presentations to the Nairobi Convention for the Western Indian Ocean (February 2021) and the Ocean Decade Predictable Ocean (September 2021). The ecosystem models and scenarios will help the fishing industry prepare for climate change and ultimately assist to prioritise resources to ensure the industry remains resilient or to find alternatives to diversify and remain viable. Several adaptation options have been proposed for the small pelagics fishery by the right holders and the findings of this study hope to help with prioritising those adaptation options by identifying which elements are more at risk and need the highest attention. By doing so, this project contributes to sustaining livelihoods for the more than 5000 people from different local communities depending on small pelagic fishery(https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2020.00540; https://doi.org/10.2989/1814232X.2022.2080268). 
URL https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2020.00540
 
Title Transformative governance for an innovative and sustainable blue society in Namibia dataset 
Description Hub researchers at the University of Namibia, Namibia, collected the quantitative and qualitative data on the blue economy, markets for small-scale fishers, and fisheries governance. The dataset addresses the following the objectives: 1. to explore possible opportunities for coastal communities to access social and economic benefits from the blue economy. 2. to Identify barriers hindering coastal communities from fully participating in policies and regulatory frameworks for ocean governance. 3. to explore the possibility of a sustainable local market for small-scale artisanal fishers in the coastal areas. In 2022, Hub researchers at the University of Namibia engaged with various stakeholders through interviews and workshops. These stakeholders include: trade facilitators working at Namibian ports authority; fishers (commercial, small-scale, and recreational); women groups and youth groups living in the coastal areas. Some of the research participants explained that they gained knowledge about the blue economy concept after the workshop and that they would use this knowledge in future engagements with other stakeholders. Others shared their experience about access to market for small-scale fishers and provided examples of countries where a chain of businesses support small-scale fishers (e.g. Angola) that potentially can be applied in the Namibian coastal areas. The dataset that Hub researchers at the University of Namibia developed revealed that participants understanding of the legal basis for governance of fishing activities was limited. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2023 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The dataset enhances learning and understanding of the concept of the blue economy and markets for small-scale fishers. The dataset and findings from the Hub research in Namibia contributed to the development of Namibia's first National Plan of Action for Small-Scale Fisheries (https://namibia.un.org/index.php/en/207292-national-plan-action-small-scale-fisheries-2022-2026-npoa-ssf) that was published in June 2022 and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)'s SSF-LEX (https://www.fao.org/faolex/en/), a legal and policy database entirely dedicated to small-scale fisheries, that was launched at the 4th World Small-Scale Fisheries Congress (4WSFC) - Africa, held in Cape Town, South Africa, in November 2022. 
 
Title Umkhosi Wenala Dataset 
Description Through counter-hegemonic mapping using Empatheatre methodology, a new play was co-developed in 2022 titled "Umkhosi Wenala" (is Zulu for "Festival of Abundance"), which aims to create an innovative participatory decision-making space where rural youth can have a voice in the creation and management of marine protected areas that exclude cultural, spiritual and other local perspectives, concerns and questions. Hub researchers based at Rhodes University, Durban University of Technology, and the University of Cape Town, South Africa created a new process of working with over 200 years of history that was co-developed by 13 young activities and 8 elders, who brought stories and iterated this timeline over 18 months near Isimangaliso Marine Protected Area, they then also created relational maps of these, which were then through call and response methods were added to a theatre production and living map of these stories and concerns and performed to communities and traditional authorities with feedback and further iteration. Through the Umkhosi Wenala play, a team of Hub researchers based at Rhodes University, University of Cape Town and Durban University of Technology, South Africa have produced a new dataset on intangible cultural heritage and a large 200-year history articulated by local communities and knowledge holders. For more information read this blogpost:https://oneoceanhub.org/fairer-and-more-inclusive-marine-protected-areas-through-restorative-public-storytelling/ and see this link: https://vimeo.com/791847743/b95e473231. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2022 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The insights and oral histories from the new dataset will be shared at the closing events of the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries and Aquaculture, which the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation is co-organising with the Hub on 27-31 March 2023 in Rome, Italy, with policy makers and practitioners involved in sustainable fisheries and marine conservation. The engagement at the international level is expected to further co-develop the Hub research and policy contributions on how to make marine protection more inclusive, just and support multi-species flourishing (human and more-than-human alike), and create new/strengthen alliances with international human rights bodies and other international actors that contribute to the protection of human rights at the national level. 
URL https://vimeo.com/791847743/b95e473231
 
Description ADVANCING MARINE SPATIAL PLANNING FOR THE WESTERN INDIAN OCEAN 
Organisation Macquarie University
Country Australia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The multi-funded Algoa Bay project at the Nelson Mandela University, South African, and its collaboration with the Hub (as a cross-scale case study) has been recognised for integrating disciplines and expertise in marine spatial planning, with particular attention on innovations in taking a system approach and using a social-ecological lens. The research has been upscaled to the regional level through the development of: 1) a framework for marine spatial planning in the Western Indian Ocean; 2) concept note on how to implement the framework and its importance; and 3) a policy brief funded by UNEP. The concept note was presented in 2021 to the Conference of the Parties of the Nairobi Convention for the Protection, Management, and Development of the Coastal and Marine Environment of the Eastern Africa region, and the framework was presented at the multi-stakeholder conference of the Western Indian Ocean Governance and Exchange Network (WIOGEN) by Hub Deputy Director Bernadette Snow. The framework is now expected to be integrated into national planning and ocean governance processes in the Western Indian Ocean).
Collaborator Contribution UNEP is a project partner of the Hub and is hosting the Secretariat of the Nairobi Convention for the Protection, Management, and Development of the Coastal and Marine Environment of the Eastern Africa region. UNEP recognized the significance of the Algoa Bay team's contribution and invited presentation at Science to Policy Forum for the UNEP/Nairobi Convention for the Protection, Management and Development of the Marine and Coastal Environment of the Western Indian Ocean on 25 March 2021 that was co-organsied by UNEP Nairobi Convention, United Nations Development Programme, Western Indian Ocean Marine Association and the Global Environment Facility. Hub researchers from Nelson Mandela University including Dr Denning Metuge, Professor Amanda Lombard and Dr Bernadette Snow have also submitted a concept note on 'A regional Marine Spatial Planning strategy for the Western Indian Ocean' to the UNEP Nairobi Convention Western Indian Ocean Regional Science to Policy Meeting in September 2021.
Impact Concept Note Submission to the United Nations Environment Programme Nairobi Convention Western Indian Ocean Regional Science to Policy Meeting September 2021, https://nairobiconvention.org/clearinghouse/sites/default/files/WIO%20MSP%20Policy%20Brief_6%20Oct2021.pdf. Framework - not for public yet. Methodological Tool - not for public yet as will go out to tender for further work.
Start Year 2020
 
Description ADVANCING MARINE SPATIAL PLANNING FOR THE WESTERN INDIAN OCEAN 
Organisation Western Indian Ocean Marine Science Association
Country Tanzania, United Republic of 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The multi-funded Algoa Bay project at the Nelson Mandela University, South African, and its collaboration with the Hub (as a cross-scale case study) has been recognised for integrating disciplines and expertise in marine spatial planning, with particular attention on innovations in taking a system approach and using a social-ecological lens. The research has been upscaled to the regional level through the development of: 1) a framework for marine spatial planning in the Western Indian Ocean; 2) concept note on how to implement the framework and its importance; and 3) a policy brief funded by UNEP. The concept note was presented in 2021 to the Conference of the Parties of the Nairobi Convention for the Protection, Management, and Development of the Coastal and Marine Environment of the Eastern Africa region, and the framework was presented at the multi-stakeholder conference of the Western Indian Ocean Governance and Exchange Network (WIOGEN) by Hub Deputy Director Bernadette Snow. The framework is now expected to be integrated into national planning and ocean governance processes in the Western Indian Ocean).
Collaborator Contribution UNEP is a project partner of the Hub and is hosting the Secretariat of the Nairobi Convention for the Protection, Management, and Development of the Coastal and Marine Environment of the Eastern Africa region. UNEP recognized the significance of the Algoa Bay team's contribution and invited presentation at Science to Policy Forum for the UNEP/Nairobi Convention for the Protection, Management and Development of the Marine and Coastal Environment of the Western Indian Ocean on 25 March 2021 that was co-organsied by UNEP Nairobi Convention, United Nations Development Programme, Western Indian Ocean Marine Association and the Global Environment Facility. Hub researchers from Nelson Mandela University including Dr Denning Metuge, Professor Amanda Lombard and Dr Bernadette Snow have also submitted a concept note on 'A regional Marine Spatial Planning strategy for the Western Indian Ocean' to the UNEP Nairobi Convention Western Indian Ocean Regional Science to Policy Meeting in September 2021.
Impact Concept Note Submission to the United Nations Environment Programme Nairobi Convention Western Indian Ocean Regional Science to Policy Meeting September 2021, https://nairobiconvention.org/clearinghouse/sites/default/files/WIO%20MSP%20Policy%20Brief_6%20Oct2021.pdf. Framework - not for public yet. Methodological Tool - not for public yet as will go out to tender for further work.
Start Year 2020
 
Description BETTER PROTECTING SMALL-SCALE FISHERS' HUMAN RIGHTS ACROSS SCALES 
Organisation Blue Ventures
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This partnership began in 2021 through the FAO existing programme to support national implementation of the FAO Guidelines on Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF) through national legislation. To support this, One Ocean Hub co-hosted with FAO regional workshops with government, community, research, and NGO representation from Ghana, Namibia, South Africa, to identify legislative barriers to the implementation of the FAO voluntary SSF guidelines in each country, thereby contributing to national research, while co-developing a global instrument, the FAO SSF Policy and Legal diagnostic tool in April 2021. Co-design of the regional workshop with South African researchers involved in the Coastal Justice Network allowed FAO to shift from a top-down approach that focused on discussing what international law requires from governments to an approach informed by local context, and responds to specific needs of SSF, through international law when national law falls short. Hub researchers facilitated SSF representatives' direct participation in the workshop in varied ways, including voice or video messages that communicated their priorities. SSF and government representatives, as well as non-legal researchers were made aware of how international law is (or is not) applied in the context of South Africa, Ghana and Namibia. This is now informing planning of further inter-disciplinary research that will guide strategies on partnerships with governments and SSF in Ghana. In addition, this regional event led to a follow-up event specifically for Namibia, in collaboration with the FAO, the Hub and the Ministry for Fisheries and Marine Resources (MFMR) Namibia. The webinar series organised on 10-11 June 2021 was titled 'Namibia's experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries.' It was aimed at providing the evidence required to support the process for the development of a National Plan of Action for Small-Scale Fisheries in Namibia, which the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources, which was published in 2022 as part of its commitment to implement the FAO SSF Guidelines. The workshop provided an opportunity to integrate the early research findings from the One Ocean Hub into the process for the development of a National Plan of Action for Small-Scale Fisheries in Namibia, notably with regard to the inclusion of the views of indigenous communities that have been displaced from the coast (Topnaar). This event led to an invitation for nominations for two experts to sit on Namibia's national task force on SSF (upon acceptance by the Ministry of Fisheries). The key research findings that were shared with FAO focused on the approaches to: • redress marginalisation of previously disadvantaged communities including those that have been historically removed from the coast e.g. the Topnaar community), and • address the diverse capacity-building needs of different stakeholder groups that are expected to benefit from or contribute to implementation (SSF associations, SSF women and youth, town councils, NGOs, and primary schools). In addition, FAO invited the Hub to co-develop two e-learning courses on implementation of the FAO Guidelines on SSF to be housed on the FAO E-learning Academy website (https://elearning.fao.org/). The courses are meant to respond to government officers' and fishers' needs respectively, to implement the FAO Guidelines. The latter will allow SSF to obtain an international certification on the FAO E-learning Academy that contributes to their professional development and recognition of SSF. Two papers by Hub colleagues in Ghana and South Africa were integrated as case studies in the first FAO e-learning course on SSF law and policy (in additions to insights arising from the joint Hub-FAO workshops). A new e-learning course will be co-developed in 2023 with a view to directly addressing the question and challenges of small-scale fishers in invoking international law and human rights in their daily interactions with authorities and other stakeholders, based on Hub partnerships with small-scale fishing organizations in Namibia, Ghana and South Africa. Meanwhile, the Hub shared some of these research findings and innovative methodologies for collaborating and supporting SSF with UNEP, in the context of a UN Global and African consultations on environmental human rights defenders. This contributing to the UN recognising SSF, indigenous peoples and local communities negatively affected by blue economy initiatives as "environmental human rights defenders" (defined by the United Nations as individuals and communities that raise awareness about the negative impacts on human rights of unsustainable decisions on the environment, who are increasingly the object of (often lethal) attacks by governments or private companies), which addressed a blind spot in current international initiatives that are land-focused and ignore "ocean defenders." Hub research was integrated into recommendations to the UN System to better coordinate efforts and fill gaps in supporting ocean defenders (to be published in 2023). Findings and approaches to enhancing participation and inclusion of SSF from South Africa (notably the Coastal Justice Network approaches) will be included among good practices documented by UNEP in a website on environmental human rights defenders to be launched in 2023. In addition, this allows the Hub to bring together FAO and UNEP into a joint event during World Oceans Week 2021 to discuss directly with SSF representatives from South Africa key challenges. Towards the end of 2021, the collaboration with FAO has led to an ambitious joint programme of work to advance the human rights-based approach to small scale fisheries as part of the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries and Aquaculture in 2022 with the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. The joint programme of work advanced understanding of the multiple threats to the rights of small-scale fishers to have a voice in decisions affecting their lives, health, culture and livelihoods, and garner further support for small-scale fishers that act as environmental human rights defenders. We shared key research insights and supported small-scale fisheries representatives to speak directly about their human rights concerns in a high-level event at World Ocean Week (WOW) 2022, to the UN Special Rapporteur on Human Rights and the Environment participated. In June 2022, the Hub was invited to join the panelists of the High-level Interactive Dialogue on Fisheries at the UN Ocean Conference, and shared on that occasion the key messages from the WOW event (see report summarising key messages shared during the event here: https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/key-messages-high-level-event-on-small-scale-fishers-rights/). These were then published in late 2022 as the first joint policy brief between FAO and the UNOHCHR, together with the Hub: "Applying coherently the human rights approach to small-scale fisheries for achieving multiple Sustainable Development Goals" (Available here: https://www.fao.org/3/cc3251en/cc3251en.pdf). This joint programme of work has also furthered partnerships with various civil society organizations. WWF Accelerating Coastal Community Led Conservation Initiative for the Oceans Practice reached out to the Hub to join efforts for IYAFA, including joint events at the UN Ocean Conference in June 2022 on the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries. WWF further invited the One Ocean Hub to join: the Blue Food Alliance that aims to transform our food system to focus on health, justice, and environmental sustainability; and the SSF Network, which arose from the first SSF Summit in September 2022. In addition, Naturskyddsföreningen (Swedish Society for Nature Conservation), Blue Venture, the Too-Big-To-Ignore research programme, and the IUCN Specialist Group on People and the Ocean have approached the Hub to contribute to the programme of work for IYAFA. All these civil society partners have emphasised how crucial it is to bring clarity on the content of the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries and build the capacities of fisheries-related communities of practice to protect human rights in their work. For the official closing of IYAFA (March 2023), the FAO invited Hub Director Elisa Morgera to speak at the high-level closing event and the Empatheatre team from South Africa to perform "Listen to the Sea" immediately afterwards. FAO and the Hub also co-organized a series of hybrid events prior to the closing event: a workshop on art-based approaches to the protection of small-scale fishers' human rights in South Africa, to explore their replicability in UN and NGO projects (Wed 29th March); a hybrid training on human rights and fisheries (29th March); and a hybrid roundtable on WTO Fisheries Subsidies Agreement and small-scale fishers' human rights (31st March). On these occasions, FAO and the Hub will plan legacy activities on SSFs' human rights for the remainder of 2023, including contributing to the integration of human rights into the second SSF Summit (scheduled in 2024). To that end, the FAO facilitated collaboration between the Hub and the Fisheries Working Group of the International Planning Committee for Food Sovereignty.
Collaborator Contribution FAO supported the development of the Guidelines on Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF) and had already run a pilot regional workshop on their implementation through legislation. FAO is a member of the Executive Team of the One Ocean Hub and based on the early findings from the Hub on the need to further clarify the human rights-based approach to fisheries (Morgera and Nakamura, 2021), FAO invited the Hub to co-develop a diagnostic tool, co-organize another regional workshop in Hub countries and develop further e-learning tools. FAO provided USD 37,450 of in-kind match funding from FAO consultants to support course development. To support the planning and the organisation of the joint programme for the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries in 2022, the FAO and UNEP has also provided in-kind support, in the form of staff time. The expansion of the partnership to the High Commissioner for Human Rights is a first for the ocean community and has provided invaluable insights for the Hub researchers, and their UN and civil society partners on how to rely on the international human rights monitoring system to support small-scale fishers on the ground when governments are falling behind in implementing their international commitments. The partnership has brought together a new Hub's inter-disciplinary team that has connected research across disciplines and scales. University of Strathclyde, Law School, Nelson Mandela University, University of Cape Coast and University of Namibia provide legal expertise. Rhodes University, Cape Town University, University of Namibia and University of Cape Coast provide sociological research co-developed with small-scale fishing communities. As an inter-disciplinary and cross-scale group we made significant progress towards channelling available legal, technical and strategic international support towards ocean-dependent communities in focus countries, as well as upscaling relevant findings to benefit other ODA-recipient countries. We contributed to focusing international support on SSF according to their needs as co-identified with Hub researchers. Our cross-scale approach has also opened pathways for marshalling international support towards, indigenous peoples and coastal communities negatively affected by blue economy initiatives ("ocean defenders"), and women and children negatively affected by unsustainable uses of the ocean. Support at the international level lends cachet to local advocacy efforts and influences systemic change at the national level. We achieved this progress by developing work programmes with international partners that are active across scales (national, regional and international), forming a nested approach to pathways to the Hub's national and international impact, and by: • co-developing research from the outset with international partners; • systematically sharing early findings through partners' ongoing capacity-building activities or co-developing new capacity-building activities, to engage in direct dialogue with their beneficiary country representatives; • proactively sharing early findings that contribute to international partners' own planning and agenda-setting activities; and • strategically utilising the strength of Hub partnerships with international organisations to leverage further support towards Hub objectives from other international partners. In doing so, we have built the capacity of: • South African, Ghanaian and Namibian community representatives to engage directly in international debates, while addressing their practical constraints and other, more pressing demands on their time; • communities to participate in national policy-making processes; • researchers to engage directly with international partners, as an essential skillset for researchers who have not yet worked across scales, so they can develop meaningful cross-scale networks; and • international partners and processes to adapt their modalities to accommodate community representatives' needs.
Impact Resultant Outcomes • Book chapter: E Morgera and J Nakamura, "Shedding a Light on the Human Rights of Small-scale Fisherfolk: Complementarities and Contrasts between the UN Declaration on Peasants' Rights and the Small-Scale Fisheries Guidelines" in Brunori et al, Commentary on the Declaration on the Rights of Peasants (Routledge, 2022, available from here: https://www.taylorfrancis.com/chapters/edit/10.4324/9781003139874-7/shedding-light-human-rights-small-scale-fishers-elisa-morgera-julia-nakamura; available on SSRN since 2021: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_i d=3850133). • FAO e-learning course "Legal and policy considerations for sustainable small-scale fisheries" (published in October 2022, available from here: https://elearning.fao.org/course/view.php?id=881). • One Ocean Hub's small-scale fisheries focused webpage: https://oneoceanhub.org/iyafa/. • A joint policy brief by FAO, One Ocean Hub, and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights "Applying coherently the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries for achieving multiple Sustainable Development Goals," https://www.fao.org/3/cc3251en/cc3251en.pdf. Blogposts and other publications summarising the events and engagements. • Small-Scale Fisheries and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks, https://oneoceanhub.org/small-scale-fisheries-and-blue-justice/. • The Food and Agriculture Organization and the One Ocean Hub co-organised a workshop on sustainable small-scale fisheries law: https://oneoceanhub.org/1939-2/ • Partnering with the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights for the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries, https://oneoceanhub.org/partnering-with-the-office-of-the-high-commissioner-for-human-rights-for-the-international-year-of-artisanal-fisheries/. • The Food and Agriculture Organization and the One Ocean Hub co-organised webinar on Namibia's small-scale fisheries, https://oneoceanhub.org/the-food-and-agriculture-organization-and-the-one-ocean-hub-co-organised-webinar-on-namibias-small-scale-fisheries/ • Strengthening knowledge on national policy and law and their alignment with the Small-Scale Fisheries Guidelines, https://oneoceanhub.org/strengthening-knowledge-on-national-policy-and-law-and-their-alignment-with-the-small-scale-fisheries-guidelines/ • Opening a platform for women in Small-Scale Fisheries in Ghana, https://oneoceanhub.org/opening-a-platform-for-women-in-small-scale-fisheries-in-ghana/ • Key messages: high level event on small-scale fishers' rights https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/key-messages-high-level-event-on-small-scale-fishers-rights/ • A Seismic Shift: A coalition of fishing communities, activists and lawyers has come together to keep the coasts and oceans of South Africa free of the destructive Blue Economy agenda" in Samudra, March, No.87, pp.4-7, ISSN 0973-1121 by Jackie Sunde. https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/a-seismic-shift-a-coalition-of-fishing-communities-activists-and-lawyers-has-come-together-to-keep-the-coasts-and-oceans-of-south-africa-free-of-the-destructive-blue-economy-agenda/ • "The court has a duty to step in and protect those who are offended and the environment" judge rules in the Shell seismic survey case, https://oneoceanhub.org/the-outcome-of-the-shell-seismic-survey-case/ • Deepening partnerships with small-scale fishers in Eastern Cape, South Africa, https://oneoceanhub.org/deepening-partnerships-with-eastern-cape-small-scale-fishers-south-africa/ • "How can national human rights institutions and international human rights mechanisms support the protection of small-scale fishers' human rights?" https://oneoceanhub.org/how-can-national-human-rights-institutions-and-international-human-rights-mechanisms-support-the-protection-of-small-scale-fishers-human-rights/ Webinars • Small-Scale Fisheries and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgdbVNhHf6Q&t=2103s. • One Ocean Hub & Food and Agriculture Organization Information Sharing Sessions on Namibia's Experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries (Day 1), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hm-KkkVfAG8&t=2 4s • One Ocean Hub & Food and Agriculture Organization Information Sharing Sessions Namibia's Experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries (Day 2), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l69nH3Uh-5I&t=8 1s. • Small-scale fishers and ocean well-being, an event for the UN World Ocean Week 2021, co-organised with FAO & UNEP, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S5yOIh-4ZpU&t=3992 s • Professor Elisa Morgera and Dr Dylan McGarry presentations in for the Inaugural GNHRE-UNEP Summer/Winter School 2021 across three sessions: (1) Environmental human rights defenders at the time of the pandemic: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-environmental-defenders-in-times-of-pandemic/. (2) Participation as resistance: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-participation-as-resistance/ (3) Marine environment, marine litter and human rights: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-the-marine-environment-marine-litter-and-human-rights/ • Exploring Challenges, Opportunities and Alliances for the Protection of Small-scale Fishers' Human Rights, at UN World Ocean Week 2022, 7 June 2022, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JaBnVZQS6_o&t=768s • One Ocean Hub's three led panels for the GNHRE-UNEP Summer/Winter School 2022: (1) The human rights dimensions of oceans crimes and its impact on small scale fishers (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S8sok7blfwM); (2) Oceans, Art and Environmental Defenders (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g42I6P1kIDc); and (3) Critical Human Rights Issues at the Ocean-Climate Nexus (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yAs48HzzQ8w). • "Fostering cooperation among relevant UN bodies to advance small-scale fishers' human rights in the face of climate change" (led by the One Ocean Hub for the COP27 Virtual Ocean Pavilion), 14 November 2022, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ukGnhAro_Ic&t=6s • Hub researchers Dr Jackie Sunder and Julia Nakamura presentations at the FAO led Parallel session #4.1 - SSF-LEX: the new small-scale fisheries policy and legal database at the 4th World Small-Scale Fisheries Congress Africa, 21 November 2023, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W87bgDcgiKc. • Dialogue Series on Human Rights Actors and Fisheries "Advancing the protection of small-scale fisher rights at national and international level organised by the Danish Institute for Human Rights (DIHR), One Ocean Hub and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR): (1) the first webinar National human rights institutions: Experiences and Potential for Addressing the Human Rights of small-scale fishers, fish workers and their communities, 1 February 2023. (https://youtu.be/O4MyETHEkdk) and (2) the second webinar Protecting the human rights of small-scale fishers through international human rights mechanisms (https://youtu.be/l9kbB3wXt6c). Video outputs • Photo-story: Small-scale fishers and human rights, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DhqzgSCjfug. • Ocean & Women, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDCyjRznGEA. • Indigenous Peoples and the Ocean, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kRzNMXiAz7I. • Ocean Connections: A Virtual Multimedia Exhibition, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AsavQOxyLFw&t=579s. • Ocean Connections Project Video, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-499UAZC3d0. • Defenders of the Ocean, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=agb9LCYhmWY.
Start Year 2021
 
Description BETTER PROTECTING SMALL-SCALE FISHERS' HUMAN RIGHTS ACROSS SCALES 
Organisation Environmental Justice Foundation
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This partnership began in 2021 through the FAO existing programme to support national implementation of the FAO Guidelines on Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF) through national legislation. To support this, One Ocean Hub co-hosted with FAO regional workshops with government, community, research, and NGO representation from Ghana, Namibia, South Africa, to identify legislative barriers to the implementation of the FAO voluntary SSF guidelines in each country, thereby contributing to national research, while co-developing a global instrument, the FAO SSF Policy and Legal diagnostic tool in April 2021. Co-design of the regional workshop with South African researchers involved in the Coastal Justice Network allowed FAO to shift from a top-down approach that focused on discussing what international law requires from governments to an approach informed by local context, and responds to specific needs of SSF, through international law when national law falls short. Hub researchers facilitated SSF representatives' direct participation in the workshop in varied ways, including voice or video messages that communicated their priorities. SSF and government representatives, as well as non-legal researchers were made aware of how international law is (or is not) applied in the context of South Africa, Ghana and Namibia. This is now informing planning of further inter-disciplinary research that will guide strategies on partnerships with governments and SSF in Ghana. In addition, this regional event led to a follow-up event specifically for Namibia, in collaboration with the FAO, the Hub and the Ministry for Fisheries and Marine Resources (MFMR) Namibia. The webinar series organised on 10-11 June 2021 was titled 'Namibia's experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries.' It was aimed at providing the evidence required to support the process for the development of a National Plan of Action for Small-Scale Fisheries in Namibia, which the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources, which was published in 2022 as part of its commitment to implement the FAO SSF Guidelines. The workshop provided an opportunity to integrate the early research findings from the One Ocean Hub into the process for the development of a National Plan of Action for Small-Scale Fisheries in Namibia, notably with regard to the inclusion of the views of indigenous communities that have been displaced from the coast (Topnaar). This event led to an invitation for nominations for two experts to sit on Namibia's national task force on SSF (upon acceptance by the Ministry of Fisheries). The key research findings that were shared with FAO focused on the approaches to: • redress marginalisation of previously disadvantaged communities including those that have been historically removed from the coast e.g. the Topnaar community), and • address the diverse capacity-building needs of different stakeholder groups that are expected to benefit from or contribute to implementation (SSF associations, SSF women and youth, town councils, NGOs, and primary schools). In addition, FAO invited the Hub to co-develop two e-learning courses on implementation of the FAO Guidelines on SSF to be housed on the FAO E-learning Academy website (https://elearning.fao.org/). The courses are meant to respond to government officers' and fishers' needs respectively, to implement the FAO Guidelines. The latter will allow SSF to obtain an international certification on the FAO E-learning Academy that contributes to their professional development and recognition of SSF. Two papers by Hub colleagues in Ghana and South Africa were integrated as case studies in the first FAO e-learning course on SSF law and policy (in additions to insights arising from the joint Hub-FAO workshops). A new e-learning course will be co-developed in 2023 with a view to directly addressing the question and challenges of small-scale fishers in invoking international law and human rights in their daily interactions with authorities and other stakeholders, based on Hub partnerships with small-scale fishing organizations in Namibia, Ghana and South Africa. Meanwhile, the Hub shared some of these research findings and innovative methodologies for collaborating and supporting SSF with UNEP, in the context of a UN Global and African consultations on environmental human rights defenders. This contributing to the UN recognising SSF, indigenous peoples and local communities negatively affected by blue economy initiatives as "environmental human rights defenders" (defined by the United Nations as individuals and communities that raise awareness about the negative impacts on human rights of unsustainable decisions on the environment, who are increasingly the object of (often lethal) attacks by governments or private companies), which addressed a blind spot in current international initiatives that are land-focused and ignore "ocean defenders." Hub research was integrated into recommendations to the UN System to better coordinate efforts and fill gaps in supporting ocean defenders (to be published in 2023). Findings and approaches to enhancing participation and inclusion of SSF from South Africa (notably the Coastal Justice Network approaches) will be included among good practices documented by UNEP in a website on environmental human rights defenders to be launched in 2023. In addition, this allows the Hub to bring together FAO and UNEP into a joint event during World Oceans Week 2021 to discuss directly with SSF representatives from South Africa key challenges. Towards the end of 2021, the collaboration with FAO has led to an ambitious joint programme of work to advance the human rights-based approach to small scale fisheries as part of the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries and Aquaculture in 2022 with the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. The joint programme of work advanced understanding of the multiple threats to the rights of small-scale fishers to have a voice in decisions affecting their lives, health, culture and livelihoods, and garner further support for small-scale fishers that act as environmental human rights defenders. We shared key research insights and supported small-scale fisheries representatives to speak directly about their human rights concerns in a high-level event at World Ocean Week (WOW) 2022, to the UN Special Rapporteur on Human Rights and the Environment participated. In June 2022, the Hub was invited to join the panelists of the High-level Interactive Dialogue on Fisheries at the UN Ocean Conference, and shared on that occasion the key messages from the WOW event (see report summarising key messages shared during the event here: https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/key-messages-high-level-event-on-small-scale-fishers-rights/). These were then published in late 2022 as the first joint policy brief between FAO and the UNOHCHR, together with the Hub: "Applying coherently the human rights approach to small-scale fisheries for achieving multiple Sustainable Development Goals" (Available here: https://www.fao.org/3/cc3251en/cc3251en.pdf). This joint programme of work has also furthered partnerships with various civil society organizations. WWF Accelerating Coastal Community Led Conservation Initiative for the Oceans Practice reached out to the Hub to join efforts for IYAFA, including joint events at the UN Ocean Conference in June 2022 on the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries. WWF further invited the One Ocean Hub to join: the Blue Food Alliance that aims to transform our food system to focus on health, justice, and environmental sustainability; and the SSF Network, which arose from the first SSF Summit in September 2022. In addition, Naturskyddsföreningen (Swedish Society for Nature Conservation), Blue Venture, the Too-Big-To-Ignore research programme, and the IUCN Specialist Group on People and the Ocean have approached the Hub to contribute to the programme of work for IYAFA. All these civil society partners have emphasised how crucial it is to bring clarity on the content of the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries and build the capacities of fisheries-related communities of practice to protect human rights in their work. For the official closing of IYAFA (March 2023), the FAO invited Hub Director Elisa Morgera to speak at the high-level closing event and the Empatheatre team from South Africa to perform "Listen to the Sea" immediately afterwards. FAO and the Hub also co-organized a series of hybrid events prior to the closing event: a workshop on art-based approaches to the protection of small-scale fishers' human rights in South Africa, to explore their replicability in UN and NGO projects (Wed 29th March); a hybrid training on human rights and fisheries (29th March); and a hybrid roundtable on WTO Fisheries Subsidies Agreement and small-scale fishers' human rights (31st March). On these occasions, FAO and the Hub will plan legacy activities on SSFs' human rights for the remainder of 2023, including contributing to the integration of human rights into the second SSF Summit (scheduled in 2024). To that end, the FAO facilitated collaboration between the Hub and the Fisheries Working Group of the International Planning Committee for Food Sovereignty.
Collaborator Contribution FAO supported the development of the Guidelines on Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF) and had already run a pilot regional workshop on their implementation through legislation. FAO is a member of the Executive Team of the One Ocean Hub and based on the early findings from the Hub on the need to further clarify the human rights-based approach to fisheries (Morgera and Nakamura, 2021), FAO invited the Hub to co-develop a diagnostic tool, co-organize another regional workshop in Hub countries and develop further e-learning tools. FAO provided USD 37,450 of in-kind match funding from FAO consultants to support course development. To support the planning and the organisation of the joint programme for the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries in 2022, the FAO and UNEP has also provided in-kind support, in the form of staff time. The expansion of the partnership to the High Commissioner for Human Rights is a first for the ocean community and has provided invaluable insights for the Hub researchers, and their UN and civil society partners on how to rely on the international human rights monitoring system to support small-scale fishers on the ground when governments are falling behind in implementing their international commitments. The partnership has brought together a new Hub's inter-disciplinary team that has connected research across disciplines and scales. University of Strathclyde, Law School, Nelson Mandela University, University of Cape Coast and University of Namibia provide legal expertise. Rhodes University, Cape Town University, University of Namibia and University of Cape Coast provide sociological research co-developed with small-scale fishing communities. As an inter-disciplinary and cross-scale group we made significant progress towards channelling available legal, technical and strategic international support towards ocean-dependent communities in focus countries, as well as upscaling relevant findings to benefit other ODA-recipient countries. We contributed to focusing international support on SSF according to their needs as co-identified with Hub researchers. Our cross-scale approach has also opened pathways for marshalling international support towards, indigenous peoples and coastal communities negatively affected by blue economy initiatives ("ocean defenders"), and women and children negatively affected by unsustainable uses of the ocean. Support at the international level lends cachet to local advocacy efforts and influences systemic change at the national level. We achieved this progress by developing work programmes with international partners that are active across scales (national, regional and international), forming a nested approach to pathways to the Hub's national and international impact, and by: • co-developing research from the outset with international partners; • systematically sharing early findings through partners' ongoing capacity-building activities or co-developing new capacity-building activities, to engage in direct dialogue with their beneficiary country representatives; • proactively sharing early findings that contribute to international partners' own planning and agenda-setting activities; and • strategically utilising the strength of Hub partnerships with international organisations to leverage further support towards Hub objectives from other international partners. In doing so, we have built the capacity of: • South African, Ghanaian and Namibian community representatives to engage directly in international debates, while addressing their practical constraints and other, more pressing demands on their time; • communities to participate in national policy-making processes; • researchers to engage directly with international partners, as an essential skillset for researchers who have not yet worked across scales, so they can develop meaningful cross-scale networks; and • international partners and processes to adapt their modalities to accommodate community representatives' needs.
Impact Resultant Outcomes • Book chapter: E Morgera and J Nakamura, "Shedding a Light on the Human Rights of Small-scale Fisherfolk: Complementarities and Contrasts between the UN Declaration on Peasants' Rights and the Small-Scale Fisheries Guidelines" in Brunori et al, Commentary on the Declaration on the Rights of Peasants (Routledge, 2022, available from here: https://www.taylorfrancis.com/chapters/edit/10.4324/9781003139874-7/shedding-light-human-rights-small-scale-fishers-elisa-morgera-julia-nakamura; available on SSRN since 2021: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_i d=3850133). • FAO e-learning course "Legal and policy considerations for sustainable small-scale fisheries" (published in October 2022, available from here: https://elearning.fao.org/course/view.php?id=881). • One Ocean Hub's small-scale fisheries focused webpage: https://oneoceanhub.org/iyafa/. • A joint policy brief by FAO, One Ocean Hub, and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights "Applying coherently the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries for achieving multiple Sustainable Development Goals," https://www.fao.org/3/cc3251en/cc3251en.pdf. Blogposts and other publications summarising the events and engagements. • Small-Scale Fisheries and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks, https://oneoceanhub.org/small-scale-fisheries-and-blue-justice/. • The Food and Agriculture Organization and the One Ocean Hub co-organised a workshop on sustainable small-scale fisheries law: https://oneoceanhub.org/1939-2/ • Partnering with the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights for the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries, https://oneoceanhub.org/partnering-with-the-office-of-the-high-commissioner-for-human-rights-for-the-international-year-of-artisanal-fisheries/. • The Food and Agriculture Organization and the One Ocean Hub co-organised webinar on Namibia's small-scale fisheries, https://oneoceanhub.org/the-food-and-agriculture-organization-and-the-one-ocean-hub-co-organised-webinar-on-namibias-small-scale-fisheries/ • Strengthening knowledge on national policy and law and their alignment with the Small-Scale Fisheries Guidelines, https://oneoceanhub.org/strengthening-knowledge-on-national-policy-and-law-and-their-alignment-with-the-small-scale-fisheries-guidelines/ • Opening a platform for women in Small-Scale Fisheries in Ghana, https://oneoceanhub.org/opening-a-platform-for-women-in-small-scale-fisheries-in-ghana/ • Key messages: high level event on small-scale fishers' rights https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/key-messages-high-level-event-on-small-scale-fishers-rights/ • A Seismic Shift: A coalition of fishing communities, activists and lawyers has come together to keep the coasts and oceans of South Africa free of the destructive Blue Economy agenda" in Samudra, March, No.87, pp.4-7, ISSN 0973-1121 by Jackie Sunde. https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/a-seismic-shift-a-coalition-of-fishing-communities-activists-and-lawyers-has-come-together-to-keep-the-coasts-and-oceans-of-south-africa-free-of-the-destructive-blue-economy-agenda/ • "The court has a duty to step in and protect those who are offended and the environment" judge rules in the Shell seismic survey case, https://oneoceanhub.org/the-outcome-of-the-shell-seismic-survey-case/ • Deepening partnerships with small-scale fishers in Eastern Cape, South Africa, https://oneoceanhub.org/deepening-partnerships-with-eastern-cape-small-scale-fishers-south-africa/ • "How can national human rights institutions and international human rights mechanisms support the protection of small-scale fishers' human rights?" https://oneoceanhub.org/how-can-national-human-rights-institutions-and-international-human-rights-mechanisms-support-the-protection-of-small-scale-fishers-human-rights/ Webinars • Small-Scale Fisheries and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgdbVNhHf6Q&t=2103s. • One Ocean Hub & Food and Agriculture Organization Information Sharing Sessions on Namibia's Experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries (Day 1), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hm-KkkVfAG8&t=2 4s • One Ocean Hub & Food and Agriculture Organization Information Sharing Sessions Namibia's Experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries (Day 2), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l69nH3Uh-5I&t=8 1s. • Small-scale fishers and ocean well-being, an event for the UN World Ocean Week 2021, co-organised with FAO & UNEP, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S5yOIh-4ZpU&t=3992 s • Professor Elisa Morgera and Dr Dylan McGarry presentations in for the Inaugural GNHRE-UNEP Summer/Winter School 2021 across three sessions: (1) Environmental human rights defenders at the time of the pandemic: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-environmental-defenders-in-times-of-pandemic/. (2) Participation as resistance: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-participation-as-resistance/ (3) Marine environment, marine litter and human rights: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-the-marine-environment-marine-litter-and-human-rights/ • Exploring Challenges, Opportunities and Alliances for the Protection of Small-scale Fishers' Human Rights, at UN World Ocean Week 2022, 7 June 2022, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JaBnVZQS6_o&t=768s • One Ocean Hub's three led panels for the GNHRE-UNEP Summer/Winter School 2022: (1) The human rights dimensions of oceans crimes and its impact on small scale fishers (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S8sok7blfwM); (2) Oceans, Art and Environmental Defenders (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g42I6P1kIDc); and (3) Critical Human Rights Issues at the Ocean-Climate Nexus (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yAs48HzzQ8w). • "Fostering cooperation among relevant UN bodies to advance small-scale fishers' human rights in the face of climate change" (led by the One Ocean Hub for the COP27 Virtual Ocean Pavilion), 14 November 2022, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ukGnhAro_Ic&t=6s • Hub researchers Dr Jackie Sunder and Julia Nakamura presentations at the FAO led Parallel session #4.1 - SSF-LEX: the new small-scale fisheries policy and legal database at the 4th World Small-Scale Fisheries Congress Africa, 21 November 2023, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W87bgDcgiKc. • Dialogue Series on Human Rights Actors and Fisheries "Advancing the protection of small-scale fisher rights at national and international level organised by the Danish Institute for Human Rights (DIHR), One Ocean Hub and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR): (1) the first webinar National human rights institutions: Experiences and Potential for Addressing the Human Rights of small-scale fishers, fish workers and their communities, 1 February 2023. (https://youtu.be/O4MyETHEkdk) and (2) the second webinar Protecting the human rights of small-scale fishers through international human rights mechanisms (https://youtu.be/l9kbB3wXt6c). Video outputs • Photo-story: Small-scale fishers and human rights, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DhqzgSCjfug. • Ocean & Women, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDCyjRznGEA. • Indigenous Peoples and the Ocean, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kRzNMXiAz7I. • Ocean Connections: A Virtual Multimedia Exhibition, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AsavQOxyLFw&t=579s. • Ocean Connections Project Video, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-499UAZC3d0. • Defenders of the Ocean, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=agb9LCYhmWY.
Start Year 2021
 
Description BETTER PROTECTING SMALL-SCALE FISHERS' HUMAN RIGHTS ACROSS SCALES 
Organisation IUCN, International Union for Conservation of Nature
Country Switzerland 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This partnership began in 2021 through the FAO existing programme to support national implementation of the FAO Guidelines on Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF) through national legislation. To support this, One Ocean Hub co-hosted with FAO regional workshops with government, community, research, and NGO representation from Ghana, Namibia, South Africa, to identify legislative barriers to the implementation of the FAO voluntary SSF guidelines in each country, thereby contributing to national research, while co-developing a global instrument, the FAO SSF Policy and Legal diagnostic tool in April 2021. Co-design of the regional workshop with South African researchers involved in the Coastal Justice Network allowed FAO to shift from a top-down approach that focused on discussing what international law requires from governments to an approach informed by local context, and responds to specific needs of SSF, through international law when national law falls short. Hub researchers facilitated SSF representatives' direct participation in the workshop in varied ways, including voice or video messages that communicated their priorities. SSF and government representatives, as well as non-legal researchers were made aware of how international law is (or is not) applied in the context of South Africa, Ghana and Namibia. This is now informing planning of further inter-disciplinary research that will guide strategies on partnerships with governments and SSF in Ghana. In addition, this regional event led to a follow-up event specifically for Namibia, in collaboration with the FAO, the Hub and the Ministry for Fisheries and Marine Resources (MFMR) Namibia. The webinar series organised on 10-11 June 2021 was titled 'Namibia's experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries.' It was aimed at providing the evidence required to support the process for the development of a National Plan of Action for Small-Scale Fisheries in Namibia, which the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources, which was published in 2022 as part of its commitment to implement the FAO SSF Guidelines. The workshop provided an opportunity to integrate the early research findings from the One Ocean Hub into the process for the development of a National Plan of Action for Small-Scale Fisheries in Namibia, notably with regard to the inclusion of the views of indigenous communities that have been displaced from the coast (Topnaar). This event led to an invitation for nominations for two experts to sit on Namibia's national task force on SSF (upon acceptance by the Ministry of Fisheries). The key research findings that were shared with FAO focused on the approaches to: • redress marginalisation of previously disadvantaged communities including those that have been historically removed from the coast e.g. the Topnaar community), and • address the diverse capacity-building needs of different stakeholder groups that are expected to benefit from or contribute to implementation (SSF associations, SSF women and youth, town councils, NGOs, and primary schools). In addition, FAO invited the Hub to co-develop two e-learning courses on implementation of the FAO Guidelines on SSF to be housed on the FAO E-learning Academy website (https://elearning.fao.org/). The courses are meant to respond to government officers' and fishers' needs respectively, to implement the FAO Guidelines. The latter will allow SSF to obtain an international certification on the FAO E-learning Academy that contributes to their professional development and recognition of SSF. Two papers by Hub colleagues in Ghana and South Africa were integrated as case studies in the first FAO e-learning course on SSF law and policy (in additions to insights arising from the joint Hub-FAO workshops). A new e-learning course will be co-developed in 2023 with a view to directly addressing the question and challenges of small-scale fishers in invoking international law and human rights in their daily interactions with authorities and other stakeholders, based on Hub partnerships with small-scale fishing organizations in Namibia, Ghana and South Africa. Meanwhile, the Hub shared some of these research findings and innovative methodologies for collaborating and supporting SSF with UNEP, in the context of a UN Global and African consultations on environmental human rights defenders. This contributing to the UN recognising SSF, indigenous peoples and local communities negatively affected by blue economy initiatives as "environmental human rights defenders" (defined by the United Nations as individuals and communities that raise awareness about the negative impacts on human rights of unsustainable decisions on the environment, who are increasingly the object of (often lethal) attacks by governments or private companies), which addressed a blind spot in current international initiatives that are land-focused and ignore "ocean defenders." Hub research was integrated into recommendations to the UN System to better coordinate efforts and fill gaps in supporting ocean defenders (to be published in 2023). Findings and approaches to enhancing participation and inclusion of SSF from South Africa (notably the Coastal Justice Network approaches) will be included among good practices documented by UNEP in a website on environmental human rights defenders to be launched in 2023. In addition, this allows the Hub to bring together FAO and UNEP into a joint event during World Oceans Week 2021 to discuss directly with SSF representatives from South Africa key challenges. Towards the end of 2021, the collaboration with FAO has led to an ambitious joint programme of work to advance the human rights-based approach to small scale fisheries as part of the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries and Aquaculture in 2022 with the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. The joint programme of work advanced understanding of the multiple threats to the rights of small-scale fishers to have a voice in decisions affecting their lives, health, culture and livelihoods, and garner further support for small-scale fishers that act as environmental human rights defenders. We shared key research insights and supported small-scale fisheries representatives to speak directly about their human rights concerns in a high-level event at World Ocean Week (WOW) 2022, to the UN Special Rapporteur on Human Rights and the Environment participated. In June 2022, the Hub was invited to join the panelists of the High-level Interactive Dialogue on Fisheries at the UN Ocean Conference, and shared on that occasion the key messages from the WOW event (see report summarising key messages shared during the event here: https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/key-messages-high-level-event-on-small-scale-fishers-rights/). These were then published in late 2022 as the first joint policy brief between FAO and the UNOHCHR, together with the Hub: "Applying coherently the human rights approach to small-scale fisheries for achieving multiple Sustainable Development Goals" (Available here: https://www.fao.org/3/cc3251en/cc3251en.pdf). This joint programme of work has also furthered partnerships with various civil society organizations. WWF Accelerating Coastal Community Led Conservation Initiative for the Oceans Practice reached out to the Hub to join efforts for IYAFA, including joint events at the UN Ocean Conference in June 2022 on the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries. WWF further invited the One Ocean Hub to join: the Blue Food Alliance that aims to transform our food system to focus on health, justice, and environmental sustainability; and the SSF Network, which arose from the first SSF Summit in September 2022. In addition, Naturskyddsföreningen (Swedish Society for Nature Conservation), Blue Venture, the Too-Big-To-Ignore research programme, and the IUCN Specialist Group on People and the Ocean have approached the Hub to contribute to the programme of work for IYAFA. All these civil society partners have emphasised how crucial it is to bring clarity on the content of the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries and build the capacities of fisheries-related communities of practice to protect human rights in their work. For the official closing of IYAFA (March 2023), the FAO invited Hub Director Elisa Morgera to speak at the high-level closing event and the Empatheatre team from South Africa to perform "Listen to the Sea" immediately afterwards. FAO and the Hub also co-organized a series of hybrid events prior to the closing event: a workshop on art-based approaches to the protection of small-scale fishers' human rights in South Africa, to explore their replicability in UN and NGO projects (Wed 29th March); a hybrid training on human rights and fisheries (29th March); and a hybrid roundtable on WTO Fisheries Subsidies Agreement and small-scale fishers' human rights (31st March). On these occasions, FAO and the Hub will plan legacy activities on SSFs' human rights for the remainder of 2023, including contributing to the integration of human rights into the second SSF Summit (scheduled in 2024). To that end, the FAO facilitated collaboration between the Hub and the Fisheries Working Group of the International Planning Committee for Food Sovereignty.
Collaborator Contribution FAO supported the development of the Guidelines on Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF) and had already run a pilot regional workshop on their implementation through legislation. FAO is a member of the Executive Team of the One Ocean Hub and based on the early findings from the Hub on the need to further clarify the human rights-based approach to fisheries (Morgera and Nakamura, 2021), FAO invited the Hub to co-develop a diagnostic tool, co-organize another regional workshop in Hub countries and develop further e-learning tools. FAO provided USD 37,450 of in-kind match funding from FAO consultants to support course development. To support the planning and the organisation of the joint programme for the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries in 2022, the FAO and UNEP has also provided in-kind support, in the form of staff time. The expansion of the partnership to the High Commissioner for Human Rights is a first for the ocean community and has provided invaluable insights for the Hub researchers, and their UN and civil society partners on how to rely on the international human rights monitoring system to support small-scale fishers on the ground when governments are falling behind in implementing their international commitments. The partnership has brought together a new Hub's inter-disciplinary team that has connected research across disciplines and scales. University of Strathclyde, Law School, Nelson Mandela University, University of Cape Coast and University of Namibia provide legal expertise. Rhodes University, Cape Town University, University of Namibia and University of Cape Coast provide sociological research co-developed with small-scale fishing communities. As an inter-disciplinary and cross-scale group we made significant progress towards channelling available legal, technical and strategic international support towards ocean-dependent communities in focus countries, as well as upscaling relevant findings to benefit other ODA-recipient countries. We contributed to focusing international support on SSF according to their needs as co-identified with Hub researchers. Our cross-scale approach has also opened pathways for marshalling international support towards, indigenous peoples and coastal communities negatively affected by blue economy initiatives ("ocean defenders"), and women and children negatively affected by unsustainable uses of the ocean. Support at the international level lends cachet to local advocacy efforts and influences systemic change at the national level. We achieved this progress by developing work programmes with international partners that are active across scales (national, regional and international), forming a nested approach to pathways to the Hub's national and international impact, and by: • co-developing research from the outset with international partners; • systematically sharing early findings through partners' ongoing capacity-building activities or co-developing new capacity-building activities, to engage in direct dialogue with their beneficiary country representatives; • proactively sharing early findings that contribute to international partners' own planning and agenda-setting activities; and • strategically utilising the strength of Hub partnerships with international organisations to leverage further support towards Hub objectives from other international partners. In doing so, we have built the capacity of: • South African, Ghanaian and Namibian community representatives to engage directly in international debates, while addressing their practical constraints and other, more pressing demands on their time; • communities to participate in national policy-making processes; • researchers to engage directly with international partners, as an essential skillset for researchers who have not yet worked across scales, so they can develop meaningful cross-scale networks; and • international partners and processes to adapt their modalities to accommodate community representatives' needs.
Impact Resultant Outcomes • Book chapter: E Morgera and J Nakamura, "Shedding a Light on the Human Rights of Small-scale Fisherfolk: Complementarities and Contrasts between the UN Declaration on Peasants' Rights and the Small-Scale Fisheries Guidelines" in Brunori et al, Commentary on the Declaration on the Rights of Peasants (Routledge, 2022, available from here: https://www.taylorfrancis.com/chapters/edit/10.4324/9781003139874-7/shedding-light-human-rights-small-scale-fishers-elisa-morgera-julia-nakamura; available on SSRN since 2021: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_i d=3850133). • FAO e-learning course "Legal and policy considerations for sustainable small-scale fisheries" (published in October 2022, available from here: https://elearning.fao.org/course/view.php?id=881). • One Ocean Hub's small-scale fisheries focused webpage: https://oneoceanhub.org/iyafa/. • A joint policy brief by FAO, One Ocean Hub, and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights "Applying coherently the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries for achieving multiple Sustainable Development Goals," https://www.fao.org/3/cc3251en/cc3251en.pdf. Blogposts and other publications summarising the events and engagements. • Small-Scale Fisheries and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks, https://oneoceanhub.org/small-scale-fisheries-and-blue-justice/. • The Food and Agriculture Organization and the One Ocean Hub co-organised a workshop on sustainable small-scale fisheries law: https://oneoceanhub.org/1939-2/ • Partnering with the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights for the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries, https://oneoceanhub.org/partnering-with-the-office-of-the-high-commissioner-for-human-rights-for-the-international-year-of-artisanal-fisheries/. • The Food and Agriculture Organization and the One Ocean Hub co-organised webinar on Namibia's small-scale fisheries, https://oneoceanhub.org/the-food-and-agriculture-organization-and-the-one-ocean-hub-co-organised-webinar-on-namibias-small-scale-fisheries/ • Strengthening knowledge on national policy and law and their alignment with the Small-Scale Fisheries Guidelines, https://oneoceanhub.org/strengthening-knowledge-on-national-policy-and-law-and-their-alignment-with-the-small-scale-fisheries-guidelines/ • Opening a platform for women in Small-Scale Fisheries in Ghana, https://oneoceanhub.org/opening-a-platform-for-women-in-small-scale-fisheries-in-ghana/ • Key messages: high level event on small-scale fishers' rights https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/key-messages-high-level-event-on-small-scale-fishers-rights/ • A Seismic Shift: A coalition of fishing communities, activists and lawyers has come together to keep the coasts and oceans of South Africa free of the destructive Blue Economy agenda" in Samudra, March, No.87, pp.4-7, ISSN 0973-1121 by Jackie Sunde. https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/a-seismic-shift-a-coalition-of-fishing-communities-activists-and-lawyers-has-come-together-to-keep-the-coasts-and-oceans-of-south-africa-free-of-the-destructive-blue-economy-agenda/ • "The court has a duty to step in and protect those who are offended and the environment" judge rules in the Shell seismic survey case, https://oneoceanhub.org/the-outcome-of-the-shell-seismic-survey-case/ • Deepening partnerships with small-scale fishers in Eastern Cape, South Africa, https://oneoceanhub.org/deepening-partnerships-with-eastern-cape-small-scale-fishers-south-africa/ • "How can national human rights institutions and international human rights mechanisms support the protection of small-scale fishers' human rights?" https://oneoceanhub.org/how-can-national-human-rights-institutions-and-international-human-rights-mechanisms-support-the-protection-of-small-scale-fishers-human-rights/ Webinars • Small-Scale Fisheries and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgdbVNhHf6Q&t=2103s. • One Ocean Hub & Food and Agriculture Organization Information Sharing Sessions on Namibia's Experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries (Day 1), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hm-KkkVfAG8&t=2 4s • One Ocean Hub & Food and Agriculture Organization Information Sharing Sessions Namibia's Experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries (Day 2), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l69nH3Uh-5I&t=8 1s. • Small-scale fishers and ocean well-being, an event for the UN World Ocean Week 2021, co-organised with FAO & UNEP, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S5yOIh-4ZpU&t=3992 s • Professor Elisa Morgera and Dr Dylan McGarry presentations in for the Inaugural GNHRE-UNEP Summer/Winter School 2021 across three sessions: (1) Environmental human rights defenders at the time of the pandemic: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-environmental-defenders-in-times-of-pandemic/. (2) Participation as resistance: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-participation-as-resistance/ (3) Marine environment, marine litter and human rights: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-the-marine-environment-marine-litter-and-human-rights/ • Exploring Challenges, Opportunities and Alliances for the Protection of Small-scale Fishers' Human Rights, at UN World Ocean Week 2022, 7 June 2022, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JaBnVZQS6_o&t=768s • One Ocean Hub's three led panels for the GNHRE-UNEP Summer/Winter School 2022: (1) The human rights dimensions of oceans crimes and its impact on small scale fishers (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S8sok7blfwM); (2) Oceans, Art and Environmental Defenders (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g42I6P1kIDc); and (3) Critical Human Rights Issues at the Ocean-Climate Nexus (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yAs48HzzQ8w). • "Fostering cooperation among relevant UN bodies to advance small-scale fishers' human rights in the face of climate change" (led by the One Ocean Hub for the COP27 Virtual Ocean Pavilion), 14 November 2022, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ukGnhAro_Ic&t=6s • Hub researchers Dr Jackie Sunder and Julia Nakamura presentations at the FAO led Parallel session #4.1 - SSF-LEX: the new small-scale fisheries policy and legal database at the 4th World Small-Scale Fisheries Congress Africa, 21 November 2023, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W87bgDcgiKc. • Dialogue Series on Human Rights Actors and Fisheries "Advancing the protection of small-scale fisher rights at national and international level organised by the Danish Institute for Human Rights (DIHR), One Ocean Hub and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR): (1) the first webinar National human rights institutions: Experiences and Potential for Addressing the Human Rights of small-scale fishers, fish workers and their communities, 1 February 2023. (https://youtu.be/O4MyETHEkdk) and (2) the second webinar Protecting the human rights of small-scale fishers through international human rights mechanisms (https://youtu.be/l9kbB3wXt6c). Video outputs • Photo-story: Small-scale fishers and human rights, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DhqzgSCjfug. • Ocean & Women, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDCyjRznGEA. • Indigenous Peoples and the Ocean, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kRzNMXiAz7I. • Ocean Connections: A Virtual Multimedia Exhibition, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AsavQOxyLFw&t=579s. • Ocean Connections Project Video, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-499UAZC3d0. • Defenders of the Ocean, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=agb9LCYhmWY.
Start Year 2021
 
Description BETTER PROTECTING SMALL-SCALE FISHERS' HUMAN RIGHTS ACROSS SCALES 
Organisation Nelson Mandela University
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This partnership began in 2021 through the FAO existing programme to support national implementation of the FAO Guidelines on Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF) through national legislation. To support this, One Ocean Hub co-hosted with FAO regional workshops with government, community, research, and NGO representation from Ghana, Namibia, South Africa, to identify legislative barriers to the implementation of the FAO voluntary SSF guidelines in each country, thereby contributing to national research, while co-developing a global instrument, the FAO SSF Policy and Legal diagnostic tool in April 2021. Co-design of the regional workshop with South African researchers involved in the Coastal Justice Network allowed FAO to shift from a top-down approach that focused on discussing what international law requires from governments to an approach informed by local context, and responds to specific needs of SSF, through international law when national law falls short. Hub researchers facilitated SSF representatives' direct participation in the workshop in varied ways, including voice or video messages that communicated their priorities. SSF and government representatives, as well as non-legal researchers were made aware of how international law is (or is not) applied in the context of South Africa, Ghana and Namibia. This is now informing planning of further inter-disciplinary research that will guide strategies on partnerships with governments and SSF in Ghana. In addition, this regional event led to a follow-up event specifically for Namibia, in collaboration with the FAO, the Hub and the Ministry for Fisheries and Marine Resources (MFMR) Namibia. The webinar series organised on 10-11 June 2021 was titled 'Namibia's experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries.' It was aimed at providing the evidence required to support the process for the development of a National Plan of Action for Small-Scale Fisheries in Namibia, which the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources, which was published in 2022 as part of its commitment to implement the FAO SSF Guidelines. The workshop provided an opportunity to integrate the early research findings from the One Ocean Hub into the process for the development of a National Plan of Action for Small-Scale Fisheries in Namibia, notably with regard to the inclusion of the views of indigenous communities that have been displaced from the coast (Topnaar). This event led to an invitation for nominations for two experts to sit on Namibia's national task force on SSF (upon acceptance by the Ministry of Fisheries). The key research findings that were shared with FAO focused on the approaches to: • redress marginalisation of previously disadvantaged communities including those that have been historically removed from the coast e.g. the Topnaar community), and • address the diverse capacity-building needs of different stakeholder groups that are expected to benefit from or contribute to implementation (SSF associations, SSF women and youth, town councils, NGOs, and primary schools). In addition, FAO invited the Hub to co-develop two e-learning courses on implementation of the FAO Guidelines on SSF to be housed on the FAO E-learning Academy website (https://elearning.fao.org/). The courses are meant to respond to government officers' and fishers' needs respectively, to implement the FAO Guidelines. The latter will allow SSF to obtain an international certification on the FAO E-learning Academy that contributes to their professional development and recognition of SSF. Two papers by Hub colleagues in Ghana and South Africa were integrated as case studies in the first FAO e-learning course on SSF law and policy (in additions to insights arising from the joint Hub-FAO workshops). A new e-learning course will be co-developed in 2023 with a view to directly addressing the question and challenges of small-scale fishers in invoking international law and human rights in their daily interactions with authorities and other stakeholders, based on Hub partnerships with small-scale fishing organizations in Namibia, Ghana and South Africa. Meanwhile, the Hub shared some of these research findings and innovative methodologies for collaborating and supporting SSF with UNEP, in the context of a UN Global and African consultations on environmental human rights defenders. This contributing to the UN recognising SSF, indigenous peoples and local communities negatively affected by blue economy initiatives as "environmental human rights defenders" (defined by the United Nations as individuals and communities that raise awareness about the negative impacts on human rights of unsustainable decisions on the environment, who are increasingly the object of (often lethal) attacks by governments or private companies), which addressed a blind spot in current international initiatives that are land-focused and ignore "ocean defenders." Hub research was integrated into recommendations to the UN System to better coordinate efforts and fill gaps in supporting ocean defenders (to be published in 2023). Findings and approaches to enhancing participation and inclusion of SSF from South Africa (notably the Coastal Justice Network approaches) will be included among good practices documented by UNEP in a website on environmental human rights defenders to be launched in 2023. In addition, this allows the Hub to bring together FAO and UNEP into a joint event during World Oceans Week 2021 to discuss directly with SSF representatives from South Africa key challenges. Towards the end of 2021, the collaboration with FAO has led to an ambitious joint programme of work to advance the human rights-based approach to small scale fisheries as part of the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries and Aquaculture in 2022 with the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. The joint programme of work advanced understanding of the multiple threats to the rights of small-scale fishers to have a voice in decisions affecting their lives, health, culture and livelihoods, and garner further support for small-scale fishers that act as environmental human rights defenders. We shared key research insights and supported small-scale fisheries representatives to speak directly about their human rights concerns in a high-level event at World Ocean Week (WOW) 2022, to the UN Special Rapporteur on Human Rights and the Environment participated. In June 2022, the Hub was invited to join the panelists of the High-level Interactive Dialogue on Fisheries at the UN Ocean Conference, and shared on that occasion the key messages from the WOW event (see report summarising key messages shared during the event here: https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/key-messages-high-level-event-on-small-scale-fishers-rights/). These were then published in late 2022 as the first joint policy brief between FAO and the UNOHCHR, together with the Hub: "Applying coherently the human rights approach to small-scale fisheries for achieving multiple Sustainable Development Goals" (Available here: https://www.fao.org/3/cc3251en/cc3251en.pdf). This joint programme of work has also furthered partnerships with various civil society organizations. WWF Accelerating Coastal Community Led Conservation Initiative for the Oceans Practice reached out to the Hub to join efforts for IYAFA, including joint events at the UN Ocean Conference in June 2022 on the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries. WWF further invited the One Ocean Hub to join: the Blue Food Alliance that aims to transform our food system to focus on health, justice, and environmental sustainability; and the SSF Network, which arose from the first SSF Summit in September 2022. In addition, Naturskyddsföreningen (Swedish Society for Nature Conservation), Blue Venture, the Too-Big-To-Ignore research programme, and the IUCN Specialist Group on People and the Ocean have approached the Hub to contribute to the programme of work for IYAFA. All these civil society partners have emphasised how crucial it is to bring clarity on the content of the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries and build the capacities of fisheries-related communities of practice to protect human rights in their work. For the official closing of IYAFA (March 2023), the FAO invited Hub Director Elisa Morgera to speak at the high-level closing event and the Empatheatre team from South Africa to perform "Listen to the Sea" immediately afterwards. FAO and the Hub also co-organized a series of hybrid events prior to the closing event: a workshop on art-based approaches to the protection of small-scale fishers' human rights in South Africa, to explore their replicability in UN and NGO projects (Wed 29th March); a hybrid training on human rights and fisheries (29th March); and a hybrid roundtable on WTO Fisheries Subsidies Agreement and small-scale fishers' human rights (31st March). On these occasions, FAO and the Hub will plan legacy activities on SSFs' human rights for the remainder of 2023, including contributing to the integration of human rights into the second SSF Summit (scheduled in 2024). To that end, the FAO facilitated collaboration between the Hub and the Fisheries Working Group of the International Planning Committee for Food Sovereignty.
Collaborator Contribution FAO supported the development of the Guidelines on Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF) and had already run a pilot regional workshop on their implementation through legislation. FAO is a member of the Executive Team of the One Ocean Hub and based on the early findings from the Hub on the need to further clarify the human rights-based approach to fisheries (Morgera and Nakamura, 2021), FAO invited the Hub to co-develop a diagnostic tool, co-organize another regional workshop in Hub countries and develop further e-learning tools. FAO provided USD 37,450 of in-kind match funding from FAO consultants to support course development. To support the planning and the organisation of the joint programme for the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries in 2022, the FAO and UNEP has also provided in-kind support, in the form of staff time. The expansion of the partnership to the High Commissioner for Human Rights is a first for the ocean community and has provided invaluable insights for the Hub researchers, and their UN and civil society partners on how to rely on the international human rights monitoring system to support small-scale fishers on the ground when governments are falling behind in implementing their international commitments. The partnership has brought together a new Hub's inter-disciplinary team that has connected research across disciplines and scales. University of Strathclyde, Law School, Nelson Mandela University, University of Cape Coast and University of Namibia provide legal expertise. Rhodes University, Cape Town University, University of Namibia and University of Cape Coast provide sociological research co-developed with small-scale fishing communities. As an inter-disciplinary and cross-scale group we made significant progress towards channelling available legal, technical and strategic international support towards ocean-dependent communities in focus countries, as well as upscaling relevant findings to benefit other ODA-recipient countries. We contributed to focusing international support on SSF according to their needs as co-identified with Hub researchers. Our cross-scale approach has also opened pathways for marshalling international support towards, indigenous peoples and coastal communities negatively affected by blue economy initiatives ("ocean defenders"), and women and children negatively affected by unsustainable uses of the ocean. Support at the international level lends cachet to local advocacy efforts and influences systemic change at the national level. We achieved this progress by developing work programmes with international partners that are active across scales (national, regional and international), forming a nested approach to pathways to the Hub's national and international impact, and by: • co-developing research from the outset with international partners; • systematically sharing early findings through partners' ongoing capacity-building activities or co-developing new capacity-building activities, to engage in direct dialogue with their beneficiary country representatives; • proactively sharing early findings that contribute to international partners' own planning and agenda-setting activities; and • strategically utilising the strength of Hub partnerships with international organisations to leverage further support towards Hub objectives from other international partners. In doing so, we have built the capacity of: • South African, Ghanaian and Namibian community representatives to engage directly in international debates, while addressing their practical constraints and other, more pressing demands on their time; • communities to participate in national policy-making processes; • researchers to engage directly with international partners, as an essential skillset for researchers who have not yet worked across scales, so they can develop meaningful cross-scale networks; and • international partners and processes to adapt their modalities to accommodate community representatives' needs.
Impact Resultant Outcomes • Book chapter: E Morgera and J Nakamura, "Shedding a Light on the Human Rights of Small-scale Fisherfolk: Complementarities and Contrasts between the UN Declaration on Peasants' Rights and the Small-Scale Fisheries Guidelines" in Brunori et al, Commentary on the Declaration on the Rights of Peasants (Routledge, 2022, available from here: https://www.taylorfrancis.com/chapters/edit/10.4324/9781003139874-7/shedding-light-human-rights-small-scale-fishers-elisa-morgera-julia-nakamura; available on SSRN since 2021: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_i d=3850133). • FAO e-learning course "Legal and policy considerations for sustainable small-scale fisheries" (published in October 2022, available from here: https://elearning.fao.org/course/view.php?id=881). • One Ocean Hub's small-scale fisheries focused webpage: https://oneoceanhub.org/iyafa/. • A joint policy brief by FAO, One Ocean Hub, and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights "Applying coherently the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries for achieving multiple Sustainable Development Goals," https://www.fao.org/3/cc3251en/cc3251en.pdf. Blogposts and other publications summarising the events and engagements. • Small-Scale Fisheries and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks, https://oneoceanhub.org/small-scale-fisheries-and-blue-justice/. • The Food and Agriculture Organization and the One Ocean Hub co-organised a workshop on sustainable small-scale fisheries law: https://oneoceanhub.org/1939-2/ • Partnering with the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights for the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries, https://oneoceanhub.org/partnering-with-the-office-of-the-high-commissioner-for-human-rights-for-the-international-year-of-artisanal-fisheries/. • The Food and Agriculture Organization and the One Ocean Hub co-organised webinar on Namibia's small-scale fisheries, https://oneoceanhub.org/the-food-and-agriculture-organization-and-the-one-ocean-hub-co-organised-webinar-on-namibias-small-scale-fisheries/ • Strengthening knowledge on national policy and law and their alignment with the Small-Scale Fisheries Guidelines, https://oneoceanhub.org/strengthening-knowledge-on-national-policy-and-law-and-their-alignment-with-the-small-scale-fisheries-guidelines/ • Opening a platform for women in Small-Scale Fisheries in Ghana, https://oneoceanhub.org/opening-a-platform-for-women-in-small-scale-fisheries-in-ghana/ • Key messages: high level event on small-scale fishers' rights https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/key-messages-high-level-event-on-small-scale-fishers-rights/ • A Seismic Shift: A coalition of fishing communities, activists and lawyers has come together to keep the coasts and oceans of South Africa free of the destructive Blue Economy agenda" in Samudra, March, No.87, pp.4-7, ISSN 0973-1121 by Jackie Sunde. https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/a-seismic-shift-a-coalition-of-fishing-communities-activists-and-lawyers-has-come-together-to-keep-the-coasts-and-oceans-of-south-africa-free-of-the-destructive-blue-economy-agenda/ • "The court has a duty to step in and protect those who are offended and the environment" judge rules in the Shell seismic survey case, https://oneoceanhub.org/the-outcome-of-the-shell-seismic-survey-case/ • Deepening partnerships with small-scale fishers in Eastern Cape, South Africa, https://oneoceanhub.org/deepening-partnerships-with-eastern-cape-small-scale-fishers-south-africa/ • "How can national human rights institutions and international human rights mechanisms support the protection of small-scale fishers' human rights?" https://oneoceanhub.org/how-can-national-human-rights-institutions-and-international-human-rights-mechanisms-support-the-protection-of-small-scale-fishers-human-rights/ Webinars • Small-Scale Fisheries and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgdbVNhHf6Q&t=2103s. • One Ocean Hub & Food and Agriculture Organization Information Sharing Sessions on Namibia's Experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries (Day 1), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hm-KkkVfAG8&t=2 4s • One Ocean Hub & Food and Agriculture Organization Information Sharing Sessions Namibia's Experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries (Day 2), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l69nH3Uh-5I&t=8 1s. • Small-scale fishers and ocean well-being, an event for the UN World Ocean Week 2021, co-organised with FAO & UNEP, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S5yOIh-4ZpU&t=3992 s • Professor Elisa Morgera and Dr Dylan McGarry presentations in for the Inaugural GNHRE-UNEP Summer/Winter School 2021 across three sessions: (1) Environmental human rights defenders at the time of the pandemic: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-environmental-defenders-in-times-of-pandemic/. (2) Participation as resistance: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-participation-as-resistance/ (3) Marine environment, marine litter and human rights: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-the-marine-environment-marine-litter-and-human-rights/ • Exploring Challenges, Opportunities and Alliances for the Protection of Small-scale Fishers' Human Rights, at UN World Ocean Week 2022, 7 June 2022, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JaBnVZQS6_o&t=768s • One Ocean Hub's three led panels for the GNHRE-UNEP Summer/Winter School 2022: (1) The human rights dimensions of oceans crimes and its impact on small scale fishers (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S8sok7blfwM); (2) Oceans, Art and Environmental Defenders (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g42I6P1kIDc); and (3) Critical Human Rights Issues at the Ocean-Climate Nexus (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yAs48HzzQ8w). • "Fostering cooperation among relevant UN bodies to advance small-scale fishers' human rights in the face of climate change" (led by the One Ocean Hub for the COP27 Virtual Ocean Pavilion), 14 November 2022, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ukGnhAro_Ic&t=6s • Hub researchers Dr Jackie Sunder and Julia Nakamura presentations at the FAO led Parallel session #4.1 - SSF-LEX: the new small-scale fisheries policy and legal database at the 4th World Small-Scale Fisheries Congress Africa, 21 November 2023, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W87bgDcgiKc. • Dialogue Series on Human Rights Actors and Fisheries "Advancing the protection of small-scale fisher rights at national and international level organised by the Danish Institute for Human Rights (DIHR), One Ocean Hub and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR): (1) the first webinar National human rights institutions: Experiences and Potential for Addressing the Human Rights of small-scale fishers, fish workers and their communities, 1 February 2023. (https://youtu.be/O4MyETHEkdk) and (2) the second webinar Protecting the human rights of small-scale fishers through international human rights mechanisms (https://youtu.be/l9kbB3wXt6c). Video outputs • Photo-story: Small-scale fishers and human rights, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DhqzgSCjfug. • Ocean & Women, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDCyjRznGEA. • Indigenous Peoples and the Ocean, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kRzNMXiAz7I. • Ocean Connections: A Virtual Multimedia Exhibition, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AsavQOxyLFw&t=579s. • Ocean Connections Project Video, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-499UAZC3d0. • Defenders of the Ocean, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=agb9LCYhmWY.
Start Year 2021
 
Description BETTER PROTECTING SMALL-SCALE FISHERS' HUMAN RIGHTS ACROSS SCALES 
Organisation Rhodes University
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This partnership began in 2021 through the FAO existing programme to support national implementation of the FAO Guidelines on Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF) through national legislation. To support this, One Ocean Hub co-hosted with FAO regional workshops with government, community, research, and NGO representation from Ghana, Namibia, South Africa, to identify legislative barriers to the implementation of the FAO voluntary SSF guidelines in each country, thereby contributing to national research, while co-developing a global instrument, the FAO SSF Policy and Legal diagnostic tool in April 2021. Co-design of the regional workshop with South African researchers involved in the Coastal Justice Network allowed FAO to shift from a top-down approach that focused on discussing what international law requires from governments to an approach informed by local context, and responds to specific needs of SSF, through international law when national law falls short. Hub researchers facilitated SSF representatives' direct participation in the workshop in varied ways, including voice or video messages that communicated their priorities. SSF and government representatives, as well as non-legal researchers were made aware of how international law is (or is not) applied in the context of South Africa, Ghana and Namibia. This is now informing planning of further inter-disciplinary research that will guide strategies on partnerships with governments and SSF in Ghana. In addition, this regional event led to a follow-up event specifically for Namibia, in collaboration with the FAO, the Hub and the Ministry for Fisheries and Marine Resources (MFMR) Namibia. The webinar series organised on 10-11 June 2021 was titled 'Namibia's experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries.' It was aimed at providing the evidence required to support the process for the development of a National Plan of Action for Small-Scale Fisheries in Namibia, which the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources, which was published in 2022 as part of its commitment to implement the FAO SSF Guidelines. The workshop provided an opportunity to integrate the early research findings from the One Ocean Hub into the process for the development of a National Plan of Action for Small-Scale Fisheries in Namibia, notably with regard to the inclusion of the views of indigenous communities that have been displaced from the coast (Topnaar). This event led to an invitation for nominations for two experts to sit on Namibia's national task force on SSF (upon acceptance by the Ministry of Fisheries). The key research findings that were shared with FAO focused on the approaches to: • redress marginalisation of previously disadvantaged communities including those that have been historically removed from the coast e.g. the Topnaar community), and • address the diverse capacity-building needs of different stakeholder groups that are expected to benefit from or contribute to implementation (SSF associations, SSF women and youth, town councils, NGOs, and primary schools). In addition, FAO invited the Hub to co-develop two e-learning courses on implementation of the FAO Guidelines on SSF to be housed on the FAO E-learning Academy website (https://elearning.fao.org/). The courses are meant to respond to government officers' and fishers' needs respectively, to implement the FAO Guidelines. The latter will allow SSF to obtain an international certification on the FAO E-learning Academy that contributes to their professional development and recognition of SSF. Two papers by Hub colleagues in Ghana and South Africa were integrated as case studies in the first FAO e-learning course on SSF law and policy (in additions to insights arising from the joint Hub-FAO workshops). A new e-learning course will be co-developed in 2023 with a view to directly addressing the question and challenges of small-scale fishers in invoking international law and human rights in their daily interactions with authorities and other stakeholders, based on Hub partnerships with small-scale fishing organizations in Namibia, Ghana and South Africa. Meanwhile, the Hub shared some of these research findings and innovative methodologies for collaborating and supporting SSF with UNEP, in the context of a UN Global and African consultations on environmental human rights defenders. This contributing to the UN recognising SSF, indigenous peoples and local communities negatively affected by blue economy initiatives as "environmental human rights defenders" (defined by the United Nations as individuals and communities that raise awareness about the negative impacts on human rights of unsustainable decisions on the environment, who are increasingly the object of (often lethal) attacks by governments or private companies), which addressed a blind spot in current international initiatives that are land-focused and ignore "ocean defenders." Hub research was integrated into recommendations to the UN System to better coordinate efforts and fill gaps in supporting ocean defenders (to be published in 2023). Findings and approaches to enhancing participation and inclusion of SSF from South Africa (notably the Coastal Justice Network approaches) will be included among good practices documented by UNEP in a website on environmental human rights defenders to be launched in 2023. In addition, this allows the Hub to bring together FAO and UNEP into a joint event during World Oceans Week 2021 to discuss directly with SSF representatives from South Africa key challenges. Towards the end of 2021, the collaboration with FAO has led to an ambitious joint programme of work to advance the human rights-based approach to small scale fisheries as part of the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries and Aquaculture in 2022 with the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. The joint programme of work advanced understanding of the multiple threats to the rights of small-scale fishers to have a voice in decisions affecting their lives, health, culture and livelihoods, and garner further support for small-scale fishers that act as environmental human rights defenders. We shared key research insights and supported small-scale fisheries representatives to speak directly about their human rights concerns in a high-level event at World Ocean Week (WOW) 2022, to the UN Special Rapporteur on Human Rights and the Environment participated. In June 2022, the Hub was invited to join the panelists of the High-level Interactive Dialogue on Fisheries at the UN Ocean Conference, and shared on that occasion the key messages from the WOW event (see report summarising key messages shared during the event here: https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/key-messages-high-level-event-on-small-scale-fishers-rights/). These were then published in late 2022 as the first joint policy brief between FAO and the UNOHCHR, together with the Hub: "Applying coherently the human rights approach to small-scale fisheries for achieving multiple Sustainable Development Goals" (Available here: https://www.fao.org/3/cc3251en/cc3251en.pdf). This joint programme of work has also furthered partnerships with various civil society organizations. WWF Accelerating Coastal Community Led Conservation Initiative for the Oceans Practice reached out to the Hub to join efforts for IYAFA, including joint events at the UN Ocean Conference in June 2022 on the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries. WWF further invited the One Ocean Hub to join: the Blue Food Alliance that aims to transform our food system to focus on health, justice, and environmental sustainability; and the SSF Network, which arose from the first SSF Summit in September 2022. In addition, Naturskyddsföreningen (Swedish Society for Nature Conservation), Blue Venture, the Too-Big-To-Ignore research programme, and the IUCN Specialist Group on People and the Ocean have approached the Hub to contribute to the programme of work for IYAFA. All these civil society partners have emphasised how crucial it is to bring clarity on the content of the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries and build the capacities of fisheries-related communities of practice to protect human rights in their work. For the official closing of IYAFA (March 2023), the FAO invited Hub Director Elisa Morgera to speak at the high-level closing event and the Empatheatre team from South Africa to perform "Listen to the Sea" immediately afterwards. FAO and the Hub also co-organized a series of hybrid events prior to the closing event: a workshop on art-based approaches to the protection of small-scale fishers' human rights in South Africa, to explore their replicability in UN and NGO projects (Wed 29th March); a hybrid training on human rights and fisheries (29th March); and a hybrid roundtable on WTO Fisheries Subsidies Agreement and small-scale fishers' human rights (31st March). On these occasions, FAO and the Hub will plan legacy activities on SSFs' human rights for the remainder of 2023, including contributing to the integration of human rights into the second SSF Summit (scheduled in 2024). To that end, the FAO facilitated collaboration between the Hub and the Fisheries Working Group of the International Planning Committee for Food Sovereignty.
Collaborator Contribution FAO supported the development of the Guidelines on Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF) and had already run a pilot regional workshop on their implementation through legislation. FAO is a member of the Executive Team of the One Ocean Hub and based on the early findings from the Hub on the need to further clarify the human rights-based approach to fisheries (Morgera and Nakamura, 2021), FAO invited the Hub to co-develop a diagnostic tool, co-organize another regional workshop in Hub countries and develop further e-learning tools. FAO provided USD 37,450 of in-kind match funding from FAO consultants to support course development. To support the planning and the organisation of the joint programme for the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries in 2022, the FAO and UNEP has also provided in-kind support, in the form of staff time. The expansion of the partnership to the High Commissioner for Human Rights is a first for the ocean community and has provided invaluable insights for the Hub researchers, and their UN and civil society partners on how to rely on the international human rights monitoring system to support small-scale fishers on the ground when governments are falling behind in implementing their international commitments. The partnership has brought together a new Hub's inter-disciplinary team that has connected research across disciplines and scales. University of Strathclyde, Law School, Nelson Mandela University, University of Cape Coast and University of Namibia provide legal expertise. Rhodes University, Cape Town University, University of Namibia and University of Cape Coast provide sociological research co-developed with small-scale fishing communities. As an inter-disciplinary and cross-scale group we made significant progress towards channelling available legal, technical and strategic international support towards ocean-dependent communities in focus countries, as well as upscaling relevant findings to benefit other ODA-recipient countries. We contributed to focusing international support on SSF according to their needs as co-identified with Hub researchers. Our cross-scale approach has also opened pathways for marshalling international support towards, indigenous peoples and coastal communities negatively affected by blue economy initiatives ("ocean defenders"), and women and children negatively affected by unsustainable uses of the ocean. Support at the international level lends cachet to local advocacy efforts and influences systemic change at the national level. We achieved this progress by developing work programmes with international partners that are active across scales (national, regional and international), forming a nested approach to pathways to the Hub's national and international impact, and by: • co-developing research from the outset with international partners; • systematically sharing early findings through partners' ongoing capacity-building activities or co-developing new capacity-building activities, to engage in direct dialogue with their beneficiary country representatives; • proactively sharing early findings that contribute to international partners' own planning and agenda-setting activities; and • strategically utilising the strength of Hub partnerships with international organisations to leverage further support towards Hub objectives from other international partners. In doing so, we have built the capacity of: • South African, Ghanaian and Namibian community representatives to engage directly in international debates, while addressing their practical constraints and other, more pressing demands on their time; • communities to participate in national policy-making processes; • researchers to engage directly with international partners, as an essential skillset for researchers who have not yet worked across scales, so they can develop meaningful cross-scale networks; and • international partners and processes to adapt their modalities to accommodate community representatives' needs.
Impact Resultant Outcomes • Book chapter: E Morgera and J Nakamura, "Shedding a Light on the Human Rights of Small-scale Fisherfolk: Complementarities and Contrasts between the UN Declaration on Peasants' Rights and the Small-Scale Fisheries Guidelines" in Brunori et al, Commentary on the Declaration on the Rights of Peasants (Routledge, 2022, available from here: https://www.taylorfrancis.com/chapters/edit/10.4324/9781003139874-7/shedding-light-human-rights-small-scale-fishers-elisa-morgera-julia-nakamura; available on SSRN since 2021: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_i d=3850133). • FAO e-learning course "Legal and policy considerations for sustainable small-scale fisheries" (published in October 2022, available from here: https://elearning.fao.org/course/view.php?id=881). • One Ocean Hub's small-scale fisheries focused webpage: https://oneoceanhub.org/iyafa/. • A joint policy brief by FAO, One Ocean Hub, and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights "Applying coherently the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries for achieving multiple Sustainable Development Goals," https://www.fao.org/3/cc3251en/cc3251en.pdf. Blogposts and other publications summarising the events and engagements. • Small-Scale Fisheries and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks, https://oneoceanhub.org/small-scale-fisheries-and-blue-justice/. • The Food and Agriculture Organization and the One Ocean Hub co-organised a workshop on sustainable small-scale fisheries law: https://oneoceanhub.org/1939-2/ • Partnering with the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights for the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries, https://oneoceanhub.org/partnering-with-the-office-of-the-high-commissioner-for-human-rights-for-the-international-year-of-artisanal-fisheries/. • The Food and Agriculture Organization and the One Ocean Hub co-organised webinar on Namibia's small-scale fisheries, https://oneoceanhub.org/the-food-and-agriculture-organization-and-the-one-ocean-hub-co-organised-webinar-on-namibias-small-scale-fisheries/ • Strengthening knowledge on national policy and law and their alignment with the Small-Scale Fisheries Guidelines, https://oneoceanhub.org/strengthening-knowledge-on-national-policy-and-law-and-their-alignment-with-the-small-scale-fisheries-guidelines/ • Opening a platform for women in Small-Scale Fisheries in Ghana, https://oneoceanhub.org/opening-a-platform-for-women-in-small-scale-fisheries-in-ghana/ • Key messages: high level event on small-scale fishers' rights https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/key-messages-high-level-event-on-small-scale-fishers-rights/ • A Seismic Shift: A coalition of fishing communities, activists and lawyers has come together to keep the coasts and oceans of South Africa free of the destructive Blue Economy agenda" in Samudra, March, No.87, pp.4-7, ISSN 0973-1121 by Jackie Sunde. https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/a-seismic-shift-a-coalition-of-fishing-communities-activists-and-lawyers-has-come-together-to-keep-the-coasts-and-oceans-of-south-africa-free-of-the-destructive-blue-economy-agenda/ • "The court has a duty to step in and protect those who are offended and the environment" judge rules in the Shell seismic survey case, https://oneoceanhub.org/the-outcome-of-the-shell-seismic-survey-case/ • Deepening partnerships with small-scale fishers in Eastern Cape, South Africa, https://oneoceanhub.org/deepening-partnerships-with-eastern-cape-small-scale-fishers-south-africa/ • "How can national human rights institutions and international human rights mechanisms support the protection of small-scale fishers' human rights?" https://oneoceanhub.org/how-can-national-human-rights-institutions-and-international-human-rights-mechanisms-support-the-protection-of-small-scale-fishers-human-rights/ Webinars • Small-Scale Fisheries and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgdbVNhHf6Q&t=2103s. • One Ocean Hub & Food and Agriculture Organization Information Sharing Sessions on Namibia's Experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries (Day 1), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hm-KkkVfAG8&t=2 4s • One Ocean Hub & Food and Agriculture Organization Information Sharing Sessions Namibia's Experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries (Day 2), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l69nH3Uh-5I&t=8 1s. • Small-scale fishers and ocean well-being, an event for the UN World Ocean Week 2021, co-organised with FAO & UNEP, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S5yOIh-4ZpU&t=3992 s • Professor Elisa Morgera and Dr Dylan McGarry presentations in for the Inaugural GNHRE-UNEP Summer/Winter School 2021 across three sessions: (1) Environmental human rights defenders at the time of the pandemic: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-environmental-defenders-in-times-of-pandemic/. (2) Participation as resistance: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-participation-as-resistance/ (3) Marine environment, marine litter and human rights: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-the-marine-environment-marine-litter-and-human-rights/ • Exploring Challenges, Opportunities and Alliances for the Protection of Small-scale Fishers' Human Rights, at UN World Ocean Week 2022, 7 June 2022, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JaBnVZQS6_o&t=768s • One Ocean Hub's three led panels for the GNHRE-UNEP Summer/Winter School 2022: (1) The human rights dimensions of oceans crimes and its impact on small scale fishers (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S8sok7blfwM); (2) Oceans, Art and Environmental Defenders (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g42I6P1kIDc); and (3) Critical Human Rights Issues at the Ocean-Climate Nexus (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yAs48HzzQ8w). • "Fostering cooperation among relevant UN bodies to advance small-scale fishers' human rights in the face of climate change" (led by the One Ocean Hub for the COP27 Virtual Ocean Pavilion), 14 November 2022, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ukGnhAro_Ic&t=6s • Hub researchers Dr Jackie Sunder and Julia Nakamura presentations at the FAO led Parallel session #4.1 - SSF-LEX: the new small-scale fisheries policy and legal database at the 4th World Small-Scale Fisheries Congress Africa, 21 November 2023, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W87bgDcgiKc. • Dialogue Series on Human Rights Actors and Fisheries "Advancing the protection of small-scale fisher rights at national and international level organised by the Danish Institute for Human Rights (DIHR), One Ocean Hub and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR): (1) the first webinar National human rights institutions: Experiences and Potential for Addressing the Human Rights of small-scale fishers, fish workers and their communities, 1 February 2023. (https://youtu.be/O4MyETHEkdk) and (2) the second webinar Protecting the human rights of small-scale fishers through international human rights mechanisms (https://youtu.be/l9kbB3wXt6c). Video outputs • Photo-story: Small-scale fishers and human rights, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DhqzgSCjfug. • Ocean & Women, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDCyjRznGEA. • Indigenous Peoples and the Ocean, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kRzNMXiAz7I. • Ocean Connections: A Virtual Multimedia Exhibition, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AsavQOxyLFw&t=579s. • Ocean Connections Project Video, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-499UAZC3d0. • Defenders of the Ocean, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=agb9LCYhmWY.
Start Year 2021
 
Description BETTER PROTECTING SMALL-SCALE FISHERS' HUMAN RIGHTS ACROSS SCALES 
Organisation Swedish Society for Nature Conservation
Country Sweden 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This partnership began in 2021 through the FAO existing programme to support national implementation of the FAO Guidelines on Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF) through national legislation. To support this, One Ocean Hub co-hosted with FAO regional workshops with government, community, research, and NGO representation from Ghana, Namibia, South Africa, to identify legislative barriers to the implementation of the FAO voluntary SSF guidelines in each country, thereby contributing to national research, while co-developing a global instrument, the FAO SSF Policy and Legal diagnostic tool in April 2021. Co-design of the regional workshop with South African researchers involved in the Coastal Justice Network allowed FAO to shift from a top-down approach that focused on discussing what international law requires from governments to an approach informed by local context, and responds to specific needs of SSF, through international law when national law falls short. Hub researchers facilitated SSF representatives' direct participation in the workshop in varied ways, including voice or video messages that communicated their priorities. SSF and government representatives, as well as non-legal researchers were made aware of how international law is (or is not) applied in the context of South Africa, Ghana and Namibia. This is now informing planning of further inter-disciplinary research that will guide strategies on partnerships with governments and SSF in Ghana. In addition, this regional event led to a follow-up event specifically for Namibia, in collaboration with the FAO, the Hub and the Ministry for Fisheries and Marine Resources (MFMR) Namibia. The webinar series organised on 10-11 June 2021 was titled 'Namibia's experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries.' It was aimed at providing the evidence required to support the process for the development of a National Plan of Action for Small-Scale Fisheries in Namibia, which the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources, which was published in 2022 as part of its commitment to implement the FAO SSF Guidelines. The workshop provided an opportunity to integrate the early research findings from the One Ocean Hub into the process for the development of a National Plan of Action for Small-Scale Fisheries in Namibia, notably with regard to the inclusion of the views of indigenous communities that have been displaced from the coast (Topnaar). This event led to an invitation for nominations for two experts to sit on Namibia's national task force on SSF (upon acceptance by the Ministry of Fisheries). The key research findings that were shared with FAO focused on the approaches to: • redress marginalisation of previously disadvantaged communities including those that have been historically removed from the coast e.g. the Topnaar community), and • address the diverse capacity-building needs of different stakeholder groups that are expected to benefit from or contribute to implementation (SSF associations, SSF women and youth, town councils, NGOs, and primary schools). In addition, FAO invited the Hub to co-develop two e-learning courses on implementation of the FAO Guidelines on SSF to be housed on the FAO E-learning Academy website (https://elearning.fao.org/). The courses are meant to respond to government officers' and fishers' needs respectively, to implement the FAO Guidelines. The latter will allow SSF to obtain an international certification on the FAO E-learning Academy that contributes to their professional development and recognition of SSF. Two papers by Hub colleagues in Ghana and South Africa were integrated as case studies in the first FAO e-learning course on SSF law and policy (in additions to insights arising from the joint Hub-FAO workshops). A new e-learning course will be co-developed in 2023 with a view to directly addressing the question and challenges of small-scale fishers in invoking international law and human rights in their daily interactions with authorities and other stakeholders, based on Hub partnerships with small-scale fishing organizations in Namibia, Ghana and South Africa. Meanwhile, the Hub shared some of these research findings and innovative methodologies for collaborating and supporting SSF with UNEP, in the context of a UN Global and African consultations on environmental human rights defenders. This contributing to the UN recognising SSF, indigenous peoples and local communities negatively affected by blue economy initiatives as "environmental human rights defenders" (defined by the United Nations as individuals and communities that raise awareness about the negative impacts on human rights of unsustainable decisions on the environment, who are increasingly the object of (often lethal) attacks by governments or private companies), which addressed a blind spot in current international initiatives that are land-focused and ignore "ocean defenders." Hub research was integrated into recommendations to the UN System to better coordinate efforts and fill gaps in supporting ocean defenders (to be published in 2023). Findings and approaches to enhancing participation and inclusion of SSF from South Africa (notably the Coastal Justice Network approaches) will be included among good practices documented by UNEP in a website on environmental human rights defenders to be launched in 2023. In addition, this allows the Hub to bring together FAO and UNEP into a joint event during World Oceans Week 2021 to discuss directly with SSF representatives from South Africa key challenges. Towards the end of 2021, the collaboration with FAO has led to an ambitious joint programme of work to advance the human rights-based approach to small scale fisheries as part of the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries and Aquaculture in 2022 with the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. The joint programme of work advanced understanding of the multiple threats to the rights of small-scale fishers to have a voice in decisions affecting their lives, health, culture and livelihoods, and garner further support for small-scale fishers that act as environmental human rights defenders. We shared key research insights and supported small-scale fisheries representatives to speak directly about their human rights concerns in a high-level event at World Ocean Week (WOW) 2022, to the UN Special Rapporteur on Human Rights and the Environment participated. In June 2022, the Hub was invited to join the panelists of the High-level Interactive Dialogue on Fisheries at the UN Ocean Conference, and shared on that occasion the key messages from the WOW event (see report summarising key messages shared during the event here: https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/key-messages-high-level-event-on-small-scale-fishers-rights/). These were then published in late 2022 as the first joint policy brief between FAO and the UNOHCHR, together with the Hub: "Applying coherently the human rights approach to small-scale fisheries for achieving multiple Sustainable Development Goals" (Available here: https://www.fao.org/3/cc3251en/cc3251en.pdf). This joint programme of work has also furthered partnerships with various civil society organizations. WWF Accelerating Coastal Community Led Conservation Initiative for the Oceans Practice reached out to the Hub to join efforts for IYAFA, including joint events at the UN Ocean Conference in June 2022 on the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries. WWF further invited the One Ocean Hub to join: the Blue Food Alliance that aims to transform our food system to focus on health, justice, and environmental sustainability; and the SSF Network, which arose from the first SSF Summit in September 2022. In addition, Naturskyddsföreningen (Swedish Society for Nature Conservation), Blue Venture, the Too-Big-To-Ignore research programme, and the IUCN Specialist Group on People and the Ocean have approached the Hub to contribute to the programme of work for IYAFA. All these civil society partners have emphasised how crucial it is to bring clarity on the content of the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries and build the capacities of fisheries-related communities of practice to protect human rights in their work. For the official closing of IYAFA (March 2023), the FAO invited Hub Director Elisa Morgera to speak at the high-level closing event and the Empatheatre team from South Africa to perform "Listen to the Sea" immediately afterwards. FAO and the Hub also co-organized a series of hybrid events prior to the closing event: a workshop on art-based approaches to the protection of small-scale fishers' human rights in South Africa, to explore their replicability in UN and NGO projects (Wed 29th March); a hybrid training on human rights and fisheries (29th March); and a hybrid roundtable on WTO Fisheries Subsidies Agreement and small-scale fishers' human rights (31st March). On these occasions, FAO and the Hub will plan legacy activities on SSFs' human rights for the remainder of 2023, including contributing to the integration of human rights into the second SSF Summit (scheduled in 2024). To that end, the FAO facilitated collaboration between the Hub and the Fisheries Working Group of the International Planning Committee for Food Sovereignty.
Collaborator Contribution FAO supported the development of the Guidelines on Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF) and had already run a pilot regional workshop on their implementation through legislation. FAO is a member of the Executive Team of the One Ocean Hub and based on the early findings from the Hub on the need to further clarify the human rights-based approach to fisheries (Morgera and Nakamura, 2021), FAO invited the Hub to co-develop a diagnostic tool, co-organize another regional workshop in Hub countries and develop further e-learning tools. FAO provided USD 37,450 of in-kind match funding from FAO consultants to support course development. To support the planning and the organisation of the joint programme for the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries in 2022, the FAO and UNEP has also provided in-kind support, in the form of staff time. The expansion of the partnership to the High Commissioner for Human Rights is a first for the ocean community and has provided invaluable insights for the Hub researchers, and their UN and civil society partners on how to rely on the international human rights monitoring system to support small-scale fishers on the ground when governments are falling behind in implementing their international commitments. The partnership has brought together a new Hub's inter-disciplinary team that has connected research across disciplines and scales. University of Strathclyde, Law School, Nelson Mandela University, University of Cape Coast and University of Namibia provide legal expertise. Rhodes University, Cape Town University, University of Namibia and University of Cape Coast provide sociological research co-developed with small-scale fishing communities. As an inter-disciplinary and cross-scale group we made significant progress towards channelling available legal, technical and strategic international support towards ocean-dependent communities in focus countries, as well as upscaling relevant findings to benefit other ODA-recipient countries. We contributed to focusing international support on SSF according to their needs as co-identified with Hub researchers. Our cross-scale approach has also opened pathways for marshalling international support towards, indigenous peoples and coastal communities negatively affected by blue economy initiatives ("ocean defenders"), and women and children negatively affected by unsustainable uses of the ocean. Support at the international level lends cachet to local advocacy efforts and influences systemic change at the national level. We achieved this progress by developing work programmes with international partners that are active across scales (national, regional and international), forming a nested approach to pathways to the Hub's national and international impact, and by: • co-developing research from the outset with international partners; • systematically sharing early findings through partners' ongoing capacity-building activities or co-developing new capacity-building activities, to engage in direct dialogue with their beneficiary country representatives; • proactively sharing early findings that contribute to international partners' own planning and agenda-setting activities; and • strategically utilising the strength of Hub partnerships with international organisations to leverage further support towards Hub objectives from other international partners. In doing so, we have built the capacity of: • South African, Ghanaian and Namibian community representatives to engage directly in international debates, while addressing their practical constraints and other, more pressing demands on their time; • communities to participate in national policy-making processes; • researchers to engage directly with international partners, as an essential skillset for researchers who have not yet worked across scales, so they can develop meaningful cross-scale networks; and • international partners and processes to adapt their modalities to accommodate community representatives' needs.
Impact Resultant Outcomes • Book chapter: E Morgera and J Nakamura, "Shedding a Light on the Human Rights of Small-scale Fisherfolk: Complementarities and Contrasts between the UN Declaration on Peasants' Rights and the Small-Scale Fisheries Guidelines" in Brunori et al, Commentary on the Declaration on the Rights of Peasants (Routledge, 2022, available from here: https://www.taylorfrancis.com/chapters/edit/10.4324/9781003139874-7/shedding-light-human-rights-small-scale-fishers-elisa-morgera-julia-nakamura; available on SSRN since 2021: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_i d=3850133). • FAO e-learning course "Legal and policy considerations for sustainable small-scale fisheries" (published in October 2022, available from here: https://elearning.fao.org/course/view.php?id=881). • One Ocean Hub's small-scale fisheries focused webpage: https://oneoceanhub.org/iyafa/. • A joint policy brief by FAO, One Ocean Hub, and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights "Applying coherently the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries for achieving multiple Sustainable Development Goals," https://www.fao.org/3/cc3251en/cc3251en.pdf. Blogposts and other publications summarising the events and engagements. • Small-Scale Fisheries and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks, https://oneoceanhub.org/small-scale-fisheries-and-blue-justice/. • The Food and Agriculture Organization and the One Ocean Hub co-organised a workshop on sustainable small-scale fisheries law: https://oneoceanhub.org/1939-2/ • Partnering with the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights for the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries, https://oneoceanhub.org/partnering-with-the-office-of-the-high-commissioner-for-human-rights-for-the-international-year-of-artisanal-fisheries/. • The Food and Agriculture Organization and the One Ocean Hub co-organised webinar on Namibia's small-scale fisheries, https://oneoceanhub.org/the-food-and-agriculture-organization-and-the-one-ocean-hub-co-organised-webinar-on-namibias-small-scale-fisheries/ • Strengthening knowledge on national policy and law and their alignment with the Small-Scale Fisheries Guidelines, https://oneoceanhub.org/strengthening-knowledge-on-national-policy-and-law-and-their-alignment-with-the-small-scale-fisheries-guidelines/ • Opening a platform for women in Small-Scale Fisheries in Ghana, https://oneoceanhub.org/opening-a-platform-for-women-in-small-scale-fisheries-in-ghana/ • Key messages: high level event on small-scale fishers' rights https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/key-messages-high-level-event-on-small-scale-fishers-rights/ • A Seismic Shift: A coalition of fishing communities, activists and lawyers has come together to keep the coasts and oceans of South Africa free of the destructive Blue Economy agenda" in Samudra, March, No.87, pp.4-7, ISSN 0973-1121 by Jackie Sunde. https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/a-seismic-shift-a-coalition-of-fishing-communities-activists-and-lawyers-has-come-together-to-keep-the-coasts-and-oceans-of-south-africa-free-of-the-destructive-blue-economy-agenda/ • "The court has a duty to step in and protect those who are offended and the environment" judge rules in the Shell seismic survey case, https://oneoceanhub.org/the-outcome-of-the-shell-seismic-survey-case/ • Deepening partnerships with small-scale fishers in Eastern Cape, South Africa, https://oneoceanhub.org/deepening-partnerships-with-eastern-cape-small-scale-fishers-south-africa/ • "How can national human rights institutions and international human rights mechanisms support the protection of small-scale fishers' human rights?" https://oneoceanhub.org/how-can-national-human-rights-institutions-and-international-human-rights-mechanisms-support-the-protection-of-small-scale-fishers-human-rights/ Webinars • Small-Scale Fisheries and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgdbVNhHf6Q&t=2103s. • One Ocean Hub & Food and Agriculture Organization Information Sharing Sessions on Namibia's Experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries (Day 1), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hm-KkkVfAG8&t=2 4s • One Ocean Hub & Food and Agriculture Organization Information Sharing Sessions Namibia's Experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries (Day 2), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l69nH3Uh-5I&t=8 1s. • Small-scale fishers and ocean well-being, an event for the UN World Ocean Week 2021, co-organised with FAO & UNEP, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S5yOIh-4ZpU&t=3992 s • Professor Elisa Morgera and Dr Dylan McGarry presentations in for the Inaugural GNHRE-UNEP Summer/Winter School 2021 across three sessions: (1) Environmental human rights defenders at the time of the pandemic: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-environmental-defenders-in-times-of-pandemic/. (2) Participation as resistance: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-participation-as-resistance/ (3) Marine environment, marine litter and human rights: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-the-marine-environment-marine-litter-and-human-rights/ • Exploring Challenges, Opportunities and Alliances for the Protection of Small-scale Fishers' Human Rights, at UN World Ocean Week 2022, 7 June 2022, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JaBnVZQS6_o&t=768s • One Ocean Hub's three led panels for the GNHRE-UNEP Summer/Winter School 2022: (1) The human rights dimensions of oceans crimes and its impact on small scale fishers (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S8sok7blfwM); (2) Oceans, Art and Environmental Defenders (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g42I6P1kIDc); and (3) Critical Human Rights Issues at the Ocean-Climate Nexus (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yAs48HzzQ8w). • "Fostering cooperation among relevant UN bodies to advance small-scale fishers' human rights in the face of climate change" (led by the One Ocean Hub for the COP27 Virtual Ocean Pavilion), 14 November 2022, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ukGnhAro_Ic&t=6s • Hub researchers Dr Jackie Sunder and Julia Nakamura presentations at the FAO led Parallel session #4.1 - SSF-LEX: the new small-scale fisheries policy and legal database at the 4th World Small-Scale Fisheries Congress Africa, 21 November 2023, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W87bgDcgiKc. • Dialogue Series on Human Rights Actors and Fisheries "Advancing the protection of small-scale fisher rights at national and international level organised by the Danish Institute for Human Rights (DIHR), One Ocean Hub and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR): (1) the first webinar National human rights institutions: Experiences and Potential for Addressing the Human Rights of small-scale fishers, fish workers and their communities, 1 February 2023. (https://youtu.be/O4MyETHEkdk) and (2) the second webinar Protecting the human rights of small-scale fishers through international human rights mechanisms (https://youtu.be/l9kbB3wXt6c). Video outputs • Photo-story: Small-scale fishers and human rights, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DhqzgSCjfug. • Ocean & Women, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDCyjRznGEA. • Indigenous Peoples and the Ocean, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kRzNMXiAz7I. • Ocean Connections: A Virtual Multimedia Exhibition, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AsavQOxyLFw&t=579s. • Ocean Connections Project Video, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-499UAZC3d0. • Defenders of the Ocean, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=agb9LCYhmWY.
Start Year 2021
 
Description BETTER PROTECTING SMALL-SCALE FISHERS' HUMAN RIGHTS ACROSS SCALES 
Organisation UN Division for Ocean Affairs and the Law of the Sea
Country United States 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution This partnership began in 2021 through the FAO existing programme to support national implementation of the FAO Guidelines on Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF) through national legislation. To support this, One Ocean Hub co-hosted with FAO regional workshops with government, community, research, and NGO representation from Ghana, Namibia, South Africa, to identify legislative barriers to the implementation of the FAO voluntary SSF guidelines in each country, thereby contributing to national research, while co-developing a global instrument, the FAO SSF Policy and Legal diagnostic tool in April 2021. Co-design of the regional workshop with South African researchers involved in the Coastal Justice Network allowed FAO to shift from a top-down approach that focused on discussing what international law requires from governments to an approach informed by local context, and responds to specific needs of SSF, through international law when national law falls short. Hub researchers facilitated SSF representatives' direct participation in the workshop in varied ways, including voice or video messages that communicated their priorities. SSF and government representatives, as well as non-legal researchers were made aware of how international law is (or is not) applied in the context of South Africa, Ghana and Namibia. This is now informing planning of further inter-disciplinary research that will guide strategies on partnerships with governments and SSF in Ghana. In addition, this regional event led to a follow-up event specifically for Namibia, in collaboration with the FAO, the Hub and the Ministry for Fisheries and Marine Resources (MFMR) Namibia. The webinar series organised on 10-11 June 2021 was titled 'Namibia's experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries.' It was aimed at providing the evidence required to support the process for the development of a National Plan of Action for Small-Scale Fisheries in Namibia, which the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources, which was published in 2022 as part of its commitment to implement the FAO SSF Guidelines. The workshop provided an opportunity to integrate the early research findings from the One Ocean Hub into the process for the development of a National Plan of Action for Small-Scale Fisheries in Namibia, notably with regard to the inclusion of the views of indigenous communities that have been displaced from the coast (Topnaar). This event led to an invitation for nominations for two experts to sit on Namibia's national task force on SSF (upon acceptance by the Ministry of Fisheries). The key research findings that were shared with FAO focused on the approaches to: • redress marginalisation of previously disadvantaged communities including those that have been historically removed from the coast e.g. the Topnaar community), and • address the diverse capacity-building needs of different stakeholder groups that are expected to benefit from or contribute to implementation (SSF associations, SSF women and youth, town councils, NGOs, and primary schools). In addition, FAO invited the Hub to co-develop two e-learning courses on implementation of the FAO Guidelines on SSF to be housed on the FAO E-learning Academy website (https://elearning.fao.org/). The courses are meant to respond to government officers' and fishers' needs respectively, to implement the FAO Guidelines. The latter will allow SSF to obtain an international certification on the FAO E-learning Academy that contributes to their professional development and recognition of SSF. Two papers by Hub colleagues in Ghana and South Africa were integrated as case studies in the first FAO e-learning course on SSF law and policy (in additions to insights arising from the joint Hub-FAO workshops). A new e-learning course will be co-developed in 2023 with a view to directly addressing the question and challenges of small-scale fishers in invoking international law and human rights in their daily interactions with authorities and other stakeholders, based on Hub partnerships with small-scale fishing organizations in Namibia, Ghana and South Africa. Meanwhile, the Hub shared some of these research findings and innovative methodologies for collaborating and supporting SSF with UNEP, in the context of a UN Global and African consultations on environmental human rights defenders. This contributing to the UN recognising SSF, indigenous peoples and local communities negatively affected by blue economy initiatives as "environmental human rights defenders" (defined by the United Nations as individuals and communities that raise awareness about the negative impacts on human rights of unsustainable decisions on the environment, who are increasingly the object of (often lethal) attacks by governments or private companies), which addressed a blind spot in current international initiatives that are land-focused and ignore "ocean defenders." Hub research was integrated into recommendations to the UN System to better coordinate efforts and fill gaps in supporting ocean defenders (to be published in 2023). Findings and approaches to enhancing participation and inclusion of SSF from South Africa (notably the Coastal Justice Network approaches) will be included among good practices documented by UNEP in a website on environmental human rights defenders to be launched in 2023. In addition, this allows the Hub to bring together FAO and UNEP into a joint event during World Oceans Week 2021 to discuss directly with SSF representatives from South Africa key challenges. Towards the end of 2021, the collaboration with FAO has led to an ambitious joint programme of work to advance the human rights-based approach to small scale fisheries as part of the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries and Aquaculture in 2022 with the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. The joint programme of work advanced understanding of the multiple threats to the rights of small-scale fishers to have a voice in decisions affecting their lives, health, culture and livelihoods, and garner further support for small-scale fishers that act as environmental human rights defenders. We shared key research insights and supported small-scale fisheries representatives to speak directly about their human rights concerns in a high-level event at World Ocean Week (WOW) 2022, to the UN Special Rapporteur on Human Rights and the Environment participated. In June 2022, the Hub was invited to join the panelists of the High-level Interactive Dialogue on Fisheries at the UN Ocean Conference, and shared on that occasion the key messages from the WOW event (see report summarising key messages shared during the event here: https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/key-messages-high-level-event-on-small-scale-fishers-rights/). These were then published in late 2022 as the first joint policy brief between FAO and the UNOHCHR, together with the Hub: "Applying coherently the human rights approach to small-scale fisheries for achieving multiple Sustainable Development Goals" (Available here: https://www.fao.org/3/cc3251en/cc3251en.pdf). This joint programme of work has also furthered partnerships with various civil society organizations. WWF Accelerating Coastal Community Led Conservation Initiative for the Oceans Practice reached out to the Hub to join efforts for IYAFA, including joint events at the UN Ocean Conference in June 2022 on the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries. WWF further invited the One Ocean Hub to join: the Blue Food Alliance that aims to transform our food system to focus on health, justice, and environmental sustainability; and the SSF Network, which arose from the first SSF Summit in September 2022. In addition, Naturskyddsföreningen (Swedish Society for Nature Conservation), Blue Venture, the Too-Big-To-Ignore research programme, and the IUCN Specialist Group on People and the Ocean have approached the Hub to contribute to the programme of work for IYAFA. All these civil society partners have emphasised how crucial it is to bring clarity on the content of the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries and build the capacities of fisheries-related communities of practice to protect human rights in their work. For the official closing of IYAFA (March 2023), the FAO invited Hub Director Elisa Morgera to speak at the high-level closing event and the Empatheatre team from South Africa to perform "Listen to the Sea" immediately afterwards. FAO and the Hub also co-organized a series of hybrid events prior to the closing event: a workshop on art-based approaches to the protection of small-scale fishers' human rights in South Africa, to explore their replicability in UN and NGO projects (Wed 29th March); a hybrid training on human rights and fisheries (29th March); and a hybrid roundtable on WTO Fisheries Subsidies Agreement and small-scale fishers' human rights (31st March). On these occasions, FAO and the Hub will plan legacy activities on SSFs' human rights for the remainder of 2023, including contributing to the integration of human rights into the second SSF Summit (scheduled in 2024). To that end, the FAO facilitated collaboration between the Hub and the Fisheries Working Group of the International Planning Committee for Food Sovereignty.
Collaborator Contribution FAO supported the development of the Guidelines on Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF) and had already run a pilot regional workshop on their implementation through legislation. FAO is a member of the Executive Team of the One Ocean Hub and based on the early findings from the Hub on the need to further clarify the human rights-based approach to fisheries (Morgera and Nakamura, 2021), FAO invited the Hub to co-develop a diagnostic tool, co-organize another regional workshop in Hub countries and develop further e-learning tools. FAO provided USD 37,450 of in-kind match funding from FAO consultants to support course development. To support the planning and the organisation of the joint programme for the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries in 2022, the FAO and UNEP has also provided in-kind support, in the form of staff time. The expansion of the partnership to the High Commissioner for Human Rights is a first for the ocean community and has provided invaluable insights for the Hub researchers, and their UN and civil society partners on how to rely on the international human rights monitoring system to support small-scale fishers on the ground when governments are falling behind in implementing their international commitments. The partnership has brought together a new Hub's inter-disciplinary team that has connected research across disciplines and scales. University of Strathclyde, Law School, Nelson Mandela University, University of Cape Coast and University of Namibia provide legal expertise. Rhodes University, Cape Town University, University of Namibia and University of Cape Coast provide sociological research co-developed with small-scale fishing communities. As an inter-disciplinary and cross-scale group we made significant progress towards channelling available legal, technical and strategic international support towards ocean-dependent communities in focus countries, as well as upscaling relevant findings to benefit other ODA-recipient countries. We contributed to focusing international support on SSF according to their needs as co-identified with Hub researchers. Our cross-scale approach has also opened pathways for marshalling international support towards, indigenous peoples and coastal communities negatively affected by blue economy initiatives ("ocean defenders"), and women and children negatively affected by unsustainable uses of the ocean. Support at the international level lends cachet to local advocacy efforts and influences systemic change at the national level. We achieved this progress by developing work programmes with international partners that are active across scales (national, regional and international), forming a nested approach to pathways to the Hub's national and international impact, and by: • co-developing research from the outset with international partners; • systematically sharing early findings through partners' ongoing capacity-building activities or co-developing new capacity-building activities, to engage in direct dialogue with their beneficiary country representatives; • proactively sharing early findings that contribute to international partners' own planning and agenda-setting activities; and • strategically utilising the strength of Hub partnerships with international organisations to leverage further support towards Hub objectives from other international partners. In doing so, we have built the capacity of: • South African, Ghanaian and Namibian community representatives to engage directly in international debates, while addressing their practical constraints and other, more pressing demands on their time; • communities to participate in national policy-making processes; • researchers to engage directly with international partners, as an essential skillset for researchers who have not yet worked across scales, so they can develop meaningful cross-scale networks; and • international partners and processes to adapt their modalities to accommodate community representatives' needs.
Impact Resultant Outcomes • Book chapter: E Morgera and J Nakamura, "Shedding a Light on the Human Rights of Small-scale Fisherfolk: Complementarities and Contrasts between the UN Declaration on Peasants' Rights and the Small-Scale Fisheries Guidelines" in Brunori et al, Commentary on the Declaration on the Rights of Peasants (Routledge, 2022, available from here: https://www.taylorfrancis.com/chapters/edit/10.4324/9781003139874-7/shedding-light-human-rights-small-scale-fishers-elisa-morgera-julia-nakamura; available on SSRN since 2021: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_i d=3850133). • FAO e-learning course "Legal and policy considerations for sustainable small-scale fisheries" (published in October 2022, available from here: https://elearning.fao.org/course/view.php?id=881). • One Ocean Hub's small-scale fisheries focused webpage: https://oneoceanhub.org/iyafa/. • A joint policy brief by FAO, One Ocean Hub, and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights "Applying coherently the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries for achieving multiple Sustainable Development Goals," https://www.fao.org/3/cc3251en/cc3251en.pdf. Blogposts and other publications summarising the events and engagements. • Small-Scale Fisheries and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks, https://oneoceanhub.org/small-scale-fisheries-and-blue-justice/. • The Food and Agriculture Organization and the One Ocean Hub co-organised a workshop on sustainable small-scale fisheries law: https://oneoceanhub.org/1939-2/ • Partnering with the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights for the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries, https://oneoceanhub.org/partnering-with-the-office-of-the-high-commissioner-for-human-rights-for-the-international-year-of-artisanal-fisheries/. • The Food and Agriculture Organization and the One Ocean Hub co-organised webinar on Namibia's small-scale fisheries, https://oneoceanhub.org/the-food-and-agriculture-organization-and-the-one-ocean-hub-co-organised-webinar-on-namibias-small-scale-fisheries/ • Strengthening knowledge on national policy and law and their alignment with the Small-Scale Fisheries Guidelines, https://oneoceanhub.org/strengthening-knowledge-on-national-policy-and-law-and-their-alignment-with-the-small-scale-fisheries-guidelines/ • Opening a platform for women in Small-Scale Fisheries in Ghana, https://oneoceanhub.org/opening-a-platform-for-women-in-small-scale-fisheries-in-ghana/ • Key messages: high level event on small-scale fishers' rights https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/key-messages-high-level-event-on-small-scale-fishers-rights/ • A Seismic Shift: A coalition of fishing communities, activists and lawyers has come together to keep the coasts and oceans of South Africa free of the destructive Blue Economy agenda" in Samudra, March, No.87, pp.4-7, ISSN 0973-1121 by Jackie Sunde. https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/a-seismic-shift-a-coalition-of-fishing-communities-activists-and-lawyers-has-come-together-to-keep-the-coasts-and-oceans-of-south-africa-free-of-the-destructive-blue-economy-agenda/ • "The court has a duty to step in and protect those who are offended and the environment" judge rules in the Shell seismic survey case, https://oneoceanhub.org/the-outcome-of-the-shell-seismic-survey-case/ • Deepening partnerships with small-scale fishers in Eastern Cape, South Africa, https://oneoceanhub.org/deepening-partnerships-with-eastern-cape-small-scale-fishers-south-africa/ • "How can national human rights institutions and international human rights mechanisms support the protection of small-scale fishers' human rights?" https://oneoceanhub.org/how-can-national-human-rights-institutions-and-international-human-rights-mechanisms-support-the-protection-of-small-scale-fishers-human-rights/ Webinars • Small-Scale Fisheries and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgdbVNhHf6Q&t=2103s. • One Ocean Hub & Food and Agriculture Organization Information Sharing Sessions on Namibia's Experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries (Day 1), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hm-KkkVfAG8&t=2 4s • One Ocean Hub & Food and Agriculture Organization Information Sharing Sessions Namibia's Experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries (Day 2), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l69nH3Uh-5I&t=8 1s. • Small-scale fishers and ocean well-being, an event for the UN World Ocean Week 2021, co-organised with FAO & UNEP, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S5yOIh-4ZpU&t=3992 s • Professor Elisa Morgera and Dr Dylan McGarry presentations in for the Inaugural GNHRE-UNEP Summer/Winter School 2021 across three sessions: (1) Environmental human rights defenders at the time of the pandemic: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-environmental-defenders-in-times-of-pandemic/. (2) Participation as resistance: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-participation-as-resistance/ (3) Marine environment, marine litter and human rights: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-the-marine-environment-marine-litter-and-human-rights/ • Exploring Challenges, Opportunities and Alliances for the Protection of Small-scale Fishers' Human Rights, at UN World Ocean Week 2022, 7 June 2022, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JaBnVZQS6_o&t=768s • One Ocean Hub's three led panels for the GNHRE-UNEP Summer/Winter School 2022: (1) The human rights dimensions of oceans crimes and its impact on small scale fishers (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S8sok7blfwM); (2) Oceans, Art and Environmental Defenders (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g42I6P1kIDc); and (3) Critical Human Rights Issues at the Ocean-Climate Nexus (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yAs48HzzQ8w). • "Fostering cooperation among relevant UN bodies to advance small-scale fishers' human rights in the face of climate change" (led by the One Ocean Hub for the COP27 Virtual Ocean Pavilion), 14 November 2022, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ukGnhAro_Ic&t=6s • Hub researchers Dr Jackie Sunder and Julia Nakamura presentations at the FAO led Parallel session #4.1 - SSF-LEX: the new small-scale fisheries policy and legal database at the 4th World Small-Scale Fisheries Congress Africa, 21 November 2023, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W87bgDcgiKc. • Dialogue Series on Human Rights Actors and Fisheries "Advancing the protection of small-scale fisher rights at national and international level organised by the Danish Institute for Human Rights (DIHR), One Ocean Hub and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR): (1) the first webinar National human rights institutions: Experiences and Potential for Addressing the Human Rights of small-scale fishers, fish workers and their communities, 1 February 2023. (https://youtu.be/O4MyETHEkdk) and (2) the second webinar Protecting the human rights of small-scale fishers through international human rights mechanisms (https://youtu.be/l9kbB3wXt6c). Video outputs • Photo-story: Small-scale fishers and human rights, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DhqzgSCjfug. • Ocean & Women, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDCyjRznGEA. • Indigenous Peoples and the Ocean, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kRzNMXiAz7I. • Ocean Connections: A Virtual Multimedia Exhibition, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AsavQOxyLFw&t=579s. • Ocean Connections Project Video, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-499UAZC3d0. • Defenders of the Ocean, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=agb9LCYhmWY.
Start Year 2021
 
Description BETTER PROTECTING SMALL-SCALE FISHERS' HUMAN RIGHTS ACROSS SCALES 
Organisation United Nations (UN)
Department Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights
Country Switzerland 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This partnership began in 2021 through the FAO existing programme to support national implementation of the FAO Guidelines on Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF) through national legislation. To support this, One Ocean Hub co-hosted with FAO regional workshops with government, community, research, and NGO representation from Ghana, Namibia, South Africa, to identify legislative barriers to the implementation of the FAO voluntary SSF guidelines in each country, thereby contributing to national research, while co-developing a global instrument, the FAO SSF Policy and Legal diagnostic tool in April 2021. Co-design of the regional workshop with South African researchers involved in the Coastal Justice Network allowed FAO to shift from a top-down approach that focused on discussing what international law requires from governments to an approach informed by local context, and responds to specific needs of SSF, through international law when national law falls short. Hub researchers facilitated SSF representatives' direct participation in the workshop in varied ways, including voice or video messages that communicated their priorities. SSF and government representatives, as well as non-legal researchers were made aware of how international law is (or is not) applied in the context of South Africa, Ghana and Namibia. This is now informing planning of further inter-disciplinary research that will guide strategies on partnerships with governments and SSF in Ghana. In addition, this regional event led to a follow-up event specifically for Namibia, in collaboration with the FAO, the Hub and the Ministry for Fisheries and Marine Resources (MFMR) Namibia. The webinar series organised on 10-11 June 2021 was titled 'Namibia's experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries.' It was aimed at providing the evidence required to support the process for the development of a National Plan of Action for Small-Scale Fisheries in Namibia, which the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources, which was published in 2022 as part of its commitment to implement the FAO SSF Guidelines. The workshop provided an opportunity to integrate the early research findings from the One Ocean Hub into the process for the development of a National Plan of Action for Small-Scale Fisheries in Namibia, notably with regard to the inclusion of the views of indigenous communities that have been displaced from the coast (Topnaar). This event led to an invitation for nominations for two experts to sit on Namibia's national task force on SSF (upon acceptance by the Ministry of Fisheries). The key research findings that were shared with FAO focused on the approaches to: • redress marginalisation of previously disadvantaged communities including those that have been historically removed from the coast e.g. the Topnaar community), and • address the diverse capacity-building needs of different stakeholder groups that are expected to benefit from or contribute to implementation (SSF associations, SSF women and youth, town councils, NGOs, and primary schools). In addition, FAO invited the Hub to co-develop two e-learning courses on implementation of the FAO Guidelines on SSF to be housed on the FAO E-learning Academy website (https://elearning.fao.org/). The courses are meant to respond to government officers' and fishers' needs respectively, to implement the FAO Guidelines. The latter will allow SSF to obtain an international certification on the FAO E-learning Academy that contributes to their professional development and recognition of SSF. Two papers by Hub colleagues in Ghana and South Africa were integrated as case studies in the first FAO e-learning course on SSF law and policy (in additions to insights arising from the joint Hub-FAO workshops). A new e-learning course will be co-developed in 2023 with a view to directly addressing the question and challenges of small-scale fishers in invoking international law and human rights in their daily interactions with authorities and other stakeholders, based on Hub partnerships with small-scale fishing organizations in Namibia, Ghana and South Africa. Meanwhile, the Hub shared some of these research findings and innovative methodologies for collaborating and supporting SSF with UNEP, in the context of a UN Global and African consultations on environmental human rights defenders. This contributing to the UN recognising SSF, indigenous peoples and local communities negatively affected by blue economy initiatives as "environmental human rights defenders" (defined by the United Nations as individuals and communities that raise awareness about the negative impacts on human rights of unsustainable decisions on the environment, who are increasingly the object of (often lethal) attacks by governments or private companies), which addressed a blind spot in current international initiatives that are land-focused and ignore "ocean defenders." Hub research was integrated into recommendations to the UN System to better coordinate efforts and fill gaps in supporting ocean defenders (to be published in 2023). Findings and approaches to enhancing participation and inclusion of SSF from South Africa (notably the Coastal Justice Network approaches) will be included among good practices documented by UNEP in a website on environmental human rights defenders to be launched in 2023. In addition, this allows the Hub to bring together FAO and UNEP into a joint event during World Oceans Week 2021 to discuss directly with SSF representatives from South Africa key challenges. Towards the end of 2021, the collaboration with FAO has led to an ambitious joint programme of work to advance the human rights-based approach to small scale fisheries as part of the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries and Aquaculture in 2022 with the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. The joint programme of work advanced understanding of the multiple threats to the rights of small-scale fishers to have a voice in decisions affecting their lives, health, culture and livelihoods, and garner further support for small-scale fishers that act as environmental human rights defenders. We shared key research insights and supported small-scale fisheries representatives to speak directly about their human rights concerns in a high-level event at World Ocean Week (WOW) 2022, to the UN Special Rapporteur on Human Rights and the Environment participated. In June 2022, the Hub was invited to join the panelists of the High-level Interactive Dialogue on Fisheries at the UN Ocean Conference, and shared on that occasion the key messages from the WOW event (see report summarising key messages shared during the event here: https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/key-messages-high-level-event-on-small-scale-fishers-rights/). These were then published in late 2022 as the first joint policy brief between FAO and the UNOHCHR, together with the Hub: "Applying coherently the human rights approach to small-scale fisheries for achieving multiple Sustainable Development Goals" (Available here: https://www.fao.org/3/cc3251en/cc3251en.pdf). This joint programme of work has also furthered partnerships with various civil society organizations. WWF Accelerating Coastal Community Led Conservation Initiative for the Oceans Practice reached out to the Hub to join efforts for IYAFA, including joint events at the UN Ocean Conference in June 2022 on the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries. WWF further invited the One Ocean Hub to join: the Blue Food Alliance that aims to transform our food system to focus on health, justice, and environmental sustainability; and the SSF Network, which arose from the first SSF Summit in September 2022. In addition, Naturskyddsföreningen (Swedish Society for Nature Conservation), Blue Venture, the Too-Big-To-Ignore research programme, and the IUCN Specialist Group on People and the Ocean have approached the Hub to contribute to the programme of work for IYAFA. All these civil society partners have emphasised how crucial it is to bring clarity on the content of the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries and build the capacities of fisheries-related communities of practice to protect human rights in their work. For the official closing of IYAFA (March 2023), the FAO invited Hub Director Elisa Morgera to speak at the high-level closing event and the Empatheatre team from South Africa to perform "Listen to the Sea" immediately afterwards. FAO and the Hub also co-organized a series of hybrid events prior to the closing event: a workshop on art-based approaches to the protection of small-scale fishers' human rights in South Africa, to explore their replicability in UN and NGO projects (Wed 29th March); a hybrid training on human rights and fisheries (29th March); and a hybrid roundtable on WTO Fisheries Subsidies Agreement and small-scale fishers' human rights (31st March). On these occasions, FAO and the Hub will plan legacy activities on SSFs' human rights for the remainder of 2023, including contributing to the integration of human rights into the second SSF Summit (scheduled in 2024). To that end, the FAO facilitated collaboration between the Hub and the Fisheries Working Group of the International Planning Committee for Food Sovereignty.
Collaborator Contribution FAO supported the development of the Guidelines on Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF) and had already run a pilot regional workshop on their implementation through legislation. FAO is a member of the Executive Team of the One Ocean Hub and based on the early findings from the Hub on the need to further clarify the human rights-based approach to fisheries (Morgera and Nakamura, 2021), FAO invited the Hub to co-develop a diagnostic tool, co-organize another regional workshop in Hub countries and develop further e-learning tools. FAO provided USD 37,450 of in-kind match funding from FAO consultants to support course development. To support the planning and the organisation of the joint programme for the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries in 2022, the FAO and UNEP has also provided in-kind support, in the form of staff time. The expansion of the partnership to the High Commissioner for Human Rights is a first for the ocean community and has provided invaluable insights for the Hub researchers, and their UN and civil society partners on how to rely on the international human rights monitoring system to support small-scale fishers on the ground when governments are falling behind in implementing their international commitments. The partnership has brought together a new Hub's inter-disciplinary team that has connected research across disciplines and scales. University of Strathclyde, Law School, Nelson Mandela University, University of Cape Coast and University of Namibia provide legal expertise. Rhodes University, Cape Town University, University of Namibia and University of Cape Coast provide sociological research co-developed with small-scale fishing communities. As an inter-disciplinary and cross-scale group we made significant progress towards channelling available legal, technical and strategic international support towards ocean-dependent communities in focus countries, as well as upscaling relevant findings to benefit other ODA-recipient countries. We contributed to focusing international support on SSF according to their needs as co-identified with Hub researchers. Our cross-scale approach has also opened pathways for marshalling international support towards, indigenous peoples and coastal communities negatively affected by blue economy initiatives ("ocean defenders"), and women and children negatively affected by unsustainable uses of the ocean. Support at the international level lends cachet to local advocacy efforts and influences systemic change at the national level. We achieved this progress by developing work programmes with international partners that are active across scales (national, regional and international), forming a nested approach to pathways to the Hub's national and international impact, and by: • co-developing research from the outset with international partners; • systematically sharing early findings through partners' ongoing capacity-building activities or co-developing new capacity-building activities, to engage in direct dialogue with their beneficiary country representatives; • proactively sharing early findings that contribute to international partners' own planning and agenda-setting activities; and • strategically utilising the strength of Hub partnerships with international organisations to leverage further support towards Hub objectives from other international partners. In doing so, we have built the capacity of: • South African, Ghanaian and Namibian community representatives to engage directly in international debates, while addressing their practical constraints and other, more pressing demands on their time; • communities to participate in national policy-making processes; • researchers to engage directly with international partners, as an essential skillset for researchers who have not yet worked across scales, so they can develop meaningful cross-scale networks; and • international partners and processes to adapt their modalities to accommodate community representatives' needs.
Impact Resultant Outcomes • Book chapter: E Morgera and J Nakamura, "Shedding a Light on the Human Rights of Small-scale Fisherfolk: Complementarities and Contrasts between the UN Declaration on Peasants' Rights and the Small-Scale Fisheries Guidelines" in Brunori et al, Commentary on the Declaration on the Rights of Peasants (Routledge, 2022, available from here: https://www.taylorfrancis.com/chapters/edit/10.4324/9781003139874-7/shedding-light-human-rights-small-scale-fishers-elisa-morgera-julia-nakamura; available on SSRN since 2021: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_i d=3850133). • FAO e-learning course "Legal and policy considerations for sustainable small-scale fisheries" (published in October 2022, available from here: https://elearning.fao.org/course/view.php?id=881). • One Ocean Hub's small-scale fisheries focused webpage: https://oneoceanhub.org/iyafa/. • A joint policy brief by FAO, One Ocean Hub, and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights "Applying coherently the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries for achieving multiple Sustainable Development Goals," https://www.fao.org/3/cc3251en/cc3251en.pdf. Blogposts and other publications summarising the events and engagements. • Small-Scale Fisheries and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks, https://oneoceanhub.org/small-scale-fisheries-and-blue-justice/. • The Food and Agriculture Organization and the One Ocean Hub co-organised a workshop on sustainable small-scale fisheries law: https://oneoceanhub.org/1939-2/ • Partnering with the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights for the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries, https://oneoceanhub.org/partnering-with-the-office-of-the-high-commissioner-for-human-rights-for-the-international-year-of-artisanal-fisheries/. • The Food and Agriculture Organization and the One Ocean Hub co-organised webinar on Namibia's small-scale fisheries, https://oneoceanhub.org/the-food-and-agriculture-organization-and-the-one-ocean-hub-co-organised-webinar-on-namibias-small-scale-fisheries/ • Strengthening knowledge on national policy and law and their alignment with the Small-Scale Fisheries Guidelines, https://oneoceanhub.org/strengthening-knowledge-on-national-policy-and-law-and-their-alignment-with-the-small-scale-fisheries-guidelines/ • Opening a platform for women in Small-Scale Fisheries in Ghana, https://oneoceanhub.org/opening-a-platform-for-women-in-small-scale-fisheries-in-ghana/ • Key messages: high level event on small-scale fishers' rights https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/key-messages-high-level-event-on-small-scale-fishers-rights/ • A Seismic Shift: A coalition of fishing communities, activists and lawyers has come together to keep the coasts and oceans of South Africa free of the destructive Blue Economy agenda" in Samudra, March, No.87, pp.4-7, ISSN 0973-1121 by Jackie Sunde. https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/a-seismic-shift-a-coalition-of-fishing-communities-activists-and-lawyers-has-come-together-to-keep-the-coasts-and-oceans-of-south-africa-free-of-the-destructive-blue-economy-agenda/ • "The court has a duty to step in and protect those who are offended and the environment" judge rules in the Shell seismic survey case, https://oneoceanhub.org/the-outcome-of-the-shell-seismic-survey-case/ • Deepening partnerships with small-scale fishers in Eastern Cape, South Africa, https://oneoceanhub.org/deepening-partnerships-with-eastern-cape-small-scale-fishers-south-africa/ • "How can national human rights institutions and international human rights mechanisms support the protection of small-scale fishers' human rights?" https://oneoceanhub.org/how-can-national-human-rights-institutions-and-international-human-rights-mechanisms-support-the-protection-of-small-scale-fishers-human-rights/ Webinars • Small-Scale Fisheries and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgdbVNhHf6Q&t=2103s. • One Ocean Hub & Food and Agriculture Organization Information Sharing Sessions on Namibia's Experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries (Day 1), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hm-KkkVfAG8&t=2 4s • One Ocean Hub & Food and Agriculture Organization Information Sharing Sessions Namibia's Experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries (Day 2), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l69nH3Uh-5I&t=8 1s. • Small-scale fishers and ocean well-being, an event for the UN World Ocean Week 2021, co-organised with FAO & UNEP, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S5yOIh-4ZpU&t=3992 s • Professor Elisa Morgera and Dr Dylan McGarry presentations in for the Inaugural GNHRE-UNEP Summer/Winter School 2021 across three sessions: (1) Environmental human rights defenders at the time of the pandemic: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-environmental-defenders-in-times-of-pandemic/. (2) Participation as resistance: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-participation-as-resistance/ (3) Marine environment, marine litter and human rights: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-the-marine-environment-marine-litter-and-human-rights/ • Exploring Challenges, Opportunities and Alliances for the Protection of Small-scale Fishers' Human Rights, at UN World Ocean Week 2022, 7 June 2022, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JaBnVZQS6_o&t=768s • One Ocean Hub's three led panels for the GNHRE-UNEP Summer/Winter School 2022: (1) The human rights dimensions of oceans crimes and its impact on small scale fishers (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S8sok7blfwM); (2) Oceans, Art and Environmental Defenders (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g42I6P1kIDc); and (3) Critical Human Rights Issues at the Ocean-Climate Nexus (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yAs48HzzQ8w). • "Fostering cooperation among relevant UN bodies to advance small-scale fishers' human rights in the face of climate change" (led by the One Ocean Hub for the COP27 Virtual Ocean Pavilion), 14 November 2022, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ukGnhAro_Ic&t=6s • Hub researchers Dr Jackie Sunder and Julia Nakamura presentations at the FAO led Parallel session #4.1 - SSF-LEX: the new small-scale fisheries policy and legal database at the 4th World Small-Scale Fisheries Congress Africa, 21 November 2023, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W87bgDcgiKc. • Dialogue Series on Human Rights Actors and Fisheries "Advancing the protection of small-scale fisher rights at national and international level organised by the Danish Institute for Human Rights (DIHR), One Ocean Hub and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR): (1) the first webinar National human rights institutions: Experiences and Potential for Addressing the Human Rights of small-scale fishers, fish workers and their communities, 1 February 2023. (https://youtu.be/O4MyETHEkdk) and (2) the second webinar Protecting the human rights of small-scale fishers through international human rights mechanisms (https://youtu.be/l9kbB3wXt6c). Video outputs • Photo-story: Small-scale fishers and human rights, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DhqzgSCjfug. • Ocean & Women, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDCyjRznGEA. • Indigenous Peoples and the Ocean, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kRzNMXiAz7I. • Ocean Connections: A Virtual Multimedia Exhibition, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AsavQOxyLFw&t=579s. • Ocean Connections Project Video, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-499UAZC3d0. • Defenders of the Ocean, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=agb9LCYhmWY.
Start Year 2021
 
Description BETTER PROTECTING SMALL-SCALE FISHERS' HUMAN RIGHTS ACROSS SCALES 
Organisation United Nations (UN)
Department United Nations Environment Programme
Country Kenya 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This partnership began in 2021 through the FAO existing programme to support national implementation of the FAO Guidelines on Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF) through national legislation. To support this, One Ocean Hub co-hosted with FAO regional workshops with government, community, research, and NGO representation from Ghana, Namibia, South Africa, to identify legislative barriers to the implementation of the FAO voluntary SSF guidelines in each country, thereby contributing to national research, while co-developing a global instrument, the FAO SSF Policy and Legal diagnostic tool in April 2021. Co-design of the regional workshop with South African researchers involved in the Coastal Justice Network allowed FAO to shift from a top-down approach that focused on discussing what international law requires from governments to an approach informed by local context, and responds to specific needs of SSF, through international law when national law falls short. Hub researchers facilitated SSF representatives' direct participation in the workshop in varied ways, including voice or video messages that communicated their priorities. SSF and government representatives, as well as non-legal researchers were made aware of how international law is (or is not) applied in the context of South Africa, Ghana and Namibia. This is now informing planning of further inter-disciplinary research that will guide strategies on partnerships with governments and SSF in Ghana. In addition, this regional event led to a follow-up event specifically for Namibia, in collaboration with the FAO, the Hub and the Ministry for Fisheries and Marine Resources (MFMR) Namibia. The webinar series organised on 10-11 June 2021 was titled 'Namibia's experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries.' It was aimed at providing the evidence required to support the process for the development of a National Plan of Action for Small-Scale Fisheries in Namibia, which the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources, which was published in 2022 as part of its commitment to implement the FAO SSF Guidelines. The workshop provided an opportunity to integrate the early research findings from the One Ocean Hub into the process for the development of a National Plan of Action for Small-Scale Fisheries in Namibia, notably with regard to the inclusion of the views of indigenous communities that have been displaced from the coast (Topnaar). This event led to an invitation for nominations for two experts to sit on Namibia's national task force on SSF (upon acceptance by the Ministry of Fisheries). The key research findings that were shared with FAO focused on the approaches to: • redress marginalisation of previously disadvantaged communities including those that have been historically removed from the coast e.g. the Topnaar community), and • address the diverse capacity-building needs of different stakeholder groups that are expected to benefit from or contribute to implementation (SSF associations, SSF women and youth, town councils, NGOs, and primary schools). In addition, FAO invited the Hub to co-develop two e-learning courses on implementation of the FAO Guidelines on SSF to be housed on the FAO E-learning Academy website (https://elearning.fao.org/). The courses are meant to respond to government officers' and fishers' needs respectively, to implement the FAO Guidelines. The latter will allow SSF to obtain an international certification on the FAO E-learning Academy that contributes to their professional development and recognition of SSF. Two papers by Hub colleagues in Ghana and South Africa were integrated as case studies in the first FAO e-learning course on SSF law and policy (in additions to insights arising from the joint Hub-FAO workshops). A new e-learning course will be co-developed in 2023 with a view to directly addressing the question and challenges of small-scale fishers in invoking international law and human rights in their daily interactions with authorities and other stakeholders, based on Hub partnerships with small-scale fishing organizations in Namibia, Ghana and South Africa. Meanwhile, the Hub shared some of these research findings and innovative methodologies for collaborating and supporting SSF with UNEP, in the context of a UN Global and African consultations on environmental human rights defenders. This contributing to the UN recognising SSF, indigenous peoples and local communities negatively affected by blue economy initiatives as "environmental human rights defenders" (defined by the United Nations as individuals and communities that raise awareness about the negative impacts on human rights of unsustainable decisions on the environment, who are increasingly the object of (often lethal) attacks by governments or private companies), which addressed a blind spot in current international initiatives that are land-focused and ignore "ocean defenders." Hub research was integrated into recommendations to the UN System to better coordinate efforts and fill gaps in supporting ocean defenders (to be published in 2023). Findings and approaches to enhancing participation and inclusion of SSF from South Africa (notably the Coastal Justice Network approaches) will be included among good practices documented by UNEP in a website on environmental human rights defenders to be launched in 2023. In addition, this allows the Hub to bring together FAO and UNEP into a joint event during World Oceans Week 2021 to discuss directly with SSF representatives from South Africa key challenges. Towards the end of 2021, the collaboration with FAO has led to an ambitious joint programme of work to advance the human rights-based approach to small scale fisheries as part of the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries and Aquaculture in 2022 with the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. The joint programme of work advanced understanding of the multiple threats to the rights of small-scale fishers to have a voice in decisions affecting their lives, health, culture and livelihoods, and garner further support for small-scale fishers that act as environmental human rights defenders. We shared key research insights and supported small-scale fisheries representatives to speak directly about their human rights concerns in a high-level event at World Ocean Week (WOW) 2022, to the UN Special Rapporteur on Human Rights and the Environment participated. In June 2022, the Hub was invited to join the panelists of the High-level Interactive Dialogue on Fisheries at the UN Ocean Conference, and shared on that occasion the key messages from the WOW event (see report summarising key messages shared during the event here: https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/key-messages-high-level-event-on-small-scale-fishers-rights/). These were then published in late 2022 as the first joint policy brief between FAO and the UNOHCHR, together with the Hub: "Applying coherently the human rights approach to small-scale fisheries for achieving multiple Sustainable Development Goals" (Available here: https://www.fao.org/3/cc3251en/cc3251en.pdf). This joint programme of work has also furthered partnerships with various civil society organizations. WWF Accelerating Coastal Community Led Conservation Initiative for the Oceans Practice reached out to the Hub to join efforts for IYAFA, including joint events at the UN Ocean Conference in June 2022 on the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries. WWF further invited the One Ocean Hub to join: the Blue Food Alliance that aims to transform our food system to focus on health, justice, and environmental sustainability; and the SSF Network, which arose from the first SSF Summit in September 2022. In addition, Naturskyddsföreningen (Swedish Society for Nature Conservation), Blue Venture, the Too-Big-To-Ignore research programme, and the IUCN Specialist Group on People and the Ocean have approached the Hub to contribute to the programme of work for IYAFA. All these civil society partners have emphasised how crucial it is to bring clarity on the content of the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries and build the capacities of fisheries-related communities of practice to protect human rights in their work. For the official closing of IYAFA (March 2023), the FAO invited Hub Director Elisa Morgera to speak at the high-level closing event and the Empatheatre team from South Africa to perform "Listen to the Sea" immediately afterwards. FAO and the Hub also co-organized a series of hybrid events prior to the closing event: a workshop on art-based approaches to the protection of small-scale fishers' human rights in South Africa, to explore their replicability in UN and NGO projects (Wed 29th March); a hybrid training on human rights and fisheries (29th March); and a hybrid roundtable on WTO Fisheries Subsidies Agreement and small-scale fishers' human rights (31st March). On these occasions, FAO and the Hub will plan legacy activities on SSFs' human rights for the remainder of 2023, including contributing to the integration of human rights into the second SSF Summit (scheduled in 2024). To that end, the FAO facilitated collaboration between the Hub and the Fisheries Working Group of the International Planning Committee for Food Sovereignty.
Collaborator Contribution FAO supported the development of the Guidelines on Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries (SSF) and had already run a pilot regional workshop on their implementation through legislation. FAO is a member of the Executive Team of the One Ocean Hub and based on the early findings from the Hub on the need to further clarify the human rights-based approach to fisheries (Morgera and Nakamura, 2021), FAO invited the Hub to co-develop a diagnostic tool, co-organize another regional workshop in Hub countries and develop further e-learning tools. FAO provided USD 37,450 of in-kind match funding from FAO consultants to support course development. To support the planning and the organisation of the joint programme for the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries in 2022, the FAO and UNEP has also provided in-kind support, in the form of staff time. The expansion of the partnership to the High Commissioner for Human Rights is a first for the ocean community and has provided invaluable insights for the Hub researchers, and their UN and civil society partners on how to rely on the international human rights monitoring system to support small-scale fishers on the ground when governments are falling behind in implementing their international commitments. The partnership has brought together a new Hub's inter-disciplinary team that has connected research across disciplines and scales. University of Strathclyde, Law School, Nelson Mandela University, University of Cape Coast and University of Namibia provide legal expertise. Rhodes University, Cape Town University, University of Namibia and University of Cape Coast provide sociological research co-developed with small-scale fishing communities. As an inter-disciplinary and cross-scale group we made significant progress towards channelling available legal, technical and strategic international support towards ocean-dependent communities in focus countries, as well as upscaling relevant findings to benefit other ODA-recipient countries. We contributed to focusing international support on SSF according to their needs as co-identified with Hub researchers. Our cross-scale approach has also opened pathways for marshalling international support towards, indigenous peoples and coastal communities negatively affected by blue economy initiatives ("ocean defenders"), and women and children negatively affected by unsustainable uses of the ocean. Support at the international level lends cachet to local advocacy efforts and influences systemic change at the national level. We achieved this progress by developing work programmes with international partners that are active across scales (national, regional and international), forming a nested approach to pathways to the Hub's national and international impact, and by: • co-developing research from the outset with international partners; • systematically sharing early findings through partners' ongoing capacity-building activities or co-developing new capacity-building activities, to engage in direct dialogue with their beneficiary country representatives; • proactively sharing early findings that contribute to international partners' own planning and agenda-setting activities; and • strategically utilising the strength of Hub partnerships with international organisations to leverage further support towards Hub objectives from other international partners. In doing so, we have built the capacity of: • South African, Ghanaian and Namibian community representatives to engage directly in international debates, while addressing their practical constraints and other, more pressing demands on their time; • communities to participate in national policy-making processes; • researchers to engage directly with international partners, as an essential skillset for researchers who have not yet worked across scales, so they can develop meaningful cross-scale networks; and • international partners and processes to adapt their modalities to accommodate community representatives' needs.
Impact Resultant Outcomes • Book chapter: E Morgera and J Nakamura, "Shedding a Light on the Human Rights of Small-scale Fisherfolk: Complementarities and Contrasts between the UN Declaration on Peasants' Rights and the Small-Scale Fisheries Guidelines" in Brunori et al, Commentary on the Declaration on the Rights of Peasants (Routledge, 2022, available from here: https://www.taylorfrancis.com/chapters/edit/10.4324/9781003139874-7/shedding-light-human-rights-small-scale-fishers-elisa-morgera-julia-nakamura; available on SSRN since 2021: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_i d=3850133). • FAO e-learning course "Legal and policy considerations for sustainable small-scale fisheries" (published in October 2022, available from here: https://elearning.fao.org/course/view.php?id=881). • One Ocean Hub's small-scale fisheries focused webpage: https://oneoceanhub.org/iyafa/. • A joint policy brief by FAO, One Ocean Hub, and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights "Applying coherently the human rights-based approach to small-scale fisheries for achieving multiple Sustainable Development Goals," https://www.fao.org/3/cc3251en/cc3251en.pdf. Blogposts and other publications summarising the events and engagements. • Small-Scale Fisheries and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks, https://oneoceanhub.org/small-scale-fisheries-and-blue-justice/. • The Food and Agriculture Organization and the One Ocean Hub co-organised a workshop on sustainable small-scale fisheries law: https://oneoceanhub.org/1939-2/ • Partnering with the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights for the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries, https://oneoceanhub.org/partnering-with-the-office-of-the-high-commissioner-for-human-rights-for-the-international-year-of-artisanal-fisheries/. • The Food and Agriculture Organization and the One Ocean Hub co-organised webinar on Namibia's small-scale fisheries, https://oneoceanhub.org/the-food-and-agriculture-organization-and-the-one-ocean-hub-co-organised-webinar-on-namibias-small-scale-fisheries/ • Strengthening knowledge on national policy and law and their alignment with the Small-Scale Fisheries Guidelines, https://oneoceanhub.org/strengthening-knowledge-on-national-policy-and-law-and-their-alignment-with-the-small-scale-fisheries-guidelines/ • Opening a platform for women in Small-Scale Fisheries in Ghana, https://oneoceanhub.org/opening-a-platform-for-women-in-small-scale-fisheries-in-ghana/ • Key messages: high level event on small-scale fishers' rights https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/key-messages-high-level-event-on-small-scale-fishers-rights/ • A Seismic Shift: A coalition of fishing communities, activists and lawyers has come together to keep the coasts and oceans of South Africa free of the destructive Blue Economy agenda" in Samudra, March, No.87, pp.4-7, ISSN 0973-1121 by Jackie Sunde. https://oneoceanhub.org/publications/a-seismic-shift-a-coalition-of-fishing-communities-activists-and-lawyers-has-come-together-to-keep-the-coasts-and-oceans-of-south-africa-free-of-the-destructive-blue-economy-agenda/ • "The court has a duty to step in and protect those who are offended and the environment" judge rules in the Shell seismic survey case, https://oneoceanhub.org/the-outcome-of-the-shell-seismic-survey-case/ • Deepening partnerships with small-scale fishers in Eastern Cape, South Africa, https://oneoceanhub.org/deepening-partnerships-with-eastern-cape-small-scale-fishers-south-africa/ • "How can national human rights institutions and international human rights mechanisms support the protection of small-scale fishers' human rights?" https://oneoceanhub.org/how-can-national-human-rights-institutions-and-international-human-rights-mechanisms-support-the-protection-of-small-scale-fishers-human-rights/ Webinars • Small-Scale Fisheries and Blue Justice: Procedural and Substantive Rights of Fisherfolks, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgdbVNhHf6Q&t=2103s. • One Ocean Hub & Food and Agriculture Organization Information Sharing Sessions on Namibia's Experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries (Day 1), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hm-KkkVfAG8&t=2 4s • One Ocean Hub & Food and Agriculture Organization Information Sharing Sessions Namibia's Experience on Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines on Small-Scale Fisheries (Day 2), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l69nH3Uh-5I&t=8 1s. • Small-scale fishers and ocean well-being, an event for the UN World Ocean Week 2021, co-organised with FAO & UNEP, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S5yOIh-4ZpU&t=3992 s • Professor Elisa Morgera and Dr Dylan McGarry presentations in for the Inaugural GNHRE-UNEP Summer/Winter School 2021 across three sessions: (1) Environmental human rights defenders at the time of the pandemic: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-environmental-defenders-in-times-of-pandemic/. (2) Participation as resistance: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-school-participation-as-resistance/ (3) Marine environment, marine litter and human rights: https://gnhre.org/critical-perspectives-on-human-rights-and-the-environment-the-2021-gnhre-unep-summer-winter-school/2021-summer-winter-scho