Promoting Safer Building - Using science, technology, communication and humanitarian practice to support family and community self-recovery

Lead Research Organisation: Overseas Development Inst ODI (Internat)
Department Name: Climate Change, Enviroment and Forests

Abstract

Poorly constructed buildings are often the largest cause of injury, trauma and death in the event of a natural disaster. Most families rebuild houses relying on their own resources, with little or no external support. They "self-recover". An analysis of statistics shows that the impact of aid agencies on housing recovery rarely reaches more than 20% of affected families and is frequently in single figures (Parrack, 2014). Moreover, much of that support is in the form of temporary housing intended to last only a few years. Therefore, we know that 80%, or more, self-recover.

The potential impact is huge: any one emergency can leave hundreds of thousands of families homeless, with women and girls disproportionately affected (Bradshaw, 2015). As things stand, these homes are too often rebuilt using the same pre-disaster bad practice that caused so much death, injury and economic damage in the first place.

Currently, shelter professionals lack understanding of the recovery process and therefore of inherent opportunities for appropriate and effective support. Families choose when and how to rebuild based on little-understood circumstances. Empowering them in the exercise of informed choice is integral to assisting self-recovery. There are neither tools nor knowledge to effectively support this at scale. The challenge for the humanitarian community, as well as national and local organisations, is to support this inevitable process of self-recovery.

While efforts are made to include Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) into many emergency and recovery shelter interventions, these activities are often very narrow in scope, frequently limited to the printing of simple guidance sheets. These have very little impact on resilience of self-built housing stock.
We know that simply informing people about risk - poor engineering, construction, and hazard risk - does not result in changed behaviour (van Wijk 1995), or in better, safer homes and communities. We also know there are no universal solutions. Evidence from post-disaster needs-assessments shows that families rapidly rebuild their homes with little or no knowledge of safer building techniques or the environmental factors that may increase their vulnerability. However there is evidence that demand for technical assistance can be very high soon after a rapid onset disaster. Only 12% of respondents interviewed for a CARE Nepal survey were able to name any techniques for improving seismic performance of a house, but 60% listed building safety as a top concern.

Currently, the international aid community lacks skills to adequately contextualise each unique situation, arrive rapidly and reliably at key technical messages and effectively transmit and promote those messages in a way that allows informed choice and ensures maximum acceptance by the affected population. Current post-disaster programmes do not systematically or effectively address the motivations (want), resources (can) and abilities (know-how) of beneficiaries in the process of self-recovery.

Through the multidisciplinary research of scientists, engineers and humanitarian practitioners, this proposal addresses the needs of those who self-build. It specifically addresses two important gaps:
- Technical best practice - what key construction and siting messages will make a substantial improvement to self-building in different contexts?
- Changing current practice - getting the message across; what communication and promotion methods really work; learning from current technology transfer and public education approaches.

References:
Parrack, C; Flinn, B and Passey, M (2014): Open House International
van Wijk, C; Murre, T (1995): UNICEF
Bradshaw, S., Fordham, M., (2015): Elsevier

Planned Impact

Research, as well as the experience of humanitarian practitioners, demonstrates that self-recovery after natural disasters is the predominant pathway to recovery for affected families and communities. Between 80 and 90% of households self-recover in a typical large-scale disaster such as an earthquake, flood or cyclonic storm (Parrack 2014). A programme that aims to support the 80% who self-recover will have an impact at a substantial scale. In the 20 years between 1994 and 2015, 66 million homes were damaged or destroyed by floods, 25 million by earthquake and 24 million by storm (CRED 2015). The Nepalese earthquake caused damage or collapse of 712,000 houses, the majority solidly built stone dwellings in remote rural locations. Typhoon Haiyan, the strongest storm to ever make landfall and arguably a symptom of climate change and a future indicator, affected as many as one million homes (information from shelter cluster).
Increasingly, aid agencies are recognising the need to move away from a product-based response (a temporary structure, a tent) towards technical assistance, training and incremental support through cash and materials. This dramatically escalates the significance, impact and value for money of a response, as well as increasing the long-term legacy through improved building practice and disaster risk reduction. Self-recovery is central to this methodology that tends towards an enabling approach to recovery and away from physical construction. Moreover, support to self-recovery is not a stand-alone approach: conventional modalities such as cash transfer, materials, vouchers etc. will complement an approach that includes an overall improvement in safe building techniques. While self-recovery programmes will have an impact on entire communities through training and improved practice, it is also possible to target vulnerable and marginalized families through a bespoke selection process.
Knowledge of the self-recovery process, and how to support it, is very limited. This research will benefit:
- Disaster affected populations: the most important stakeholders are the hundreds of thousands of families that lose their homes through natural disasters each year. Through a better understanding of their pathway through self-recovery, and by developing contextualised tools and techniques to support that process, the enduring benefit will be resilient communities, a safer building stock and long-term disaster risk reduction.
- International humanitarian NGOs and in particular shelter departments and practitioners: through CARE's network of contacts, the majority of key actors will be aware of, and involved in, this research. Several will be represented on the steering group. CARE's position as a lead shelter agency will be instrumental in ensuring that the impact of this research will be multiplied through engagement with peer agencies.
- National organisations and partners will become increasingly engaged as the longer-term programme evolves. In this foundation phase, many national partnerships will be forged through the case-studies and the international symposium. The extensive international networks of the four collaborating organisations will facilitate far-reaching and diverse contacts.
- Academic organisations based both in the UK and the global south, through direct involvement in research, workshops and symposia (Academic Beneficiaries). The cross disciplinary research will involve scientists, architects, engineers, social scientists and humanitarian practitioners.
- Coordination bodies - there are already established strong links with UN and other coordinating bodies. Of particular mention are: the International Federation of the Red Cross, UNHCR, UNISDR and the International Organisation for Migration.

References
Parrack, C; Flinn, B and Passey, M (2014) Getting the Message Across for Safer Self-Recovery in Post-Disaster Shelter. Open House International
CRED (2015) The Human Cost of Natural Disasters

Publications

10 25 50
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Flinn B (2017) The Case for Self-Recovery in Forced Migration Review

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Miranda Morel, L (2017) Mapping (self-) recovery: Reflections on people's trajectories, perceptions and aspirations of recovery in the Philippines. in UNMGCY Youth Science Policy Interface Publication - Special Edition: Disaster Risk

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Schofield H; (2017) Expert view: 'Self-recovery for resilience: a multifaceted process' in Resilience Scan January-March 2017: a review of literature, debates and tweets on resilience

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Schofield, H (2017) Whose recovery? Power, roles and ownership in humanitarian shelter assistance in Humanitarian Practice Network

 
Description The project has launched an intensive investigation of 'self-recovery', where disaster-affected families rebuild their homes relying on their own or local resources, with little or no external assistance. With this grant, we have explored the governmental, economic, environmental technical and socio-cultural contexts in which self-recovery takes place and which shape self-recovery pathways and processes. The research in the Philippines and Nepal shows that the process of reconstruction through self-recovery is mutli-facted, involving complex decision-making and priority setting by affected households and individuals. It identified a number of different influences that contributed to the overall progression of self-recovery, or to progress being held back. These included households' changing needs and priorities at different stages in the recovery process, livelihood pressures, psychological reactions to disaster and risk, regulatory requirements, access to funding and material resources for reconstruction, and the level of technical knowledge and skills available. The research adopted an inter-disciplinary approach, which involved social scientists, engineers, geoscientists and humanitarian practitioners in collecting and analysing data collaboratively: this was challenging but ultimately rewarding in the range of insights that it delivered. Throughout the project there was extensive engagement with humanitarian shelter practitioners, at national and international levels, through workshops and conferences.
Exploitation Route The project has led to a second phase of work by the same partners, which is investigating self-recovery in urban contexts (again in Nepal and the Philippines). This is funded by the British Academy's Cities & Infrastructure Programme.
Sectors Other

 
Description Engagement with the international humanitarian shelter community of practice continues, and is encouraging interest in a number of international agencies. The Inter-Agency Standing Committee's Global Shelter Cluster - a co-ordinating body for humanitarian agencies working on this issue in major disasters - has recently established a working group on self-recovery to share knowledge and experience of good practice, with one of the project partners (CARE International) as convenor.
First Year Of Impact 2017
Impact Types Policy & public services

 
Description Global Challenges Research Fund Cities and Infrastructure Programme
Amount £299,999 (GBP)
Funding ID CI170172 
Organisation The British Academy 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (UK)
Start 09/2017 
End 01/2019
 
Description 3rd International Conference on Urban Sustainability and Resilience Conference, UCL - June 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Two members of the Promoting Safer Building team presented a paper titled 'Promoting Safer Building: Using science, technology, communications and humanitarian practice to support family and community self-recovery' at the 3rd International Conference on Urban Sustainability and Resilience in University College London, June 2017.The presentation was well attended with some interesting questions and engagement following the event. The team has since received a request to submit a paper to include in the conference proceedings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Building Resilience to Geohazards in the Face of Uncertainty, Geological Society 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The purpose of the meeting was to bring together earth scientists, social scientists and science-policy practitioners to discuss the way in which research and researchers are able to contribute to the resilience building process and how to do this effectively in the face of the many scientific and social uncertainties that exist.
Our team presented some initial reflections on the role of practitioners as knowledge intermediaries in using science to inform humanitarian response and support self-recovery.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.ucl.ac.uk/rdr/events-news-publication/building-resilience
 
Description Building Resilient Cities and Communities after Disasters: Lessons in Humanitarian Assistance, Recovery, Partnerships and Policies. Training event. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact At the World Urban Forum (WUF9) the team was part of a wider training on humanitarian shelter response. A session within this training was facilitated by a team member and focused on understanding self-recovery. The training involved a presentation, group dialogue and open discussion. The intended purpose was to disseminate the research findings, open new opportunities of dialogue with people that are unfamiliar with the concept and spark interest for future collaborations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://wuf9.org/programme/training-events/building-resilient-cities-and-communities-after-disasters-...
 
Description IGNITE presentation at the Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction (Mexico) on 'Promoting safer self-recovery after a disaster' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This presentation shares the stories and images of self-recovery and response to the 2015 earthquake in Nepal and the 2013 Typhoon Haiyan and 2016 Typhoon Haima in the Philippines, drawing on our experiences from the Promoting Safer Building project. These case studies show examples of self-recovery that take into account different types of hazards and contexts. The presentation demonstrates new areas of research in terms of linking safer self-recovery and promoting safer buildings i.e. building back better and safer.

The Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction took place in Mexico from 24 to 26 May 2017, and was the first to take place since the adoption of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction. Seven thousand people attended the Global Platform, with participation from Asia, the Americas, Africa, Europe and the Pacific. The IGNITE stage was a special venue at the entrance of the 2017 Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction conference centre where selected participants are allowed 15 minutes to present a disaster risk reduction topic, project or initiative. Its aim is to widen the array of topics that are discussed at the Global Platform beyond those presented in the main sessions and events.

The presentation was well attended with some interesting questions and engagement following the event.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.unisdr.org/conferences/2017/globalplatform/en/programme/ignite-stage/view/763
 
Description IHR - DDN Dealing with Disasters Conference, Durham University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact To celebrate the 10 year anniversary of the Institute of Hazard, Risk & Resilience (IHRR) based at Durham University, the IHRR has come together with the 11th Dealing with Disasters (DwD) Conference, Disaster and Development Network (DDN) based in Northumbria University, to organise this international conference. Our aim is to bring together practitioners, researchers, humanitarian agencies and hazard managers to present and discuss the latest understanding and challenges around managing hazards and surviving disasters. For this event, broad interpretations of hazard, risk and resilience will be considered in keeping with demands for new strategic developments in this field globally, regionally and more locally.
Our team carried out a presentation on the use of science to inform humanitarian support for recovery after disasters and the role of knowledge intermediaries in the process.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.dur.ac.uk/ihrr/10th-anniversary/ihrr10/dwd-conference2017/
 
Description Keynote speech 10th Caribbean Disaster Management Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact An invited keynote speech on community resilience to practitioners and policy makers from government, international and local organisations working on disaster risk reduction across the Caribbean. Community self-recovery featured in the speech as an important but largely overlooked dimension of community resilience. The keynote led to several conversations with local practitioners and international donor agencies about the potential for further work on self-recovery in the region.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Official side event at the Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction (Mexico) - 'Promoting safer buildings, schools and hospitals' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction took place in Mexico from 24 to 26 May 2017, and was the first to take place since the adoption of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction. Seven thousand people attended the Global Platform, with participation from Asia, the Americas, Africa, Europe and the Pacific.

The official side event 'Promoting safer buildings, schools and hospitals' was organised by ODI, the Mexican Institute of Social Security and Save the Children in Australia. The event took place on Friday 26th May 2017. The abstract is provided below:

"Poorly constructed buildings are often the largest cause of death, injury and loss of assets during a disaster. SFDRR prioritises the need to 'substantially reduce disaster damage to critical infrastructure and disruption of basic services, among them health and educational facilities, including through developing their resilience'. It also identifies a need to 'Enhance disaster preparedness for effective response and to "Build Back Better" in recovery, rehabilitation and reconstruction'. This event promotes the need for multi-stakeholder engagement, community-based approaches and partnerships to support building safer buildings, schools and hospitals, with policies and practices to reduce loss of life, assets and livelihoods".

The event was well attended with some interesting questions and engagement following the event.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.unisdr.org/conferences/2017/globalplatform/en/programme/side-events/view/670
 
Description Promoting Safer Building - Supporting Safer Self-Recovery - InterAction Shelter and Settlements Conference, Washinngtong DC - June 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Two members of the Promoting Safer Building Team attended a stakeholders conference on making the settlements approach a reality to present a paper and facilitate a session on self-recovery and its potential role in a settlements approach to humanitarian assistance. The conference took place on the 15th and 16th of June in Washington DC. The presentation was well attended with some interesting questions and engagement following the event.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2009,2017
 
Description Promoting Safer Building Kathmandu Roundtable May 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Nepal research case study took place from the 18th of April until the 01st of May 2017 in several communities within Dhading District, which was devastated by the earthquakes of 2015. The aim of this roundtable was to bring our initial research findings together to present them to practitioners, academics, policymakers and affected communities and get their feedback. Furthermore, it was important for us to critically reflect and engage with these important actors in how to take this research forward. Revising our initial observations and sharing them with experts in the practice and theory of shelter and disaster recovery was an important step to better understand the place of our research within the context of recovery processes in Nepal. By bringing such expertise together as well as the voices of some of the people who have practised (self-) recovery we hoped to (1) promote further understanding and interest in 'self-recovery' in Nepal; (2) promote collective engagement and discussion on safer self-recovery; (3) share some of our initial findings from fieldwork in Nepal and engage in knowledge exchange on how to move forward with this research; and finally (4) build a local network in Nepal of different actors involved in the recovery process to contribute to our growing community of practice.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://promotingsaferbuilding.org/self-recovery-in-nepal-reflecting-with-practitioners
 
Description Promoting Safer Building Philippines Roundtable March 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The project's Philippines case study took place from the 4th until the 18th of March 2017 in several communities in the Philippines that were devastated by Typhoons Haiyan (2013) and Haima (2016). The aim of this roundtable was to bring our initial research findings together to present them to practitioners, academics, policymakers and affected communities and get their feedback.
Furthermore, it was important for us to critically reflect and engage with these important actors in how to take this research forward. Revising our initial observations and sharing them with experts in the practice and theory of shelter and disaster recovery was an important step to better understand the place of our research within the context of recovery processes in the Philippines.
By bringing such expertise together as well as the voices of some of the people who have practised (self-) recovery we hoped to (1) promote further understanding and interest in 'self-recovery' in the Philippines; (2) promote collective engagement and discussion on safer self-recovery; (3) share some of our initial findings from fieldwork in the Philippines and engage in knowledge exchange on how to move forward with this research; and finally (4) build a local network in the Philippines of different actors involved in the recovery process to contribute to our growing community of practice.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://promotingsaferbuilding.org/self-recovery-in-the-philippines
 
Description Promoting Safer Building UK Workshop January 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact This was a two-day workshop. The first day was largely internal with the project team and some outside participation. The activities of the day focused on following up on a two page proposal prepared by each of the partners. The objectives were to (1) Define the key research questions for the research and (2) determine an appropriate multidisciplinary methodology.
The second workshop day was opened to outside participation and included the project advisory group. The objectives of this second day were to (1) formally present the research project to our network (2) test and refine the key research questions by exposing them to people outside of the research team and opening spaces for feedback; and (3) engage the project's network in defining an operational methodology for the research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://promotingsaferbuilding.org/first-project-workshop
 
Description Promoting Safer Building: End of Pilot Project Conference July 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The pilot research took place in the Philippines between the 4th and the 18th of March 2017 & Nepal, between the 18th of April and the 01st of May 2017. These comparative case studies will inform the development of a working paper on supporting self-recovery in post-disaster emergencies and the development of future research. The research was brought together and presented at this conference on the 13th of July 2017.

This conference was also important to situate the project in the wider context of humanitarian action, disaster risk reduction, disaster response, resilience building and recovery. It sought to highlight the key role that science and engineering have to play in each of the above processes, as well as the challenges and opportunities that all stakeholders face in communicating and articulating these different forms of knowledge to ensure better informed, more rigorous and effective humanitarian practice. At the centre of these debates lay the question, is supporting self-recovery a new direction for humanitarian action? If so, what are the strengths, opportunities, challenges and risks? How do we respond to these?
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Promoting Safer Building: Initial Reflections Workshop May 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A Promoting Safer Building Workshop which took place in London UK in May 2017 in which the team placed its initial findings for scrutiny among the wider community of practice. The even encouraged interesting and productive discussion and debate relating to the findings but also next steps and also areas for additional research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Promoting Safer Building: Using science, technology, communications and humanitarian practice to support family and community self-recovery - 8th i-Rec conference Toronto, Canada 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Promoting Safer Building team prepared a presentation to be delivered at the 8th I-Rec conference in Toronto Canada.

The main goal of i-Rec conferences is to contribute to disaster reconstruction and recovery knowledge and its applications in disaster impacted populations through interdisciplinary research and information sharing with various stakeholders. The 2017 i-Rec conference sought to understand how disaster recovery and reconstruction knowledge and practice can contribute to the recovery and reconstruction of displaced and refugee populations.

The title of the presentation was ' Promoting Safer Building: Using science, technology, communications and humanitarian practice to support family and community self-recovery'. The team was represented by a member of CARE Canada who delivered the presentation to the conference.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Researching Self-Recovery in Rural and Urban environments (CENDEP Session 1) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact This was the first of two sessions carried out by two team members at the OXFORD Brookes Centre for Development and Emergency Practice (CENDEP). The lesson focused on the research methodologies and the challenges and opportunities of working in interdisciplinary teams. The objective of this session was to introduce students to the process of researching self-recovery and prepare them for a more in-depth discussion in the following session (two weeks later).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/shelter-after-disaster/
 
Description Shelter Week 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The team participated and presented on multiple occasions during this week-long meeting. The Shelter Meeting is a biannual conference for humanitarian technical practitioners, constituting a state-of-the-art meeting involving live video conferencing, including good practice case studies, the peer review of sector projects and the prioritisation and knowledge sharing in the humanitarian sector.

The Shelter Meeting is your opportunity to promote your priorities and share your experience, whether related to the event theme, or generally relevant to our shared community of practice. From this meeting the PSB team established a collaboration with CRATerre, and co-leadership of the Promoting Safer Building Working Group with the GSC.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://sheltercentre.org/collaboration/#shelter-meeting
 
Description Strengthening resilience of human settlements after complex natural disasters and conflicts Lessons from Humanitarian Response and Recovery 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact This interactive networking event highlighted new approaches, challenges, and key lessons learned in some of the most complex (urban) environments after major humanitarian emergencies. InterAction and other humanitarian and development partners shared innovative practical examples and initiatives from natural disasters, internal displacements, refugee crises and other complex emergencies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://wuf9.org/programme/networking-events/strengthening-resilience-of-human-settlements-after-comp...
 
Description Supporting strategies for self-recovery (CENDEP Session 2) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact This was the second session at the Centre for Development and Emergency Practice (CENDEP) at OXFORD Brookes. The session built on a previous one that had focused on interdisciplinary research on self-recovery and focused on identifying strategies of self-recovery in rural environments. The session then generated discussions on how these strategies might be supported in a practical sense. The students worked in small groups and through open debate and discussion.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/shelter-after-disaster/
 
Description Talk for Geological Society Careers Day 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact I spoke about my work on this project as part of a presentation at the Geological Society's careers event in November 2017. A number of students contacted me afterwards who are keen to work in geohazards and in resilience-related activities and I provided advice on possible careers paths and people to contact.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description UK Shelter Forum - May 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Three members of the Promoting Safer Building team attended the two day UK Shelter Forum in Oxford, UK. The UK Shelter Forum is a community of practice for individuals and organisations involved in shelter and settlement reconstruction activities after disasters and has held twice yearly meetings since 2006. The team presented the research and the preliminary findings to the community of practice. The presentation sparked interest and encouraged interesting questions and discussion.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description World Reconstruction Conference 3: Promoting Resilience Through Post -Crisis Recovery, Brussels, Belgium - June 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A member of the Promoting Safer Building Team attended the World Reconstruction Conference 3: Promoting Resilience Through Post -Crisis Recovery, Brussels, Belgium on the 6th - 8th of June. They participated in discussions and side events in order to promote the project among an international audience of international donors, policymakers and humanitarian actors. It sparked interest in the project and served to increase the project's community of practice.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description World Urban Forum (WUF) #9 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The World Urban Forum (WUF) is a non-legislative technical forum convened by the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat) held since 2002.

The Forum gathers a wide range of experts from every walk of life. Participants of the Forum include, but are not limited to, national, regional and local governments, non-governmental organizations, community-based organizations, professionals, research institutions and academies, professionals, private sector, development finance institutions, foundations, media and United Nations organizations and other international agencies.

It is recognized as the foremost global arena for interaction among policymakers, local government leaders, non-governmental organizations and expert practitioners in the field of sustainable urban development and human settlements.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://wuf9.org/about-wuf/