Project support for the Wide Area Search for Planets

Lead Research Organisation: Queen's University Belfast
Department Name: Sch of Mathematics and Physics

Abstract

Questions such as ``how many stars have planets around them?'' and ``how many habitable planets are there?'' interest both astronomers and everyone else. To answer them we need to find planets that can be studied in detail, seeking to understand the processes by which planets form and solar systems evolve. Of the two hundred planets that astronomers have found orbiting other stars we can learn most about those that transit in front of their star. We can measure how big they are, how heavy they are, and thus deduce their density and what they are made of. And by looking at how their atmosphere absorbs the light of their star we can discover the composition of their atmospheres. The WASP project aims to monitor 40 million of the brightest stars, looking for the tiny dips in their light caused by a planet passing in front of them. We will survey the sky for the transiting planets that are relatively close to Earth, which we can study in detail to enable us to understand how planetary systems form and evolve. The next generation of space missions, such as the James Webb Space Telescope, the successor to Hubble, will prioritize the study of planets around other stars. The WASP project will find the planets that will make the best and most interesting targets.

Publications

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Gibson N (2010) A transit timing analysis of seven RISE light curves of the exoplanet system HAT-P-3 in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Gibson N (2010) Ground-based detection of thermal emission from the exoplanet WASP-19b in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters

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Hebb L (2010) WASP-19b: THE SHORTEST PERIOD TRANSITING EXOPLANET YET DISCOVERED in The Astrophysical Journal

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Hellier C (2010) WASP-29b: A SATURN-SIZED TRANSITING EXOPLANET in The Astrophysical Journal

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Hellier C (2011) WASP-43b: the closest-orbiting hot Jupiter in Astronomy & Astrophysics

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Hellier C (2011) The WASP-South search for transiting exoplanets in EPJ Web of Conferences

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Hellier C (2014) Transiting hot Jupiters from WASP-South, Euler and TRAPPIST: WASP-95b to WASP-101b in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Hidas M (2010) An ingress and a complete transit of HD 80606 b Ingress and complete transit of HD 80606 b in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Hrudkov√° M (2010) Tight constraints on the existence of additional planets around HD 189733 in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Hsieh H (2010) SuperWASP observations of the 2007 outburst of Comet 17P/Holmes SuperWASP observations of 17P/Holmes in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Lendl M (2012) WASP-42 b and WASP-49 b: two new transiting sub-Jupiters in Astronomy & Astrophysics

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Maxted P (2010) WASP-32b: A Transiting Hot Jupiter Planet Orbiting a Lithium-Poor, Solar-Type Star in Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific

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Maxted P (2011) WASP-41b: A Transiting Hot Jupiter Planet Orbiting a Magnetically Active G8V Star in Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific

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McQuillin R (2012) Novae in the SuperWASP data base Novae in the SuperWASP data base in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

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Norton A (2011) Short period eclipsing binary candidates identified using SuperWASP in Astronomy & Astrophysics

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Queloz D (2010) WASP-8b : a retrograde transiting planet in a multiple system in Astronomy and Astrophysics

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Simpson E (2010) The spin-orbit alignment of the transiting exoplanet WASP-3b from Rossiter-McLaughlin observations in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society