Rolling Grant

Lead Research Organisation: University College London
Department Name: Mullard Space Science Laboratory

Abstract

A Rolling Grant is designed to support a programme of research within a particular domain. The domain in this case is Space Science, in particular the fields of: 1. Compact Objects (Black Holes and Neutron Stars, seeking to understand the physics associated with the enormously compact objects. this includes studying Gamma-ray bursts (giant supernovae in distant galaxies), isolated neutron stars including those with gigantic magnetic fields, and black holes); 2. Galaxy Formation and Evolution (Understanding these processes using extremely sophisticated computer modelling techniques. Looking at the role of Active Galactic Nuclei, the history of star formation and the role of feedback) 3. Magnetic Coupling and the Heliosphere (The emergence of magnetic field structures on the Sun, how solar eruptions are triggered, the creation of the Solar Wind and how it affects the Earth); 4. Plasma Physics of the Terrestrial and Planetary Environments (The Earth and some other planets are surrounded and protected by magnetic fields which provide a local laboratory for fundamental research into how charged particles interact with complex magnetic field structures. Through the use of in-situ space probes we will study these processes to gain a fuller understanding of this important physics. Many solar system bodies do not have a protective magnetic field and so we will also study the these interactions, especially planets and moons with an atmospheres (e.g. Mars and Titan)); 5. Planetary Surfaces (The surfaces of planets, particularly Mars, provide interesting and alternative geological and meteorological settings to the Earth. We plan to use the plethora of observational data available from currently orbiting spacecraft to study in great detail these terrains). 6. Enabling technologies (Miniature, very low temperature coolers, auroral imagers and plasma analysers will be developed. New methods of constructing 3-dimensional models of planetary surfaces will be produced. A study will be made (with impact trials) of the survivability of an instrumented penetrator into ice at around 700 miles per hour).

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description Significant improved understanding in the fields of astrophysics, space plasma physics, solar physics, planetary sciences and instrumentation
Exploitation Route Through peer reviewed publications
Sectors Other

 
Description Consolidated Grants
Amount £2,537,157 (GBP)
Funding ID ST/N000722/1 
Organisation Science and Technologies Facilities Council (STFC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2016 
End 03/2019
 
Description Consolidated Grants
Amount £1,138,583 (GBP)
Funding ID ST/N000811/1 
Organisation Science and Technologies Facilities Council (STFC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2016 
End 03/2019
 
Description STFC Consolidated Grant
Amount £2,145,073 (GBP)
Funding ID ST/K000977/1 
Organisation Science and Technologies Facilities Council (STFC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2013 
End 03/2017
 
Title Cryogenic system elements 
Description Elements of millK Adiabatic Demagnetisation Refrigerators including heatswitches and magnets. Magnets, cryogenics, vacuum 
Type Of Technology Systems, Materials & Instrumental Engineering 
Year Produced 2011 
Impact Development will lead to minaturization of coolers which will make them more suitable for space and ground-based applications