NCAS Climate and High Impact Weather

Lead Research Organisation: NERC National Ctr for Atmospheric Sci

Abstract

High impact Weather events such as storms, heatwaves and cold spells can result in substantial socio-economic impacts on water resources, infrastructure, agriculture and public health. To mitigate the risks of High Impact Weather, society needs improved early warnings, risk assessments and further knowledge on the impact of climate change. Our priority is to understand the processes behind different types of high-impact weather events (such as convective storms, cyclonic storms, cold spells, heatwaves and droughts) as well as large-scale modes of variability.

Publications

10 25 50

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Arduini G (2020) Local and non-local controls on a persistent cold-air pool in the Arve River Valley in Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society

 
Description The programme has been influential in a number of different areas relating to the science of climate and high-impact weather, by furthering our understanding of:
1. Weather forecasting of storms and extreme precipitation in the UK and Europe.
2. Improving subseasonal to seasonal forecast skill for European weather, El Nino, and the Indian Summer Monsoon.
3. The projected climate change responses of heat waves, tropical cyclones, mid-latitude storms, monsoon rainfall, and anticyclonic blocking.
4. The variability and predictability of convective storms and the processes controlling the development of convection (e.g. aerosol-cloud interactions).
Exploitation Route The science theme covers a broad range of topics in the area of Climate and High Impact Weather. Key ways that others may take the outcomes forward include:

1. Academics: Working in the area of environmental impacts and environmental science.

2. Government, NGOs and industry: Informing UK and global policy on natural hazards and climate change and helping users assess key environmental risks

3. Operational forecast centres: Results will help to improve weather and subseasonal-to-seasonal forecasts on timescales of days to months.
Sectors Agriculture, Food and Drink,Energy,Environment,Financial Services, and Management Consultancy,Healthcare,Government, Democracy and Justice

URL https://ncas.ac.uk/our-science/climate-high-impact-weather/
 
Description This submission relates to the NCAS research programme on Climate and High-Impact Weather. The outputs of the NCAS science theme have resulted in impacts in a wide range of areas, which include: 1. International assessments, the most prominent example of which is contributing to and reviewing the next IPCC assessment on climate change. 2. Research has had substantial impact on NGOs and UK Government Departments (especially DFID/FCOD). This includes tailoring meteorological forecast information for a range of humanitarian agencies in anticipation of, and in response to, impending monthly and seasonal-scale precipitation and weather extremes such as El Nino and La Nina. 3. Outputs have also been used develop risk assessment tools in the private sector and operational forecast centres. Examples include an insurance risk models of correlated wind and flood risk in the UK and a tool to help the UK Met Office assess sting-jet precursors in weather forecasts of severe windstorms.
First Year Of Impact 2018
Sector Agriculture, Food and Drink,Environment,Financial Services, and Management Consultancy,Healthcare,Government, Democracy and Justice
Impact Types Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description IPCC AR6 Lead Author / Department for Business, Innovation and Skills; International Organisations/Committees; UNFCCC
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Climate Canopy exhibit at Leeds Light Night 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The National Centre for Atmospheric Science, in collaboration with artist Alison Smith, created a sensory art installation to encourage climate and community action in the face of global environmental challenges. The suspended exhibit, titled Climate Canopy, uses light and recycled materials to display the story of global warming through colour and touch. Climate Canopy was exhibited for the first time at Leeds Light Night on Thursday 14th and Friday 15th October 2021, at the Carriageworks Theatre. Leeds Light Night is a free arts and light festival that transforms some of the city's most recognizable spaces into spectacular artworks and captivating performances. Leeds Light Night is the UK's largest annual arts and light festival, boasting 150,000 visitors each year.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
 
Description Climate Canopy sculpture installed at United Nations Climate Change Conference - COP26 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The science-art light installation Climate Canopy was exhibited for world leaders at the United Nations Climate Change Conference, COP26, in Glasgow. The suspended structure illuminated tens of thousands of passing delegates in the Blue Zone, displaying the history of global temperature rise, at one of the most decisive events in our lifetime.
The display, created by the National Centre for Atmospheric Science and Leeds-based artist Alison Smith, is formed from coloured stripes of light which represent 170 year of global temperature data. There are 26 stripes in total, inspired by the warming stripes created by Professor Ed Hawkins, for COP26. As delegates walked under the sculpture, the lights transitioned from blue to red, reflecting the growing impacts of climate change in virtually every region worldwide. Displaying the art installation at the United Nations conference sent a powerful message about the way that art and science can work together to engage people in environmental issues.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
 
Description Earth System and Climate Projection storyboard videos for COP26 public exhibition in Glasgow 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Videos about climate change modelling for a Green Zone COP26 public exhibition in Glasgow, to support the Natural Environmental Research Council stand
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
 
Description International Piano Festival / Leeds Conservatoire event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The National Centre for Atmospheric Science collaborated with visual artist Alison Smith and composers at Leeds Conservatoire, to create Turn the Tide - an interactive sculpture accompanied by several new pieces of music. Turn the Tide weaves together a broad ensemble of climate science, visual and performing arts, and local people to inspire creative action on climate change. Turn the Tide formed part of the Leeds International Piano Competition, and featured on the community-based Piano Trail, with a dedicated free and public performance on Friday 10th September at midday in Leeds city centre. Alison's installation features an upcycled upright piano and a crescendo of colourful recycled plastics and animated lights, which swell in stripes over a wave-like structure covering the piano's lid and upper panel. The sculpture's lights and stripes are arranged in a way that depict the change in global temperatures over the past 180 years. To visualise the changes, Professor Ed Hawkins from the National Centre for Atmospheric Science and University of Reading created a set of warming stripes, which influenced the design of Alison's piano piece. Student composers at Leeds Conservatoire, a multidisciplinary music and performing arts college, were commissioned to produce pieces of music that could be played on, or accompany, the sculptural piano. The bespoke arrangements take inspiration from the environment and our social responsibility to help the planet. Turn the Tide encouraged people in Leeds (and via social media) to think about society and the future challenges and choices of COP26.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
 
Description Young people's club visit (Leeds) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Daniel Grosvenor, an NCAS Researcher in Aerosol-Climate Modelling based at the University of Leeds, attended the Horsforth Cubs group and talked to the young members about clouds, which sparked questions and conversation.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022