NOC Marine Systems Modelling

Lead Research Organisation: National Oceanography Centre (WEF011019)

Abstract

The Marine Systems Modelling Programme undertakes numerical modelling of the global oceans and shelf seas. This includes modelling the ocean circulation and heat transport, marine ecosystems, sea-ice, turbulence, surface waves, sediment transport, tides and storm surges. A wide range of measurements from ships, moorings, gliders, autonomous vehicles and satellites are employed . Much of our research is carried out with academic and international partners across the world, but with a particular focus on the Atlantic, Arctic and Southern Oceans as well as the world’s continental shelves.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description The mission of the Marine Systems Modelling group is to advance our understanding of the marine environment and improve our ability to predict the Earth System on timescales of days to centuries. We work at national, regional and global scales from the coasts to the open ocean and specifically consider the dynamic links between these scales. We achieve this mission through the development, application, assessment and analysis of world-leading ocean models. We aim to exploit this understanding and capability to address societally relevant issues and deliver clear and traceable impacts.
Exploitation Route a wide range of scientific, innovation and policy relevant application involving ocean models.
Sectors Aerospace, Defence and Marine,Agriculture, Food and Drink,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Environment,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Transport

URL http://noc.ac.uk/science/research-areas/marine-systems-modelling
 
Description The findings of this award have been used as follows:- • Climate change impacts Man-made climate change has been estimated to cost the UK economy 5-20% of Gross Domestic Product (GDP)1 amounting to £80-320 billion for 2011 GDP2. The National Oceanography Centre (NOC) is providing impartial, independent, world-leading expertise in developing the international scientific consensus that informs the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) series of Assessment Reports3. NOC provides authoritative oceanographic scientific evidence to underpin the assessments, necessary as climate change has enormous economic and societal implications. NOC research is a significant contributor to the international delivery of evidence on ocean circulation, global temperature, sea level and climate. In response to research evidence presented by the IPCC the UK parliament passed the world's first long-term legally binding framework to tackle the dangers of climate change (The Climate Change Act 20086). The act requires Government to set carbon budgets, which are limits on greenhouse gas emissions in the UK for consecutive five-year periods. In addition to IPCC assessments, NOC data and expertise, including sea-level from PSMSL (Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level), inform studies of impacts of climate change on both national and international levels [e.g. UK Marine Climate Change Impacts Partnership (MCCIP), UK Climate Impacts Programme (UKCIP), UK Foresight Flood and Coastal Defence Review, Charting Progress and Charting Progress 2 • Sustainability and health of UK National seas NOC was pivotal in providing advice and evidence feeding into UK assessments on "clean, healthy, safe, productive and biologically diverse oceans and seas". These underpin legislation aimed at achieving this vision, specifically the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive. In the UK this took the form of the report: "Charting Progress 2 (CP2): The State of UK Seas", and the on-going Evidence Groups. Alongside this, the Marine Climate Change Impacts Partnership (MCCIP) and UKCP09 (UK Climate Projections 09) provide assessments of potential future conditions and substantially contributing to the on-going UKCP18 assessment. NOC is the leading UK organisation for providing this evidence, advice, information and future projections for physical oceanography. Its scientists were lead / co-authors for CP2 "Ocean Processes" chapter, most MCCIP science reviews, and the UKCP09 Marine Section. • Improved seasonal forecasting Improved seasonal forecasting of UK winter weather conditions months in advance is key to our ability to manage our environment and resources responsibly, and to be resilient to hazards. For instance, environmental change will affect our infrastructure (through storms, flooding and coastal erosion - particularly damaging for the South-west coastline and the Somerset levels during the winter of 2013/14), food, water and energy resources (changes to rainfall and wind) and the health of our population (the incidence of influenza is related to winter temperatures). Improved seasonal forecasting is therefore of immense societal importance for the UK population, and to our Government for planning and policy development. Many sectors of the UK economy (transport, agriculture, health, etc) need accurate forecasts of weather conditions many months in advance (seasonal forecasts) for planning purposes. These forecasts are provided to UK Government by operational systems run at the Met Office. Through a major strategic partnership, the Joint Weather and Climate Research Programme, a coordinated programme of effort has been established between NOC and the Met Office to provide the best possible ocean models to Met Office forecasting systems. New higher resolution ocean models have in this way been included in the latest seasonal forecasting systems and have led to a dramatic improvement in the skill of winter forecasts for the UK, with widespread benefits to the UK. NOC also works with Met Office in the UK Environmental Prediction Project to develop a national scale land-sea-wave-atmosphere couple system with the aim of improving forecasting of environmental hazards such as coastal flooding and extreme rain fall events. NOC plays a pivotal role in the development and assessment of marine forecasts and reanalysing products delivered by the Copernicus Marine Environmental Monitoring Service. These provide key environmental information for a range of downstream industrial, operational and policy stakeholders.
Sector Aerospace, Defence and Marine,Agriculture, Food and Drink,Energy,Environment,Healthcare,Leisure Activities, including Sports, Recreation and Tourism,Government, Democracy and Justice,Transport
Impact Types Societal,Economic,Policy & public services

 
Description Climate Change Impacts
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
Impact Man-made climate change has been estimated to cost the UK economy 5-20% of Gross Domestic Product (GDP)1 amounting to £80-320 billion for 2011 GDP2. The National Oceanography Centre (NOC) is providing impartial, independent, world-leading expertise in developing the international scientific consensus that informs the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) series of Assessment Reports3. NOC provides authoritative oceanographic scientific evidence to underpin the assessments, necessary as climate change has enormous economic and societal implications. NOC research is a significant contributor to the international delivery of evidence on ocean circulation, global temperature, sea level and climate. In response to research evidence presented by the IPCC the UK parliament passed the world's first long-term legally binding framework to tackle the dangers of climate change (The Climate Change Act 20086). The act requires Government to set carbon budgets, which are limits on greenhouse gas emissions in the UK for consecutive five-year periods. In addition to IPCC assessments, NOC data and expertise, including sea-level from PSMSL (Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level), inform studies of impacts of climate change on both national and international levels [e.g. UK Marine Climate Change Impacts Partnership (MCCIP), UK Climate Impacts Programme (UKCIP), UK Foresight Flood and Coastal Defence Review, Charting Progress and Charting Progress 2.
 
Description Improved Seasonal Forecasting
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact Improved seasonal forecasting of UK winter weather conditions months in advance is key to our ability to manage our environment and resources responsibly, and to be resilient to hazards. For instance, environmental change will affect our infrastructure (through storms, flooding and coastal erosion - particularly damaging for the South-west coastline and the Somerset levels during the winter of 2013/14), food, water and energy resources (changes to rainfall and wind) and the health of our population (the incidence of influenza is related to winter temperatures). Improved seasonal forecasting is therefore of immense societal importance for the UK population, and to our Government for planning and policy development. Many sectors of the UK economy (transport, agriculture, health, etc) need accurate forecasts of weather conditions many months in advance (seasonal forecasts) for planning purposes. These forecasts are provided to UK Government by operational systems run at the Met Office. Through a major strategic partnership, the Joint Weather and Climate Research Programme, a coordinated programme of effort has been established between NOC and the Met Office to provide the best possible ocean models to Met Office forecasting systems. New higher resolution ocean models have in this way been included in the latest seasonal forecasting systems and have led to a dramatic improvement in the skill of winter forecasts for the UK, with widespread benefits to the UK.
 
Description Sustainability and health of UK national seas
Geographic Reach Asia 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
Impact NOC was pivotal in providing advice and evidence feeding into UK assessments on "clean, healthy, safe, productive and biologically diverse oceans and seas". These underpin legislation aimed at achieving this vision, specifically the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive. In the UK this took the form of the report: "Charting Progress 2 (CP2): The State of UK Seas", and the on-going Evidence Groups. Alongside this, the Marine Climate Change Impacts Partnership (MCCIP) and UKCP09 (UK Climate Projections 09) provide assessments of potential future conditions. NOC is the leading UK organisation for providing this evidence, advice, information and future projections for physical oceanography. Its scientists were lead / co-authors for CP2 "Ocean Processes" chapter, most MCCIP science reviews, and the UKCP09 Marine Section.
 
Description Sources, impacts and solutions for plastics in South East Asia coastal environments
Amount £53,772 (GBP)
Funding ID NE/V009591/1 
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2020 
End 11/2023
 
Description NEMO Consortium 
Organisation Euro-Mediterranean Center on Climate Change (CMCC)
Country Italy 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The NEMO consortium mainains and developes the NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean) ocean model. This is a state-of-the-art modelling framework for research activities and forecasting services in ocean and climate sciences, developed in a sustainable way by a European consortium.
Collaborator Contribution The NEMO consortium mainains and developes the NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean) ocean model. This is a state-of-the-art modelling framework for research activities and forecasting services in ocean and climate sciences, developed in a sustainable way by a European consortium.
Impact The consortium provides regular model code updates (currently V4). These form the basis for most model based operational, climate and research oceanography in Europe, including the UK, Frence and italian contributions the CMIP process informing the IPCC Assessment and Special Reports, and also the Copernicus Marine Environmental Monitoring Service.
Start Year 2008
 
Description NEMO Consortium 
Organisation Mercator Océan
Country France 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The NEMO consortium mainains and developes the NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean) ocean model. This is a state-of-the-art modelling framework for research activities and forecasting services in ocean and climate sciences, developed in a sustainable way by a European consortium.
Collaborator Contribution The NEMO consortium mainains and developes the NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean) ocean model. This is a state-of-the-art modelling framework for research activities and forecasting services in ocean and climate sciences, developed in a sustainable way by a European consortium.
Impact The consortium provides regular model code updates (currently V4). These form the basis for most model based operational, climate and research oceanography in Europe, including the UK, Frence and italian contributions the CMIP process informing the IPCC Assessment and Special Reports, and also the Copernicus Marine Environmental Monitoring Service.
Start Year 2008
 
Description NEMO Consortium 
Organisation Meteorological Office UK
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The NEMO consortium mainains and developes the NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean) ocean model. This is a state-of-the-art modelling framework for research activities and forecasting services in ocean and climate sciences, developed in a sustainable way by a European consortium.
Collaborator Contribution The NEMO consortium mainains and developes the NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean) ocean model. This is a state-of-the-art modelling framework for research activities and forecasting services in ocean and climate sciences, developed in a sustainable way by a European consortium.
Impact The consortium provides regular model code updates (currently V4). These form the basis for most model based operational, climate and research oceanography in Europe, including the UK, Frence and italian contributions the CMIP process informing the IPCC Assessment and Special Reports, and also the Copernicus Marine Environmental Monitoring Service.
Start Year 2008
 
Description NEMO Consortium 
Organisation National Center for Scientific Research (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique CNRS)
Country France 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The NEMO consortium mainains and developes the NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean) ocean model. This is a state-of-the-art modelling framework for research activities and forecasting services in ocean and climate sciences, developed in a sustainable way by a European consortium.
Collaborator Contribution The NEMO consortium mainains and developes the NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean) ocean model. This is a state-of-the-art modelling framework for research activities and forecasting services in ocean and climate sciences, developed in a sustainable way by a European consortium.
Impact The consortium provides regular model code updates (currently V4). These form the basis for most model based operational, climate and research oceanography in Europe, including the UK, Frence and italian contributions the CMIP process informing the IPCC Assessment and Special Reports, and also the Copernicus Marine Environmental Monitoring Service.
Start Year 2008
 
Description NOC and Met Office Collaboration 
Organisation Meteorological Office UK
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Under the Joint Weather and Climate Research Programme (JWCRP) between NERC and the Met Office, we have forged a strong strategic partnership with the Met Office. This takes the form of the Joint Marine Modelling Project (JMMP; formerly JOMP; the Joint Ocean Modelling Programme and JCOMP; the Joint Coastal Ocean Modelling Programme). JMMP comprises staff from both NOC (from the Marine Systems Modelling group) and the Met Office and enables the best possible versions of the NEMO global and coastal-ocean models to be taken up into predictive systems at the Met Office (for ocean forecasting, coupled weather forecasting, seasonal prediction, decadal prediction, and climate and earth system modelling). Successive versions of NEMO are developed internationally on a regular cycle and have a number of new options. The benefit of these options are assessed both individually and in various combinations through undertaking decadal timescale simulations on MONSooN, a supercomputer facility shared between NERC and the Met Office, and identical in architecture to the main Met Office supercomputer. Once the optimal combination of options has been ascertained, the NEMO model can then be rapidly and easily taken up into the predictive systems at the Met Office. The cycle is repeated approximately every 1-2 years. The shelf seas activities, specifically support the models run operationally in the shelf sea forecasting and reanalysis system at the Met Office and delivered by the European Copernicus Marine Environmental Monitoring Service. Alongside JMMP, the National Partnership for Ocean Prediction (formally known as the National Centre for Ocean Forecasting) aims to develop and promote the application of world-leading marine products and services to stakeholders, with a focus on national and public benefit. This is achieved firstly through the integration of models, observations and scientific understanding to produce the best information and advice about the marine environment, with rigorous quality assurance and traceability; and secondly through engaging with stakeholders to understand their requirements and to maximise the beneficial use of marine products and services.
Collaborator Contribution Under the Joint Weather and Climate Research Programme (JWCRP) between NERC and the Met Office, we have forged a strong strategic partnership with the Met Office. This takes the form of the Joint Marine Modelling Project (JMMP; formerly JOMP; the Joint Ocean Modelling Programme and JCOMP; the Joint Coastal Ocean Modelling Programme). JMMP comprises staff from both NOC (from the Marine Systems Modelling group) and the Met Office and enables the best possible versions of the NEMO global and coastal-ocean models to be taken up into predictive systems at the Met Office (for ocean forecasting, coupled weather forecasting, seasonal prediction, decadal prediction, and climate and earth system modelling). Successive versions of NEMO are developed internationally on a regular cycle and have a number of new options. The benefit of these options are assessed both individually and in various combinations through undertaking decadal timescale simulations on MONSooN, a supercomputer facility shared between NERC and the Met Office, and identical in architecture to the main Met Office supercomputer. Once the optimal combination of options has been ascertained, the NEMO model can then be rapidly and easily taken up into the predictive systems at the Met Office. The cycle is repeated approximately every 1-2 years. The shelf seas activities, specifically support the models run operationally in the shelf sea forecasting and reanalysis system at the Met Office and delivered by the European Copernicus Marine Environmental Monitoring Service. Alongside JMMP, the National Partnership for Ocean Prediction (formally known as the National Centre for Ocean Forecasting) aims to develop and promote the application of world-leading marine products and services to stakeholders, with a focus on national and public benefit. This is achieved firstly through the integration of models, observations and scientific understanding to produce the best information and advice about the marine environment, with rigorous quality assurance and traceability; and secondly through engaging with stakeholders to understand their requirements and to maximise the beneficial use of marine products and services.
Impact NEMO model configurations. NW European Shelf Operational Copernicus service.
Start Year 2008
 
Title The Marine Model Optimization Testbed (MarMOT) 1.1 software http://noc.ac.uk/project/marmot/marmot-11-software 
Description Overview document available at: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/504004/ Types of beneficiary include: Research Council/Institute;Public Research Organisation 
Type Of Technology Software 
URL http://noc.ac.uk/project/marmot/marmot-11-software
 
Title Vertical Discretization In NEMO 
Description  
Type Of Technology Software