Teaching Collections and Fine Art Pedagogy

Lead Research Organisation: Newcastle University
Department Name: School of Arts and Cultures

Abstract

I will be undertaking my research in the context of a collaborative project which is examining art education and the culture of the North East between the 1930s and 1970s.
My research will consider the role, rationale, and influence of teaching collections within Fine Art Departments in the 20th century. I will focus on the Hatton Gallery Collection at Newcastle University as a case study, particularly concentrating on the teaching collection formed in the 1940's to 1960's under the guidance of professor Lawrence Gowing and art historian Ralph Holland.

I will examine the pedagogical significance of the teaching collection and the evidence for its influence on specific examples of artistic production and consider the notion that a collection of objects in the North East of England may have influenced the story of art in the 20th and into the 21st century.

Proposed research process:
I will take the approach of working through from an overview of teaching collections in general, to concentrating on the specifics of the role and significance of the Gowing and Holland collection and then focus on the impact of individual objects within the collection.

Step 1 - To understand the Hatton Teaching collection in the context of the history of fine art teaching collections per se, through a literature review of the existing research.

Step 2 - To establish a time line for the evidence of the use of teaching collections, eg from the influence of collections of classical art and antiquities on the development of Renaissance ideas, onwards to the origins of the Hatton collection and through to the Gowing and Holland acquisitions.

Step 3 - To focus on the content of the Hatton Collection by gaining an understanding of its content through review of the current catalogue and studying the archives.

Step 4 - to gather information and gain an insight into how the Hatton Teaching collection is currently being used.

Step 5 - To identify, from my personal experience of Step 3 as a user of the catalogue and from possible research undertaken with existing students, how the information in the catalogue may need improving in its role as a resource for understanding and accessing the collection.

Step 6 - To research what evidence exists that can identify specific reasons for the inclusion of each object in the teaching collection and thereby gain a better understanding of the role of each object within the collection and its pedagogical purpose.

Step 7 - to undertake (or collate information gained through steps 1 - 5) a literature review of the Gowing and Holland collection and its role in the studio and art history teaching of the Fine Art Department.

Step 8 - to gather further evidence of the role and influence of the teaching collections from accounts gathered through interviews and surveys on artists and art historians who have worked in the Fine Art department.

Step 9 - to consider how we may involve the wider North East community in contributing their views on what they know about the Hatton teaching collections.

Step 10 - to consider how the role of the Hatton teaching collection can be preserved as an integral part of art education with the Fine Art department but also maintained and promoted as a resource across the North East community.
(A possible collaboration with Tyneside Cinema, University of the Third Age? Collaboration with Equal Arts and other organisations to involve hard to reach communities, eg people living with dementia).

Step 11 onwards - to work with the fellow studentships to promote the research undertaken, through seminars, film, conferences and exhibitions.
 
Title Re-frame/Re-model:Reconstructing the Archive - self-published Artist's Book/catalogue 
Description This entry is cross-referenced in Publications). A 20 page, A5 sized, self-published Artist's Book/catalogue printed in the Fine Art Department of Newcastle University, created as a record of and response to the exhibition, Re-frame/Re-model: Reconstructing the Archive, of February to May 2018. The exhibition was the result of collaboration with my fellow AHRC CDA partner, Harriet Sutcliffe. The Artist's Book/catalogue is an ongoing collaboration as a result of the exhibition which includes photographs and texts either designed for the exhibition or written in response to the exhibition and adapted for the context of the Artist's Book/catalogue. The layout and design of the Artist's Book was originated by Harriet Sutcliffe. Harriet and I chose the materials for the catalogue, printed the text and photographs in the Fine Art Department and assembled the artefact by hand. I contributed a 1000 word text titled "It enfolds us", reflecting on the the collaboration between Professor Lawrence Gowing and Richard Hamilton on the exhibition "Man, Machine and Motion", held in the Hatton Gallery in 1955, which took place alongside Gowing's art collecting activities for the Fine Art Department and the Hatton Gallery. The Artist's Book/catalogue is being produced in at least two editions of 50. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact The Artist's Book/catalogue was circulated to the attendees at a NICAP Lunch-Time talk/presentation (reported separately under Engagement Activities) which Harriet Sutcliffe and I delivered to our peers, tutors and supervisors on 6 February 2019. Thirty-five were given out, thereby circulating a record of our collaborative exhibition and providing a tangible, material reference point for our research. 
 
Title TWAM Re-frame/Re-model:Reconstructing the Archive - Hatton Gallery exhibition 
Description Please see the entry under 'Engagement Activities'. This exhibition showcases the evolving and developing processes of my research and is the result of a collaborative, creative process with my Fine Art practice-led researcher colleague, Harriet Sutcliffe, taking place in an art gallery and exhibiting installations of written texts and visual displays alongside art works. The primary aim of this exhibition is to help inform and progress my research through engagement with gallery visitors through the display of texts and images. This is why I have chosen to describe it in detail under its primary function. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact Please see entry under 'Engagement Activities' 
URL https://hattongallery.org.uk/whats-on/re-frame-re-model-reconstructing-the-archive
 
Description As I am currently in my "writing up" year of my thesis and as I have not yet concluded my research it is not possible to fully assess how this award has contributed to any non-academic impacts. However, a significant part of my research has involved engaging and interviewing former students and staff of the Fine Art Department in the 1950s and 1960s - some of them now in their late 70s and early 80s. This has resulted in people reviewing and reflecting on their experience of the Fine Art School, on their past and current art practice and re-visiting their own archives. Some of the people I have been in contact with have continued to engage with my research. This has resulted in an ongoing dialogue and sharing of information. In some cases, I believe, this has had the effect of re-connecting them more definitively with the activities of the Hatton Gallery, the Hatton Gallery Archive, the Fine Art School, the University and, in some circumstances, their own art practice. The exhibition Re-frame/Re-model: Reconstructing the Archive, on which I collaborated (reported separately under Engagement Activities and cross-referenced under Artistic and Creative Products), aimed to engage the gallery visitors with the Hatton Gallery collection and Archive and the pedagogy of the Fine Art School in the 1950s and 1960s. The Hatton Gallery estimates that it has monthly visitor numbers of 3,400 people so the exhibition had the potential to reach 10,000 - 12,000 visitors in its 15-week duration. This number would have included people of all ages and from diverse backgrounds, especially through the Hatton Gallery's education programme of art workshops, which take place in the Learning Space adjoining the gallery in which the exhibition was held. The Hatton Learning Officer includes a tour and discussion of the current exhibitions as part of the workshop sessions. My research has led to a number of collaborations and engagements with people outside of the Fine Art Department as reported under Engagement Activities and Collaborations. I have been involved in talks, presentations and an Artist's Book/publication, as a result of the Re-frame/Re-model:Reconstructing the Archive exhibition (reported under Engagement Activities). These have resulted in people becoming acquainted or re-acquainted with the Hatton Gallery and its collections. My research has uncovered or re-discovered information which has contributed to a better understanding of the history of the Fine Art Department of Newcastle University and the Hatton Gallery Collection, which will be accessible to both the academic and non-academic community through public-facing resources such as the Hatton Gallery Collections website and other platforms. Once I have completed my thesis I will be able to report further on the use and impact of my findings.
First Year Of Impact 2018
Sector Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural,Societal

 
Description NICAP - Hatton Gallery 3 Exhibition, Marketing, Contingency
Amount £3,600 (GBP)
Funding ID NICAP C0300D4001 OSR/0341 
Organisation Newcastle University 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 12/2017 
End 03/2019
 
Title Hatton Exhibition Catalogue Record 
Description I assisted my CDA researcher colleague to collate and record the details of exhibition catalogues created between the 1950s - 1970s held in the Hatton Gallery Archives into a document which can be referenced by Hatton Gallery staff and volunteers. This data set is the outcome of the collaboration recorded under Collaborations and Partnerships - TWAM Hatton Gallery Exhibition Catalogues. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2016 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact This data set will provide other researchers with searchable information to help inform their understanding of exhibition catalogue production in the 1950s and 1960s, particularly that undertaken by Richard Hamilton and his students. 
 
Title Newcastle Fine Art School Timeline 
Description I have created an Excel spreadsheet recording significant events in the history of the Newcastle Fine Art School alongside those of its parent institution, Durham University/Newcastle University, other Fine Art Schools and institutions and developments in art education. The information has been collated from archival records, books and publications and is informing my understanding of relationships between policies, institutions and individuals. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2016 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact It has provided me with a very helpful reference tool for my specific research and, when completed, I will make it available to the Hatton Gallery and the Fine Art Department. 
 
Title The Charlton Lectures 
Description I have created an Excel spreadsheet which collates information on all the Charlton Lectures - a series of annual lectures on art subjects, that are recorded as taking place at Durham University/Newcastle University since their inception in 1919, with their associated publications and publication location, if any, in the Newcastle University Library and information on the lecturer. This information has been collated from a range of sources and is aiding my understanding of how the subject of the lecturer or the presenter of the lecture may have had a role in the choices of works acquired for the Hatton Gallery Permanent Collection in the 1950s and 1960s. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2016 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact This data set will be available to Newcastle University Public Lectures administrators and organisers for reference in the planning of any future Charlton Lectures and commemoration of any relevant anniversaries in the University lecture programme. 
 
Description TWAM Collaborative Doctoral Award non Higher Education Institution Partner 
Organisation Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums (TWAM) are the non Higher Education Institution Partner in this Collaborative Doctoral Award. I have been working with TWAM/Hatton Gallery to research the acquisitions of art works by Professor Lawrence Gowing, Professor Kenneth Rowntree and others for the Hatton Permanent Collection in the Fine Art Department of King's College, University of Durham/University of Newcastle upon Tyne during the 1950s and 1960s. I have undertaken a range of projects on behalf of the Hatton Gallery (described separately) which are contributing to the recording and cataloguing of the archive and understanding of the contents of the archive. Aspects of my research are bringing the Hatton Gallery Archive and the Hatton Gallery Permanent Collection of art works to the notice of a wider public.
Collaborator Contribution TWAM has provided access to the Hatton Gallery Archives, experience of working with its collections and working with its staff. Each of these activities is described under separate entries. TWAM has contributed financially and in kind to the award (£3000 over the three years of the award and a pass which provides free entrance to fee paying TWAM exhibitions, estimated value of £60).
Impact Please see separate entries under: Collaborations and Partnerships: TWAM Hatton Gallery Pioneers of Pop Exhibition, TWAM Hatton Exhibition Catalogue Collection, TWAM Hatton Poster Collection, TWAM Hatton Closing Show. Engagement Activities: TWAM Re-frame/Re-model:Reconstructing the archive - Hatton Gallery exhibition Research Databases and Models: The Charlton Lectures Newcastle Fine Art School Timeline Hatton Exhibition Catalogue Record Other Outputs and Knowledge/Future Steps: TWAM Hatton Exhibition Posters Information Sheets
Start Year 2015
 
Description TWAM Hatton Closing Show 
Organisation Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution I worked with the Keeper of the Hatton Gallery Collection and with my fellow Collaborative Doctoral Award PhD researcher colleague to curate part of the closing show of the Hatton Gallery, managed by Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums (TWAM) prior to its closure for renovation in February 2016. This entailed choosing the placing and display of sculpture and archival material in the exhibition, including the arrangement of objects and images in display cases.
Collaborator Contribution TWAM provided experience in curation and exhibition display and working with the Hatton Gallery/TWAM team in the preparation of an exhibition. The URL relating to this collaboration refers to information relating to the closing exhibition, it does not specifically link to examples of the work in which I was involved. Please note that the financial and in-kind contributions described in this entry are the total amounts provided by TWAM over the three years of the CDA for all activities undertaken during the period of the award.
Impact I have gained an understanding of the issues involved in setting up and displaying an exhibition and handling art works and archival material. The collaboration has given me a greater knowledge and understanding of the content of the Hatton Gallery Collection and the archival material in the collection. The collaboration was multi-disciplinary in respect of working with my fellow PhD collaborative researcher colleague, who is an artist and practice-led researcher, with the Keeper of the Hatton Collection who is an art historian and curator, with a range of TWAM staff involved in the practical aspects of organising exhibitions and the gallery staff who work as the public face of the Hatton Gallery.
Start Year 2016
 
Description TWAM Hatton Exhibition Catalogue Collection 
Organisation Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution In May/June 2016 I assisted my Collaborative Doctoral Award (CDA) PhD researcher/colleague to create a photographic record of the Hatton Gallery Exhibition catalogues from the 1950s - 1970s held in the Hatton Gallery Archive. This record provides a physical description of the exhibition catalogues and details the content, designer and publisher (where identified) of each catalogue. This work has resulted in our deciphering the coding used in the publications produced by the Fine Art Department so that the date of publication and the number of catalogues in the production run can be identified. These records will enable future researchers to have to access to information on the artists/designers and publishers of the catalogues held in the archive and support the increased interest in post-war exhibition production and the associated development of catalogue design of the 1950s - 1970s. It will be specifically helpful in identifying and understanding the development of catalogue design within the Fine Art Department of King's College University of Durham/University of Newcastle upon Tyne, during this time frame by artists/tutors such as Richard Hamilton and his students.
Collaborator Contribution TWAM provided access to the Hatton Gallery Archives and to the collection of exhibition catalogues. Please note that the financial and in-kind contributions described in this entry are the total amounts provided by TWAM over the three years of the CDA for all activities undertaken during the period of the award.
Impact My direct collaboration has been with the PhD researcher who is part of this CDA with the Hatton Gallery/Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums. She is a fine art practitioner so I have gained an understanding of how the archives are informing her practice and vice versa - providing a different perspective on approaches to research in contrast to that of my thesis-based research. The exhibition catalogue recording process has provided me with a more in-depth understanding of the content of the Hatton Gallery Archives and of the development of catalogue design through the 1950s to 1970s, particularly the contribution to and influence of the artist and lecturer Richard Hamilton to exhibition catalogue design, while he taught in the Fine Art Department of King's College, University of Durham/University of Newcastle upon Tyne in the 1950s and 1960s.
Start Year 2016
 
Description TWAM Hatton Gallery Exhibition - A Philosophy for Teaching Art - Academic Adviser role 
Organisation Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution I provided information and guidance on the Hatton Gallery art collection to the Curatorial Intern who was allocated the project of curating the exhibition: A Philosophy for Teaching Art:The Development of the Hatton Collection (February to May 2019). I did not have any direct involvement in curating the exhibition or developing the text for the exhibition but I provided the intern with the research I had carried out on the works that made up the collection created by Professor Lawrence Gowing and Professor Kenneth Rowntree. This provided the intern with an understanding of what constituted the collection and thereby helped them make an informed choice about the works exhibited. The intern was able to shape the content of collection to better represent its original concept of Old Master paintings and contemporary art works donated by the Contemporary Art Society.
Collaborator Contribution The exhibition has enabled me to view the works in the Hatton Gallery, which I am researching, in the space for which they were originally collected and where they were originally shown and exhibited together, as part of the collection they were intended to be part of. I would have otherwise only been able to view them in the Hatton Gallery store. Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums have credited my contribution in the exhibition information displayed in the Hatton Gallery and in so doing, have acknowledged my research input.
Impact The following outcomes have resulted: - I have been able to inform one former student that their work is on show and this has prompted them to update their biographical details and information about the work and visit the exhibition. - the Hatton Gallery has been able to update and improve its recorded information on this particular object in the collection - my contact with former students has encouraged them to visit the exhibition - the exhibition has enabled me to engage with the curatorial intern and with former students in front of the paintings and discuss the paintings with them. This collaboration has been multi-disciplinary in that I have supported work being undertaken in the profession of art gallery curating.
Start Year 2019
 
Description TWAM Hatton Gallery Pioneers of Pop Exhibition 
Organisation Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution I worked with my Collaborative Doctoral Award (CDA) PhD researcher/colleague to curate a display cabinet for the Hatton Gallery 'Pioneers of Pop' exhibition which launched the re-opening exhibition of the renovated Hatton Gallery in October 2017. This involved selecting photographic images, exhibition catalogues and newspaper articles to design a cabinet display to inform gallery visitors of aspects of exhibition history and life within the Fine Art Department at King's College, University of Durham/University of Newcastle during the time of artist and lecturer Richard Hamilton and others in the 1950s and 1960s. We worked with Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums(TWAM) staff on the practical activities and issues of setting up the display cabinet and with Newcastle University Special Collections staff in the handling of archive material for display. The URL links to images of the other two display cabinets in the room in which our display cabinet was situated but which does not appear in the photograph.
Collaborator Contribution The TWAM exhibition organising staff provided us with experience in the physical setting up of the display cabinet. Support from Newcastle University staff within the Library Special Collections Department contributed materials and provided experience in the handling, care and presentation of archive material within the display cabinet. Please note that the financial and in-kind contributions described in this entry are the total amounts provided by TWAM over the three years of the CDA for all activities undertaken during the period of the award.
Impact The ongoing close collaboration and working relationship with my CDA PhD Fine Art practice-led researcher/colleague has provided me with a better insight and increased understanding of the practice-led approach to research. This collaboration has been multi-disciplinary with regard to the involvement of TWAM curatorial and exhibition staff and Newcastle University Special Collections librarians and archivists.
Start Year 2017
 
Description TWAM Hatton Poster Collection 
Organisation Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution I worked with my fellow Collaborative Doctoral Award (CDA) PhD researcher colleage and a Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums (TWAM) paper conservator to audio record details of the collection of Hatton posters from the 1950s and 1960s held in the Hatton Gallery Archives. This involved recording the conservator's narrative description of each poster image and manufacture technique to support the creation of a photographic and written record of this section of the Hatton Gallery collection.
Collaborator Contribution The TWAM conservator provided knowledge and understanding of paper handling and poster making/printing techniques which were used in the 1950s and 1960s. Please note that the financial and in-kind contributions described in this entry are the total amounts provided by TWAM over the three years of the CDA for all activities undertaken during the period of the award.
Impact This collaboration provided me with a better understanding of the curation and content of the Hatton Gallery poster archive. The collaboration was multi-disciplinary in providing an opportunity to exchange skills and knowledge with the TWAM Archives and Museums paper conservation staff member and with my fellow artist and practice-led PhD researcher.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Friends of the Hatton Gallery Talk - The Hatton Gallery Collection 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Supporters
Results and Impact This was an evening talk in April 2018 to co-incide with the exhibition Re-frame/Re-model:Reconstructing the Archive (see separate entry under Engagement Activities) arranged by and for the Friends of the Hatton. Friends of the Hatton are a registered charity made up of artists, former artists, art enthusiasts and other individuals who support the activities of the Newcastle University Hatton Gallery through awareness raising, networking and fundraising events. Their fundraising contributes to Hatton Gallery purchases.

The aim of my talk was to:
- provide some insight into the exhibition which was informed by the Hatton Gallery Collection and Hatton Gallery Archive
- provide a survey of the Hatton Gallery Collection history
- provide an insight into the contents of the Hatton Gallery Collection and the Archive
- provide some insight into my research approach to understanding the collection formed by Professors Lawrence Gowing and Kenneth Rowntree in the 1950s and 1960s and its role as a teaching collection.

This was attended by four Hatton Friends - (the talk coincided with very bad weather!).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Lasting Impressions Study Day Hatton Gallery Store Tour 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact I delivered an event on the AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnership Lasting Impressions Study Day in June 2018 which introduced Study Day delegates to the Hatton Gallery works held in store and some of the works in the Hatton Gallery Collection, using the theme of paintings as reproductions. This workshop was delivered to 20 people (two groups of 10). My involvement with the Lasting Impressions Study Day introduced delegates to the Hatton Gallery - most of who were unfamiliar with its location, facilities or its collection and raised their awareness of some of the Hatton Collection of works which are mostly in store. My involvement also introduced the delegates to the Newcastle University Fine Art Department and some aspects of its history and influence on UK art education. The Study Day introduced me to other researchers and has resulted in ongoing contact and sharing of research knowledge on shared interests, for example, the history of the Hatton Gallery and the City of Newcastle Laing Gallery.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.ahrc-cdp.org/student-led-activity-lasting-impressions-29th-june-2018/
 
Description Newcastle Institute for Creative Arts Practice (NICAP) Talk - Re-frame/Re-model: Reconfigured 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was a talk and slide presentation given to around 40 people in February this year as part of the NICAP lunchtime research sharing programme. This programme is made up of talks and presentations by researchers who have been awarded funding by NICAP towards expanding or developing projects within their research activity. My fellow AHRC CDA PhD research colleague, Harriet Sutcliffe and I gave a joint talk reflecting on our experiences of collaborating on and producing the exhibition Re-frame/Re-model: Reconstructing the Archive, of February to May 2018 (reported separately under Engagement Activities).The audience was made up of fellow postgraduates and staff from across the Newcastle University School of Arts and Cultures (Fine Art, Architecture, Planning and Landscape, Museums, Culture, Heritage, Music, History, Classics and Archaeology) and staff from the Hatton Gallery. The aim was to explain to the audience about our research within shared archives - the Hatton Gallery Archive, what we had learned from our collaborative working and how working on the exhibition has informed our research. To accompany the talk and slide presentation we gave out the first edition of our Artist's Book/catalogue to each audience member. This publication is self-produced collaboration between Harriet and I containing images from the exhibition and texts included in or inspired by the exhibition, produced as a record of and an extension to the exhibition. (The publication is recorded separately under Artefacts and Creative Products).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Newcastle University Oral History Collective Show and Tell Creative Practice Seminar & Workshop - Artists' History: rethinking the archive? 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was a presentation to six fellow practitioners and researchers with an interest and/or involvement in Oral History and in using Oral History within Creative Practice. My presentation discussed my collaborative research with fellow PhD researcher, Harriet Sutcliffe, in undertaking interviews with former students in the Newcastle University Fine Art Department in the 1950s and 1960s. I considered the challenges and benefits of undertaking shared interviews with alumni. I also considered how prompting artists to reflect on their past practice and to look into their archives might impact on their recollections and narrative as well as their future practice. I also discussed how this, in turn, helped me to reflect on my own response to my archive of art work. My presentation provided some practical insights into managing interviews for novice practitioners as well as discussion on art and memory.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://blogs.ncl.ac.uk/oral-history/2018/09/27/report-oral-history-creative-practice-show-and-tell/
 
Description TWAM Re-frame/Re-model:Reconstructing the Archive - Hatton Gallery Lunch-Time Talk 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact This took place in April 2018 as part of the programme of Hatton Gallery Lunch-Time Talks organised by the Hatton Gallery Learning Officer to raise awareness and understanding of the exhibitions and increase visitor participation in and knowledge of Hatton Gallery activities and the Hatton Gallery Collection at Newcastle University.
My talk took place as an outreach activity to coincide with the exhibition Re-frame/Re-model:Reconstructing the Archive which I collaborated on with my fellow AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Award PhD colleague from February to May 2018 (reported as a separate Engagement Activity). The aim of my talk was to:
- inform the talk attendees of my research subject - The Role of Teaching Collections in Fine Art Pedagogy - within the AHRC funded project "Art Education and Culture in the North East from the 1930s- 1970s".
- inform the attendees of the background to the making and content of the exhibition within my research.
- raise awareness of the activities and influence of the Newcastle University Fine Art Department in the 1950s and 1960s and specifically of Professor Lawrence Gowing on the creation of the Hatton Gallery Collection and on future developments in art education
- raise awareness of some of the content of the Hatton Gallery Collection
- engage the attendees with the ideas that had come out of my work on the exhibition.

The talk was attended by around 15 people - fellow postgraduate students, Hatton Gallery Front-of-House Staff and other Hatton Staff, Hatton Gallery volunteers, former art students and gallery visitors.

The talk led to:
- a collaboration with one of the attendees - a fellow PhD student on a Collaborative Doctoral Partnership award (CDP) which contributed to the involvement of Newcastle University Fine Art Department and Hatton Gallery in providing facilities for the CDP Lasting Impressions Study Day event in June 2018 and my involvement in the Study Day programme. (See entry on Lasting Impressions Study Day)
- ongoing contact with one of the alumni of the Fine Art Department who attended and the sharing of information which is contributing to my research knowledge and informing their own reflections on their creative practice.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description TWAM Re-frame/Re-model:Reconstructing the Archive - Hatton Gallery exhibition 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This is an ongoing event which is running in the Hatton Gallery from 3 February - 19 May 2018, made possible by Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums (TWAM) and Newcastle University Institute for Creative Arts Practice (NICAP). My Collaborative Doctoral Award (CDA) researcher colleague and Fine Art practitioner, Harriet Sutcliffe and I are showcasing the developing and evolving processes of our research into aspects of art education in the Fine Art Department of King's College, University of Durham/University of Newcastle in the 1950s and 1960s in the form of an exhibition. This has been a collaborative process from its inception - we have worked together to create an environment/installation which can provide a semi-permanent infrastructure for the duration of the exhibition in line with the health and safety requirements of the gallery, but which we can alter and adapt to display images and texts or other media which support our research. The specific intended purpose of my contribution to the installation is the display of texts and images inspired by or related to the subject of my research - the Hatton Gallery Permanent Collection created by Lawrence Gowing, Kenneth Rowntree and others in the 1950s and 1960s. I have been able to select and hang 16th century paintings from the Hatton Gallery Collection which are not usually on show and which indicate aspects of the collection created by Lawrence Gowing, alongside reproductions of art works from the Fine Art Image Library which have not been seen or used within the Fine Art Department for many years . I have created texts to display beside the paintings describing their position and significance in the collection and texts which provide a commentary on how art works were experienced at the time the collection was being created - mainly through black and white reproduction. I have also created a text which references the development of our collaborative installation in relation to the collaborations which produced the innovative exhibition design in the Hatton Gallery in the 1950s. The display of texts and images will develop and change over time as I have the opportunity to reflect on the content of the Hatton Collection, the Fine Art Image Collection and other archival material, as well as any comments which we receive from public engagement in the exhibition. The exhibition coincides with a exhibition of work by internationally acclaimed artist Sean Scully, who studied in the Fine Art Department in the late 1960s - early 1970s, a Hatton site-specific commission by the artist Kate Liston and an exhibition of collages by Kurt Schwitters showing alongside the permanent installation of his Merzbarn Wall. These exhibitions are anticipated to attract large numbers of visitors locally, nationally and possibly internationally, along with the numerous school visits which take place in the Hatton Gallery's learning space. The outcome for me has been the opportunity to work with my fine art practitioner colleague to create and curate an exhibition space, including the physical construction of the infrastructure, to gain experience in writing texts to explain my research to the general public, undergraduate and postgraduate students and staff from across the University and to work with TWAM/Hatton Gallery staff, conservators and technicians to install the exhibition. I am delivering a presentation to a special interest group - the Friends of the Hatton Gallery, in April, on the exhibition and my research. The final outcome in terms of visitor numbers will not be known until the end of the exhibition. Initial outcomes are the engagement in discussion about the research with TWAM/Hatton Gallery staff and engagement with visitors through comments in our Visitor's Book.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://hattongallery.org.uk/whats-on/re-frame-re-model-reconstructing-the-archive