Troubled Waters, Stormy Futures: heritage in times of accelerated climate change

Lead Research Organisation: Aberystwyth University
Department Name: Theatre Film and Television Studies

Abstract

The winter storms of 2013-2014 set new precedents of coastal damage in the UK, forcing government, heritage bodies and local communities to seriously reconsider the future management of coastal heritage. Relevant organisations were seemingly unprepared for these events, and communities were possibly surprised by what had happened, as well as by their own emotional response. Over 8200 miles away, in the low-lying island nation of Kiribati in the Pacific Ocean, over 100,000 citizens face the possibility of permanent relocation due to climate change and sea-level rise which threaten homeland and heritage. Troubling in itself, Kiribati also presents an unsettling visualisation of a collective future. These diverse settings are brought together in this project through the exploration of current and potential loss of heritage in times of accelerated climate change.

In the UK our project partners, the National Trust, own 742 miles of coastline and face difficult negotiations regarding their Coastal Adaptation Strategy. This research will consider the challenges facing heritage organisations and communities by focusing on three case studies; two of these are National Trust sites: Porthdinllaen (in North Wales) and Durgan Village (in Cornwall), with these two villages at risk respectively of increased tidal flooding and coastal erosion. The third case study in Kiribati considers a more urgent situation, exploring the societal and personal effect of potential whole-scale loss on perceptions of heritage, sense of place, religious beliefs and cultural identity. At each distinct site we will explore community, heritage and government responses to current challenges, as well as strategies for a stormy future. The data collected will be archived with project partners National Library of Wales and Cornish Audio Visual Archive, providing a legacy for this research and the communities under threat. More immediately, we hope to inform improved communication and consultation processes for these and comparative communities in future.

Whereas popular imaginings of 'heritage' are likely to include buildings or assets with acknowledged historic value, there is an increased awareness among heritage organisations and administrations such as the Welsh Government that the more 'ordinary' or 'everyday' can also be valuable to communities, embedded in local history and the texture of lived lives. Broader definitions of heritage could include a bus shelter, coastal path, or even a particular tree, because they have meaning to the people who experience them. In order to deepen our understanding of 'sense of place', we will use a multi-layered interpretation of heritage as a concept and a process relating both to the tangible as well as the intangible (values, beliefs, practices). This strategy is essential to fully appreciate the subtle and traumatic ways in which climate-change disrupts community lives and identities, with potentially painful transitions ahead.

This interdisciplinary project invites collaboration with the Australian poet Mark Tredinnick, who will visit Kiribati and offer a poetic response to the effects of climate change on 'place' in more abstract terms. This research claims a greater stake for arts and humanities disciplines in climate adaptation debates, mostly dominated by natural and social scientists, and we will adopt an innovative approach towards engagement in and dissemination of our research. There will be poetry, films, conversation and community stories as well as scholarly and qualitative analysis. Artistic responses will be useful in connecting and articulating perceptions of the past and imaginings of the future at these sites, and in a broader cultural context. Our edited films, freely available to relevant organisations, may serve to amplify and bridge multiple voices, forging local and international cross-cultural understanding of the effect of climate change on heritage, communities and sense of place.

Planned Impact

Our research will develop deeper understandings and framings of heritage loss at a local level and international level, investigate how the impacts of climate change disrupt this heritage, and seek strategies for improved communication and consultation around these issues. This work will benefit communities at a grassroots level through direct engagement, as well as comparative communities in future. We will create multi-media resources and make them freely available to pro-actively targeted organisations, share our findings through our website, and promote the research through social media. This is a conscious effort to inhabit local, national and transnational public spheres, with collective benefits from enhanced dialogue and 'good information'.

1. Policy-makers and government: We will engage relevant government/policy makers (national, regional and community levels) through interviews, and shared findings. In Wales, the Welsh Government is currently holding a 'national conversation' about climate-change, are interested in 'sense of place' work and site public communication as a key priority with flooding and coastal adaptation. The WG is loosely connected to the project through these collaborators: (i) Sustainable Wales (who have agreed to host videos), (ii) Climate Outreach Information Network (lead advisors for the Welsh Government on sustainable development narratives), and (iii) Prof. Mike Philips, professor of coastal geomorphology (project advisor, active in policy circles). In Kiribati we have access to policy makers through the involvement of Claire Anterea Kaitaake (Kiribati Adaptation Project), and through the advice of Riibeta Abeta, former Senior Environment Officer (Kiribati Government). Our multi-media resources would be made freely available to the Kiribati Government for local and international advocacy and informational purposes.

2. International organisations: We are in dialogue with: Climate Outreach Information Network (our collaborators) and Pacific Calling Partnership, and seek to develop connections with: Pacific Island Development Programme, Pacific Water Institute, United Nations Environment Programme, Union of Concerned Scientists

3. Third Sector: The National Trust (partners) are integrated into our research in several ways: attending out symposia (beginning and end of project); grass-roots involvement in the UK case studies; interviewed as part of our contextual overview on heritage organisations and climate change. They will share and disseminate findings through their organisation and networks. With our partners, the National Library of Wales and the Cornish Audio Visual Archive, we will co-develop methodologies for archiving the contemporary life that we encounter in our case studies. This will have long-term impact for NLW and CAVA, future researchers, and the documented communities. With a strong religious aspect to our research in Kiribati, we would target: Christian Aid, World Council of Churches, Forum on Religion and Ecology (FORE).

4. Creative Collaborations: We have two direct non-HEI collaborations to create artistic work which can reach a broad international audience (i) Australian poet Mark Tredinnick will visit Kiribati, to write about 'place' in times of accelerated climate change; (ii) The PI will collaborate with Kiribati locals and sound-recordist Richard Gott to create short online films. Arts output will be publicised and disseminated by project collaborators: Cape Farewell and Welsh Literature Exchange, and will interest: New Welsh Review, Planet Magazine, Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment (ASLE), Centre for Contemporary Art and the Natural World (CCANW), RANE (Research in Art and Nature), and various literary publications.

5. The media: We would contact Guardian online, Australia Network News online, OneClimate, The Kiribati Independent etc and local media at case-study sites (radio, newspapers, community newsletters.)

Related Projects

Project Reference Relationship Related To Start End Award Value
AH/M006263/1 01/01/2015 31/08/2015 £44,679
AH/M006263/2 Transfer AH/M006263/1 01/09/2015 30/06/2016 £13,347
 
Title Shorter edit of Troubled Waters for engagement/eductional purposes (5.21 min) 
Description This shorted, subtitled version of the longer 'Troubled Waters' film was created at the request of the National Trust and the International National Trust Organisation. This has been used by them to highlight the connection between climate change and cultural heritage. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact This film has screened at several venues at the UN Climate Change Summitt in Marrakech (2016) and Bonn (2017) by INTO, and by Phil Dyke (NT) in talks. It is freely available online as a resource for anyone to use. It is subtitled to help to make it useful in all kinds of environments (including noisy, public events). 
URL https://vimeo.com/199817541
 
Title TIMELINE (30 min film) 
Description This 30-minute film combines techniques from the film essay, activist environmental video and documentary tradition to explore the relationship between cultural identity, attachment to place and climate change. Water, as both threat to, and part of heritage, is present throughout as an idea and motif. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact This film was shortlisted for two AHRC awards for research in film in 2016: 'Best Research film 2016' and 'Utopia Award'. TIMELINE was also published/embedded online on Screenworks (February 2017), and shortlisted for a British Association of Film, Television and Screen Studies award: 'Best Practice Research' (2017). It was described by one peer reviewer as having 'considerable potential for public engagement and impact as a piece of practice research / activism'. The film has screened at the following public events as part of the 'Being Human' festival (supported by the AHRC): Burdall's Yard, Bath Spa. November 19th, 2016; Aberystwyth Arts Centre, November 25th, 2016; Borth, The Friendship Inn, November 25th, 2016. It was also screened at a 'Past Matters, Research Futures' academic conference, on 12/13 December 2016 at the Royal Society, showcasing research under the AHRC's 'Care for the Future' theme. TIMELINE was also featured in the Times Higher Education Magazine, and embedded on its website. This was part of a larger debate about the use of film in research. It was also embedded on 'The Conversation' online, under the heading 'five award-winning short films made by researchers that you should watch'. TIMELINE was also embedded on the blog 'Climate Crocs', by foremost climate blogger in the USA, Peter Sinclair, and described as a 'masterclass in visual storytelling'. 
URL https://vimeo.com/172669824
 
Title Troubled Waters- Film 
Description 'Troubled Waters' is an online documentary (9:41 minutes) produced, filmed and edited by the project PI, Sara Penrhyn Jones. The sound recording was by the project's creative collaborator, Richard Gott. The film specifically addresses the ways in which climate change affects heritage in the low-lying island nation of Kiribati. It does this by bringing together diverse perspectives through a sequence of interview clips with the President, cultural officer, community members, activists, and scholars in Kiribati. These are layered with a visual representation of the landscape and culture. 'Troubled Waters' may begin to redefine the very concept of heritage, which is presented as inextricably connected to land and the natural environment in Kiribati. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact The film has been shown in its entirety, or as a series of clips in several public events and academic conferences, detailed separately. It is hard to prove a change in public perception (which is an overt aim of the project), but audiences have reported that they had not previously considered climate change as affecting culture (or fully acknowledged how culture frames the experience of climate change). The film has certainly fed into contemporary debate, and has been referred to, and engaged with by practitioners and academics in an international sphere of climate activism, and heritage conservation (e.g: Edmund Rice Centre Australia, Climate Outreach Information Network, Newport Restoration Foundation). I was asked to do a radio interview as a result of a film screening (BBC Radio Cymru), and consulted about a forthcoming Welsh-language documentary series on climate change (by Tinopolis, for S4C, forthcoming in 2016). The film has also promoted creative practice as a research methodology, achieving recognition in the AHRC Research in Film Awards, with a short clip screened at the British Film Institute. 
URL https://vimeo.com/130445697
 
Description By engaging with specific local communities in Porthdinllaen (Wales), and Durgan (Cornwall), it was possible to gain a sense of community awareness of environmental change in two distinct locations. In general, local communities seemed very aware of visible environmental and coastal change, and were already dealing with issues such as coastal erosion, land slips, and flooding. However, there was less certainty about the future implications of climate change. Some of this was due to lack of specific local climate projections, the necessarily imprecise nature of scientific modelling, and- in some cases- the perception that there was no scientific consensus that climate change was 'definitely happening'. Some residents or long-term tenants expressed the idea that climate change was a worry for the future, and not something that felt pressing at the moment: 'Nothing comes through the letterbox on climate change'.

Some National Trust staff and community members had not heard about the National Trust's Coastal Adaptation Strategy (CAS) before, including those in management positions. This indicates that there some key steps between national level Shifting Shores policy and local CAS development, which need more development to ensure what is proposed at the top level is engaged with on the ground in a productive way that listens and responses to local needs. Clear communication on climate change is obviously needed from the National Trust, but it may be very challenging to convey the idea that coastal adaptation is needed now. It is often hard to compete with the need to manage other issues which may feel more immediately pressing for residents (such as visitor access, and parking). There was also a belief at the local and national level of the National Trust, that arts-based community engagement could potentially be one of the best ways to instigate necessary awareness and conversations.

In both Durgan and Porthdinllaen, it was clear that there's a very strong attachment to the coast, and that this was not only felt by permanent residents, but also by visitors. Some long-term lease holders of the NT cottages in NT had been visiting Porthdinllaen for three generations. In both communities there was an interest in preserving intangible heritage, such as local knowledge and oral history, and not just tangible heritage, such as buildings and coastal paths.

It was interesting to find strong points of connection between the climate-vulnerable communities in the UK and in Kiribati. Shared concerns included anxiety over the impact of change on the meaning of place and a sense that some things were already lost. There were problems with managing sewage and/or water pollution at each site, and a feeling that there was a need to address immediate problems before long-term planning can be taken seriously. One particular feature of the research in Kiribati, however, was the provisional finding that religion is a very important cultural frame for understanding climate change, with only 5% of the population reporting no religious faith. There was also an acknowledgement that Kiribati is entirely coastal, in the sense that it's inhabitants 'can't move back, or we fall into the sea on the other side'. It was clear that climate change is experienced in very local ways, and in Kiribati there are particular challenges with issues such as the cultural meaning of ancestral land, or the burial of family members, which should be factored into climate adaptation policy and planning.

We used film as a key research tool that proved to be both creative and highly effective for communicating findings. Producing edited films from project interviews in Kiribati was an effective way to amplify those perspectives, as well as to forge new networks. On the other hand, it was also clear that there was a need for some more locally-driven or co-designed creative film projects to take place in Kiribati, to challenge the current politics of representation, which tends to portray Kiribati in limited ways, or only in connection with climate change.

Interviews with Museum and Heritage practitioners: Our research suggested that there isn't a single cohesive approach to climate change across the heritage sector, nor would you necessarily expect there to be. Although there may be a public misconception that the remit of heritage organisations is to keep things the same, many heritage professionals acknowledged that their primary role is usually about managing change. However, communicating the potentially disruptive impacts of climate change is challenging, both within a heritage organisation, and externally, towards the public. There are a number of reasons for this. For example, it may create an unrealistic expectation that the heritage organisation is responsible for 'saving' everything. This would be a serious risk for organisations that increasingly rely on public goodwill and support to survive. Some respondents clearly believed that climate change is a highly complex issue and that there is nothing simple about how an organisation 'should' and can respond. Organisations are caught like a 'rabbit in the headlights', and a sense of paralysis was apparent for some. Although mapping the sites of specific risk, mitigation and adaptation may be 'easier' for the Heritage Sector, as existing heritage work is very process driven, this does not necessarily help to inform a strategy for how to really engage diverse publics in a conversation about what change means. Conversations are risky, and respondents clearly believed that they could benefit from expert guidance on climate change communicate, specifically targeting the heritage sector.
Exploitation Route The main project output, the film 'Troubled Waters', has been screened by many project partners, as well as being extremely useful in making new connections for ongoing research and impact. The idea that the story of climate change and cultural heritage needs to be told in more compelling ways, is one that is shared by organisations such as the International National Trusts Organisation, UCOMOS USA, Newport Restoration Foundation, and Climate Outreach. The film continues to put across such messages by organisations such as these, at venues such as the UN Climate Change Conferences, various websites, heritage conferences, university courses, and so on. Our main findings have appeared in the National Trust's internal magazine ('Views'), but we could do more work to ensure that insights feed back more widely to our partner organisation through dialogue, specific workshops or training. We have used other artistic methods (such as artistic street projection) to reach diverse audiences.

The original three early-career investigators are all still involved in follow-on research and impact activities which utilise a range of strategies for acting upon, developing, or feeding back the most significant findings of the project- either to a general or target audience. These strategies include: working with local partners in Kiribati to address current and pressing development needs; continuing to engage the National Trust, Durgan community and visitors through a local art project; providing targeted resources on climate communication to heritage organisations in the UK; creating a collaborative film in Kiribati, and providing further opportunities for cultural exchange between Kiribati and the UK.
Sectors Agriculture, Food and Drink,Communities and Social Services/Policy,Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

URL http://www.corddirdyfroedd.org
 
Description This project has highlighted the experience of coastal inundation and flooding for distinct communities in the UK and Kiribati. In the UK, our project partners, the National Trust, own 742 miles of coastline and face difficult negotiations regarding their Coastal Adaptation Strategy. Through this research, the National Trust has gained a more in-depth portrayal of the challenges facing two of its climate-vulnerable villages, which could also inform their approach at other, comparative sites. The project findings appeared in the Trust's internal magazine, Views, in May 2017, and can be accessed by all its employees and members of the public. The local communities at such sites should also benefit from enhanced awareness and understanding of the issues involved, that threaten their own wellbeing. The National Library of Wales and the Cornish Audio Visual Archive have benefited from an opportunity to share knowledge. This has included hosting and attending project symposia, as well as an opportunity to hear expert advice on 'future-proofing' the archive. This may in turn have fed into organisational thinking and practice around the idea of curating archives for climate-vulnerable communities. Our partners the National College of Wales strives to promote academic research and teaching through the medium of Welsh, and the project PI has delivered two public talks, and a radio discussion on the research in Welsh. This has raised general awareness in Wales of the specific climate-challenges facing Kiribati, and helped to frame climate change in a more cultural way in public debates. The author Angharad Tomos wrote an opinion piece for a local newspaper in response to one of these talks, commenting on the deep contemplation that was inspired by hearing perspectives from Kiribati. The research team has responded directly to the need amongst heritage professionals for advice on how to effectively communicate climate change, by gaining further funding to create a climate change communication toolkit. This was in direct response to the sector's expressed need for such resources. Although contacts in Kiribati were quite limited in this initial development project, these have expanded into a far more involved and collaborative efforts to address Kiribati's challenges through further, current research. This project's focus has evolved naturally into a more international domain, due to growing interest. The 'Troubled Waters' project was vindicated in its original ambitions when one of the founders of KiriCAN (a local, grassroots environmental organisation in Kiribati) said on camera: 'we are worried that no one in the world will hear our stories'. Some of these stories have been successfully amplified through the production of a film: 'Troubled Waters', which explores climate change through a local, cultural lens in Kiribati. Our original partnership with the National Trust has grown to also involve the International National Trusts Organization. It is through INTO that part of the 'Troubled Waters' film was screened at several events in the UN Climate Change Conference, in Marrakech (2016) and Bonn (2017), to reach a diverse international audience, which included policymakers and politicians. INTO have reported that the film has been an invaluable resource for them in making the case that climate change threatens cultural heritage. The same film has also been screened in the USA, Canada, and Sweden, to audiences with a strong representation of heritage professionals. The project has demonstrated the value of research through film: it harnesses creativity in order to educate and raise awareness internationally, and to create new knowledge networks. This may help to argue for the importance of creativity (and the arts and humanities more generally) in solving some of our greatest global challenges.
First Year Of Impact 2015
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Environment,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description Care for the Future/Translating Culture & International Development research grant
Amount £70,000 (GBP)
Funding ID AH/P007635/1 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2016 
End 04/2018
 
Description Follow-on funding for impact under the 'creating living knowledge' highlight notice
Amount £68,000 (GBP)
Funding ID AH/P00959X/1 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2017 
End 01/2018
 
Description Climate Outreach 
Organisation Climate Outreach and Information Network (COIN)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The team, led by Dr Anna Woodham, helped to connect Climate Outreach with a group of heritage professionals who are interested in working to communicate climate change. We achieved this by bringing Climate Outreach together with 15 individuals from a range of large and small heritage organisations. There was representation from those working in or with local authority, national and university museums, world heritage sites, heritage advisory bodies, international heritage organisations and heritage conservation charities. These included Historic Scotland, Historic England and the International National Trust. We then built on these connections by helping to host a live webinar on climate change communication, and collaborating on the production of a workshop facilitator's pack. Climate Outreach could also benefit from the facilitation work of community engagement and participatory research consultant Joanne Orchard-Webb, who is trained as a social scientists, and employed by the project to help deliver these tangible outputs..
Collaborator Contribution Climate Outreach provided expertise on effective communication on climate change in a presentation at our project workshop in Manchester Museum on 7th April 2017. They also helped to move the conversation forward and deliver the outputs that the original workshop's participants deemed most useful: a live webinar and workshop facilitation pack. They were also able to offer an extensive network of contacts with whom they shared the outputs.
Impact The outputs are connected to a central question: How can the heritage/museum sector engage the mainstream public with climate change? They include a workshop in Manchester Museum on April 7th, 2016, and freely available online resources: a Worshop facilitation pack; Workshop summary; live webinar, uploaded online and promoted through networks. Each draws on the disciplines of heritage, media and communication, and social science.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Coleg Cymraeg (Welsh College) 
Organisation Welsh National College
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution PI Jones delivered two public talks in the Welsh language about the research, as well as a Welsh language radio broadcast.
Collaborator Contribution The College's contribution was financial, and covered a return flight to Kiribati for Jones.
Impact One major project output, the multidisciplinary film 'Troubled Waters' was partially enabled through the College's financial contribution. This partnership also meant that Jones was able to reach new audiences through public events promoted or organised by the College.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Cornish Audio Visual Archive 
Organisation Cornish Audio Visual Archive (CAVA)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Co-I Bryony Onciul has shared insights and impressions from her oral history interviews in Durgan, Cornwall, with CAVA. She has brought them into discussions (via an end of project symposium) on 'future-proofing' the archive.
Collaborator Contribution CAVA engaged with the project by engaging in ongoing knowledge transfer and dialogue with Co-I Onciul. They also engaged with the project by attending the final project symposium.
Impact The outcomes would be intangible knowledge exchange (such as advice on archiving as part of preserving cultural memory). This has facilitated a longer-term strand of interest in follow-on research, with a strong digital humanities/archives component.
Start Year 2015
 
Description INTO 
Organisation International National Trusts Organisation
PI Contribution The team supplied INTO with custom-made edited videos for use at two UN Climate Change conferences (Marrakech in 2016 and Bonn in 2017). These were a shorter, subtitled versions of the 'Troubled Waters' film, shown on each occasion at several side events and on a loop at their exhibition stand. The team offered the opportunity for INTO's director, Oliver Maurice, to attend the project's workshop on communicating climate change in more efficient ways (at Manchester Museum, April 2017).
Collaborator Contribution The director of INTO, Oliver Maurice helped to publicise the research through his social media, his outreach work at two UNCCC conferences, and he also participated in the project's knowledge-exchange workshop on communicating climate change to a mainstream audience (Manchester Museum, April 2017).
Impact 7 screenings of creative research from 'Troubled Waters' at side-events in two UN Climate Change Conferences (2016, 2017), as well as the screening of the film on a loop at the INTO exhibition stand. INTO made a contribution to a set of resources responding to the question: 'how can the heritage sector communicate climate change to a mainstream audience'. They did this by participating in the original workshop exploring this topic in Manchester Museum, April 2017, after being invited by the project co-i Dr Anna Woodham.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Manchester Museum: How can the heritage sector communicate climate change? 
Organisation University of Manchester
Department Manchester Museum
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The research team, led by Dr Anna Woodham, helped to connect a group of heritage professionals who are interested in working to communicate climate change (including Manchester Museum) with Climate Outreach. We achieved this by bringing Climate Outreach together with 15 individuals from a range of large and small heritage organisations. There was representation from those working in or with local authority, national and university museums, world heritage sites, heritage advisory bodies, international heritage organisations and heritage conservation charities. These included Historic Scotland, Historic England and the International National Trust. We then built on these connections by helping to host a live webinar on climate change communication, and collaborating on the production of a workshop facilitator's pack. Manchester Museum benefited from the expertise and network of Climate Outreach, and also from the facilitation work of community engagement and participatory research consultant Joanne Orchard-Webb, who is trained as a social scientists, and employed by the project to help deliver these tangible outputs..
Collaborator Contribution Manchester Museum, and curator Henry McGhie in particular, has been engaged with, and supportive of the ongoing research and impact (Troubled Waters; Enduring Connections and follow-on impact). As well as feeding into the original research conducted by Dr Anna Woodham with heritage organisations across the UK, he has helped to stimulate an ongoing dialogue through participation in relevant events for heritage professionals, and through his online media (personal and organisational). He helped to organise and facilitate a workshop exploring 'How can the heritage sector communicate climate change to a mainstream audience', held at Manchester Museum in April 2017. Manchester Museum also helped host a cultural exchange visit from Natan Itonga, a heritage expert from Kiribati, who was able to view the museum's Kiribati collection, and share insights with MM and the relevant ministries in Kiribati. This meant working closely with project Co-i Dr Bryony Onciul, who was leading this exchange. Henry McGhie was also filmed by the project PI Sara Penrhyn Jones, to create a resource for mutual benefit, and to further stimulate awareness within the heritage sector in future.
Impact One output was a workshop on how the heritage sector can communicate climate change in Manchester Museum, April 2017. Other resources include are freely available and downloadable online: Workshop summary pdf report, facilitation pack to stimulate dialogue within heritage organisations and beyond. There has also been some audio-video material generated for future editing and dissemination to raise awareness within the heritage sector, and beyond.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Museum of World Culture, Gothenburg, Sweden 
Organisation Museum of World Culture
PI Contribution Project PI Sara Penrhyn Jones visited the museum in Gothenburg in order to view the museum and it's exhibitions, and to discuss future collaboration. She screened the film 'Troubled Waters' and talked about research in both 'Troubled Waters' and the follow-on research project 'Enduring Connections'. This was a public event.
Collaborator Contribution The Museum of World Culture hosted Sara Penrhyn Jones at the museum for two days, publicised and organised the pubic screening and Q & A. They also engaged in discussions about future collaboration.
Impact Outcomes include a public screening and Q & A session about the research (Troubled Waters and Enduring Connections). There is also a high likelihood of the creative research being incorporated into a future permanent exhibition at the museum.
Start Year 2017
 
Description National Library of Wales 
Organisation National Library of Wales
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The research team participated in ongoing dialogue with the National Library on the idea of proactive curation of archives for climate-vulnerable locations. They invited many participants to a symposium at the National Library, to enrich that debate.
Collaborator Contribution The NLW offered up to one month of staff time to engage with the project, and hosted a project symposium.
Impact One output was a multidisciplinary paper presented at a conference entitled 'Keeping History Above Water' in the USA, titled: 'Troubled Waters: The role of practice-led research in understanding and documenting heritage loss'. This was one of the first national dialogues in the USA on cultural heritage and climate change. The paper was co-presented by invited speakers, project PI Jones and project advisor (based at the library then): Prof. Lorna Hughes. The relevant academic/professional fields would be: the Digital Humanities, Creative Practice as Research, and Archival practice.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Newport Restoration Foundation 
Organisation Newport Restoration Foundation
PI Contribution Dr Anna Woodham from the project team supplied written content for the NRF's blog 'Keeping History Above Water', and helped share strategies and content for disseminating the ongoing research and impact activities.
Collaborator Contribution Interns at the NRF (with the full support of their organisation) helped to disseminate the project's ongoing research and impact activities, and helped to facilitate a lively online dialogue under the hashtag #heritage4climate.
Impact Output include blog posts (by Dr Anna Woodham) on the NRF's website 'Keeping History Above Water' and a series of social media interactions. The relationship developed organically after the Project PI Sara Penrhyn Jones was an invited speaker to the inaugural 'Keeping History Above Water' event in 2016, where she presented research from 'Troubled Waters'.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Royal Albert Memorial Museum, Exeter, hosting Cultural Exchange 
Organisation Royal Albert Memorial Museum
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The project enabled Kiribati cultural heritage expert, Natan Itonga, to visit RAMM's Kiribati collection. In an exchange led by Dr Bryony Onciul, the museum was able to benefit from new insights provided by Natan Itonga, to better understand the cultural meaning and context of their own collection.
Collaborator Contribution RAMM curator, Mr Tony Eccles, generously offered his time to allow Natan Itong and the research team access to Kiribati artefacts held in storage at the museum. This benefited Natan Itonga, who was then able to feed this information back to the relevant ministries in Kiribati. The exchange also offered Dr Bryony Onciul an opportunity to observe first hand what such an exchange could offer both parties, which is also of direct relevance to her own current (and future) research interests.
Impact Cutrator Tony Eccles was able to document new information regarding the object from Kiribati held in storage by the museum, in a way which may enhance future public displays, as well as improve his own understanding of the meaning of such objects. Natan Itonga has also created a report about the cultural exchange more generally, which will be shared with the relevant ministries and cultural organisations in Kiribati. He will be able to share knowledge of which objects are held in British Museums, and how they are cared for. In witnessing and hosting such exchanges, Dr Bryony Onciul's disciplinary expertise in heritage and public history is enriched, which can also be shared further through her teaching, and in future research projects and publications.
Start Year 2017
 
Description The National Trust 
Organisation National Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The NT contributed staff time at two case study sites, and attended project symposia.
Collaborator Contribution The research team conducted research at two NT sites, and fed back insights. The team also shared audiovisual resources produced by the research.
Impact This collaboration fed into all UK-focused conference presentations by the research team (delivered in the UK and beyond). The connections also developed into an international arena (through an introduction to the International National Trusts Organization), with both the NT and INTO becoming a partner on follow-on funded research and impact projects.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Conference paper 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Around 12 people attended a talk by CI Bryony Onciul about the projects at the European Society of Oceanist's conference in Munich, Germany 29th June - 2 July. This created new contacts (Academic, source community and professional) which led to the development of a small network in which we exchange ideas/information etc. It also resulted in a request for our work to be included in international policy reports.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://esfo-org.eu/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/ESfO_booklet.pdf
 
Description Conference paper given at the AHRC and Association of Critical Heritage Studies conference in London 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk given by CI Bryony Onciul about the projects to a room full of academics, post grads and professional heritage practitioners, as part of the Heritage Studies: Critical Approaches and New Directions conference. This led to requests for further information and ideas for potential future collaborations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://ahrcheritage.wixsite.com/ahrcheritage/conference-heritage-studies-critica
 
Description Hope and Fear- Gobaith ac Ofn, part of the AHRC's Being Human festival, Aberystwyth 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A diverse general public were engaged in this event, which was part of the AHRC's 'Being Human' festival. This was also advertised nationally (through the AHRC catalogue and social media) and was reported in the local newspaper, 'The Cambrian News'. The Arts Centre in Aberystwyth was hired as a location, and there were screenings of two project-related films (TIMELINE and Y Gors) and music performed by singer-songwriters Gwilym and Siwan Morus. There was also a discussion about hope and fear in the context of environmental challenges, facilitated by community partner Shelagh Hourahane. Images from the 'Hydrocitizenship' project, depicting creative engagement activities all year round, were played on the screen during the live music. Many members of the audience stayed to talk afterwards, and many are still in touch with the project teams. This outcome is relevant to the creative research and engagement undertaken on both 'Troubled Waters' and 'Hydrocitizenship' research projects.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/aberystwyth-gobaith-ac-ofn-dwy-sgriniad-hope-and-fear-two-screenings-...
 
Description Hope and Fear- Gobaith ac Ofn, part of the AHRC's Being Human festival, Friendship Inn, Borth. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This was a public screening, as part of the AHRC's 'Being Human' festival in 2016, on the theme of 'Hope and Fear'. There was a screening of two project related films: 'TIMELINE' and 'Y Gors' in the local pub in Borth. The even was packed, to the extent that more people came than could physically fit into the space. Both films featured local people, including members of the public and/or artists that had participated in their creation in some way. There was also music by the band Whistler. There were vocal and public expression of enthusiasm towards the films, and very lively and spontaneous conversations for the whole evening on what it meant to live in Borth (so vulnerable to the sea, yet also thriving in many ways). There was feedback that the films naturally touched on huge and often-depressing global challenges, but that the effect overall was a celebration of place and community. There were many requests for future screenings and events, as well as enquiries about online links to the films and the two research projects ('Hydrocitizenship' and 'Troubled Waters') that were connected to each film.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Interview and short boardcast for BBC Spotlight and online about the Boat Shed Gallery at Glendurgan 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact BBC news journalist interviewed CI Bryony Onciul and project partner National Trust Tamsin Hennah about the project funded Boat Shed Gallery by artist Matthew Walmsley and 12 local artists. It was broadcast on local BBC news Spotlight, on BBC radio and online on the BBC website.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-england-cornwall-41432976/tiny-art-gallery-hidden-in-cornish-garden
 
Description Live projection of footage from Kiribati on to houses in Borth 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Artist Esther Tew (commissioned through the research project 'Hydrocitizenship') projected footage on to houses in Borth, mid-Wales as part of an artistic event. These included interviews with locals. It was an opportunity to also project footage from Kiribati ('Troubled Waters') in the same space, and to connect the local to the global, in terms of climate vulnerability. This fed into a continued dialogue with the public that was facilitated by Esther Tew in the same area over the same weekend. This was in great contrast to an Environment Agency (as they were then) meeting to consult with Borth locals over climate vulnerability, which was very poorly attended.The projections were experienced by many people who had come specifically for the event, but also drew attention from the many people who were passing on the way to the pub (to watch rugby!).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.hydrocitizens.com/blogs/item/water-water-everywhere-princess-street-projections
 
Description National Trust- Shifting Shores Seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Reuben Knutson (Project RA) introduced the 'Troubled Waters' research to an audience consisting primarily of people working with and for the National Trust, and in local government (planning and environment).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Presentation at World Symposium for Climate Change Communication (Manchester Museum) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact A presentation for a diverse, international audience concerned with communicating climate change. The talk, given by Dr Anna Woodham (with Sara Penrhyn Jones as named co-author) was: "Troubled Waters: How should heritage organisations communicate climate change?". Dr Woodham was then approached for more online information about the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Public Screening: Troubled Waters film at Museum of World Culture in Gothenburg, Sweden 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The film Troubled Waters was screened to the general public at the Museum of World Culture, follow by a talk and Q & A. Current research in Kiribati (Enduring Connections) was also shared with the audience, which also included heritage professionals from the museum. As part of the same trip there was a meeting between Sara Penrhyn Jones and a curator at the Museum, Klas Grinell. Plans were made to incorporate the creative research into a permanent exhibition on climate change and migration at the museum.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://enduringconnections.com/filmscreening-at-the-museum-of-world-culture-gothenburg-dec-06-2017/
 
Description Public Talk (Event: Boddi Mewn Celfyddyd/Drowning in Art), North Wales 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Sara Penrhyn Jones (project PI) presented and screened film clips from 'Troubled Waters' to a very diverse Welsh-speaking audience (around 30 people), which included the general public as well as prominent figures in Welsh cultural life, including politicians, dramatist, performers, folksingers, writers, university researchers, film funders and activists. Each talk and presentation related to the idea of drowning in art. The audience reported that they had not previously connected the drowning of Welsh villages (like Tryweryn) in the 50s and 60s to the current and projected 'drowning' of low-lying nations because of climate change. There was a powerful realisation for the audience and speaker that the question of how to treat the dead (buried in the ground) during such drownings was one of the most emotive issues, especially for smaller and indigenous cultures. This event was organised by the School of Music and School of Welsh, Bangor University, and the Welsh College.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://gwyneddgreadigol.com/digwyddiadau/digwyddiad.php?eventKey=797
 
Description Public Talk, sharing insights from research in Kiribati, with film clips (Aberystwyth) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This was a public talk in the Welsh language (by Sara Penrhyn Jones, project PI), about the relationship between climate change and heritage in Kiribati. It was organised by the National Welsh College (Y Coleg Cymraeg), who are one of the research project partners. It was also attended by a representative from the National Library of Wales, another of the research project partners. It was filmed and added to the College's digital archive of talks in Welsh. The purpose of this series of seminars, 'a World of Information' is to bring academic research to a wider public audience through the medium of Welsh. They aim to facilitate a flow of information and awareness of research activities within, between, and beyond different academic disciplines. There was a lively discussion at the end of the presentation, and as a result of related social media activity, I was invited to talk more about the project on BBC Radio Cymru (again, in Welsh). The audience reported that the had not previously considered climate change as affecting heritage and culture.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.corddirdyfroedd.org/?page_id=176
 
Description Public event as part of the AHRC's Being Human festival. Talk titled: Troubled Waters, Stormy Futures: Religion and Climate Change in Kiribati in Bath 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 30 members of the general public attended this talk (by Co-i Kate Rigby) as part of a two hour Q & A on the theme of 'Hope and Fear'. Many expressed an emotional response to the various presentations, and particularly welcomed the interactive opportunity to share ideas and responses to the theme. The film TIMELINE (Jones) was also screened.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/bath-spa-hope-and-fear-in-times-of-change-tickets-26881245529#
 
Description Radio interview (BBC Radio Cymru) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The project PI spoke about Kiribati, and the relationship between climate change, culture and heritage on BBC Radio Cymru (in Welsh). The discussion (re)framed climate change in cultural terms, and referred to climate change induced migration in the future. I would hope that such interviews are part of a gradual and far broader effort to consider the specific local and cultural effects of climate change and to encourage empathy and solidarity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02pnckv
 
Description Screening of Troubled Waters film at the Association of Critical Heritage Studies conference, Montreal 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The 'Troubled Waters' film was screened to an audience which included professionals from the heritage sector. The film was promoted and commented upon in social media, which was a gateway to a wider public. It helped to engender a connection between Co-I Bryony Onciul and the lead curator of the Museum of World Culture, Sweden. This resulted in a formal partnership in the successful follow-on funding for impact project (Troubled Waters- Reaching Out), with Onciul and PI Jones invited to do a future public talk and screening in Sweden (2017).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Screening of the film TIMELINE at the University of Adelaide 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The University of Adelaide and the EU Centre for Global Affairs convened a conference with the J.M. Coetzee Centre for Creative Practice, called: H20: Life and Death. TIMELINE, (featuring footage associated with two research projects: Troubled Waters and Hydrocitizenship) was one of the films screened at an event that was open to the public. According to Professor Christina Slade (representing the Global Academy of Liberal Arts): 'There were calls for Sara's powerfully polemic and moving documentary to be shown more widely'. Dr Jenny Newell (Acting Director, Australian Museum) praised the film as engaging and touching, and the conference organiser Camille Marie Eugenie Rouliere reported that the film 'generated a very interesting debate on what the Humanities can contribute to changing people's (unsustainable) behaviours'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://gala.network/university-of-adelaide/2017/03/21/h2o-life-and-death-an-interdisciplinary-confer...
 
Description Screenings of Troubled Waters (short version) at UN Climate Change Conference 2017 (Bonn) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Our partners the International National Trusts Organisation used our custom-made five minute film (extracted from the film 'Troubled Waters') at four different side events at the UNCCC. They also played the film on a loop in their booth, which would have been seen by many conference attendees from all over the world. They reported that the film went 'down very well' and was an extremely valuable resource for them in communicating the link between threatened heritage and climate change. They deem this useful in emphasising the more cultural ramifications of climate change.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.motherchannel.com/cop-22-culture-move-sea-level-rise-cultural-heritage-climate-mobility/
 
Description Troubled Waters Symposium, National Library of Wales (Aberystwyth) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Project investigators, partners and collaborators came together to discuss heritage in times of accelerated climate change, and strategies for adaptation, communication and heritage conservation. Participants included the National Trust, National Library, COIN (Climate Outreach Information Network), local artists, and academics from the field of heritage, literature, human geography, environmental humanities, history, film, media and communication. Academics reported that they had a far better idea of the challenges facing the National Trust regarding coastal erosion in the UK, and public communication. It was an opportunity to make more detailed plans with the National Trust for collaborative working in Potrthdinllaen (North Wales), where arts-based methods might be used and tested. There was also discussion of how the NT might be able to travel to Kiribati for knowledge-exchange. COIN agreed to participate in a filmed interview with Sara Penrhyn Jones. The National Library reported that they ha become more interested in the idea and practical challenge of archiving/recording intangible heritage.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.corddirdyfroedd.org/?page_id=183
 
Description Troubled Waters Website (Corddi'r Dyfroedd) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The intention of this website is to explain and make accessible some of the research that is conducted as part of Troubled Waters. This is evolving with the project, and we are aiming for the creation of a multi-media resource; it already has an embedded film. This resource is internationally accessible, and we will attempt to draw attention to it in our various presentations and engagement events, as well as through social media.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.corddirdyfroedd.org
 
Description Troubled Waters film screened at UN Climate Change Summit in Marrakech (2016) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact PI Jones created a customised-edit of the 'Troubled Waters' film for the International National Trusts Organization (5 mins, with subtitles). This was then ideally suited for them to screen on a loop at their exhibit stand at the COP. They also screened the film at three side events, in which there was also representation from UCOMOS, the Arctic Institute, UNHCR, and SPREP. Some of these organisations promoted the film through their social media channels. The audience would be very international, and consist of people connected in some way to climate change advocacy and policymaking. INTO reported feedback that audience members not only acknowledged that climate change can have a profound (even fatal) effect on heritage but also that such global challenges are best presented through personal and compelling stories, conveyed through the arts (like film). This collaboration also led to a formal partnership with INTO in the successful follow-on impact project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.motherchannel.com/cop-22-culture-move-sea-level-rise-cultural-heritage-climate-mobility/
 
Description Webinar: How can the Heritage/Museum sector engage the mainstream public with climate change? 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Participants on an earlier workshop for heritage and museum professionals held at Manchester Museum were asked for their views on how we can all work together to address climate change and the communication challenge. They expressed their need for more multi-media resources and further, national and international dialogue. With this in mind the project team worked with Climate Outreach to create an international dialogue through an online webinar that any one could register for. Over 200 people registered for this live, interactive event, which now also exists online as a resource. Climate Outreach has promoted this resource to their own extensive, international networks. They reported a request for more information and a desire for future collaboration from new contacts due to this work.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://climateoutreach.org/resources/webinar-and-guides-climate-change-can-heritage-sector-engage-m...
 
Description Workshop in Manchester Museum: We need to talk about climate change 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The 'We need to talk about climate change' workshop was held at the Manchester Museum, UK on 7th April 2017. The aim of the event was to bring together a diverse group of UK heritage practitioners to explore existing heritage sector practices and share collective wisdom relating to new approaches to engagement and communication around climate change. A community engagement and participatory research consultant, Joanne Orchard-Webb, facilitated dialogue between project researchers, Head of Collections at Manchester Museum, Henry McGhie and George Marshall from Climate Outreach.

The premise of the day emerged from the findings of the "Troubled Waters, Stormy Futures: heritage in times of accelerated climate change" research conducted in the UK and Kiribati during 2015-16: [http://www.corddirdyfroedd.org/]. The research surfaced a number of key questions relating to the often challenging role of heritage organisations in climate change debates and these questions were used to guide the workshop structure:

15 individuals from a range of large and small heritage organisations attended the workshop There was representation from those working in or with local authority, national and university museums, world heritage sites, heritage advisory bodies, international heritage organisations and heritage conservation charities. These included Historic Scotland, Historic England and the International National Trust. Further action and outputs were co- decided (a workshop facilitation pack and webinar, detailed elsewhere), with very positive feedback from participants, for example that the workshop left them 'genuinely much more excited about the possibility for talking about climate change and heritage'. The dialogue was extended online, and internationally, through the #heritage4climate, with examples of interaction collated here: https://storify.com/annawoodham1/we-need-to-talk-about-climate-change
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://enduringconnections.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/HERITAGE-AND-CLIMATE-CHANGE-WORKSHOP-SUMM...
 
Description Workshop on heritage and climate change (with project partners the National Trust) in Penryn, Cornwall 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact This was an intense but focused workshop, including 25 participants. There were academics from the project team (and advisers), but also representatives from the National Trust (local and national leadership levels), artists, and archivists working in Cornwall. There was great interest in the way that the arts could help explore and communicate climate change, as well as an opportunity to present and co-analyse research findings from Porthdinllaen (Wales), Durgan (Wales) and Kiribati (Micronesia). The archivists participating expressed the usefulness of the presentation on 'future-proofing' archives. People expressed appreciation of the opportunity to talk across disciplines and professions. The National Trust (Durgan) reported that the local community had begun to donate more money to protect the local coastal path. He publicly attributed this greater sense of ownership to the ongoing local engagement conducted by Co-I Bryony Onciul as part of the project research. The kinds of connections made helped to ensure that there was a solid foundation for the next (separately funded) follow-on funding for impact application: 'Troubled Waters: Reaching Out" (2017-18). It also helped to lay the foundation for a future artistic commission in Durgan (managed by Bryony Onciul).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016