Imagining Autism: Drama, Performance and Intermediality as Interventions for Autistic Spectrum Conditions

Lead Research Organisation: University of Kent
Department Name: Sch of Arts

Abstract

Imagining Autism is a collaboration between the disciplines of drama and psychology, promoting cross disciplinary research both within and beyond the arts and humanities. Our main aim is to test the hypothesis that many aspects of autism can be ameliorated through participation in drama based activities, specifically live, interactive performance. Our contention is that the embodied qualities of participatory, immersive performance create an opening into the autistic child's world. If successful, the project will provide the basis for a large-scale efficacy trial, and more generally, will raise the possibility that other forms of developmental disorder might also benefit from drama-based interventions. As a consequence, we will disseminate our findings across a wide audience that reaches beyond academia to Health, Education and Social Services.

Autism affects as many as 1 in 100 people in the UK and is characterised by a pervasive spectrum of impairments in social interaction, social communication and imagination. There is no cure for autism and there is no single effective intervention. The search continues for an intervention approach which produces demonstrable and generalisable gains for at least the majority of children with autism. There is a lack of research into many interventions that claim to be effective, including drama. Simon Baron-Cohen whose research has transformed our understanding of autism states that ' for severe autism, it may be that no one single method is effective for all children. But researching such methods may enable us to develop a range of methods that teachers, therapists and parents can turn to, to help children connect with the social world.' (Baron Cohen, 2007). This project aims to develop these methods.

Our hypothesis is predicated on a close relationship between the triad of impairments which are the diagnostic criteria for autism and the constituent elements of drama:
Imagination through the construction of a fictional or alternative reality
Interaction in the physical engagement between performer(s) and audience
Communication through the dialogue between performer(s) and audience

Given this relation, the project uses drama techniques as an intervention for autism to facilitate language and communication, sociability and empathy and imagination and creativity. The proposed intervention is designed to help autistic children to compensate for their difficulties through participation in fictional structures in visual and sensory environments using, for example, puppetry, light, sound and multimedia. These help the participants develop 'felt' understanding through experiential, physical and immersive media. Since the highly visual, kinetic and aural qualities of the autistic imagination are also the qualities of contemporary performance, the project also investigates how drama might help us to understand the imagination in relation to autism.

The project uses psychological approaches to evaluate the impact of the intervention on three groups of six children, exploring the effect of the intervention on their social interaction, communication and imagination. It will employ a wide range of measures, most of which will be measures which have been used before in studies of intervention in autism. As in other recent intervention evaluations, the main outcome variable will be the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (Lord et al., 2001). In addition to the ADOS, the evaluation will use measures of theory of mind, imitation, emotion recognition as well as observations of spontaneous social activity and play and ratings by parents and staff of attention, social engagement, communication and play based activities.

In keeping with the aims of the AHRC scheme, the proposed project promises to further understanding of contemporary human culture through drama and performance practices and our encounter with the autistic consciousness.

Planned Impact

Impact Summary

Who will benefit from the research?

The development of a relatively simple template that can be cheaply and flexibly applied in a range of non academic contexts will be of benefit to a range of potential user groups:

Individuals with autistic spectrum conditions

Parents and carers of these individuals

Arts Practitioners in applied and community theatre

Educators (preschool/primary/secondary teachers/teaching assistants/educational psychologists/speech therapists)

Local Education Authorities

Social Services

Health services (paediatricians/clinical psychologists)

How will they benefit?
Individuals with autistic spectrum conditions will benefit from increased opportunities for social interaction, imagination and communication.

Parents and careers will benefit from increased opportunities for remediation in the children they care for.

Arts practitioners will benefit from a proven technique of intervention which is flexible and can be creatively adapted

Educators will similarly benefit from access to a relatively cheap and flexible intervention

Local Education Authorities will benefit from effective and cost efficient training packages for inset days and short courses

Social Services will similarly benefit from effective and cost efficient interventions which can be used in a range of contexts (e.g. respite centres; weekend and holiday play schemes)

Health Services will benefit from access to similar training packages as above but these techniques may also be adapted and developed to facilitate child friendly methods of diagnostic assessment

What will be done to ensure they benefit
The project allows for follow up workshops and training materials for use by parents, carers, teachers, social workers, paediatricians, psychologists and other beneficiaries as listed above. As part of the intervention parents and teachers will be given guidance and support to continue the work started by the practitioners in order to maintain any gains and to provide the same intervention to other children in the school. The project will also inform the work of practitioners working in the field of applied theatre . Workshops held at the end of the project will be used both to disseminate the findings to those who were involved in any way in the project and to seek their feedback on the process and the interpretation of the results.
Finally, local education authorities will benefit in that the project hopes to demonstrate that it is possible to produce demonstrable, positive and maintainable gains for these children with a relatively low intensity, low cost, school-based intervention which can be administered by trained teachers and practitioners working in the school environment. Investment in establishing drama-based interventions programmes in schools will reap benefits in the long run if the children undergoing the programmes are more able to cope and engage better with others around them as adults. It will potentially improve children's ability to cope with the social demands of school and enable them to better reach their academic potential. The project would provide clear evidence of the impact of the intervention and the conditions in which it is most effective, which Local Education authorities could use to justify support for schools implementing the programme.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Title Film: Playing a Part 
Description Community participation project, funded by a University of Kent Public Engagement Award and the Autism Ethics Network. Professor Nicola Shaughnessy co-ordinated a collaboration between autistic women and arts practitioners to explore their experiences, identities and perceptions, finding expression for invisibility through live art and participatory performance, 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact This will be screened at three arts centres/festivals around the UK in 2018 and evaluative feedback will be collated following the screenings. The project led directly to an AHRC Research Projects application submitted in January 2018 (awaiting response). 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vOMkPr8si7M&feature=youtu.be.
 
Title Imagining Autism 
Description A short film featuring the impact and legacy of the Imagining Autism project featuring schools in Kent who are using the resources generated by the research 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2023 
Impact Impact on autistic learners at the Beacon School who are featured i the film. The methods support communication, emotional literacy and well-being. Impact on teachers who discuss the value of the approach for supporting and educating autistic learners. The school are now using the creative methods in a range of classrooms and contexts. As a centre of excellence, the Beacon has a network of special schools who are also using the methods. Other teachers within the network (generally SENCOS), accessed the training funded through the Follow On project (Autism Re-Imagined) as "Imagining Autism Champions." They are using the approach in their schools and training their staff in the creative methods. They testify to the impact and effectiveness of the approach as a pedagogy for neurodivergent learners. 
 
Title Now I See the World: Imagining Autism 
Description Documentary film based on the project and featuring participants from the final school with contributions from parents and teachers. It was made in collaboration with Sarah Turner, an experimental film maker who specialises in documentary. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact There have been 3 film screenings, attracting large audiences. The film documentary was launched at the Gulbenkian Cinema in March 2014 for an audience of 300. In April is was screened at an international conference (Cognitive Futures, Durham) and in July it was screened at the International Federation for Theatre Research (University of Warwick). In 2014 it will be published in the Routledge digital archives series 
URL http://www.arts-archives.org/index.htm
 
Title PopUpPod: Creative Box 
Description We developed in collaboration with Cardiff School of Art and Design a pilot PopPupPod 'playbox' suitable for both parents and teacher, in order, longer term, to see how iA methods can be made accessible more widely. . This box opens up to reveal an appealing bespoke hand puppet, 'Bo', with tips on how to use Bo effectively to communicate better with an autistic child. Bo can also be used situations that often cause stress (for example, eating, washing or getting dressed). The iA colour coded 'themes' of Outer Space, Forest, Underwater, Arctic and Under the City prompt activity suggestions grouped under Puppetry, Play and Senses. With a little imagination, sensitivity to the iA techniques of following the child's cues, and some cheap easily accessible resources (all clearly explained in the box) any of these environments can easily be adapted to a classroom or a bedroom. The child is enabled to take imaginative journeys alongside parent,carer or teacher in sensory rich and autistic friendly spaces, whose effectiveness was first demonstrated in our full-size pod. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact Developed and trialled from October 2018 to March 2019. Evaluation will follow and impact may result in future. 
 
Description First of all this study demonstrated the feasibility of conducting the Imagining Autism intervention in special schools, the adaptations necessary for differing ages and differing levels of ability. It also identified the measures that seemed to work best for evaluating the impact of the intervention.

Secondly, this study also provided preliminary evidence that the intervention makes a difference to many of the children who took part. Almost half the children improved significantly on at least one measure of social interaction, six of them on the core measure, the Autism Diagnostic Observation Scale (ADOS). Those who increased most in reciprocal social interaction were those who were less severely affected by their autism, in particular in terms of communication. It is likely that these children show more accelerated change whereas those with lower levels of functioning need longer to start to show changes. The 10 weeks of the intervention might not have been enough to see significant changes for this group.

Thirteen children increased substantially (more than would have been predicted by increase in chronological age) on some aspect of communication as rated by the parents and three improved significantly on the Communication domain of the ADOS.

In terms of play and imagination, there were few significant changes in these domains. However, 2 children showed noteworthy changes in their imaginative play on the ADOS and four children also showed substantial increases in observed joint functional play with objects during unstructured (play time observations) observations.

One of the most noteworthy findings was a significant increase across all children in the accuracy with which children in the study recognized facial expressions. This was particular pronounced for the children with lower levels of social and adaptive functioning.

Finally, teacher ratings of severity of autism declined significantly post intervention across the whole sample. In two schools the reduction in severity of was significant as rated by teachers; eight children showed significant changes individually. Parent ratings of severity of autism also decreased for the whole sample and almost three quarters of the children showed at least some positive change in terms of the severity of autism as rated by their parents. Interviews with parents and teachers highlighted the enjoyment the children had experienced and how easily they had gone to the sessions with the drama practitioners. 19 parents were interviewed following the intervention :
• All reported that they wanted their child to access more sessions.
• 16 said their child had gained as a result of the intervention in some way.
• For some the gain was enjoyment and increased confidence, for others the gain was related to communication and language, for others play, imagination and socialisation.
• A number of families in particular were very clear that the gain was due to the intervention.

As a multi-disciplinary research team, we are now in a better position to apply for funding for a larger, better controlled study that will establish proof of concept for the Imagining Autism intervention.
Exploitation Route This study established the feasibility of both conducting the Imagining Autism sessions in schools as well as preliminary evidence that the intervention has a positive effect on a number of different measures for a substantial proportion of the children involved. The next step in terms of research will be to seek funding for a larger, better controlled trial study that will provide proof of concept for the intervention. Exploring the impact in other settings and using different measures is already planned through a collaboration with Stony Brook University, New York. However the project illustrated that the children at the very least enjoyed the intervention and were very keen to take part. Making the intervention available to more children in a wider range of settings will be possible and will be necessary as part of the larger trial study. Discussions on how to develop the capacity of the IA team are already underway. Collaborations with other groups working in related areas are currently being established in order to achieve this greater capacity to deliver Imagining Autism to more children. At this stage, the particular group who will take forward the findings will be the research team and collaborators as well as the practitioners working in the field. Teachers in some of the specialist autism schools have already received some training inspired by the intervention which they can take forward to their day to day practice of working with the children. In the future this area of impact should be increased.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Education,Healthcare

 
Description 1. Film documentary on the impact of the autism project through its affects on participants, families and schools. Explores insights into the imagination in autism and challenges stereotypes of the condition. Has been screened at conferences and for community groups. Available in the Routledge Performance Archive. 2. Tour to NAS Schools 2014 to train teachers and careworkers in Imagining Autism's methods Workshop programme to disseminate Imagining Autism's methods 3. Extensive training programme held in house with students since 2012 (University of Kent Canterbury campus) and externally as CPD training since 2017 whereby the Imagining Autism team train practitioners, healthcare workers, artists and other interested members of public in techniques and methods of the project. The trainees then go on and use and implement these methods elsewhere in their work life. A 6 week Training Course was offered to teachers and arts practitioners in Spring 2017 prior to The Atkinson residency, Southport ; we then employed one of the arts worker trainees as part of the practitioner team delivering the residency. A CPD training programme for teachers in the Shepway district (Beacon School Training Centre Folkestone) began In November 2017. 4. Imagining Autism for Arts Centres. Developed for a residency at The Atkinson Southport in March 2017. The 'pod' immersive drama experience was adapted to accommodate one off visits by children from local special needs schools supported by their teachers. Professional training events during the residency were directed at teachers and other professionals and 'Autistic Community cafes' for parents and carers, developing a template for such events (see successful bid for Follow On Funding 2018). 5. Imagining Autism for Families developed in 2015 from an internal (University of Kent) Public Engagement grant. Post diagnosis, play is often neglected as parents are told their child lacks skills for pretend play: on the contrary Imagining Autism found imaginative play to be a key to understanding, supporting and preventing managing stressed behaviours. Parents are offered one or more workshops to demonstrate the creative practices of Imagining Autism and how this relates to imaginative play. Trained practitioners then work with autistic children (any age) alongside their parents and siblings in the 'pod'. 6. Imagining Autism Community Cafes: trialled at Southport (Atkinson Arts Centre residency) and developed into a template for use in community venues and schools. In 2018 we presented cafes at Nottingham Lakeside (twilight cafe), Midlands Arts Centre (whole day cafe), Quarterhouse Folkestone (whole day cafe) and Beacon School (whole day cafe). 7. The Beacon School Folkestone used the Imagining Autism approach (training and mini pods) as part of their post covid recovery curriculum. Pods were created as imaginary environments in classrooms with different themes, connected to the curriculum (e.g. pirate ship, dentist, forest) and the creative arts lead for the school, Allan Ince, liaised with the PI Shaughnessy and CI Trimingham; Shaughnessy visited the school in July 2020. The approach was disseminated to other special schools in the Beacon network and a regular series of Imagining Autism forums are scheduled (twice termly) for teachers to discuss their work with each other and with the project team. A member of staff has undertaken fund raising for addition resources to support the development of Imagining Autism in the school. Allan Ince also conducted an evaluation of the efficacy of the approach. 8. The Imagining Autism pod is being used at The Beacon School, Walmer, a new satellite provision for children with Special Educational Needs. The new site was established increase the number of specialist PSCN places available in Dover District particularly for pupils with ASD as one of their need types. particularly for pupils with ASD and/or moderate/ severe learning difficulties. Teachers have consulted with the Imagining Autism PI and CI in creating scenic environments and the PI and CI visited the school to work with the children in the pod (19/10/21). See https://imaginingautism.org/2021/10/01/ia-pod-at-walmer-beacon/.
First Year Of Impact 2012
Sector Creative Economy,Education,Healthcare
Impact Types Cultural,Societal

 
Description Advising National Theatre as Autism and Neurodiversity consultant
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact The changes to understanding and practice are evident in the differences between the previous NT production and the current tour. The company are working with neurodivergent performers and are adopting inclusive and accessible practices in all aspects of production. The trigger warnings and sensitivity notes have been updated. There has been training and discussion in relation to neurodiversity and representations of disability. All of this impacts on the audience experience as the production seeks to challenge stereotypes of autism and disability and to promote understanding and awareness of neurodiversity and neurodivergent people. As this is a set text in schools the production attracts school groups and is very influential on adolescent understanding of autism. Evaluation is ongoing as the production continues.
URL https://www.nationaltheatre.org.uk/shows/the-curious-incident-on-tour
 
Description An Imagining Autism Champion has established iA at Brookland C of E Primary School, Romney Marsh. She created an outdoor sensory space in a tent modeled on the Imagining Autism pod for cross curricular learning..
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Beacon School Creative Curriculum 2020/21: outdoor sensory space created
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Beacon School Creative Curriculum 2020/21: outdoor sensory space created
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Imagining Autism Pod erected at The Beacon Walmer
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Contribution to new or Improved professional practice
Impact The introduction of (what is in effect) a new method of teaching consisting of immersive drama, teacher in role, puppetry etc to the curriculum at The Beacon Walmer, right at the start of a new school, has led to staff creativity and well being, enjoying furnishing the pod and developing ideas around the children's visits, spending their own time and even money to improve it. The children have benefitted too in their well being and education, enjoying this new method of teaching. Subjects taught through the garden scenario include the environment (growing seeds, the weather) and communication skills (eg talking to puppets, helping to write the diary).
 
Description Interdisciplinary PhD on Imagining Autism for diagnostic purposes
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Dr Yvonne Parks, Consultant Paediatrician for Kent and Canterbury Hospital, has used the project in training her team and is external advisor for the PhD. Dr Parks instigated the PhD research project, recognising the potential of the methods to ehance diagnosis. In terms of education, Imagining Autism training has been delivered to every National Autistic Society school in the UK. Each NAS school has a network of special schools whose staff also participated in training as part of their CPD. For feedback, see the Imagining Autism website. Imagining Autism is now collaborating with members of the Sydney de Haan Research Centre for Arts and Health, to develop evaluation frameworks for measuring the impact of Arts on wellbeing. Sydney de Haan's report, arising from AHRC funding, was launched recently at the House of Commons. Members of this team, local government reprentatives for Canterbury and Medway and participants in the All Parliamentary Action Group for Autism are involved in a forthcoming colloquium in January 2015, 'Changing lives through live art practice'.
URL http://www.imaginingautism.org
 
Description Sensory theatre for young people with PMLD
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Contribution to new or improved professional practice
URL https://www.frozenlighttheatre.com/sensorystudio
 
Description Training researchers and trainee social workers in the Czech Republic: PEDAL
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Training workshops in techniques for working Autism and Special Needs
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Improved skill levels of those working with autistic and other special needs children by running a series of training workshops for arts, education and health professionals. Training delivered across 5 UK arts organisations - 'Magpie Dance; (October 14), Kelly Hunter Heart Beat Method (Jan 15), Oily Cart Theatre (Feb 15), Moving Memory (March 15).
 
Description 50th Anniversary Scholarship
Amount £54,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of Kent 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2013 
End 09/2016
 
Description AHRC Follow on Funding
Amount £24,627 (GBP)
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2018 
End 12/2018
 
Description Beacon 50th Anniversary Scheme
Amount £97,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of Kent 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2014 
End 12/2016
 
Description Ideas Factory
Amount £7,084 (GBP)
Organisation University of Kent 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2014 
End 07/2014
 
Description Now I See the World'
Amount £10,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of Kent 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2012 
End 09/2013
 
Description Playing A/Part: Investigating the Experiences of Autistic Girls through Drama, Interactive Media and Participatory Arts, AHRC
Amount £806,475 (GBP)
Funding ID AH/S001158/1 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2018 
End 10/2021
 
Description Public Engagement with Research
Amount £2,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of Kent 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2017 
End 04/2017
 
Description Public Engagement with Research
Amount £2,000 (GBP)
Organisation University of Kent 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2016 
End 12/2016
 
Description Public Engagement with Researchg
Amount £1,942 (GBP)
Organisation University of Kent 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 05/2017 
End 04/2018
 
Description The Atkinson, Children in the Arts
Amount £5,495 (GBP)
Organisation Maersk 
Sector Private
Country Denmark
Start 03/2017 
End 04/2017
 
Title Evaluation framework for participatory arts 
Description As an interdisciplinary collaboration between Pyschology and Drama, much was learned about how to design and evaluate qualitative and quantitative data, particularly in research with human subjects that engages with hard to reach areas of neuropsychology (atypical cognitive profiles, imagination, perception and memory). Methods were developed for evaluation of the processes of engagement. This has led to collaboration between applied music (Adam Ockleford's "Sounds of Intent" framework) and applied science (Philip Barnard, ICS model). A follow on research project is developing this into an evaluative framework as well as a colloquium on evaluation of participatory arts practice 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The new framework (a collaboration between Imagining Autism and Sounds of Intent) will be made available to arts practitioners and researchers to be used as a methodology for analysing engagement, development and process in practice based performance research. 
 
Title Imagining Autism On Line Resources and PopPupPod 
Description Our online resources were developed in conjunction with the PopPupPod creative box and are adapted from the original project's practical workshops using immersive sensory environments, imaginative interaction and creative media (e.g. puppetry) to engage with autistic children. They are suitable for both parents and teachers to work with autistic children. They are based on the practical and play-based approaches used in the original Imagining Autism project as well as the creative materials produced in the Follow-on project: Autism Re-Imagined. Although the project began with 7-12 year olds, the methods have also been used with autistic teenagers. The iA colour coded spaces of Outer Space, Forest, Underwater, Arctic and Under the City prompt Activity suggestions grouped under Puppetry, Play and Senses. There are suggestions for adapting the activities to suit the interests and capabilities of the young person working with them. With a little imagination, sensitivity to the iA techniques of following the child's cues, and some cheap easily accessible resources, any of these spaces can easily be adapted to a classroom or a bedroom. The young person is able to take imaginative journeys facilitated by a teacher, parent or carer in autistic friendly and rich sensory spaces which are co-produced together. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2019 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The resources are being used by schools and were used by parents for homeschooling during the Covid 19 Pandemic. They were also part of the recovery curriculum for Beacon School, Folkestone. 
URL https://imaginingautism.org/online-resources/
 
Title Training in Imagining Autism Methodologies 
Description Training in Imagining Autism methods for professional arts workers and teachers. 6 week programme .Approx 15 participants. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2017 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Professionals in the education and health sectors are able to adopt some of these methods and use within their own practice or in the workplace 
 
Description Beacon School Training Centre, Folkstone 
Organisation The Beacon Folkestone
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Beacon School Training Centre, Folkestone. CPD training workshops (18/10/17 and 15/11/17 and 20/2/18 and 20/3/18) for teachers in the Shepway region in Imagining Autism pedagogical methods
Collaborator Contribution Financial contribution of £2,800 to facilitate workshops, as well as provision of space and additional resources
Impact CPD training in methods of Imagining Autism for teachers in the Shepway region
Start Year 2017
 
Description CPD (Continuing Professional Development Workshops) at The Beacon[special needs school], Folkestone 
Organisation The Beacon Folkestone
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution A series of CPD workshops delivered to a group of staff from The Beacon and other schools in the district, to train 'Imagining Autism Champions'. The training involved understanding autism better through our embodied and multi-sensory approaches well as giving the teaching staff specific skills in classroom puppetry, drama games and humour (clowning techniques).
Collaborator Contribution Support from the school, particularly the Deputy Head (DH) teacher who led the project, to cascade Imagining Autism methods (creative approaches within the classroom, using eg puppetry) throughout the school. The DH also led a fund raising initiative (Big Lottery and Kent County Council) to bring the Imagining Autism 'pod' to the school as a week long residency, to complement the CPD training. The Beacon has put financial resources into additional CPD training (Feb 2019) as well as considerable help in kind (specifically, staff time). DH sat on a iA panel at the Quarterhouse's Festival of the Brain May 2018.
Impact Further CPD training day at The Beacon delivered by PI and CoI Feb 2019 to fresh cohort of staff members Residency by Imagining Autism team using the 'pod' in Nov 2018 Hosted Imagining Autism Cafe in Nov 18 as part of Imagining Autism Week Evaluating a PopPupPod box in the classroom
Start Year 2017
 
Description Midland Arts Centre and Open Theatre Company 
Organisation Midland Arts Centre (mac)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Open Theatre partnership for Autistic Community Cafes with Richard Hayhow and Midlands Arts Centre (MAC), Birmingham
Collaborator Contribution Expertise, staff, marketing, space and resources.
Impact The Autistic Community Cafes are being developed in partnership with Midlands Arts Centre and Open Theatre Company and it is anticipated that they will be a regular occurrence.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Multi Agency Autism Group Workshop and Presentation 
Organisation National Autistic Society
Department Helen Allison School
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Family Liaison Officer at the NAS Helen Allison School, invited the team in June 2017 to present to the Multi Agency Autism Group meeting, running a workshop and presentation for its members (education and health professionals, service providers, charity groups and community members)
Collaborator Contribution Facilitated the workshop and presentation ensuring presence from numerous non HEI partners.
Impact Training professionals from education and healthcare in methods of Imagining Autism
Start Year 2015
 
Description National Autistic Society 
Organisation National Autistic Society
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Discussions and presentations with NAS; participation in NAS professional conference (workshop and presentations). Contribution to training in NAS schools and to curriculum development
Collaborator Contribution Staff consultations with Director of the Centre for Autism, Director of Education and Head of Training, Consultancy and Conferences. Hosting of Imagining Autism in each NAS school in UK for staff training.
Impact Training programme of CPD workshops. Imagining Autism Film documentary (filmed in Helen Allison School, Meopham, featuring pupils and parents).
Start Year 2013
 
Description Stony Brook collaboration 
Organisation Stony Brook University
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Research exchange whereby Imagining Autism would be developed in the USA at the University of Stonybrook as an interdisciplinary collaboration between the University of Kent and the Centre for Embodied Cognition at Stony Brook. Members of the Imagining Autism team have undertaken 2 visits to Stonybrook (November 2013 and Nov 2014) for discussion with and training of Stonybrook staff from Theatre Arts, Psychology and the Cody Centre. Funding is being sought for Imagining Autism to be developed and trialled in the US in 2016/17
Collaborator Contribution Stony Brook representatives from Theatre, Psychology and the Cody Centre, visiting the University of Kent in June 2014 to meet the project team and attend workshops and presentations.
Impact Grant application proposed- multi-disciplinary between theatre arts and psychology
Start Year 2013
 
Description The Atkinson, Arts Centre, Southport 
Organisation Southport College
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Sefton SEN Schools launch into Outer Space for Imagining Autism Project From 6 - 16 March 2017 Imagining Autism will be in residence at The Atkinson. Over 150 children from two local schools, Rowan Park School and Presfield High School & Specialist College, are participating in an Imagining Autism residency at The Atkinson in March 2017. All of the children have varied educational needs and are participating in the three year Start arts programme run by Children & the Arts and delivered by The Atkinson. Start has been using The Atkinson's cultural resources and opportunities to introduce the children - many of whom have never visited an art gallery before - to the pleasure and benefits of engaging with the arts. Through visits, workshops and the opportunity to create their own artwork for display at The Atkinson, the children improve their communication skills, self-confidence, knowledge and practical abilities. To complement the work with Children & the Arts and local SEN schools, The Atkinson has invited Imagining Autism, a special project by The University of Kent's drama department, for a two week residency 'Outer Space' between 6th - 16th March at The Atkinson. This project shows the social impact of academic research on the real world and its results will have the potential to influence the practice of museum and galleries as well as the potential for future multi-sensory programming across the arts.
Collaborator Contribution This project is funded by University of Kent, Children and the Arts, The Atkinson Development Trust and the Heritage Lottery Fund. tkinson have provided funding of £6,000 to facilitate this project. The University of Kent has contributed £3,200.
Impact Training Events Imagining Autism for professionals Events for professionals who work with people with autism, including teachers, childcare professionals, drama and arts professionals and healthcare professionals. Professor Nicola Shaughnessy and Dr Melissa Trimingham will present their work and discuss how their findings can be applied in a variety of professions. There are two events for professionals, they are: Wednesday 8 March, 6.30pm - 8.30pm SOLD OUT The Atkinson, Gallery 1 Tuesday 14 March, 5pm - 7pm SOLD OUT Litherland Sports Park Imagining Autism for families Events for parents and carers of children with autism. As parents of autistic children themselves, Professor Nicola Shaughnessy and Dr Melissa Trimingham will share and discuss how their findings can be applied at home as well as inviting families to share and discuss their own experiences. There are two events for families, they are: Monday 13 March, 5pm - 7pm Free The Atkinson, Children's Library Thursday 16 March, 1.30pm - 2.45pm Free Rowan High School
Start Year 2016
 
Description The Beacon School and associated local schools: Imagining Autism Champions 
Organisation The Beacon Folkestone
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Regular Zoom meetings and e mail correspondence with the iA team at The Beacon and associated Schools (Marsh Academy, Brookland C of E Primary and The Beacon Walmer, new satellite school) to offer advice, help and support in incorporating iA into the curriculum.
Collaborator Contribution The Beacon built an outdoor iA space in summer 2020 when Covid prevented close contact in an immersive environment planned for inside the school; the iA team in the school has secured £700 internally to create a permanent iA room inside the school now (2021)restrictions are easing.
Impact See above re outdoor space for learning and sections on March Academy and Brookland Primary under Influence on Policy, Practice. A collaboration between Drama researchers and education professionals.
Start Year 2017
 
Description The Beacon School and associated local schools: Imagining Autism Champions 
Organisation The Beacon Folkestone
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Regular Zoom meetings and e mail correspondence with the iA team at The Beacon and associated Schools (Marsh Academy, Brookland C of E Primary and The Beacon Walmer, new satellite school) to offer advice, help and support in incorporating iA into the curriculum.
Collaborator Contribution The Beacon built an outdoor iA space in summer 2020 when Covid prevented close contact in an immersive environment planned for inside the school. The iA team in the school secured £700 internally to create a permanent iA room inside the school (2021) once restrictions eased. This was established on the WALMER site and the pod was installed in 2021 with visits from the iA team to work with the teachers and autistic learners. During 2022, the teachers designed a series of environments using the iA method and this was featured in a film commissioned by KMTV on the impact of the project. Teachers on the Beacon Folkestone site, led by iA champion Allan Ince set up iA environments in classrooms as part of the Covid recovery curriculum. This was also featured in the film (to be screened in 2023).
Impact See above re outdoor space for learning and sections on March Academy and Brookland Primary under Influence on Policy, Practice. A collaboration between Drama researchers and education professionals. FILM: Imagining Autism, documenting the impact of the project on the schools involved
Start Year 2018
 
Description 'Autism Affects': Conference Paper Presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Type Of Presentation paper presentation
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Paper and 'Shift' presentation for Psi 18 (Performance Studies International) Leeds, 27 June-July 1st. The 'shift' involved a practical demonstration of the pod and the space environment with delegates experiencing an immersive interactice installation. The paper outlined the project's rationale and methods with particular attention to the evaluation of efficacy and the demonstration of impact

Each demonstration in the pod generated discussion between academics and the practitioners and requests for more information. The paper was one of the best attended at the conference (alongside two other speakers) and generated a lively and interested discussion. One important impact is demonstrating the efficacy and application of practice to theatre scholars.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description CPD Training/Workshops for teachers 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Over 100 teachers attended two training days, led by the Playing A/Part project team, at St Anselm's Catholic School (3/10/19), Canterbury and Simon Langton Grammar School for Girls Canterbury (5/2/19). These professional training events promoted changes in attitude and empathetic responses towards those with autism, giving teachers practical strategies to engage pupils through creativity in new ways.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description CPD Workshop - INSET day for teachers at Beacon School, Folkestone 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Puppetry and Perceiving Differently Workshop, an INSET day for all staff, was held at Beacon School, Folkestone, and led by the research team. Evaluations reported an increased understanding in empathy and understanding of the autistic experience of pupils.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description CPD workshops 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact CPD training workshops took place at The Beacon Folkestone involving 15 teaching staff from the school and from other local schools to create 'Imagining Autism Champions' cascading the iA methods (play and puppetry) throughout the school.The workshops also involved iA embodied and multi-sensory approaches to understanding autism.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Conference presentation: 'Responsive Scenography: Imagining Autism' presented by Dr Melissa Trimingham at the IFTR (International Federation of Theatre Research) Scenography Working Group at the Prague Quadrenielle 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Conference presentation which led to question and answer sessions. Sparked interest in research around Imagining Autism
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Contribution (talk and panel member) to public engagement event, 'Festival of the Brain', Quarterhouse, Folkstone, 22nd May 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Nicola Shaughnessy presented a paper and was a panel member at the 'Festival of the Brain' public engagement event at the Quarterhouse, Folkstone, on 22nd May 2015.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Conversations about arts, health humanities and interdisciplinary research 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Interview with Dr Dieter Declercq (Aesthetics) , and Professor Ian Sabroe (Clinician) to launch the medical humanities podcast series "Conversations about arts, humanities and health. Recorded on 30 April 2021 (duration: 1 hour 1 minute). Viewings are currently 119, alongside an audience of 50 for the live event.
The data for the series indicates audiencesacross 35 countries. The majority are UK (52%) and US (27%). The podcast is part of a series of free online events where scholars, health professionals, and the public discuss how arts and humanities can inform healthcare. Hosted by the University of Kent and with the support of the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust, these conversations seek to develop meaningful dialogue and connection between humanities and medicine. Each podcast has a short follow up on the website. Imagining Autism, Autism Re-Imagined and Playing A/Part were discussed in the Podcast with follow up emails subsequently and an invitation to speak for a seminar at the Research and Pedagogy unit at Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts, Singapore. Reference was also made to the ATTUNE project consortium and the work done prior to securing the funding.
There was also follow-up from education professionals interested in the resources and training (e.g. Matthew Velada-Billson, Headteacher, Edgebury Primary School, Bromley). The podcast is at: https://anchor.fm/convoartshealth/episodes/Episode-2---In-Conversation-with-Prof-Nicola-Shaughnessy-e1002ta April 2021
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://research.kent.ac.uk/medicalhumanities/conversations-about-arts-humanities-and-health
 
Description Drama helps kids with autism communicate better: Feature article in New Scientist magazine - online and hard copy 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Article in 'New Scientist' magazine, written by Simon Makin

The article gave the project scientific credibility. It generated several enquiries about the project including valuable leads who could be approached in the context of commercialisation and potential bookings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Festival of the Brain 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Playing A/Part: film for public screening; commissioned for Festival of the Brain (May 2018), Nottingham Lakeside (Autism Reimagined event)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.lakesidearts.org.uk/theatre/event/3768/autism-reimagined.html
 
Description Film screening and talk at Festival of the Brain, Folkstone Quarterhouse, Kent 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact . Screening of "Imagining Autism: Now I See the World" at Quarterhouse, Folkestone, 'Festival of the Brain, 26 May 2016, Nicola Shaughnessy, with Q&A, attended by approx 40 participants
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Imagining Autism Cafes 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We ran Autistic Community Cafes at Folkestone Quarterhouse (as part of Festival of the brain May 18), Nottingham Lakeside, Birmingham MAC and The Beacon Folkestone, for local and community organisations, inspired by the popular 'Dementia Cafes' and the associated 'Imagination Café' that offer help and support to families and professionals dealing with dementia. The 'Autistic Community' is anyone autistic or in contact with autistic people, such as parents, relatives, neighbours and professionals. We offered a range of activities that foregrounded autistic advocacy and the voice of the autistic community, including puppetry and 'Perceiving Differently' workshops, panels of autistic self advocates, autistic friendly food plus information, and films.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Imagining Autism Online Resources 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Impact N/K, but the website was revamped in the context of the Covid lockdown in early 2020, and online resources were created to expand impact of the limited edition PopPupPod boxes (made as part of Autism Re-Imagined). The PopPupPod activities and resources were directly translated into online activities for parents and teachers: for example making your own immersive 'den' at home, or using puppets to support learning at home and school. This enabled iA to reach many more parents and teachers. Extracts from the video made for the DVD in the PopPupPod were used to support the suggested activities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL http://imaginingautism.org
 
Description Imagining Autism Residency at The Atkinson Arts Centre, Southport 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Residency at Atkinson Arts Centre, Southport,March 6th-16th.. Imagining Autism workshops for participants aged 6-17 (so covering Key stage 1 and keys stages 3 and 4 in addition to key stage 2). Total participants approx 75. Professional training: 2 sessions for education, health, social care professionals (60 participants for Weds 8 March, approx 25 participants expected for Tues 14 March); Autism cafes for families and carers (15 participants, Mon 13th and approx 25 participants Thurs 16 March).

Further Info: From 6 - 16 March 2017 Imagining Autism was in residence at The Atkinson, an Arts Centre in Southport. Children from two local SEN schools, Rowan Park School and Presfield High School & Specialist College, participated in the programme. All of the children had varied educational needs and are participating in the three year Start arts programme run by Children & the Arts and delivered by The Atkinson. Start has been using The Atkinson's cultural resources and opportunities to introduce the children - many of whom have never visited an art gallery before - to the pleasure and benefits of engaging with the arts. Through visits, workshops and the opportunity to create their own artwork for display at The Atkinson, the children improve their communication skills, self-confidence, knowledge and practical abilities. To complement the work with Children & the Arts and local SEN schools, The Atkinson invited Imagining Autism for a two week residency 'Outer Space' between 6th - 16th March.

For 2 weeks the Imagining Autism pod was built in the Atkinson studio and children from Rowan Park and Presfield High took their very own journey into Outer Space. Each child , working with the IA team, arrived in a rocket exploring the different planets, moon walking, shadow play, meeting the alien and feeding him moon rocks then returned back to earth.
This project showed the social impact of academic research on the real world and the results from the Atkinson have the potential to influence the practice of museum and galleries as well as the potential for future multi-sensory programming across the arts.

In addition, professional training events took place on Wednesday 8 March, 6.30pm-8.30pm at The Atkinson and Tuesday 14 March, 5pm-7pm at Litherland Sports Park. Professor Nicola Shaughnessy and Dr Melissa Trimingham from The University of Kent team presented their work and discussing how their findings can be applied in a variety of contexts. Both events were sold out.
A Family Autism Café was also available on Monday 13 March, 5pm-7pm at The Atkinson and Thursday 16 March, 1.30pm-2.45pm at Rowan High School, Litherland. These FREE and informal events were aimed at parents and carers of children with autism. As parents of autistic children themselves, Professor Nicola Shaughnessy and Dr Melissa Trimingham shared and discussed how their findings can be applied at home as well as inviting families to share and discuss their own experiences.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Imagining Autism feature in 'Special Children' magazine, April/May 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Imagining Autism feature in 'Special Children' magazine, April/May 2015
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Imagining Autism for Families 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Funded by he Public Engagement Fund from the University of Kent, Imagining Autism for Families, included the training of six practitioners in the methods of Imagining Autism as well as three sessions in Canterbury for families with autistic children as well as their siblings.

June 2016: 10 participants from 4 families and 6 trainees [ 4 training sessions on iA techniques to parents and professionals; 4 iA sessions for families parent(s) and siblings- and one uncle!).

This gained regional TV news coverage as well as regional and national newspaper coverage. Both trainees and families reported that they had improved their knowledge and experience around drama and autism.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Imagining Autism results feature on ITV's Meridian News 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact We were approached by ITV who wanted to do a news feature on research in HE and impact. This was linked to launch of results and press release. We were filmed in schools doing training with teachers and clips from film were also shown. This was picked up by other regional stations across the UK.





Many more saw a reduction in autistic symptoms. Researchers will officially release the findings soon but Christine Alsford has this exclusive report.



She spoke to Gillian Burns, Kieran's mother, Professor Nicola Shaughnessy from Imagining Autism Project and Lisa Richardson from the University of Kent.'

Invitations to a range of schools, locally and nationally to deliver Imagining Autism training
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.itv.com/.../meridian/.../new-research-to-help-autistic-children-com..
 
Description Lecture Demonstration: The Embodied Researcher: Effecting Change Through the Body, Creative Processes, Materials and Interaction 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This talk took place as part of the International Summer School hosted by the Barbican as part of their exhibition Bauhaus: Art and Life. Influenced by the Bauhaus, the lecture was about transformation - not just the alluring or intriguing visual transformation that dress, costume and bodily accoutrements can achieve, but a real and lasting transformation in wearer, witness and maker. Dr Melissa Trimingham applied this notion to her work with autistic children in Imagining Autism, and Donatella Barbieri explored synergies with the Bauhaus via narratives, gestures and performed meanings deriving from Lecoq's LEM workshop. The question and answer session was lengthy and almost exclusively directed at the Imagining Autism project. Members of the audience stayed behind afterwards and discussed the project; many asked for the URL to the project.

The question and answer session was lengthy and almost exclusively directed at the Imagining Autism project. Members of the audience stayed behind afterwards and discussed the project; many asked for the URL to the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Magazine Coverage: Care Apointments 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Media coverage of Imagining Autism for Families in Care Appointments online Magazine on 1st July 2016
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.careappointments.co.uk/education-training/item/39951-kent-academics-to-extend-innovative-...
 
Description Magazine article - A New Environment: Imagining Autism 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Article in 'Arts Professional' online magazine

At least two professional (special needs teachers) enquirers by email asking for access to the work for their schools mentioned this as a source. Such contacts on our mailing list are valuable for the commercialisation of the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Network symposium 'Interacting with Autism', hosted and funded by Beacon Institute, University of Kent 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was a network event, hosted by the Beacon Institute, at which invited participants from the world of academia, healthcare, arts practice and other interested parties discussed some of the current debates around autism.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Playing A/Part - Meridian TV News 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Playing A/Part featured as part of Meridian TV news segment. The journalists joined the research team in a school where they were working with autistic/neurodiverse girls. This provided a showcase for the project and gave both the creative practitioners and the girls an opportunity to discuss the positive effects of the project on their wellbeing.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Presentation at National Autistic Society: Understanding and Managing Challenging Behaviour Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Nicola Shaughnessy presented a paper entitled 'Playing with Difference' at the national Autistic Society annual conference in Reading on 25th June 2015
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Regional TV news coverage 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Segment on BBC South East News which covered Imagining Autism for Familes public engagement sessions on 23rd June 2016. Reporters interviewed Nicola Shaughnessy, Melissa Trimingham and families involved in the activities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://news.imaginingautism.org/post/147037831448/in-may-and-june-we-worked-with-four-families-in
 
Description Work in Progress, V&A Research Department 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The talk on costume and Imagining Autism was attended by the Head of Research at the V & A, who are co-publishing with Bloomsbury a book on costume 'Costume in Performance' to which I am contributing a chapter. The talk prompted questions about the project.

There were requests for information from attendees including academic s outside the V & A..
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Workshop on consent for young people with PMLD 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Expert group meeting/workshop focussed on ethics and practices for seeking consent when working with people with profound and multiple learning disabilities. How we can ensure we are working in an ethically sound way; sharing practices, prior to developing tools. Co-ordinated by Frozen Light Theatre in connection with a new project, 'The Sensory Studio" (funded by Paul Hamlyn Foundation)a collaboration with adult artists with profound and multiple learning disabilities. Invitation only with contributions from specialists in arts, education, health, parents, carers/advocates.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://www.frozenlighttheatre.com