The Creative Exchange

Lead Research Organisation: Lancaster University
Department Name: Lancaster Inst for the Contemporary Arts

Abstract

This unique consortium draws on the research excellence of interdisciplinary and complementary design innovation labs at three universities - Lancaster University, Newcastle University and the Royal College of Art and connects it with public and private sectors, linking large and small-scale businesses, service providers and citizens. Together, our expertise in developing and applying creative techniques to navigate unexplored challenges includes that of designers, artists, curators, producers, broadcasters, engineers, managers, technologists and writers - and draws on wider expertise from across the partner universities and beyond.

The Creative Exchange responds to profound changes in practice in the creative and media-based industries stimulated by the opening of the digital public space, the ability of everyone to access, explore and create in any aspect of the digital space, moving from 'content consumption' to 'content experience'. It explores new forms of engagement and exchange in the broadcast, performing and visual arts, digital media, design and gaming sectors, by focusing on citizen-led content, interactive narrative, radical personalization and new forms of value creation in the context of the 'experience economy'. The primary geographic focus is the Northwest of England centred around the opportunity presented by the growth of MediaCityUK and its surrounding economy. The three universities act as local test beds with field trials in London, Lancaster and Newcastle prior to larger public facing trials in the northwest. This will support the North West regional strategy for growth in digital and creative media industries, whilst generating comparative research and development locally, nationally and internationally.

The Creative Exchange has been developed in response to a paradigm shift in content creation and modes of distribution in a digitally connected world, which has profound impact for the arts and humanities. This transformational-change is taking place within the landscape of a growing digital public space that includes archives, data, information and content. How we navigate and experience this space - and how we generate content for and within it - is central to how we create economic, social, cultural and personal value. The Hub draws on new and agile approaches to knowledge exchange for the creative economy that have been previously developed by the partner universities and new ones co-developed with specialist arts organizations, sector organizations and communities of users.

Planned Impact

This hubs will explore new forms of engagement and exchange in the broadcast, performing & visual arts, digital media, design and gaming sectors. Many of whom will be located in the Northwest of England around the opportunity presented by the growth of Media City and it surrounding economy. However as the three universities will act as local test beds prior to public facing trials in the northwest and therefore beneficiary companies will also be located in NorthEast and London.

Through literature, individual company engagement and our pre-bid workshop in Manchester we have identified wide ranging business/organisational research and skills needs, ranging from:
1 Understanding citizen empowerment, how to operate in an experience economy, how to upskill for the digital environment especially in Northwest and MediaCity (NWDA (2008),Skills Set(2010)
2 Understanding 'how an avalanche of technology will deliver opportunities as well as threats' 'to explore how to avoid inequality of access' 'Arts understanding of the audience and how to create experiences using technology', 'how to increase citizen engagement both physically and digitally' 'how to understand human responses, psychology and legal and ethical issues' Sample from Workshop 25 June.
3 Exploring the opportunities presented by the digital public space, and to explore access issues, enable business to experiment, to prototype experiences in the real world, understand the creative context for data driven experiences, broker new forms of co-design develop new services that go beyond crowd sources, (partners)

Therefore a wide range of partners have been recruited to develop the Hub. These include a Lead partner, BBC. Large corporates (e.g Miscrosoft) Public Sector (e.g. Manchester City Council, Lancashire City Council); connecting/portal bodies (e.g Sharp, Creative Lancashire); and SME's Creative Concern, Stardotstar.
The Creative Exchange Hub's proposed knowledge exchange activities responds to these needs and impacts on the target sectors through:
i) Identifying shared concerns, skills needs and emerging trends and themes of interest and concern to partner companies through the curate activity
ii) Brokering connections between organisations and businesses to identify project, research requirements and KE and facilitating exchange of leading edge academic research, sharing insights and trends through the connect activity
iii) Facilitating new collaborations around new services and products generated through co-creation and design experiments, enabling scaling-up of micro-enterprises and SMEs and opening up new demonstration and live testing opportunities, and thus enable new entrepreneurial activities around new services and products, through the intervention activity
iv) Introducing new knowledge and access to new arts and humanities researchers during the resource activity
v) Enabling citizen and community engagement via participation in events, co-design, rapid prototyping and testing, investigating appropriate, usable, personal and meaningful services that lead to new business proposition, through field trials.
iv)Developing toolkits for creative KE mechanisms for exploitation beyond the hub and into other sectors such as health and transport, and other disciplines e.g Law or Philosophy
v) Disseminating to a broader industry audience through industry facing conferences both the KE activities and mechanisms

The KE Hub will identify and attract additional partners into the the Hub through an energetic communication campaign, through the hub council and partners support and communication of successful activities, dissemination of the work through the conferences and field trials, and through the allied activities of the Highwire CDT, SIDE Digital Hub and RCA Helen Hamlyn Centre and our intermediary partners such as Sharp and Creative Lancashire. All of which enables us to expand the hub, its impact and its sustainability.

Organisations

Publications

10 25 50
 
Title 404th Wall 
Description Salellite event from the International Symposium of Electronic Art 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact
 
Title Ageing Playfully (video) 
Description The video provides a snapshot of the Ageing Playfully research project. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jYCAABnnpRU
 
Title Awakenings 
Description An artistic intervention for use with the TILO platform 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact The artwork was part of an art through research activity and generated valuable insights for the research and the evaluation of the Nesta funded project TILO 
 
Title Behind the Scenes at Co-Opera Co: The Making of the Mikado 
Description A 20-minute documentary about the production of the operetta 'The Mikado' by Co-Opera Co. Produced in collaboration with Red Havoc Media. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact Contributed to ongoing discourses concerning the value of user-generated media. 
URL https://vimeo.com/74529941
 
Title Bitesize Training - How to Write a Good Lay Summary 
Description VOICENorth members in collaboration with Newcastle University's Faculty of Medical Sciences Public Engagement team, have created this training video for researchers about how to write a good lay summary. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Improved lay summaries for medical grant applications 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gRe4TXWT50Q
 
Title Chattr (FutureEverything) 
Description Chattr was a provocative experiment that brought the benefits of social networking into a physical café. Hidden by a lovely veneer, Chattr participants adventured into dystopian space, a café governed by social media rules, in which they had to negotiate unknown boundaries between physical - digital, private - public, live - archived, local - global. At a first glance Chattr might look as an access restricted area, conversely Chattr was presented as the utterly public environment. Under the slogan 'your privacy is very important to us', Chattr provided a temporary hybrid space in which participants could kick back and enjoy a coffee while sharing their chats with an online community. Chattr mirrored the Terms of Service of social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn. By choosing to access Chattr lounge, participants accepted the Data Use Policy, which required them to carry a recording device within Chattr confines. All spoken conversations would then be recorded, transcribed and archived in a publicly accessible database that shall remain permanently in a public space online. Thus, Chattr's operational model relayed on the generation of an archive of popular culture as a by-product of participant's social interactions within the café. Chattr is conceived following the operational model of digital social networks, providing a service in exchange for participant's privacy, aiming to build up a publicly accessible archive of private conversations. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact FutureEverything, Manchester with 500 attendees 
 
Title CheckinDJ 
Description CheckinDJ uses social data and location data to change the music genre that is in a place by crowdsourcing the preferences of the people within that space. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2012 
Impact This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
 
Title Cinehack Cape Town 1 & 2 
Description 2 short promotional videos for Cinehack: Cape Town 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact Hip-hop hacking in the mother city - blog with international readership 
URL https://cinehackcapetown.wordpress.com/
 
Title Cinehack Music Video - Anyway by BFK 
Description Music video by Cape Town hip hop artists 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact Over 5,0000 YouTube views across the 5 videos 
URL http://www.cinehack.com/cinehack-cape-town/
 
Title Cinehack Music Video - Black or White by Archetypes 
Description Music video by Cape Town hip hop artists. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact Over 5,000 YouTube views across the 5 videos 
URL http://www.cinehack.com/cinehack-cape-town/
 
Title Cinehack Music Video - Stay by Mingus 
Description Music video by Cape Town hip hop artist. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact A total of over 5,000 YouTube views across the 5 videos 
URL http://www.cinehack.com/cinehack-cape-town/
 
Title Cinehack Music Video - Sterk op Hede by Die Skerpste Lem 
Description Music video by Cape Town hip hop artist 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact Over 5,000 YouTube views across the 5 videos 
URL http://www.cinehack.com/cinehack-cape-town/
 
Title Co-Opera Co 
Description A short prototype interactive documentary, developed during a workshop. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact na 
 
Title Data-Things of Craft Practice 
Description A series of physical artefacts that were generated from sensor data of craft practitioner's hand gestures. As part of the project This Is How We Do It, these artefacts were designed as novel approach to represent sensor data back to practitioners in order to encourage and facilitate reflection and conversation in tangible ways. The data-things designed as part of this project involved different data representations, materials and processes. Some of the artefacts were laser cut into wood, card or fabric while others were 3D printed, and the participants had opportunity to be involved in the making process of their own unique data-things. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact Impact is described in the associated project (This Is How We Do It), notably 'CHI'15 paper publication' and 'producing data symposium' 
 
Title Dementia-Friendly Train Stations 
Description Produced in collaboration with The Dementia Innovation Hub and the British Transport Police (BTP); a YouTube video campaign to raise awareness of Dementia Friendly stations. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact http://www.ncl.ac.uk/press/news/2015/11/dementiafriendlystations/ 
URL http://www.ncl.ac.uk/press/news/2015/11/dementiafriendlystations/
 
Title Digital Public What 
Description An interactive video documentary bridging academic discourses with people's discourses in the street on the topic of the Digital Public Space. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
URL https://vimeo.com/101278233
 
Title Digital Public What? 
Description We asked 16 researchers to respond to the question: "What is the digital public space?" Rather than asking the same question each time, we showed each participant the response from the previous participant and asked them to respond to that - a bit like a Chinese whisper! Next, we built an app with links to each of the 16 videos, which we took to the streets of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK. We 'bleeped' the term 'digital public space' and asked the members of the public to guess what they were talking about... 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact Engaging the public in a public discourse about the nature of 'Digital Public Space'. A work-in-progress publication at TVX2014. 
URL http://dpgreen.info/idocs/dps/
 
Title Digital Travelling Suitcases 
Description The 'Travelling Suitcases' are custom built digital suitcases to support processes of collection and distribution of narratives and opinions about matters of concerns. The suitcases support face-to-face and mediated encounters and the valorization of existing relations within a locality. The design of the suitcases emphasise choice and reciprocity through a process of 'asking' and 'giving', formulating questions to inspire story telling and nominating people to hand a suitcase to. With their thoughtful material design, travelling suitcases are specifically designed to draw people in reflective processes and engage with fellow citizens' personal narratives and perspectives. The suitcases technical system was chosen to make the system as accessible as possible-tailored for low media and digital literacy skills, and to upload media content online in areas where there is very low or inexistent wi-fi network and accessibility. For this reason an Interactive Voice Responsive system was chosen. The suitcase comprised a GSM phone in a 3D printed case, which allowed the recoding and uploading of media content online without the need for an internet connection. Suitcase comes with its associated webpage where all content can be accessed (and curate it). Process A 'Travelling Suitcase' is given to a citizen who is prompted to record a story s/he wants to share with others. Then the citizen is invited to pick an envelope and write something about the story recorded and added it to the top of the suitcase. S/he is then prompted to choose someone else to hand the suitcase to and formulate a question to inspire storytelling. In this way the suitcase travels person to person till the last envelope that prompts to handing the suitcase back to the initiator of the process. Technical system For the purpose of building a robust, sustainable (in terms of monetary costs and technical expertise needed to use and maintain it) and reliable system for the collection of place-related stories and their community dissemination an IVR system was designed and developed. A number of communications frameworks have been reviewed for this (including asterisk and freeswitch) but for the purpose of this project a more reliable and quick solution was chosen - an already running cloud communications service (e.g. twilio.com and nexmo.com). One ten digit number was purchased per suitcase; each call is redirected to an Apache server (on an Ubuntu installation hosted at digitalocean.com/) where a PHP script serves a VoiceXML file with instructions of how the call should be handled (menu options, voice clips etc.); if the user chooses to record a message the story is being recorded and stored on the server; if the user chooses to listen to a message, a random (or sorted) story is being fetched by the server and played back to the user; the messages can be accessed by either calling the equivalent phone number or visiting erithwalks.co.uk. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact The residents and the housing institution were able to collect and distribute place-based stories about the multiple practices and values in and about their estate undergoing urban regeneration. The artefact supported dialogue between residents and between residents and the housing institution. Ed Vasey ministry of culture came to visit the project in October 2015. This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
URL http://erithwalks.co.uk
 
Title Entanglement of Data-Things 
Description Entanglements of Data-Things was the culminating exhibition of my PhD research exploring data and digital fabrication as creative materials in practice-based inquiries of public making. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact This exhibition was held at the Hatton Gallery, Newcastle, and had approx. 1800 visitors. It encouraged discussion and questions amongst academics regarding forms of dissemination of practice-based research. This 'Annotated Exhibition' was presented at a PhD symposium (Research in Practice at NTU) and a further paper publication about this method for dissemination is currently under review at DIS'16. 
URL https://makingdatathings.wordpress.com/2015/08/22/entanglements-of-data-things/
 
Title Erratics Exhibition/Performance 
Description As part of the Pacitti Companies Performing Collections, we were invited to respond during the course of a winter residency in 2014 to a number of artefacts from the natural history collection at Ipswich Museum in the UK. Using the artefacts as materials we designed and developed a number of sonic instruments and used forms of data sonification to create a multi-channel sound and image installation. The work was developed through a series of public 'drop in' workshops during which a more recognisable exhibition form gradually evolved. Other than a commitment to work with natural history artefacts, the only other constraints set in advance were the title of the residency and the technologies and skills we brought with us. We entitled the residency Interglacial/Erratics to bring to mind a connection between our era and that of glaciation and to play metaphorically with the notion of an 'erratic', the geological term for a rock carried from its indigenous place to another by glacial forces. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact During our residency we had over 50 visitors engaging in our activities. This work was also the beginning of our practical thinking around Public Making, which has now been presented across the UK as well as in Norway. We estimate that this has engaged over 500 people across 6 different arts and cultural institutions. Public Making has been published academically at NIME and ISEA with a paper pending at DIS. 
 
Title Everybody Needs Somebody 
Description Using square cork tiles, coloured rubber bands, coloured and pushpins participants were asked to create physical models of their social networks using these materials. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact This tool was used to physically map personal relationships at a number of public events including the Royal Institution, London and Smart Citizen initiative, Hamburg. These events involved 75 people. The impacts included the establishment of new networks and recognition of existing ones. 
URL https://researchimaginings.wordpress.com/2014/07/28/stories-of-networks/
 
Title Fabricating FACTs fingerprints 
Description As part of a collaboration with Gabriella Arrigoni, participants during an exhibition at FACT Liverpool were able to generate and 3D print personalised fingerprint shapes from stories they've imagined as part of a forensic engagement activity. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Impact for this artefact is described in the associated engagement event (Fabricating FACTs) 
URL https://makingdatathings.wordpress.com/2015/02/05/fabricating-facts-3/
 
Title False Faces 
Description Personal projector, single-board computer, computer-vision software and mannequin; screenprints and digital prints on sustainable cotton t-shirts. Decorative patterns derived from face biometrics appear to humans as abstract forms but can trigger some face-detection systems to record 'false positives' as if a face was there. This project presents algorithmic Elvis sightings - as t-shirts designed to over-stimulate surveillance systems - offering a form of machine invisibility. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact First exhibited as part of the group show WHY WOULD I LIE? at the Royal College of Art, London over a week long exhibition in a public gallery and conference. T-shirts produced as part of this artwork were sold to gallery visitors as part of a wider discussion about digital identity during and after the show. 
URL http://lie.rca.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/WWIL-Gallery-Guide_Final.pdf
 
Title Fields - Tim Shaw 
Description Fields is a networked system exploring new areas of musical performance and spatialised sound through the use of personal mobile technology as a medium for sound diffusion. Personal mobile technology in this context includes smart phones, tablets and laptops as well as other portable devices that support web browsing. This project provides an alternative method for sound spatialisation as well as offering new ways in which audiences can engage in media works. The project Fields refers to two main, interconnecting parts; Audio playback system using web technologies to diffuse sound live through the inbuilt speakers of the audience's mobile devices. A specially designed electro-acoustic composition and performance demonstrated through the system presenting this new approach to sound diffusion. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact Fields is an international collaboration between Sebastien Piquemal (based at Media Lab, Helsinki) and myself. Through numerous local, national and international performances the piece has been presented to over 400 people and opened up conversations and collaborations between various individuals, organisations and institutions. Notably examples include: Magnus Williamson from ICMUS, Fort Process in Brighton and the NewBridge Project, Newcastle. This is a first performance of its kind, I know of no other performance piece utilising mobile technology for this method of sound diffusion. In early 2015 the system will be open sourced and available for other sound artists and musicians to ultilise. Fields has recently received support from UK commissioners Sound and Music to engage new audiences through a 5-date tour across 2015. Fields has been performend at the following events: NordicCHI - Helsinki, Finland International Computer Music Conference - Athens, Greece Media Lab - Helsinki, Finland NK Projekt - Berlin, Germany CTM Festival - Berlin, Germany 404th Wall - Newcastle, UK Mining Institute - Newcastle, UK Fort Process, Newhaven, UK 
URL http://tim-shaw.net/fields_/
 
Title Frankensaurus: Leaving the Cave 
Description A short film, produced during a free 1-day filmmaking workshop at Whitley Bay Film Festival 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact na 
URL https://vimeo.com/104336513
 
Title Great North Run Data Things 
Description As part of the engagement programme alongside the Great North Run event, the designed artefacts were physical explorations of running data. Participants could generate and 3D print a physical artefact from their official time chip data as a memento of their experience of participating in the half-marathon. And the activity of making this souvenir encouraged further discussion and reflection amongst participants as well as other visitors. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Impact for this artefacts is discussed in the associated engagement event (Great North Fabrications) 
URL https://makingdatathings.wordpress.com/2015/08/18/great-north-fabrications/
 
Title Hybrid Lives Co-Working Space 
Description CX co-working space, as part of the 'Hybrid Lives' project, which reveals the social relations at work, through interactive tables which measure and display bandwidth usage, and video works which blend live images of current and historical work. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact Hybrid Lives was a freely accessible co-working space used by over 1,000 people during the run of the FACT exhibition Time and Motion. The space was used for participative research work, for the presentation of collaborative artworks, for socialising and conversation, and as an office space for freelance workers. It also hosted language lessons, business meetings, and family meals. 
URL http://www.fact.co.uk/projects/time-motion-redefining-working-life/the-creative-exchange-hybrid-live...
 
Title Interglacial 
Description As part of the Pacitti Companies Performing Collections, we were invited to respond during the course of a winter residency in 2014 to a number of artefacts from the natural history collection at Ipswich Museum in the UK. Using the artefacts as materials we designed and developed a number of sonic instruments and used forms of data sonification to create a multi-channel sound and image installation. The work was developed through a series of public 'drop in' workshops during which a more recognisable exhibition form gradually evolved. Other than a commitment to work with natural history artefacts, the only other constraints set in advance were the title of the residency and the technologies and skills we brought with us. We entitled the residency Interglacial/Erratics to bring to mind a connection between our era and that of glaciation and to play metaphorically with the notion of an 'erratic', the geological term for a rock carried from its indigenous place to another by glacial forces. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact During our residency we had over 50 visitors engaging in our activities. This work was also the beginning of our practical thinking around Public Making, which has now been presented across the UK as well as in Norway. We estimate that this has engaged over 500 people across 6 different arts and cultural institutions. Public Making has been published academically at NIME and ISEA with a paper pending at DIS. 
 
Title Magic Cauldron 
Description An interactive cauldron designed for a traveling children exhibition which creates light and sound feedback when ingredients are placed within it. Children visiting the exhibition could dress up as witches or wizards and experiment with the different ingredients to 'brew' spells in an immersive magical visual, audio landscape. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact Displayed within the Hancock Museum in Newcastle upon Tyne as part of the V&A's Magic Worlds exhibition. 
 
Title Magic Mirrors 
Description Two interactive artworks (the "Delay Mirror" and "Kaleidoscope Mirror") built to accompany a three- month installation of the V& A Musem of Childhood's "Magic Worlds" exhibition at the Great North Museum:Hancock, Newcastle. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
 
Title Meet the Hubs: A Knowledge Exchange Salon (Imitarium) 
Description A bespoke artwork produced for the Imitarium platform 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact Presented at the AHRC Creative Economy Showcase 
URL http://thecreativeexchange.org/projects/imitarium-presents-meet-hubs-knowledge-exchange-salon
 
Title NoPayPhone 
Description NoPayPhone is the FutureEverything, Manchester Festival, City Fictions telecoms service, providing free telephone communication through the redistribution of donated free minutes from inclusive mobile plans to public telephones. Anyone can simply call a landline or mobile from the phone by dialling the desired number. People with inclusive mobile phone plans are invited to donate some of their free minutes by connecting to the NoPayPhone as a bluetooth handset. Each call is randomly routed through one of the nearby donor phones. By donating free minutes you are helping to build an open, ad-hoc community resource. By virtually lending your mobile to strangers you are also adding unknown calls to your mobile phone bill. NoPayPhone explores the notion of phone boxes as a symbol of privacy, and helps to confuse targeted advertising and profiling by your mobile phone operator and any third-party surveillance of call metadata. Presented as part of City Fictions, a speculative near future city. Institution: telecoms. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact A large and diverse international audience visited the FutureEverything Festival City Fictions exhibition, and encountered the NoPayPhone artwork. This exposure enabled a wide range of discussions with people about digital identity authentication and public commons. This artwork led to a conference talk at the Chaos Communications Congress, and large international conference on computer security. City Fictions was introduced to people in Manchester by a fictional newspaper set in 2018 and inserted in 130,000 copies of the Manchester Evening News. 
URL http://futureeverything.org/festival/2014/city-fictions/
 
Title Pac-Lan: The Zombie Apocalypse 
Description A short video which demonstrates the purpose of the game and some of its rules. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4IYxZU1JGB8
 
Title Physical Playlist: Bracelets 
Description This research re-imagines the mix-tape for digital content as physical customizable jewellery that can once again embody values not generally attributed to digital content. These were custom designed and printed bracelets for exhibition. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
 
Title Physical Playlist: Final Artefact 
Description This research re-imagines the mix-tape for digital content as physical customizable jewellery that can once again embody values not generally attributed to digital content. This is a custom designed artefact that was built to show the project in an exhibition setting. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
 
Title Physical Playlist:Video 
Description This research re-imagines the mix-tape for digital content as physical customizable jewellery that can once again embody values not generally attributed to digital content. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rPT24iBdjoc
 
Title Physical Social Network 
Description A physical artefact which allows a user to interact with a digital collection of postcards through the rotation of a physical handle. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact
 
Title Polyphonic Futures platform 
Description Polyphonic Futures is a research platform concerned with transfer of knowledge across art, design, science, and philosophy, as well as its pragmatic, fantastic, and critical dimensions. It has been initiated and is run by Veronica Ranner. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
URL http://www.polyphonicfutures.com
 
Title Project R-hythm - Tess Denman-Cleaver 
Description Project R-hythm was a performance-research project carried out by Tess Denman-Cleaver in collaboration with a resident-artist from of Holy Island in Northumberland. Tess worked with her collaborator to use performance making techniques to explore the effect that environmental rhythms have on everyday experience, and responded to these rhythms to form the basis of a live performance walk. In August 2014 they presented a walking performance which took audience members on a guided route around Holy Island where they encountered live performance and participated in performative activities. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact Project R-hythm developed a collaborative approach to working with people to interrogate their own relationship to a specific context, in this case the context of Holy Island. The project demonstrates how an open, experimental and highly collaborative approach to participatory practice can be managed and result in valuable insights concerning lived experience of particular issues. Project R-hythm culminated in 1 performance event that hosted a total of 18 people who took part in the performance walk. The audience were aged between 4 - 77yrs of age. The project supported the formation of a number of partnerships which house ongoing conversations regarding participatory practices and performance as a collaborative research tool. These partnerships include; Fuel, Fevered Sleep, Ann Light (Northumbria University), Iain Biggs (University of West England). 
 
Title Red Tales iDoc 
Description Red Tales is a participatory interactive documentary about red squirrel conservation in the UK. It is composed entirely of user-generated content from diverse and geographically separated conservation communities across the UK. It features a variety of video, image, sound and text-based content, representing contributions from >40 individuals. A unique, dynamically generated introduction sequence (composed entirely from the user-generated content) sets the scene for the documentary and also introduces a suite of interactive navigational tools that help audiences explore and create their own interpretations of the content. Rather than being a 'standalone' artefact, Red Tales integrates with existing ecologies, both online (via social media) and offline (via different co-located communities). Users can 'curate' and share collections of existing content, as well as add new content to a "living" documentary. Our aim was to reflect the heterogeneity of the content and the 'unresolved' nature of the topic. Thus, rather than presenting a linear narrative, audiences are invited to explore and contribute to the documentary through a technical framework and an interaction paradigm that builds equally upon recent research in documentary/media studies and human-computer interaction, and pioneering interactive documentaries (eg Bear71 / 18 Days in Egypt). Red Tales was produced through participatory workshops and developed in response to an ethnographic study of the community that revealed its inherent diversity, several shared concerns and hundreds of individuals' stories. In making the film, we adopted a collaborative, multidisciplinary and participatory approach and we have drawn upon - and hope to contribute new to knowledge to - the AHRC's digital-economy and knowledge-exchange programmes. Through making this film, we have gained unique insights into knowledge exchange methods that bridge the worlds of academia, industry and the voluntary/charity sectors and the role digital technology can play in forging new experiences, supporting grassroots communities and producing non-linear documentary narratives. 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Several articles in the mainstream press 
URL http://www.redtales.co.uk
 
Title Research Through Design impression 
Description As part of a design research conference, Research Through Design, a unique souvenir relating to the event was designed that would allow attendees to personalise a shape with some aspects of their conference experience. As this conference was focusing on design artefacts and novel ways of documentation both design research and the conference experience, these artefacts were explored as an experiment combining these aspects into physical data-things. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Impact is discussed in the associated engagement activity (Research Through Design - Data Translations) 
URL https://makingdatathings.wordpress.com/2015/03/30/fossil-impressions-at-rtd-2015/
 
Title Rhythmanalysis 
Description The Rhythmanalysis project collected the biological rhythms of 10 people from 2 different Liverpool based workplaces over a 24 hour period: 5 hairdressers from Minsky's and 5 game testers from Sony Computer Entertainment. This data was used to design a physical art installation to be shown at FACT, which visualised the biological rhythms of each employee over the course of the day allowing the viewer to see how different work environments impacted their physiology. The project aimed at displaying a kinectic, non-numerical visualisation of discernable rhythms of these people, influenced by the immersion (or absence of) digital technology in their daily lives. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
 
Title Ritual Machine 2 - Anticipation of Time Together 
Description A short video about one of the 'Family Rituals' project's 'Ritual Machines' (project by David Chatting, Paulina Yurman and David Kirk) 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Used as part of an exhibition at the Royal College of Art in 2015. 
URL http://familyrituals2-0.org.uk/design/ritual-machine-2/
 
Title Salient Fort Process Performance 
Description Improvised, durational, collaborative performance with Prof. John Bowers, using various technological and conceptual designs. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact Public performance with over 300 audience members 
 
Title ScareBot 
Description The digital scarecrow is the result of a participatory design exercise with children from the village who created drawings that were used to inspire the final scarecrow design. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
URL http://imagination.lancaster.ac.uk/news/ScareBot_goes_Wray_Scarecrow_Festival
 
Title Sound Mirrors 
Description This durational sound performance, inspired by the WW1 early warning listening devices dotted along the east coast of England, will attempt to re-appropriate the acoustic experience of war. Responding not only to the physical mirrors but also considering sound mirrors as a metaphor, we will explore issues around sound and technology associated with war. Our self-constructed sound making instruments will encompass time relevant acoustic technologies, communication techniques and the sounds of warfare. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact This performance had 80 visitors and was presented in the Great Hall at the Discovery Museum, Newcastle. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0TIhqlVvtQ0
 
Title Sound Spaces 
Description A public exhibition at FACT in Liverpool as an outcome of our work during the Sound Spaces project. Alongside this we also presented in an evening of performances involving Philip Jeck, Tim Shaw, John Bowers and Simon Bowen. All performances were presented through Stefan Kazassoglou's Icosahedron Sound System. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Through Sound Spaces we engaged with over 500 visitors, ran a series of public workshops, presented a collection of work in the FACT Liverpool Foyer and conducted a performance in Gallery 1. 
URL http://www.fact.co.uk/whats-on/current/philip-jeck-performance-with-john-bowers-tim-shaw.aspx
 
Title Sound Spaces exhibition/performance 
Description A public exhibition at FACT in Liverpool as an outcome of our work during the Sound Spaces project. Alongside this we also presented in an evening of performances involving Philip Jeck, Tim Shaw, John Bowers and Simon Bowen. All performances were presented through Stefan Kazassoglou's Icosahedron Sound System. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Through Sound Spaces we engaged with over 500 visitors, ran a series of public workshops, presented a collection of work in the FACT Liverpool Foyer and conducted a performance in Gallery 1. 
URL http://www.fact.co.uk/whats-on/current/philip-jeck-performance-with-john-bowers-tim-shaw.aspx
 
Title Sounds & Guts - Tess Denman-Cleaver 
Description Sounds & Guts is a live performance project that explores experiences of loneliness and isolation. It is developed through participatory, collaborative processes and manifests as both a live performance event and a performative installation artwork. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact Sounds & Guts, through the making process and performance events, created a public dialogic space in which issues relating to wellbeing, solitude and loneliness could be addressed in a way which incorporated reflection upon lived experience as well as interrogation of cultural and policy language around such issues. Sounds & Guts is engaged in developing new ways in which to work collaboratively with a range of partners who contribute to dialogue around current social, political and ontological issues. As a collaborative project it creates a space in which people can reflect upon their own experiences of particular issue and form opinions or change behaviors in relation to this issue. As an ongoing project Sounds & Guts will go on to experiment with a range of participatory approaches to engaging people with the issue of loneliness through performance making. The project resulted in partnerships between a number of individuals, organisations and institutions, including; Queens Hall Arts Centre (Hexham), Live Theatre (Newcastle), The Pacitti Company, residents of Holy Island, Dr. Laura Cull (Surrey University), Northumberland Council, Arts Council England and a number of artists and researchers who were involved in making the performance including Taryn Edmonds (film), Matthew Evans (theatre director), Emma Beverly (theatre producer) and Tim Shaw (sound). These partnerships are ongoing and will underpin Phase 2 of Sounds & Guts A total of 9 Performances of Sounds & Guts were presented at the following venues; Queens Hall Arts Centre (Hexham), Live Theatre (Newcastle), St Cuthbert's Centre (Holy Island) and SPILL Festival (Ipswich) between September 17th - November 2nd. The total audience attending these performances was 249. The installation was presented in the Ipswich Art School Gallery venue at SPILL Festival, engaging approximately 200 people. 
URL http://www.tenderbuttons.co.uk/project/sounds-guts/
 
Title Spillage 
Description 8 Channel Sound Installation, material colllected from Northumberland, in colaboration with Northumberland Exchanges. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact Over 400 visitors in 1 week 
 
Title Swaythe Band at Create 4 Dementia 
Description Swaythe Band was written at the http://create4dementia.com hackathon. Swaythe Band is designed to help participants sway to the music by illustrating a song's tempo. Players (or members of our band) are given a PlayStation Move controller (or baton). During a song, participants hold the controller as the LED light at its top changes colour in time to the beat of the music. The controllers are connected to a central computer via Bluetooth (using the PS Move API ) which dictates the colour and timing. This configuration is able to support up to eight participants with the computer being additionally responsible for playing the music. In the example presented at Create4Dementia, the timing of the lights was hardcoded to accompany "The Shrimp Boats", a song by Jo Stafford (1951). In the versions post Create4Dementia Swaytheband is fully configurable allowing different beats and tunes to be created. This is done via the XML file which is read by the program as it loads. Swaythe Band is more than just its software outputs. It's important to note how we used the PlayStation controllers. There were treated (and called) batons during the experience and given a rope textured handle, drawing inspiration from the trawling nets on the 'shrimp boats'. This made them easy to hold, pleasing to look at, and soft, should they be dropped. Correspondingly we also decided on the colour of the controllers should be the colour (Little Greene Shrimp Pink / #f7c7a9) when resting. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Swaythe Band won Best Project at the Create 4 Dementia hackathon at the Great North Museum, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne. Swaythe Band has been trialed in a care home in Ireland where residents have used it to augment their enjoyment of music sessions in the home. As well as the importance of this digital prototype to the home, Kellie Morrissey has made this one of the main outputs of her PhD and will discuss this in her upcoming DIS 2016 paper (subject to peer review). This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
URL http://thecreativeexchange.org/activity/swaythe-band-create-4-dementia
 
Title THESAURUS and Preface 
Description An artistic text produced from THESAURUS project work exploring the language of knowledge, exchange and collaboration in the form of a thesaurus that attempts to interrogate contemporary usage of these terms. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact The text was produced as part of a collaborative artist residency at the Time and Motion exhibition at FACT, presented at an academic conference in Copenhagen, developed in conversation with artists at New Bridge as part of a creative industry residency in Newcastle and the point of discussion amongst artists at PRESS ROOM, Islington Mill's takeover at the opening of Liverpool Biennial, 2014. 
 
Title The House of Lies 
Description The House of Lies is the representation of the landscape of a dream, the dreamscape. The object explores the notion of a map and challenges physical coherence in the mental models we construct of spaces, and illustrating the physical impossibility of virtual spaces. The artefact was exhibited at the Why Would I Lie Research Biennial at the Royal College of Art and was accompanied by an article in the Biennial publication, as well as a presentation as part of the conference. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact This output formed part of the design practice of the researcher, informing ongoing doctoral research and design practice. 
 
Title The Palimpsest Machine 
Description A short video documenting a performance by prof John Bowers and Dr Tom Schofield 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact N/a 
URL https://vimeo.com/138975354
 
Title The Sea, Lies Open - Tess Denman-Cleaver 
Description Installation and Walking Performance Series presented at Philosophy on Stage Festival hosted by Tanzquartier Wein in November 2015. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact The Sea, Lies Open was presented to a public audience of 900 people, including academic and non-academic professionals. Collaborative relationships underpinning it continue and plan to further develop and present the work in the UK in 2016. This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
URL http://www.tenderbuttons.co.uk/project/the-sea-lies-open/
 
Title Thinking Digital Tweet Translations 
Description Using twitter data from the conferences hashtag #TDC14, the designed tweet badges were personally generated by attendees and 3D printed live for participants to take home. Exploring the relationship between online twitter conversation and offline dialogue as part of a technology conference, these personalised data-things were worn by conference attendees throughout the event. Attendees were seen to compare their artefacts' shapes, reflecting upon their twitter behaviour and starting new conversations while inventing new stories and meanings for their data-things. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact Impact is discussed in the associated engagement event (Thinking Digital Conference - Data Translations) 
URL https://makingdatathings.wordpress.com/2014/05/30/tweet-translations-at-thinking-digital-2014/
 
Title Tuning In Listening Back in Time 
Description Tuning In - Listening Back in Time is a reconstruction of time distant voices and personal accounts of events on Tyneside during the First World War. The work will be presented using period audio technology in a science and technology basement store. The First World War listening stations which were based on our North East coast during the First World War were designed to pick up long distant sounds and communications from what may happen in the immediate future. The stone and concrete structures may well have also recorded powerful memories and events. Tuning In - Listening Back in Time is a reconstruction of those time distant voices and personal accounts of events on Tyneside during that traumatic period. The work will be diffused and realised through the period technology within a Discovery Museum basement tour. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact We had over 200 visitors to this installation at the Discovery Museum in Newcastle-upon-Tyne. 
URL http://www.decoded1914.org.uk/tuning-in-listening-back-in-time.html
 
Title Volvelles, Domes and Wristband souvenirs 
Description Three artefact designs were developed as part of the On The Precipice project which incorporated audience feedback data. The personalised artefacts were interactively created by visitors to the exhibition as souvenirs for them as well as incentives to engage with the arts organisation's feedback forms in more innovative ways. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact - academic paper presented at DIS'15, Vancouver - change in collaborating organisation's perception and use of evaluation in more creative ways - details of the impact are described in the associated project (On The Precipice) 
URL https://makingdatathings.wordpress.com/2013/09/01/on-the-precipice/
 
Title War Workings 
Description Many contemporary technologies have their ancestry in innovations developed to support military activity in World War One: communications and signalling systems, listening and timekeeping devices. Drawing on material and artefacts from the Tyne and Wear Archive, Shaw and Bowers will build a sound installation on site over a two-day period. The artists' process will be publicly open. Starting from nothing, the duo will build, create and install the work inviting the public to join them in making, listening and re-inventing war technology. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact During these activities we engaged with over 15 local artists and were visited by around 100 members of the public. This work led onto more activities in collaboration with the Tyne and Wear Archive. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0TIhqlVvtQ0
 
Description Over its four-year funding period, a partnership of Lancaster University, Newcastle University and the Royal College of Art built a dynamic knowledge exchange programme called the Creative Exchange (CX) to stimulate the creative economy in the UK, with a particular focus on the North of England.
Through novel partnerships of academic, industry, public and third sector expertise, and creative applications of digital media and technology in social and cultural contexts, the CX Hub explored new ground in terms of method and approach. It catalysed a series of paradigm shifts in the sector and delivered value through its outputs.
Four Paradigm Shifts
• A shift to a more integrated, cohesive and effective approach to working with small and micro creative and digital business, which have not traditionally engaged with academic research
• A shift from the concept of Digital Public Space as an online cultural archive, as initially proposed by the BBC, to a series of interactive digital public spaces with broader scope for business innovation
• A shift beyond traditional models of PhD research to a more flexible and
dynamic approach better suited to working with creative and cultural SMEs in the sector
• A shift from Knowledge Exchange to Creative Exchange, focusing on the
distinctive quality and value of cross-sector collaboration in the Arts &
Humanities.
Value
The CX Hub:
• Invested £333,237 in 94 projects (core and associated), generating significant value for a network of 176 contributors from 107 connected organisations as well as attracting leveraged funding of more than £1.8 million
• Generated more than 100 concepts and prototypes for new products and
services, creating new IP and 45 new jobs in creative and digital SMEs and in academia
• Produced 21 highly skilled people at Doctoral level who can lead new 'hybrid' thinking both in academia and industry in the creative economy
• Engaged with 150 academics across the Arts & Humanities and other fields and signed up 42 academics to collaboration agreements, developing new models of collaboration that have subsequently been adopted outside the CX Hub
• Secured further research funding of more than £17.5 million by CX partners to address related topics in the creative and digital sector.

The major achievements of the CX Hub can be summarised under four headings: New Thinking on Innovation in Digital Public Space (industry-theory sphere); New Product, Service and Technology Development (industry-practice sphere); New PhD Models and Capacity (academia-theory sphere); and New Forms of KE (academia-practice sphere).

The CX focused from the start on the innovation potential of Digital Public Space (DPS), initially working with core partner the BBC at MediaCityUK in Salford and its creative hinterland in the northwest to explore the Corporation's vision of open access online national cultural archives. An achievement of the CX project as a whole has been to radically broaden the concept of DPS to embrace the value creation opportunities in a range of additional digital public spaces resulting from social, civic, health and co-working flows of data. Through papers, events and think tanks, the CX started a profound debate about the future of DPS in the UK, built an autonomous expert forum comprising representatives from such bodies as the BBC, British Library, Wellcome Trust, Wikipedia and Ofcom, and is set to catalyse a Charter for Digital Public Space. This will define and seek to protect the public interest in DPS and will be of huge benefit to the many small creative firms seeking to innovate in this area.

New Products and Services
A key achievement of the CX Hub has been to develop new products, services and technologies designed to create new opportunities for creative businesses while bringing benefits to communities in the North of England and beyond. We have evidence of new apps, games and software, alongside spin out company formation
and job creation in micro firms. Four service and product development themes emerged over the life of the Hub:
• Heritage, place and tourism: novel applications of digital technology were used
to re-envision heritage/tourism offers
• Citizen participation: creative digital technologies were adopted to encourage
more open democratic processes in local communities
• Public service redesign: open data and other technology resources were co-opted
to improve local services, from transport to health
• Entrepreneurship: there was particular emphasis on working with hard-to-reach micro-businesses

New PhD Model
A distinctive achievement of the CX Hub lay in the recruitment and supervision of a cohort of 21 PhD students across the three institutions. These PhDs engaged in a series of mini-projects with academics and companies as innovation collaborators
and facilitators. To effectively combine doctoral work with innovation practice and KE required a new mixed-mode PhD model between theoretical enquiry and realworld application to be developed. The result is a new 'hybrid' cohort of researchers in KE who add capacity in the field and will, as they take up new roles, help to re-calibrate approaches across the sector in the future. The PhD cohort also
played a significant role in a deliberate shift of strategy during the project to introduce more informal, iterative and organic models of engagement with the creative economy.

New Forms of Knowledge Exchange
The CX's final major contribution lies in its work on new KE platforms and models, leading to our promotion of the idea that the digitally enabled creative economy requires swift, agile and networked 'Creative Exchange' and not simply a linear 'tech-transfer' model of knowledge exchange which presumes a simple bidirectional
transaction along a single axis of demand-produce-supply. This new
approach was first crystallised in a major two-day KE conference at Lancaster University in September 2013, and subsequently developed in PhD theses,academic papers, further projects and other outputs. In this context, the CX achievement lies in piloting new approaches that demonstrate the different and distinctive qualities that the Arts & Humanities bring to KE, in addition to challenging both academics and supporting university systems to be more responsive and flexible in how they operate. These new forms of KE are now evident in the three partner institutions in the CX Hub.
Exploitation Route We anticipate that the take up from the CX Hub's activity with its partners will be broad-based and diffused over time. Here are some specific activities that we know will be taken forward:

• Red Ninja is working with a CX intern to develop the Open Planning software application and implement with city councils 2016-17
(contact: Lee Omar, Red Ninja, lomar@redninja.co.uk)

• NHS Preston Hospital is working on phase two of the Blood Data Visualisation app through to full trials 2016 -17
(contact: Jeremy Davenport, j.davenport2@lancaster.ac.uk)

• Development of SME digital engagement with the Digital Catapult Centre in the North East January 2016 -June 2016
(contact: David Dunn, david.dunn@sunderlandsoftwarecity.com)
The CX programme has led to further research investment and will result in significant and wider impact on industry and society in general:

• EPSRC IOT PETRAS grant (announced January 2016) in collaboration with UCL,Imperial, Oxford, Warwick and 40 companies includes our partners in CX, BBCand Microsoft, Cooper and Coulton (a CX collaborating academic) are leading on adoption and acceptability, design and behaviour in relation to privacy, ethics and trust (all research topics covered under the CX programme)

• EPSRC Digital Civics (Wright and Olivier). This Centre for Doctoral Training is supporting 55 doctoral students over eight years in the design, deployment and evaluation of community-driven digital technologies and services through, for example, the redesign of local services with communities, and the development of at-scale platforms which allow citizens to engage with local government, and
commission their own services (http://digitalcivics.org.uk )

• AHRC LEAPFROG (Cruickshank). Co-designing new tools and approaches to facilitate new creative engagement activities in the public sector. The models of Creative Exchange are now being applied to the N8 consortium programme driving clusters of KE and Research under the Urban Living theme (Cooper lead for N8) and Creative and Digital theme (Coulton lead for N8) with support for KE from Professor Cruickshank (director KE on CX).

Furthermore, the PhD model is now embedded in the partner organisations and will be further developed and applied. Anticipated impact is also international as we continue to share the model with other universities, for example Gothenburg University and IE University Madrid via staff visits.
Sectors Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Other

 
Description Through collaboration with more than 100 public and private sector organisations over four years, the CX Hub developed and piloted concepts and prototypes for 61 artistic and creative products and 42 software and technical products, thus expanding the creative economy in the UK. Through this activity, we also developed capacity and capability in creative businesses and developed public service innovation. The demonstrable impact of the CX Hub can be described under three headings - economic impact, social impact and cultural impact. This project resulted in over 100 new concepts for products and services, these are being adopted to varying degrees by the partner organisations. The 42 academics involved in the work are also using the KE Techniques in their working practices and developing further KE with similar or the same partnering organisations. The 21 PhDs on this novel programme are transferring the knowledge into post doctoral research posts or their own independent practice.
Sector Creative Economy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Environment,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Other
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Economic,Policy & public services

 
Description Community Heritage
Amount £205,600 (GBP)
Funding ID HG-12-09349 
Organisation Heritage Lottery Fund 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2013 
End 12/2013
 
Description Digital Transformations in the Arts and Humanities
Amount £597,821 (GBP)
Funding ID AH/L007746/1 
Organisation Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2013 
End 03/2015
 
Description LU Impact Fund
Amount £4,994 (GBP)
Organisation Lancaster University 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2017 
End 04/2018
 
Description Strategic Touring Programme
Amount £94,000 (GBP)
Organisation Arts Council England 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2013 
End 12/2013
 
Title Creative Lounge tools 
Description We created an event called The Creative Lounge, with the thematic banner of 'Engageable Cities'. The invitation was open to both academics and creative industry representatives who had an interest in this area and digital public space including architects, artists, technologists, social studies and urbanism academics and many others. The goal of the activity was not only to create project concepts but also to build relationships and successful cross-sector interdisciplinary teams. When designing the experience and activities, our priorities based on previous learnings across the Creative Exchange were to provide a safe environment with all partners on equal footing, and to provide engaging experiences that would spark idea generation and form research teams. A process of iterative development informed the design of specific tools to meet these goals. These tools included tangible objects to facilitate mechanisms of collaboration. Tools included: 'Hearts and Hats', 'Link Map', 'Thematic Walk', 'Partners Pie' and the 'Journey Booklet'. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2014 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact As a result of this event two collaborative projects were funded through The Creative Exchange: Near Miss: this collaboration between the University of Westminster and SME Blaze ran a national digital survey on cycling 'near misses' and their impact on cyclists. It held a summation workshop with key stakeholders in this area to present the research outcomes and produced a report which has gained significant coverage in the UK press. They have now secured additional funding to extend the survey and include international aspects. Paths of Desire: this involves researchers from Lancaster University, Manchester Metropolitan University and the University of Kent as well as Lancaster City Council, a digital design company and a fine artist. They are developing a new map application which displays locations based on experiences and interests of users. This unique prototype app is in final development stages and will be developed further by the SME partner. Additional informal connections have been made and sustained between participants forming the basis of a network of collaborations who continue to discuss shared topics and may enable future working. Long term impacts of this project include the learning which has been retained within The Creative Exchange both in terms of working practices for the doctoral students and methods taken forward to other ideation and collaboration workshops and events. The tools themselves may also be transferrable to other contexts and we are exploring cross sector opportunities for this. A key outcome of this was to set a precedent for an exciting and engaging event to bring people together beyond the traditional workshop or conference with stratified hierarchies and less opportunity for broad collaboration. 
 
Title NESTA Open dataset of UK Makerspaces 
Description For NESTA we (Andrew Sleigh, Kathleen Stokes, Hannah Stewart) created an open dataset of UK makerspaces. Our goal from the beginning has been to build something useful and useable for makerspaces, researchers, and anyone with a general curiosity. Along the way, we've gathered identifiable data on makerspaces' locations, space, tools and materials, membership and users, amenities and services, external relationships, legal structure and founders, as well as aspirations and challenges. There's also some anonymised data on makerspace turnover, income, expenditure and business rates. - See more at: http://www.nesta.org.uk/blog/top-findings-open-dataset-uk-makerspaces#sthash.I4IISHSk.dpuf 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2015 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Makerspaces are a open access resource which has grown exponentially over the last decade, they are associated with some rather grand rhetoric around their role in civic and industrial life and there was a poor understanding of the types and range of facilities and aptitudes they possess. As this was the first large scale database with a clearly defined and rigorous method, pursued in an open manner, this dataset has had significant impact, enabling both researchers, policy makers and makerspaces themselves to understand more about the broader makerspace territory and the challenges and successes of a range of types of spaces. The associated user guide to the dataset provided easy access to headline findings and initial analysis through infographics and commentary, whereas the dataset github release has enabled other researchers to build upon and integrate this research into their work. 
URL http://www.nesta.org.uk/uk-makerspaces-data
 
Description A Walk in the Park 
Organisation Mitacs
Country Canada 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This project explored the creation of a commons around a new class of shareable data - self-observed/self-curated journeys or trails through digital media - and the potential within it for interaction, serendipity, mapping, storytelling, knowledge transfer and other human behaviours. The raw data from which these trails are constructed is familiar: bookmarks, tags, URLs and browsing histories. What is novel is the ability of the individual to capture, visualise, curate, create and share entirely new constructs from their own digital trails in ways that begin to define a new public space. The project built on existing personal data projects, creating enhancements for Mydex's personal data store platform and the INDX personal data store, developed by the University of Southampton as part of a larger EPSRC funded project 'SOCIAM - the theory and practice of Social Machines'. RCA CX PhD student Ben Dalton contributed planning and organising, visualisation prototyping & field trial structure.
Collaborator Contribution Mydex, represented by David Alexander, Phil Booth and Chris Adams, contributed prototyping of Mydex's Personal Data Store (PDS), developing visualisation and curation tools, hosting field trial 'sandbox' and post-trial website, and preparing technical field trial tutorial material. Dr Max Van Kleek contributed prototyping of the INDX personal data store (PDS) and participated in project workshops.
Impact Mydex PDS (Personal Data Store) browser data plugin and visualisations; New Cloud Atlas; Mydex Personal Data Store browsing trails Interface and Browser Plugin; INDX Personal Data Store browser data App; Pseudonymity in social machines (paper)
Start Year 2014
 
Description A Walk in the Park 
Organisation University of Southampton
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This project explored the creation of a commons around a new class of shareable data - self-observed/self-curated journeys or trails through digital media - and the potential within it for interaction, serendipity, mapping, storytelling, knowledge transfer and other human behaviours. The raw data from which these trails are constructed is familiar: bookmarks, tags, URLs and browsing histories. What is novel is the ability of the individual to capture, visualise, curate, create and share entirely new constructs from their own digital trails in ways that begin to define a new public space. The project built on existing personal data projects, creating enhancements for Mydex's personal data store platform and the INDX personal data store, developed by the University of Southampton as part of a larger EPSRC funded project 'SOCIAM - the theory and practice of Social Machines'. RCA CX PhD student Ben Dalton contributed planning and organising, visualisation prototyping & field trial structure.
Collaborator Contribution Mydex, represented by David Alexander, Phil Booth and Chris Adams, contributed prototyping of Mydex's Personal Data Store (PDS), developing visualisation and curation tools, hosting field trial 'sandbox' and post-trial website, and preparing technical field trial tutorial material. Dr Max Van Kleek contributed prototyping of the INDX personal data store (PDS) and participated in project workshops.
Impact Mydex PDS (Personal Data Store) browser data plugin and visualisations; New Cloud Atlas; Mydex Personal Data Store browsing trails Interface and Browser Plugin; INDX Personal Data Store browser data App; Pseudonymity in social machines (paper)
Start Year 2014
 
Description Ageing Playfully 
Organisation Age UK
Department Age UK Lancashire
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Through a number of creative and playful activities workshop participants shared their aspirations, needs and experiences and (with the help of designers from the University) came up with ideas to create plans or models (prototypes) of these ideas. In a follow-up stage of the project, these ideas and prototypes were then taken forward by the research project team and realised, and given back to workshop participants to be iteratively tested sharing feedback in order to improve them
Collaborator Contribution This project involved workshops within the Age UK Lancashire Community (with people at the early stages of Dementia, their caregivers and Age UK )
Impact Ageing Playfully: A Story of Forgetting and Remembering.Ageing playfully press coverage: Medical News TodayAgeing playfully press coverage: Medical ExpressAgeing Playfully press coverage: News-medicalAgeing Playfully (video)
Start Year 2014
 
Description Alpha Procurement 
Organisation Infonomics Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Lancaster University: Represented by Emma Murphy, Jeremy Davenport, Hannah Stewart Emma Murphy: 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved. Hannah Stewart and Jeremy Davenport will provide work in-kind to develop this project.
Collaborator Contribution University of Dundee: Represented by Mel Woods 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved. Swirrl: Represented by Ric Roberts 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved. Snook: Represented by Valerie Carr 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved. Infonomics: Represented by Robin Gower 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved. StardotStar: Represented by Gez O'Brien 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved.
Impact Reining back our projected outputs and aims somewhat, we achieved a lot within the time allocated. As that was very low (2 days per company), a lot of the work fell to Phds to undertake as we had to manage the company input very strategically. Because Alpha set out to influence and change something that wasn't within any of our remits it was challenging to actually achive the grand aim of fixing procurement, however we did achieve the majority of our research aims as scoped for the first phase. We achieved an empirical review of 'good' procurement from the reports and literature, we mapped out the landscape and factors of influence on Procurement within the BBC, we plotted and assessed the impact of previous intervention within the system and devised tools to measure procurement effectiveness and how the experience lined up with company strategy. Bringing together this learning, we recognized that a toolkit or report would not have the influence on the area that we liked and instead we formed 'the ministry of good procurement' which brought together our learning into a manifesto of good procurement and seeks to champion 'good procurement' using more guerilla tactics. Throughout the project our partners, both academic and comoany were meeting with people creating policy and procurement guidelines. We fed some findings to them directly as we went, but largey the experience and relationship with them led to us considering alternative approaches to disseminate our findings as they said they were overrun with reports and toolkits. The project and our approach was influential on developing networks between CX and Helsinki, supported by PROUD, Emma Murphy ran a Masterclass featuring the Alpha approach to mapping the Factors of Influence, our findings and recommendations on empathy and our Manifesto with Jussi in Helsiki. The Ministry for Good procurement and its associated brand collateral has great potential for impact but requires a full website building and a system so that users can sign up to the manifesto for good procurement and also input their thoughts. We are discussing bringing both the ministry and the Helsinki model of procurement to fieldtrial or a second stage project with FutureGov. That would secure significant impact on the highly complex landscape of procurement.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Alpha Procurement 
Organisation Snook
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Lancaster University: Represented by Emma Murphy, Jeremy Davenport, Hannah Stewart Emma Murphy: 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved. Hannah Stewart and Jeremy Davenport will provide work in-kind to develop this project.
Collaborator Contribution University of Dundee: Represented by Mel Woods 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved. Swirrl: Represented by Ric Roberts 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved. Snook: Represented by Valerie Carr 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved. Infonomics: Represented by Robin Gower 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved. StardotStar: Represented by Gez O'Brien 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved.
Impact Reining back our projected outputs and aims somewhat, we achieved a lot within the time allocated. As that was very low (2 days per company), a lot of the work fell to Phds to undertake as we had to manage the company input very strategically. Because Alpha set out to influence and change something that wasn't within any of our remits it was challenging to actually achive the grand aim of fixing procurement, however we did achieve the majority of our research aims as scoped for the first phase. We achieved an empirical review of 'good' procurement from the reports and literature, we mapped out the landscape and factors of influence on Procurement within the BBC, we plotted and assessed the impact of previous intervention within the system and devised tools to measure procurement effectiveness and how the experience lined up with company strategy. Bringing together this learning, we recognized that a toolkit or report would not have the influence on the area that we liked and instead we formed 'the ministry of good procurement' which brought together our learning into a manifesto of good procurement and seeks to champion 'good procurement' using more guerilla tactics. Throughout the project our partners, both academic and comoany were meeting with people creating policy and procurement guidelines. We fed some findings to them directly as we went, but largey the experience and relationship with them led to us considering alternative approaches to disseminate our findings as they said they were overrun with reports and toolkits. The project and our approach was influential on developing networks between CX and Helsinki, supported by PROUD, Emma Murphy ran a Masterclass featuring the Alpha approach to mapping the Factors of Influence, our findings and recommendations on empathy and our Manifesto with Jussi in Helsiki. The Ministry for Good procurement and its associated brand collateral has great potential for impact but requires a full website building and a system so that users can sign up to the manifesto for good procurement and also input their thoughts. We are discussing bringing both the ministry and the Helsinki model of procurement to fieldtrial or a second stage project with FutureGov. That would secure significant impact on the highly complex landscape of procurement.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Alpha Procurement 
Organisation Stardotstar
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Lancaster University: Represented by Emma Murphy, Jeremy Davenport, Hannah Stewart Emma Murphy: 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved. Hannah Stewart and Jeremy Davenport will provide work in-kind to develop this project.
Collaborator Contribution University of Dundee: Represented by Mel Woods 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved. Swirrl: Represented by Ric Roberts 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved. Snook: Represented by Valerie Carr 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved. Infonomics: Represented by Robin Gower 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved. StardotStar: Represented by Gez O'Brien 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved.
Impact Reining back our projected outputs and aims somewhat, we achieved a lot within the time allocated. As that was very low (2 days per company), a lot of the work fell to Phds to undertake as we had to manage the company input very strategically. Because Alpha set out to influence and change something that wasn't within any of our remits it was challenging to actually achive the grand aim of fixing procurement, however we did achieve the majority of our research aims as scoped for the first phase. We achieved an empirical review of 'good' procurement from the reports and literature, we mapped out the landscape and factors of influence on Procurement within the BBC, we plotted and assessed the impact of previous intervention within the system and devised tools to measure procurement effectiveness and how the experience lined up with company strategy. Bringing together this learning, we recognized that a toolkit or report would not have the influence on the area that we liked and instead we formed 'the ministry of good procurement' which brought together our learning into a manifesto of good procurement and seeks to champion 'good procurement' using more guerilla tactics. Throughout the project our partners, both academic and comoany were meeting with people creating policy and procurement guidelines. We fed some findings to them directly as we went, but largey the experience and relationship with them led to us considering alternative approaches to disseminate our findings as they said they were overrun with reports and toolkits. The project and our approach was influential on developing networks between CX and Helsinki, supported by PROUD, Emma Murphy ran a Masterclass featuring the Alpha approach to mapping the Factors of Influence, our findings and recommendations on empathy and our Manifesto with Jussi in Helsiki. The Ministry for Good procurement and its associated brand collateral has great potential for impact but requires a full website building and a system so that users can sign up to the manifesto for good procurement and also input their thoughts. We are discussing bringing both the ministry and the Helsinki model of procurement to fieldtrial or a second stage project with FutureGov. That would secure significant impact on the highly complex landscape of procurement.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Alpha Procurement 
Organisation Swirrl
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Lancaster University: Represented by Emma Murphy, Jeremy Davenport, Hannah Stewart Emma Murphy: 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved. Hannah Stewart and Jeremy Davenport will provide work in-kind to develop this project.
Collaborator Contribution University of Dundee: Represented by Mel Woods 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved. Swirrl: Represented by Ric Roberts 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved. Snook: Represented by Valerie Carr 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved. Infonomics: Represented by Robin Gower 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved. StardotStar: Represented by Gez O'Brien 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved.
Impact Reining back our projected outputs and aims somewhat, we achieved a lot within the time allocated. As that was very low (2 days per company), a lot of the work fell to Phds to undertake as we had to manage the company input very strategically. Because Alpha set out to influence and change something that wasn't within any of our remits it was challenging to actually achive the grand aim of fixing procurement, however we did achieve the majority of our research aims as scoped for the first phase. We achieved an empirical review of 'good' procurement from the reports and literature, we mapped out the landscape and factors of influence on Procurement within the BBC, we plotted and assessed the impact of previous intervention within the system and devised tools to measure procurement effectiveness and how the experience lined up with company strategy. Bringing together this learning, we recognized that a toolkit or report would not have the influence on the area that we liked and instead we formed 'the ministry of good procurement' which brought together our learning into a manifesto of good procurement and seeks to champion 'good procurement' using more guerilla tactics. Throughout the project our partners, both academic and comoany were meeting with people creating policy and procurement guidelines. We fed some findings to them directly as we went, but largey the experience and relationship with them led to us considering alternative approaches to disseminate our findings as they said they were overrun with reports and toolkits. The project and our approach was influential on developing networks between CX and Helsinki, supported by PROUD, Emma Murphy ran a Masterclass featuring the Alpha approach to mapping the Factors of Influence, our findings and recommendations on empathy and our Manifesto with Jussi in Helsiki. The Ministry for Good procurement and its associated brand collateral has great potential for impact but requires a full website building and a system so that users can sign up to the manifesto for good procurement and also input their thoughts. We are discussing bringing both the ministry and the Helsinki model of procurement to fieldtrial or a second stage project with FutureGov. That would secure significant impact on the highly complex landscape of procurement.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Alpha Procurement 
Organisation University of Dundee
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Lancaster University: Represented by Emma Murphy, Jeremy Davenport, Hannah Stewart Emma Murphy: 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved. Hannah Stewart and Jeremy Davenport will provide work in-kind to develop this project.
Collaborator Contribution University of Dundee: Represented by Mel Woods 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved. Swirrl: Represented by Ric Roberts 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved. Snook: Represented by Valerie Carr 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved. Infonomics: Represented by Robin Gower 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved. StardotStar: Represented by Gez O'Brien 1 day of time to provide research/guidance to PhD students ½ day for kick off meeting ½ day to cover two-three 1 hour skype meetings plus preparation ½ day to review outputs/provide comments = 2.5 days total. Plus time in kind for attendance at ad-hoc project meetings and for provision of ongoing research until deliverables are achieved.
Impact Reining back our projected outputs and aims somewhat, we achieved a lot within the time allocated. As that was very low (2 days per company), a lot of the work fell to Phds to undertake as we had to manage the company input very strategically. Because Alpha set out to influence and change something that wasn't within any of our remits it was challenging to actually achive the grand aim of fixing procurement, however we did achieve the majority of our research aims as scoped for the first phase. We achieved an empirical review of 'good' procurement from the reports and literature, we mapped out the landscape and factors of influence on Procurement within the BBC, we plotted and assessed the impact of previous intervention within the system and devised tools to measure procurement effectiveness and how the experience lined up with company strategy. Bringing together this learning, we recognized that a toolkit or report would not have the influence on the area that we liked and instead we formed 'the ministry of good procurement' which brought together our learning into a manifesto of good procurement and seeks to champion 'good procurement' using more guerilla tactics. Throughout the project our partners, both academic and comoany were meeting with people creating policy and procurement guidelines. We fed some findings to them directly as we went, but largey the experience and relationship with them led to us considering alternative approaches to disseminate our findings as they said they were overrun with reports and toolkits. The project and our approach was influential on developing networks between CX and Helsinki, supported by PROUD, Emma Murphy ran a Masterclass featuring the Alpha approach to mapping the Factors of Influence, our findings and recommendations on empathy and our Manifesto with Jussi in Helsiki. The Ministry for Good procurement and its associated brand collateral has great potential for impact but requires a full website building and a system so that users can sign up to the manifesto for good procurement and also input their thoughts. We are discussing bringing both the ministry and the Helsinki model of procurement to fieldtrial or a second stage project with FutureGov. That would secure significant impact on the highly complex landscape of procurement.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Being There 
Organisation Cheshire East Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Lancaster University: Represented by Paul Coulton, Corinna Pensiton-Bird, Malé Luján Escalante Corinna Peniston-Bird: 12 days of funded research time - Primary archive research (~6 days), participation in workshop sessions (~3 days), contribution to development of brief (~3 days) Paul Coulton: 2 days of support time (in-kind) - support of technological possibility research, participation in workshop sessions Malé Luján Escalante: to contribute up to 2 days per week (in-kind) - -Documenting, -Ethnography and archive research, -Facilitate design workshops - Contribute to generate a brief. -development of toolbox guidelines for heritage organisations
Collaborator Contribution University of Central Lancashire: Represented by Oliver Wilkinson To contribute 12 days of funded research time consisting of - Primary archive research (~6 days), participation in workshop sessions (~3 days), contribution to development of brief (~3 days) Cheshire East Council: Represented by Jocelyn McMillan, Helen Paton, Paul Newman To contribute 20 days of funded time Access to archives and participation in primary research Participation in scoping workshops and development of concepts Organisation of schools and teachers focus groups Input to development of brief Input to development of tool box Working with HLF and Arts Council for emergent funding
Impact Being There Synthesis document (guidelines); Digital curator brief
Start Year 2014
 
Description Being There 
Organisation United Kingdom Office for Library and Information Networking
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Lancaster University: Represented by Paul Coulton, Corinna Pensiton-Bird, Malé Luján Escalante Corinna Peniston-Bird: 12 days of funded research time - Primary archive research (~6 days), participation in workshop sessions (~3 days), contribution to development of brief (~3 days) Paul Coulton: 2 days of support time (in-kind) - support of technological possibility research, participation in workshop sessions Malé Luján Escalante: to contribute up to 2 days per week (in-kind) - -Documenting, -Ethnography and archive research, -Facilitate design workshops - Contribute to generate a brief. -development of toolbox guidelines for heritage organisations
Collaborator Contribution University of Central Lancashire: Represented by Oliver Wilkinson To contribute 12 days of funded research time consisting of - Primary archive research (~6 days), participation in workshop sessions (~3 days), contribution to development of brief (~3 days) Cheshire East Council: Represented by Jocelyn McMillan, Helen Paton, Paul Newman To contribute 20 days of funded time Access to archives and participation in primary research Participation in scoping workshops and development of concepts Organisation of schools and teachers focus groups Input to development of brief Input to development of tool box Working with HLF and Arts Council for emergent funding
Impact Being There Synthesis document (guidelines); Digital curator brief
Start Year 2014
 
Description Blockanomics 
Organisation DGKCT LTD
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Lancaster University: Representative: Hannah Stewart 10 days in-kind Project tasks include: kick-off meeting, discussion on secondary data and best practice, primary data collection and development of paper prototype system and mechanisms, interim assessment of behaviours and contribution to research outputs.
Collaborator Contribution DGKCT LTD Representative: David Kinsella (10 days in kind) Commission the build of the minecraft world, based on collaborative paper prototyping and kick off meeting discussions. Arrange for build of in-game menu of democratic or consultation techniques, as specified by Peter. Act as primary stakeholder and liason for youth councils, schools etc. Participate in knowledge exchange and codesign sessions between partners. Communicate impact and value of project approach to external bodies Shared Future CIC Representative: Peter Bryant (5 days) Identify series of methods of participation that are most suitable for engaging young people and enabling them to consider prioritised issues Work with City Council officers and elected members to ensure that the project is an opportunity for genuine citizen involvement in council decision making around a number of identified issues. Advise on how best the project can improve effectiveness in embedding deliberative democracy principles and methods. University of Cumbria Representative: Frank Peck (6 days), Keith Jackson (4 days) Frank Peck: Will provide advice to the project team on socio-economic conditions and relevant data for Carlisle District. This will include analysis of trends in relevant data that can be used to calibrate the Minecraft environment. Data will be written up in a series of briefing papers and discussed at regular meetings. Will provide oversight on research direction, and work alongside Peter and Hannah to arrive at the best research methods to embed within the game to measure participation. The project will be written up as a published case study of local government and the engagement of young people in democratic processes. Keith Jackson: Will support the project by compiling information of potential data sources and accessing and analysing data as required. Keith will also be involved in progress meetings and publication
Impact Blockonomics: UKAuthority press article
Start Year 2014
 
Description Blockanomics 
Organisation Our Life Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Lancaster University: Representative: Hannah Stewart 10 days in-kind Project tasks include: kick-off meeting, discussion on secondary data and best practice, primary data collection and development of paper prototype system and mechanisms, interim assessment of behaviours and contribution to research outputs.
Collaborator Contribution DGKCT LTD Representative: David Kinsella (10 days in kind) Commission the build of the minecraft world, based on collaborative paper prototyping and kick off meeting discussions. Arrange for build of in-game menu of democratic or consultation techniques, as specified by Peter. Act as primary stakeholder and liason for youth councils, schools etc. Participate in knowledge exchange and codesign sessions between partners. Communicate impact and value of project approach to external bodies Shared Future CIC Representative: Peter Bryant (5 days) Identify series of methods of participation that are most suitable for engaging young people and enabling them to consider prioritised issues Work with City Council officers and elected members to ensure that the project is an opportunity for genuine citizen involvement in council decision making around a number of identified issues. Advise on how best the project can improve effectiveness in embedding deliberative democracy principles and methods. University of Cumbria Representative: Frank Peck (6 days), Keith Jackson (4 days) Frank Peck: Will provide advice to the project team on socio-economic conditions and relevant data for Carlisle District. This will include analysis of trends in relevant data that can be used to calibrate the Minecraft environment. Data will be written up in a series of briefing papers and discussed at regular meetings. Will provide oversight on research direction, and work alongside Peter and Hannah to arrive at the best research methods to embed within the game to measure participation. The project will be written up as a published case study of local government and the engagement of young people in democratic processes. Keith Jackson: Will support the project by compiling information of potential data sources and accessing and analysing data as required. Keith will also be involved in progress meetings and publication
Impact Blockonomics: UKAuthority press article
Start Year 2014
 
Description Blockanomics 
Organisation University of Cumbria
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Lancaster University: Representative: Hannah Stewart 10 days in-kind Project tasks include: kick-off meeting, discussion on secondary data and best practice, primary data collection and development of paper prototype system and mechanisms, interim assessment of behaviours and contribution to research outputs.
Collaborator Contribution DGKCT LTD Representative: David Kinsella (10 days in kind) Commission the build of the minecraft world, based on collaborative paper prototyping and kick off meeting discussions. Arrange for build of in-game menu of democratic or consultation techniques, as specified by Peter. Act as primary stakeholder and liason for youth councils, schools etc. Participate in knowledge exchange and codesign sessions between partners. Communicate impact and value of project approach to external bodies Shared Future CIC Representative: Peter Bryant (5 days) Identify series of methods of participation that are most suitable for engaging young people and enabling them to consider prioritised issues Work with City Council officers and elected members to ensure that the project is an opportunity for genuine citizen involvement in council decision making around a number of identified issues. Advise on how best the project can improve effectiveness in embedding deliberative democracy principles and methods. University of Cumbria Representative: Frank Peck (6 days), Keith Jackson (4 days) Frank Peck: Will provide advice to the project team on socio-economic conditions and relevant data for Carlisle District. This will include analysis of trends in relevant data that can be used to calibrate the Minecraft environment. Data will be written up in a series of briefing papers and discussed at regular meetings. Will provide oversight on research direction, and work alongside Peter and Hannah to arrive at the best research methods to embed within the game to measure participation. The project will be written up as a published case study of local government and the engagement of young people in democratic processes. Keith Jackson: Will support the project by compiling information of potential data sources and accessing and analysing data as required. Keith will also be involved in progress meetings and publication
Impact Blockonomics: UKAuthority press article
Start Year 2014
 
Description Blood Data visualisation (Kendal) 
Organisation NHS England
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution CX PhD students Jeremy Davenport and Adrian Gradinar worked to develop a prototype to visualise the dialysing patients blood data to increase patient-clinician communication
Collaborator Contribution This was a collaboration with NHS clinicans at Preston Royal Hospital
Impact Prototype app, report
Start Year 2015
 
Description Bretton Buzz 
Organisation Government of the UK
Department Department for Communities & Local Government (DCLG)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution This project developed and tested the potential of LocalNets, an innovative social media digital analytics tool created by CX PhD researcher Jimmy Tidey to drive community action and promote the take up of community rights. Working with the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG), the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA) and software development company TableFlip, the project used the app to stage a series of interventions to improve low community rights uptake in the Bretton parish of Peterborough. The RSA has pioneered the use of offline social network analysis as a means of achieving social policy outcomes by analysing people's social relationships and seeing how they impact on wellbeing, life satisfaction and other life outcomes. However, this approach is resource intensive; the LocalNets tool automated the process of community asset discovery to help community-focused organisations identify and understand community concerns and issues more efficiently. RCA CX PhD student Jimmy Tidey provided research and software creation, project development and organisation, documentation and evaluation.
Collaborator Contribution Arianna Haberis, Miriam Levin, Ed Ridout (Department for Communities and Local Government) provided feedback on the usefulness of the LocalNets app in a policy context. Katherine Cane, Matthew Parsfield (Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce) prepared and provided 'on-the-ground' survey data and resources to run an intervention. Richard Silverman (TableFlip) provided development work to ensure the robustness of the underlying software and contribute to scaling the code.
Impact Poster: Localnets - Mapping Communities Using Twitter; Exhibit of LocalNets webapp at Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design Creative Citizen conference; What does House of Cards tell us about big data culture?
Start Year 2015
 
Description Bretton Buzz 
Organisation Nesta
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This project developed and tested the potential of LocalNets, an innovative social media digital analytics tool created by CX PhD researcher Jimmy Tidey to drive community action and promote the take up of community rights. Working with the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG), the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA) and software development company TableFlip, the project used the app to stage a series of interventions to improve low community rights uptake in the Bretton parish of Peterborough. The RSA has pioneered the use of offline social network analysis as a means of achieving social policy outcomes by analysing people's social relationships and seeing how they impact on wellbeing, life satisfaction and other life outcomes. However, this approach is resource intensive; the LocalNets tool automated the process of community asset discovery to help community-focused organisations identify and understand community concerns and issues more efficiently. RCA CX PhD student Jimmy Tidey provided research and software creation, project development and organisation, documentation and evaluation.
Collaborator Contribution Arianna Haberis, Miriam Levin, Ed Ridout (Department for Communities and Local Government) provided feedback on the usefulness of the LocalNets app in a policy context. Katherine Cane, Matthew Parsfield (Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce) prepared and provided 'on-the-ground' survey data and resources to run an intervention. Richard Silverman (TableFlip) provided development work to ensure the robustness of the underlying software and contribute to scaling the code.
Impact Poster: Localnets - Mapping Communities Using Twitter; Exhibit of LocalNets webapp at Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design Creative Citizen conference; What does House of Cards tell us about big data culture?
Start Year 2015
 
Description Bretton Buzz 
Organisation Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Learned Society 
PI Contribution This project developed and tested the potential of LocalNets, an innovative social media digital analytics tool created by CX PhD researcher Jimmy Tidey to drive community action and promote the take up of community rights. Working with the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG), the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA) and software development company TableFlip, the project used the app to stage a series of interventions to improve low community rights uptake in the Bretton parish of Peterborough. The RSA has pioneered the use of offline social network analysis as a means of achieving social policy outcomes by analysing people's social relationships and seeing how they impact on wellbeing, life satisfaction and other life outcomes. However, this approach is resource intensive; the LocalNets tool automated the process of community asset discovery to help community-focused organisations identify and understand community concerns and issues more efficiently. RCA CX PhD student Jimmy Tidey provided research and software creation, project development and organisation, documentation and evaluation.
Collaborator Contribution Arianna Haberis, Miriam Levin, Ed Ridout (Department for Communities and Local Government) provided feedback on the usefulness of the LocalNets app in a policy context. Katherine Cane, Matthew Parsfield (Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce) prepared and provided 'on-the-ground' survey data and resources to run an intervention. Richard Silverman (TableFlip) provided development work to ensure the robustness of the underlying software and contribute to scaling the code.
Impact Poster: Localnets - Mapping Communities Using Twitter; Exhibit of LocalNets webapp at Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design Creative Citizen conference; What does House of Cards tell us about big data culture?
Start Year 2015
 
Description Bretton Buzz 
Organisation Tableflip
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution This project developed and tested the potential of LocalNets, an innovative social media digital analytics tool created by CX PhD researcher Jimmy Tidey to drive community action and promote the take up of community rights. Working with the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG), the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA) and software development company TableFlip, the project used the app to stage a series of interventions to improve low community rights uptake in the Bretton parish of Peterborough. The RSA has pioneered the use of offline social network analysis as a means of achieving social policy outcomes by analysing people's social relationships and seeing how they impact on wellbeing, life satisfaction and other life outcomes. However, this approach is resource intensive; the LocalNets tool automated the process of community asset discovery to help community-focused organisations identify and understand community concerns and issues more efficiently. RCA CX PhD student Jimmy Tidey provided research and software creation, project development and organisation, documentation and evaluation.
Collaborator Contribution Arianna Haberis, Miriam Levin, Ed Ridout (Department for Communities and Local Government) provided feedback on the usefulness of the LocalNets app in a policy context. Katherine Cane, Matthew Parsfield (Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce) prepared and provided 'on-the-ground' survey data and resources to run an intervention. Richard Silverman (TableFlip) provided development work to ensure the robustness of the underlying software and contribute to scaling the code.
Impact Poster: Localnets - Mapping Communities Using Twitter; Exhibit of LocalNets webapp at Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design Creative Citizen conference; What does House of Cards tell us about big data culture?
Start Year 2015
 
Description Bretton Buzz 
Organisation University of Central Lancashire
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This project developed and tested the potential of LocalNets, an innovative social media digital analytics tool created by CX PhD researcher Jimmy Tidey to drive community action and promote the take up of community rights. Working with the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG), the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA) and software development company TableFlip, the project used the app to stage a series of interventions to improve low community rights uptake in the Bretton parish of Peterborough. The RSA has pioneered the use of offline social network analysis as a means of achieving social policy outcomes by analysing people's social relationships and seeing how they impact on wellbeing, life satisfaction and other life outcomes. However, this approach is resource intensive; the LocalNets tool automated the process of community asset discovery to help community-focused organisations identify and understand community concerns and issues more efficiently. RCA CX PhD student Jimmy Tidey provided research and software creation, project development and organisation, documentation and evaluation.
Collaborator Contribution Arianna Haberis, Miriam Levin, Ed Ridout (Department for Communities and Local Government) provided feedback on the usefulness of the LocalNets app in a policy context. Katherine Cane, Matthew Parsfield (Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce) prepared and provided 'on-the-ground' survey data and resources to run an intervention. Richard Silverman (TableFlip) provided development work to ensure the robustness of the underlying software and contribute to scaling the code.
Impact Poster: Localnets - Mapping Communities Using Twitter; Exhibit of LocalNets webapp at Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design Creative Citizen conference; What does House of Cards tell us about big data culture?
Start Year 2015
 
Description Bretton Buzz 
Organisation University of Manchester
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This project developed and tested the potential of LocalNets, an innovative social media digital analytics tool created by CX PhD researcher Jimmy Tidey to drive community action and promote the take up of community rights. Working with the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG), the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA) and software development company TableFlip, the project used the app to stage a series of interventions to improve low community rights uptake in the Bretton parish of Peterborough. The RSA has pioneered the use of offline social network analysis as a means of achieving social policy outcomes by analysing people's social relationships and seeing how they impact on wellbeing, life satisfaction and other life outcomes. However, this approach is resource intensive; the LocalNets tool automated the process of community asset discovery to help community-focused organisations identify and understand community concerns and issues more efficiently. RCA CX PhD student Jimmy Tidey provided research and software creation, project development and organisation, documentation and evaluation.
Collaborator Contribution Arianna Haberis, Miriam Levin, Ed Ridout (Department for Communities and Local Government) provided feedback on the usefulness of the LocalNets app in a policy context. Katherine Cane, Matthew Parsfield (Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce) prepared and provided 'on-the-ground' survey data and resources to run an intervention. Richard Silverman (TableFlip) provided development work to ensure the robustness of the underlying software and contribute to scaling the code.
Impact Poster: Localnets - Mapping Communities Using Twitter; Exhibit of LocalNets webapp at Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design Creative Citizen conference; What does House of Cards tell us about big data culture?
Start Year 2015
 
Description Chattr 
Organisation FutureEverything
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Chatter asks a challenging question, how much of your data are you willing to leak into the public online domain. Google Street View shared images of your street and home online. Chatter will share online private conversations of visitors to FutureEverything. Choice will be like the 'choice' given us by the Internet firms. Sign up to our terms, or you do not get the service you desire - the comfort of the Chatter lounge at the FutureEverything Summit. The FutureEverything Summit will witness a newly commissioned artwork and provocative design experiment that poses a challenging question - how far we will accept private conversations being captured and shared online. The artwork runs alongside a series of high level debates on an ambitious international initiative to build what is being called a Digital Public Space. Visitors to the cafe will be presented with a choice of whether to participate in the Chatter social area or not. They will be asked if they agree to have their voices recorded, transcribed and published on the internet, and will then be asked to accept a Data Use Policy. The cafe will use a colour coding system to remind visitors of their choice. Only visitors who have accepted to have their voices recorded and published will be allowed to enter the Chatter social area. Transcripts of recordings will be uploaded online and publicly accessible permanently. Lancaster University Represented by Drew Hemment, Joel Porter*, Lara Salinas*, Drew Hemment - 4 days of time provided in-kind for research and development Plus time in kind for attendance at project meetings and guidance for PhD students working on the project. Royal College of Art Represented by Ben Dalton
Collaborator Contribution Chatter asks a challenging question, how much of your data are you willing to leak into the public online domain. Google Street View shared images of your street and home online. Chatter will share online private conversations of visitors to FutureEverything. Choice will be like the 'choice' given us by the Internet firms. Sign up to our terms, or you do not get the service you desire - the comfort of the Chatter lounge at the FutureEverything Summit. The FutureEverything Summit will witness a newly commissioned artwork and provocative design experiment that poses a challenging question - how far we will accept private conversations being captured and shared online. The artwork runs alongside a series of high level debates on an ambitious international initiative to build what is being called a Digital Public Space. Visitors to the cafe will be presented with a choice of whether to participate in the Chatter social area or not. They will be asked if they agree to have their voices recorded, transcribed and published on the internet, and will then be asked to accept a Data Use Policy. The cafe will use a colour coding system to remind visitors of their choice. Only visitors who have accepted to have their voices recorded and published will be allowed to enter the Chatter social area. Transcripts of recordings will be uploaded online and publicly accessible permanently. Kimchi Represented by Elliot Woods 5 days of research time for Design of physical interface, middleware, assistance with interaction and concept FutureEverything Represented by Tom Higham, Joeli Brearley Tom Higham - 2 days research and development time Jeoli Brearley - 6 days project management and production assistance 6 days of production, delivery support and admin Plus time in kind for attendance at project meetings and guidance for PhD students working on the project. University of Dundee Represented by Mel Woods 3 days research and development time Plus time in kind for attendance at project meetings and guidance for PhD students working on the project.
Impact Installations at FutureEverything and TodaysArt
Start Year 2013
 
Description Chattr 
Organisation Kimchi and Chips
Country Korea, Republic of 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Chatter asks a challenging question, how much of your data are you willing to leak into the public online domain. Google Street View shared images of your street and home online. Chatter will share online private conversations of visitors to FutureEverything. Choice will be like the 'choice' given us by the Internet firms. Sign up to our terms, or you do not get the service you desire - the comfort of the Chatter lounge at the FutureEverything Summit. The FutureEverything Summit will witness a newly commissioned artwork and provocative design experiment that poses a challenging question - how far we will accept private conversations being captured and shared online. The artwork runs alongside a series of high level debates on an ambitious international initiative to build what is being called a Digital Public Space. Visitors to the cafe will be presented with a choice of whether to participate in the Chatter social area or not. They will be asked if they agree to have their voices recorded, transcribed and published on the internet, and will then be asked to accept a Data Use Policy. The cafe will use a colour coding system to remind visitors of their choice. Only visitors who have accepted to have their voices recorded and published will be allowed to enter the Chatter social area. Transcripts of recordings will be uploaded online and publicly accessible permanently. Lancaster University Represented by Drew Hemment, Joel Porter*, Lara Salinas*, Drew Hemment - 4 days of time provided in-kind for research and development Plus time in kind for attendance at project meetings and guidance for PhD students working on the project. Royal College of Art Represented by Ben Dalton
Collaborator Contribution Chatter asks a challenging question, how much of your data are you willing to leak into the public online domain. Google Street View shared images of your street and home online. Chatter will share online private conversations of visitors to FutureEverything. Choice will be like the 'choice' given us by the Internet firms. Sign up to our terms, or you do not get the service you desire - the comfort of the Chatter lounge at the FutureEverything Summit. The FutureEverything Summit will witness a newly commissioned artwork and provocative design experiment that poses a challenging question - how far we will accept private conversations being captured and shared online. The artwork runs alongside a series of high level debates on an ambitious international initiative to build what is being called a Digital Public Space. Visitors to the cafe will be presented with a choice of whether to participate in the Chatter social area or not. They will be asked if they agree to have their voices recorded, transcribed and published on the internet, and will then be asked to accept a Data Use Policy. The cafe will use a colour coding system to remind visitors of their choice. Only visitors who have accepted to have their voices recorded and published will be allowed to enter the Chatter social area. Transcripts of recordings will be uploaded online and publicly accessible permanently. Kimchi Represented by Elliot Woods 5 days of research time for Design of physical interface, middleware, assistance with interaction and concept FutureEverything Represented by Tom Higham, Joeli Brearley Tom Higham - 2 days research and development time Jeoli Brearley - 6 days project management and production assistance 6 days of production, delivery support and admin Plus time in kind for attendance at project meetings and guidance for PhD students working on the project. University of Dundee Represented by Mel Woods 3 days research and development time Plus time in kind for attendance at project meetings and guidance for PhD students working on the project.
Impact Installations at FutureEverything and TodaysArt
Start Year 2013
 
Description Chattr 
Organisation University of Dundee
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Chatter asks a challenging question, how much of your data are you willing to leak into the public online domain. Google Street View shared images of your street and home online. Chatter will share online private conversations of visitors to FutureEverything. Choice will be like the 'choice' given us by the Internet firms. Sign up to our terms, or you do not get the service you desire - the comfort of the Chatter lounge at the FutureEverything Summit. The FutureEverything Summit will witness a newly commissioned artwork and provocative design experiment that poses a challenging question - how far we will accept private conversations being captured and shared online. The artwork runs alongside a series of high level debates on an ambitious international initiative to build what is being called a Digital Public Space. Visitors to the cafe will be presented with a choice of whether to participate in the Chatter social area or not. They will be asked if they agree to have their voices recorded, transcribed and published on the internet, and will then be asked to accept a Data Use Policy. The cafe will use a colour coding system to remind visitors of their choice. Only visitors who have accepted to have their voices recorded and published will be allowed to enter the Chatter social area. Transcripts of recordings will be uploaded online and publicly accessible permanently. Lancaster University Represented by Drew Hemment, Joel Porter*, Lara Salinas*, Drew Hemment - 4 days of time provided in-kind for research and development Plus time in kind for attendance at project meetings and guidance for PhD students working on the project. Royal College of Art Represented by Ben Dalton
Collaborator Contribution Chatter asks a challenging question, how much of your data are you willing to leak into the public online domain. Google Street View shared images of your street and home online. Chatter will share online private conversations of visitors to FutureEverything. Choice will be like the 'choice' given us by the Internet firms. Sign up to our terms, or you do not get the service you desire - the comfort of the Chatter lounge at the FutureEverything Summit. The FutureEverything Summit will witness a newly commissioned artwork and provocative design experiment that poses a challenging question - how far we will accept private conversations being captured and shared online. The artwork runs alongside a series of high level debates on an ambitious international initiative to build what is being called a Digital Public Space. Visitors to the cafe will be presented with a choice of whether to participate in the Chatter social area or not. They will be asked if they agree to have their voices recorded, transcribed and published on the internet, and will then be asked to accept a Data Use Policy. The cafe will use a colour coding system to remind visitors of their choice. Only visitors who have accepted to have their voices recorded and published will be allowed to enter the Chatter social area. Transcripts of recordings will be uploaded online and publicly accessible permanently. Kimchi Represented by Elliot Woods 5 days of research time for Design of physical interface, middleware, assistance with interaction and concept FutureEverything Represented by Tom Higham, Joeli Brearley Tom Higham - 2 days research and development time Jeoli Brearley - 6 days project management and production assistance 6 days of production, delivery support and admin Plus time in kind for attendance at project meetings and guidance for PhD students working on the project. University of Dundee Represented by Mel Woods 3 days research and development time Plus time in kind for attendance at project meetings and guidance for PhD students working on the project.
Impact Installations at FutureEverything and TodaysArt
Start Year 2013
 
Description Cold Sun 
Organisation Anglia Ruskin University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Lancaster University: Represented by Paul Coulton, Dan Burnett*, Lara Salinas*, Male Lujan* 5 days research consultation and development Paul Coulton Time contributed by PhD students as in agreement with PhD policy document agreed by all partners - maximum 2 days per week (as distributed over the project lifetime) *PhD students
Collaborator Contribution Anglia Ruskin University: Represented by Rob Toulson, Zoe Jaques 5 days of Dr Rob Toulson academic time (technical, software, design) 5 days of Dr Zoe Jaques academic time (narrative and story design, user evaluation) 5 days of ARU Global Sustainability Research Fellow time (weather and meteorological data analysis) Mudlark: Represented by Matt Watkins plus additional staff: 2 days pre-production detailing and scoping (Lead Developer, Game Designer) Prototype development including: 2 days project management by Project Manager 5 days development by Lead Developer 2 days design by Graphic Designer Testing and evaluation 1 day testing and review (Project Manager, Lead Designer) 1 day evaluation report (Project manager) Admin - 0.5 days
Impact Prototype game and publications The desired outcome has been achieved in that we have high quality prototype that illustrates the concept effectively. It still requires further development to be fully functional for release more broadly but it provides an excellent base. Testing around users perception weather was done at the start of the project and fed into the prototype design. Testing of the prototype has been predominantly on an ad-hoc basis for the various prototype stages and no formal users tests have been done. Its is envisaged the more formal testing would be done once the game content has been extended
Start Year 2013
 
Description Cold Sun 
Organisation Mudlark
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Lancaster University: Represented by Paul Coulton, Dan Burnett*, Lara Salinas*, Male Lujan* 5 days research consultation and development Paul Coulton Time contributed by PhD students as in agreement with PhD policy document agreed by all partners - maximum 2 days per week (as distributed over the project lifetime) *PhD students
Collaborator Contribution Anglia Ruskin University: Represented by Rob Toulson, Zoe Jaques 5 days of Dr Rob Toulson academic time (technical, software, design) 5 days of Dr Zoe Jaques academic time (narrative and story design, user evaluation) 5 days of ARU Global Sustainability Research Fellow time (weather and meteorological data analysis) Mudlark: Represented by Matt Watkins plus additional staff: 2 days pre-production detailing and scoping (Lead Developer, Game Designer) Prototype development including: 2 days project management by Project Manager 5 days development by Lead Developer 2 days design by Graphic Designer Testing and evaluation 1 day testing and review (Project Manager, Lead Designer) 1 day evaluation report (Project manager) Admin - 0.5 days
Impact Prototype game and publications The desired outcome has been achieved in that we have high quality prototype that illustrates the concept effectively. It still requires further development to be fully functional for release more broadly but it provides an excellent base. Testing around users perception weather was done at the start of the project and fed into the prototype design. Testing of the prototype has been predominantly on an ad-hoc basis for the various prototype stages and no formal users tests have been done. Its is envisaged the more formal testing would be done once the game content has been extended
Start Year 2013
 
Description Collaboration with If Project 
Organisation If Project
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Collaborative work undertaken as a case-study by RCA CX PhD researcher Susannah Haslam. A series of conversations with one of the organisers of the If Project about alternative education models, considering knowledge production and dissemination in relation to value and infrastructure, informing a co-authored text.
Collaborator Contribution Jonny Mundey (If Project) contributed to the research.
Impact -
Start Year 2014
 
Description Collaboration with Leeds Creative Timebank 
Organisation Leeds Creative Timebank
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Collaborative work undertaken as a case-study by RCA CX PhD researcher Susannah Haslam. A series of conversations with users, time brokers and steering committee members of the timebank, about knowledge exchange in relation to the timebank model as an alternative economic system.
Collaborator Contribution Sue Ball (Leeds Creative Timebank) contributed to the research along with users, time brokers and steering committee members.
Impact -
Start Year 2016
 
Description Collaboration with THE CUBE 
Organisation The Cube London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Collaborative work undertaken as a case-study by RCA CX PhD researcher Susannah Haslam. A series of conversations with THECUBE's co-directors contextualising knowledge mobility in the coworking sector, informing the organisation of two open round table discussions and a working report to be published by THECUBE.
Collaborator Contribution Araceli Camargo and Anne Fritz (The Cube) contributed the context for the research and specialist knowledge and experience of developing co-working environments.
Impact Structuring Knowledge Mobility From Coworking to Smart Spaces
Start Year 2016
 
Description Collaboration with Wysing Arts Centre 
Organisation Wysing Arts Centre
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Collaborative work undertaken as a case-study by RCA CX PhD researcher Susannah Haslam. A series of conversations about the Syllabus and Wysing Poly programmes at Wysing Arts Centre in relation to knowledge and arts organisations.
Collaborator Contribution Lotte Juul Petersen and Chelsea Pettitt (Wysing Arts Centre) contributed to the research.
Impact -
Start Year 2016
 
Description Community Data Journalism 
Organisation Design For Social Change (D4SC) Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution This project developed tools and experiences for citizens to model the hidden and visible data in their neighbourhood, creating bottom-up solutions and challenging top-down local regeneration plans. A series of crowd-powered workshops, walks, performances and talks were held in a pop-up ideas lab and hub for social change that was established for the project. Examining learning tools like Google Sketch up and Arduino, the events focused on the physical modelling of personal social networks, the creation of alternative transport plans, mapping the future of local services, and creating stories from urban data. RCA CX PhD student John Fass facilitated and programmed events, engagement with local groups, narrative structures and theory, data capture, multimodal storytelling with an emphasis on real world and digital social networks and their value to communities in transformation. RCA researcher Dr Kevin Walker facilitated and programmed events, research design, qualitative and quantitative data collection advice, technological mediation theory, broader student engagement with the project.
Collaborator Contribution Priya Prakesh, Design for Social Change/Changify, contributed to testing, trialling, hosting and polling new formats of regen-making and urban story telling with local community, analytics and data reporting, social media engagement and voice-based reports based on probes put in physical locations. Tobias Sturt and Adam Frost, then of the Guardian Digital Agency, contributed training in data visualisation techniques, producing data visualisations to demonstrate the effectiveness of data storytelling.
Impact Everybody Needs Somebody: Physical Social Networks Visualisation; Adaptation and Input: Defining A Living Curriculum; A Funny Thing Happened On The Way To The Website: Telling About Browsing
Start Year 2014
 
Description Community Data Journalism 
Organisation Guardian Digital Agency
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution This project developed tools and experiences for citizens to model the hidden and visible data in their neighbourhood, creating bottom-up solutions and challenging top-down local regeneration plans. A series of crowd-powered workshops, walks, performances and talks were held in a pop-up ideas lab and hub for social change that was established for the project. Examining learning tools like Google Sketch up and Arduino, the events focused on the physical modelling of personal social networks, the creation of alternative transport plans, mapping the future of local services, and creating stories from urban data. RCA CX PhD student John Fass facilitated and programmed events, engagement with local groups, narrative structures and theory, data capture, multimodal storytelling with an emphasis on real world and digital social networks and their value to communities in transformation. RCA researcher Dr Kevin Walker facilitated and programmed events, research design, qualitative and quantitative data collection advice, technological mediation theory, broader student engagement with the project.
Collaborator Contribution Priya Prakesh, Design for Social Change/Changify, contributed to testing, trialling, hosting and polling new formats of regen-making and urban story telling with local community, analytics and data reporting, social media engagement and voice-based reports based on probes put in physical locations. Tobias Sturt and Adam Frost, then of the Guardian Digital Agency, contributed training in data visualisation techniques, producing data visualisations to demonstrate the effectiveness of data storytelling.
Impact Everybody Needs Somebody: Physical Social Networks Visualisation; Adaptation and Input: Defining A Living Curriculum; A Funny Thing Happened On The Way To The Website: Telling About Browsing
Start Year 2014
 
Description Community Mirror 
Organisation Government of the UK
Department Department for Communities & Local Government (DCLG)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The collaborative research project "Community Mirror" was carried out to understand ways in which online data-gathering techniques compare with door-to-door research. CX researcher Jimmy Tidey worked with the Royal Society of Arts, using the LocalNets.org application to gather the data collected online and contrasted the findings with one of their existing community research projects in the London Borough of Hounslow that used face-to-face data collection methods.
Collaborator Contribution Rowan Conway, Matthew Parsfield, Manjit Bola and Gaia Marcus (RSA) contributed research expertise and disseminated the research in publications and events.
Impact Community Mirror: A Data - Driven Method for 'Below the Radar' Research; Data For Good; Designing Democracy: How designers are changing democratic spaces and processes
Start Year 2013
 
Description Community Mirror 
Organisation Nesta
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The collaborative research project "Community Mirror" was carried out to understand ways in which online data-gathering techniques compare with door-to-door research. CX researcher Jimmy Tidey worked with the Royal Society of Arts, using the LocalNets.org application to gather the data collected online and contrasted the findings with one of their existing community research projects in the London Borough of Hounslow that used face-to-face data collection methods.
Collaborator Contribution Rowan Conway, Matthew Parsfield, Manjit Bola and Gaia Marcus (RSA) contributed research expertise and disseminated the research in publications and events.
Impact Community Mirror: A Data - Driven Method for 'Below the Radar' Research; Data For Good; Designing Democracy: How designers are changing democratic spaces and processes
Start Year 2013
 
Description Community Mirror 
Organisation Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Learned Society 
PI Contribution The collaborative research project "Community Mirror" was carried out to understand ways in which online data-gathering techniques compare with door-to-door research. CX researcher Jimmy Tidey worked with the Royal Society of Arts, using the LocalNets.org application to gather the data collected online and contrasted the findings with one of their existing community research projects in the London Borough of Hounslow that used face-to-face data collection methods.
Collaborator Contribution Rowan Conway, Matthew Parsfield, Manjit Bola and Gaia Marcus (RSA) contributed research expertise and disseminated the research in publications and events.
Impact Community Mirror: A Data - Driven Method for 'Below the Radar' Research; Data For Good; Designing Democracy: How designers are changing democratic spaces and processes
Start Year 2013
 
Description Community Mirror 
Organisation University of Central Lancashire
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The collaborative research project "Community Mirror" was carried out to understand ways in which online data-gathering techniques compare with door-to-door research. CX researcher Jimmy Tidey worked with the Royal Society of Arts, using the LocalNets.org application to gather the data collected online and contrasted the findings with one of their existing community research projects in the London Borough of Hounslow that used face-to-face data collection methods.
Collaborator Contribution Rowan Conway, Matthew Parsfield, Manjit Bola and Gaia Marcus (RSA) contributed research expertise and disseminated the research in publications and events.
Impact Community Mirror: A Data - Driven Method for 'Below the Radar' Research; Data For Good; Designing Democracy: How designers are changing democratic spaces and processes
Start Year 2013
 
Description Decoded 1914-1918 
Organisation Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Following on from their work with Archives and Public Making, CX researchers John Bowers and Tim Shaw collaborated with archivists from Tyne and Wear Archive and Museums, specifically looking into WW1 related materials in sight of building a number of artistic responses for their Digital Interpretations project. These responses were presented publicly through performances, a sound installation and a number of Public Making sessions. Particular interests included: acoustic technologies of war, accounts of sonic experience and war music.
Collaborator Contribution Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums (TWAM) supported this project via access to their collections and archivists' expertise.
Impact Sound Mirrors; War Workings; Tuning In Listening Back in Time
Start Year 2015
 
Description Digital Fiction Factory 
Organisation Digital Fiction Factory
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Contribution to the research and testing of three digital storytelling formats that provide new ways for writers to explore narrative forms, new ways for producers to use existing TV assets and which deliver exciting and interactive storytelling experiences to audiences. These formats must be tested with a variety of narratives, offering the opportunity to create new digital formats with clear creative parameters which have a potential for BBC Learning application across the BBC and beyond.
Collaborator Contribution Contribution to the research and testing of three digital storytelling formats that provide new ways for writers to explore narrative forms, new ways for producers to use existing TV assets and which deliver exciting and interactive storytelling experiences to audiences. These formats must be tested with a variety of narratives, offering the opportunity to create new digital formats with clear creative parameters which have a potential for BBC Learning application across the BBC and beyond.
Impact Covered under confidentiality
Start Year 2013
 
Description Emoto 
Organisation Studio AmaK
Country France 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The emoto project captures and visualises the excitement around London 2012. This is a whole new way to experience and make sense of the pulse of the Olympic Games. Emoto captures and visualises the global response around the London 2012 Olympic Games on Twitter in an interactive online visualisation and physical data sculpture. As events unfold, emoto processes global twitter data and analyses the messages for content and emotional tone, which is then fed back to the viewer providing greater insight in real-time. After the Games, a physical data sculpture at the Cultural Olympiad closing event provides a truly unique interactive archive of the online response to London 2012. Based on analysis of approx. 12.5 million Twitter messages, emoto presented both the big picture, the world from above, as well as the intimate and personal details enabling the viewer to zoom right in to specific detail. The dynamic nature of evolving news stories within the Olympic Games could be followed online via emoto, providing greater insight in real-time and an alternative perspective to that found in standard (eg TV) sport media coverage, or in the live experience for fans.
Collaborator Contribution Created by Moritz Stefaner, Drew Hemment and Studio NAND, emoto is a FutureEverything project for the London 2012 Festival and Cultural Olympiad in the Northwest
Impact Emote video; Emoto Data Sculpture; Emoto Topic Explorer; Emoto - visualising the online response to London 2012.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Emoto 
Organisation University of Dundee
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The emoto project captures and visualises the excitement around London 2012. This is a whole new way to experience and make sense of the pulse of the Olympic Games. Emoto captures and visualises the global response around the London 2012 Olympic Games on Twitter in an interactive online visualisation and physical data sculpture. As events unfold, emoto processes global twitter data and analyses the messages for content and emotional tone, which is then fed back to the viewer providing greater insight in real-time. After the Games, a physical data sculpture at the Cultural Olympiad closing event provides a truly unique interactive archive of the online response to London 2012. Based on analysis of approx. 12.5 million Twitter messages, emoto presented both the big picture, the world from above, as well as the intimate and personal details enabling the viewer to zoom right in to specific detail. The dynamic nature of evolving news stories within the Olympic Games could be followed online via emoto, providing greater insight in real-time and an alternative perspective to that found in standard (eg TV) sport media coverage, or in the live experience for fans.
Collaborator Contribution Created by Moritz Stefaner, Drew Hemment and Studio NAND, emoto is a FutureEverything project for the London 2012 Festival and Cultural Olympiad in the Northwest
Impact Emote video; Emoto Data Sculpture; Emoto Topic Explorer; Emoto - visualising the online response to London 2012.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Erith Park: Walk the Talk 
Organisation Microsoft Research
Department Microsoft Research Cambridge
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution CX PhD Clara Crivellaro collaborated with London-based housing association, Orbit and Microsoft Research academic Alex Taylor to support residents of the housing association in making their own digital walking tours featuring stories and anecdotes about everyday life in Erith Park/Larner Road. The local area has suffered from high deprivation with several social issues including health and crime for many years, and is currently undergoing regeneration. The residents would like to create walks around the year to establish a connection with new residents and between the past and future of the area. Clara made several visits to Erith Park to build relationships with residents, run participatory workshops, and co-design the digital walking. Together with colleagues from Newcastle University, Clara built four 'digital suitcases' and supporting infrastructure to enable the residents to create the walking tours.
Collaborator Contribution Alex Taylor (Microsoft Research Cambridge), provided advice and expertise as an experienced Human Computer Interaction researcher. Caroline Field (of Orbit Housing Association's Regeneration Team) worked with CX PhD Clara Crivellaro throughout the project in developing relationships with local residents and, later, taking the digital walking tour prototype further to inform Orbit's national community engagement activities.
Impact Re-making Places: HCI, 'Community Building' and Change; Digital Travelling Suitcases; Walks for Change platform design
Start Year 2014
 
Description Erith Park: Walk the Talk 
Organisation Orbit Housing Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution CX PhD Clara Crivellaro collaborated with London-based housing association, Orbit and Microsoft Research academic Alex Taylor to support residents of the housing association in making their own digital walking tours featuring stories and anecdotes about everyday life in Erith Park/Larner Road. The local area has suffered from high deprivation with several social issues including health and crime for many years, and is currently undergoing regeneration. The residents would like to create walks around the year to establish a connection with new residents and between the past and future of the area. Clara made several visits to Erith Park to build relationships with residents, run participatory workshops, and co-design the digital walking. Together with colleagues from Newcastle University, Clara built four 'digital suitcases' and supporting infrastructure to enable the residents to create the walking tours.
Collaborator Contribution Alex Taylor (Microsoft Research Cambridge), provided advice and expertise as an experienced Human Computer Interaction researcher. Caroline Field (of Orbit Housing Association's Regeneration Team) worked with CX PhD Clara Crivellaro throughout the project in developing relationships with local residents and, later, taking the digital walking tour prototype further to inform Orbit's national community engagement activities.
Impact Re-making Places: HCI, 'Community Building' and Change; Digital Travelling Suitcases; Walks for Change platform design
Start Year 2014
 
Description Fabricating FACTs 
Organisation University of Edinburgh
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Running alongside the exhibition 'Under Black Carpets' at FACT Liverpool, this project was a collaboration between FACT Liverpool, Curator Gabriella Arrigoni and CX PhD Student/Designer Bettina Nissen. The exhibition 'Under Black Carpets' by Ilona Gaynor explores the legal system through the cinematographic genre of the bank robbery. Working with Gabriella, Bettina developed engagement activities that invited audiences to become investigators in their own right, examining the evidence in the exhibition, collecting new material with tools generally used in forensic studies and fabricating tangible traces of their experiences. Through these activities the researchers explored the potential of digital fabrication and prototyping in audience engagement and examining the relationship between objects and stories; what stories objects can tell and how stories can inform the fabrication of new objects.
Collaborator Contribution Curator Gabriella Arrigoni (also a fine art PhD student at Newcastle University) co-developed public engagment activities with CX PhD student Bettina Nissen.
Impact Fabricating FACTs data-things
Start Year 2014
 
Description Fields 
Organisation Aalto University
Country Finland 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This project is an ongoing collaboration between CX PhD student and sound artist Tim Shaw and sound artist and developer Sébastien Piquemal. The Fields performance system, described below was co-developed by Tim and Sébastien and they have demonstrated and performed with the system across numerous venues in the UK and internationally. Fields is an audio-visual composition performed through an audience's smartphones. Participants simply connect to a specially designed web page to enable the performers to use their phone as a loudspeaker within the performance. The specially made system allows for each phone to be controlled individually and for each audience member to hold their own distinctive part of the composition. Up to 300 people can connect simultaneously, the swarm of tiny speakers creates a collection of overlapping sound sources enabling listeners to gain a unique spatial perspective on their shared environment.
Collaborator Contribution Sébastien Piquemal (Aalto University, Finland) co-developed the Fields performance system with CX researcher Tim Shaw, and has participated in numerous performances and demonstrations using it. Sébastien has also made the software behind the system freely available for others' use.
Impact Fields: A Web-based Sound Diffusion System; Proceedings of NordiCHI 2014; Fields Performance System
Start Year 2014
 
Description Good Day at Work 
Organisation Robertson Cooper Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution • Concept design for WEF mobile application • Prototype of 5 question WEF application • Consultancy for developing a mobile application from existing well being survey • Bespoke mobile application development for both iOs and Android • Assist in the integration of application support
Collaborator Contribution • Supply questions and visual assets for the application • Provide liaison on app development and feedback on iterative prototyping stages • Help prioritise features that are able to be included in the prototype from initial design requirements • Provide integration into existing system • Register for developer accounts for Android and iOs
Impact In development of an App.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Great North Fabrications 
Organisation Great North Run Culture
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Great North Fabrications was a collaboration between CX PhD student Bettina Nissen and Great North Run Culture. Bettina developed a series of workshops as part of the Great North Greats exhibition during which runners' Great North Run (GNR) data was turned into physical objects. The personal data from a participating runner's chip was translated into a unique souvenir for them to take home as a memento of their GNR achievement. During this live materializing workshop running data was translated into physical form, engaging the public not only with new technologies but also giving them the opportunity to explore the data captured from their run in tangible ways. The unique objects were generated by an interactive, digital software (developed by Bettina Nissen) using the runner's tracker number and were fabricated live by the attendees during this time using a 3D printer. Shapes could be generated from previous as well as the current year's running data and could be taken home by participants as personlised souvenirs while a selection of generated forms were displayed in the Hall of Great North Greats. This included data objects from elite runners and a combination of objects generated from data of the public selecting different groups, speeds, gender and age to show the diversity of the North East's public as Great North Greats.
Collaborator Contribution Great North Culture enabled engagement with runners (and their data), and the general public through inclusion in their Great North Greats exhibition.
Impact Great North Run data things
Start Year 2015
 
Description Group Therapy: mental distress in a digital age 
Organisation Foundation for Art and Creative Technology (FACT)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The design for the FACT Liverpool Group Therapy exhibition, researched and developed by RCA CX PhD research Benjamin Koslowski, aimed to actively encourage the visitor to reflect on their own mental health. The framing of content and people, and the blurring of the distinction between the two, was intended to encourage thinking about personal relationships to the subject matter explored in the exhibition. The exhibition design made use of prop-like frames to delineate space within the gallery and to position the visitor as an integral part of the setting. These frames established thresholds within the space and created continually shifting visual relationships between the artworks, objects and visitors.
Collaborator Contribution Vanessa Bartlett curated the exhibition with Mike Stubbs (FACT Liverpool).
Impact -
Start Year 2015
 
Description Hybrid Lives 
Organisation Bossons Group
Country United States 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Hybrid Lives explored effects of rapid change in digital technology on ways in which working life is being transformed, resulting in the installation of a free, public co-working space at FACT Liverpool. In an always-on culture of Internet-connected objects, smartphones and 24-hour email traffic, this project examined the transformative impact of digital technology on types of work, working practices, workplaces and office environments. RCA CX PhD student John Fass was project lead for the research, design and development of the co-working space, integrating a system designed to enable data collection and mapping of the space, and organised events, workshops and participatory research activities.
Collaborator Contribution Peter Bosson (Bossons Group), Luke Connoley (Unwired) and Professor Karen Ingham (University of Wales Trinity St David) contributed advice and expertise to the research, design and development of the co-working space, and contributed to events and activities organised within the co-working space.
Impact Hybrid Lives Co-Working Space
Start Year 2013
 
Description Hybrid Lives 
Organisation University of Wales Trinity Saint David
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Hybrid Lives explored effects of rapid change in digital technology on ways in which working life is being transformed, resulting in the installation of a free, public co-working space at FACT Liverpool. In an always-on culture of Internet-connected objects, smartphones and 24-hour email traffic, this project examined the transformative impact of digital technology on types of work, working practices, workplaces and office environments. RCA CX PhD student John Fass was project lead for the research, design and development of the co-working space, integrating a system designed to enable data collection and mapping of the space, and organised events, workshops and participatory research activities.
Collaborator Contribution Peter Bosson (Bossons Group), Luke Connoley (Unwired) and Professor Karen Ingham (University of Wales Trinity St David) contributed advice and expertise to the research, design and development of the co-working space, and contributed to events and activities organised within the co-working space.
Impact Hybrid Lives Co-Working Space
Start Year 2013
 
Description Hybrid Lives 
Organisation Unwired
Country Australia 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Hybrid Lives explored effects of rapid change in digital technology on ways in which working life is being transformed, resulting in the installation of a free, public co-working space at FACT Liverpool. In an always-on culture of Internet-connected objects, smartphones and 24-hour email traffic, this project examined the transformative impact of digital technology on types of work, working practices, workplaces and office environments. RCA CX PhD student John Fass was project lead for the research, design and development of the co-working space, integrating a system designed to enable data collection and mapping of the space, and organised events, workshops and participatory research activities.
Collaborator Contribution Peter Bosson (Bossons Group), Luke Connoley (Unwired) and Professor Karen Ingham (University of Wales Trinity St David) contributed advice and expertise to the research, design and development of the co-working space, and contributed to events and activities organised within the co-working space.
Impact Hybrid Lives Co-Working Space
Start Year 2013
 
Description Indiedata 
Organisation Hope London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Lancaster University Represented by Hannah Stewart, Joel Porter Hannah Stewart: • Lead contact for project to the Creative Exchange • Contribute to review of previous projects with a focus on how they have conceived those coproduced elements- products, political philosophy, processes of organising and valorising peoples data. • Discuss topic area with all partners, and relay research to Hope for communication in graphic novella form. • Schedule and assist with team meet-ups and shadowing opportunities • Support Indie with the production of the physical phone prototype and use opportunity to gain further insights on motivation and how values are embedded within work flow. • With Hope, consider and propose models for research dissemination via a graphic novel, including Creative Commons licensing, research and propose modes for graphic novels and technical requirements for downloads and distribution. Joel Porter • Investigate people's reactions to baseline questions of privacy, and then to experiment with telling the story of how they're data is being utilised and then see people's reaction and opinions of data and privacy. • Define the relationship between data, privacy and risk and how monetary incentives affect choice. Leading on from the Skatova et al study 'Perceived risks of personal data sharing'. • Review current UK legislation on data privacy and how data sharing is managed. • Contribute to review of previous projects with a focus on how they have conceived those coproduced elements- products, political philosophy, processes of organising and valorising peoples data.
Collaborator Contribution Ind.ie Represented by Aral Balkan • contribute research time to discuss and reflect on the design process, development of ind.ie/phone prototype alongside on-going development of a ergonomic prototype with iterations incorporating relevant research. • Develop strategies for a successful atypical crowd funding campaign, analysing how to gain optimum impact from; the thunderclap, the campaign itself and all associated publicity. • Contribute to research and discussion of the challenges associated with employing a business model which goes against the current trend of 'free' services which monetise personal data. Hope London • Access Interview material with general public around their experiences, expectations of data, privacy etc • Access non-confidential research raw material and findings via Hannah, Joel and Alison. • Research relevant legal issues around data privacy etc • Chair discussion on analog equivalent rights. • Digital Production of graphic novel episode as output, • Consider and propose models for dissemination, including Creative Commons licensing, research and propose modes for graphic novels and technical requirements for downloads and distribution. London School of Economics Represented by Alison Powell • consult with research students and ind.ie on integrating research and design methods. • suggest directions for research on alternative funding models, alternative governance structures and alternative data management models, based on previous experience • contribute to meetings and creative exchanges in advisory role, based on previously conducted research
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2014
 
Description Indiedata 
Organisation Ind.ie
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Lancaster University Represented by Hannah Stewart, Joel Porter Hannah Stewart: • Lead contact for project to the Creative Exchange • Contribute to review of previous projects with a focus on how they have conceived those coproduced elements- products, political philosophy, processes of organising and valorising peoples data. • Discuss topic area with all partners, and relay research to Hope for communication in graphic novella form. • Schedule and assist with team meet-ups and shadowing opportunities • Support Indie with the production of the physical phone prototype and use opportunity to gain further insights on motivation and how values are embedded within work flow. • With Hope, consider and propose models for research dissemination via a graphic novel, including Creative Commons licensing, research and propose modes for graphic novels and technical requirements for downloads and distribution. Joel Porter • Investigate people's reactions to baseline questions of privacy, and then to experiment with telling the story of how they're data is being utilised and then see people's reaction and opinions of data and privacy. • Define the relationship between data, privacy and risk and how monetary incentives affect choice. Leading on from the Skatova et al study 'Perceived risks of personal data sharing'. • Review current UK legislation on data privacy and how data sharing is managed. • Contribute to review of previous projects with a focus on how they have conceived those coproduced elements- products, political philosophy, processes of organising and valorising peoples data.
Collaborator Contribution Ind.ie Represented by Aral Balkan • contribute research time to discuss and reflect on the design process, development of ind.ie/phone prototype alongside on-going development of a ergonomic prototype with iterations incorporating relevant research. • Develop strategies for a successful atypical crowd funding campaign, analysing how to gain optimum impact from; the thunderclap, the campaign itself and all associated publicity. • Contribute to research and discussion of the challenges associated with employing a business model which goes against the current trend of 'free' services which monetise personal data. Hope London • Access Interview material with general public around their experiences, expectations of data, privacy etc • Access non-confidential research raw material and findings via Hannah, Joel and Alison. • Research relevant legal issues around data privacy etc • Chair discussion on analog equivalent rights. • Digital Production of graphic novel episode as output, • Consider and propose models for dissemination, including Creative Commons licensing, research and propose modes for graphic novels and technical requirements for downloads and distribution. London School of Economics Represented by Alison Powell • consult with research students and ind.ie on integrating research and design methods. • suggest directions for research on alternative funding models, alternative governance structures and alternative data management models, based on previous experience • contribute to meetings and creative exchanges in advisory role, based on previously conducted research
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2014
 
Description Indiedata 
Organisation London School of Economics and Political Science (University of London)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Lancaster University Represented by Hannah Stewart, Joel Porter Hannah Stewart: • Lead contact for project to the Creative Exchange • Contribute to review of previous projects with a focus on how they have conceived those coproduced elements- products, political philosophy, processes of organising and valorising peoples data. • Discuss topic area with all partners, and relay research to Hope for communication in graphic novella form. • Schedule and assist with team meet-ups and shadowing opportunities • Support Indie with the production of the physical phone prototype and use opportunity to gain further insights on motivation and how values are embedded within work flow. • With Hope, consider and propose models for research dissemination via a graphic novel, including Creative Commons licensing, research and propose modes for graphic novels and technical requirements for downloads and distribution. Joel Porter • Investigate people's reactions to baseline questions of privacy, and then to experiment with telling the story of how they're data is being utilised and then see people's reaction and opinions of data and privacy. • Define the relationship between data, privacy and risk and how monetary incentives affect choice. Leading on from the Skatova et al study 'Perceived risks of personal data sharing'. • Review current UK legislation on data privacy and how data sharing is managed. • Contribute to review of previous projects with a focus on how they have conceived those coproduced elements- products, political philosophy, processes of organising and valorising peoples data.
Collaborator Contribution Ind.ie Represented by Aral Balkan • contribute research time to discuss and reflect on the design process, development of ind.ie/phone prototype alongside on-going development of a ergonomic prototype with iterations incorporating relevant research. • Develop strategies for a successful atypical crowd funding campaign, analysing how to gain optimum impact from; the thunderclap, the campaign itself and all associated publicity. • Contribute to research and discussion of the challenges associated with employing a business model which goes against the current trend of 'free' services which monetise personal data. Hope London • Access Interview material with general public around their experiences, expectations of data, privacy etc • Access non-confidential research raw material and findings via Hannah, Joel and Alison. • Research relevant legal issues around data privacy etc • Chair discussion on analog equivalent rights. • Digital Production of graphic novel episode as output, • Consider and propose models for dissemination, including Creative Commons licensing, research and propose modes for graphic novels and technical requirements for downloads and distribution. London School of Economics Represented by Alison Powell • consult with research students and ind.ie on integrating research and design methods. • suggest directions for research on alternative funding models, alternative governance structures and alternative data management models, based on previous experience • contribute to meetings and creative exchanges in advisory role, based on previously conducted research
Impact ongoing
Start Year 2014
 
Description Intangible Assets: Experiencing the Digital 
Organisation Tactical Technology Collective
Country Germany 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This collaboration, led by RCA CX PhD researcher John Fass, developed design artefacts to make visible the opaque and hidden nature of digital experiences associated with the work of Tactical Technology Collective. When people create and interact with personal profiles, upload personal documents to cloud storage, or generate image metadata by taking and sharing digital images, they are participating in shared digital experiences. The nature of these experiences is often fragmented by the speed of interactions, flattened by homogenised interfaces, and concealed by system architecture. Alongside developing the design artefacts the project set out to develop a set of design guidelines to help Tactical Technology Collective raise awareness of such digital processes using tangible instruments.
Collaborator Contribution Maya Ganesh, Stephanie Hankey and Fieke Jansen (Tactical Technology Collective) and RCA researcher Dr Jonathan Edelman contributed research and design expertise to the project and participated in workshops.
Impact -
Start Year 2015
 
Description Interglacial/Erratics 
Organisation Pacitti Company
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution As part of the Pacitti Company's 2014 UNLOCKED programme, CX Co-I Prof. John Bowers and CX PhD student Tim Shaw were invited to respond to a number of artefacts from the natural history collection at Ipswich Museum. Using the artefacts as artistic materials they designed and developed a number of sonic instruments and used forms of data sonification to create a multi-channel sound and image installation. The artwork directly responded to locally found artefacts, including a 330 million year tree root, a fossilised elephants ear and a number of Neolithic tools such as spear and arrow heads. This work was published in the proceedings at the conference for New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME) in 2014 (http://nime2014.org/proceedings/papers/429_paper.pdf). The knowledge explored during this project has informed a principle defined as Public Making.
Collaborator Contribution The Pacitti Company enabled CX researchers to work with Ipswich Museums under the auspices of their artistic programme.
Impact Public Making : Artistic Strategies for Working with Museum Collections , Technologies and Publics; Erratics Exhibition/Performance; Interglacial Exhibition/Performance
Start Year 2013
 
Description Lancaster Arts at the Storey: 21st Century Arts Centre 
Organisation Lancaster University
Department Lancaster Institute for the Contemporary Arts
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Supporting an event to interrogate the notion of a 21st Century arts centre
Collaborator Contribution A collaboration with Lancaster Arts
Impact -
Start Year 2015
 
Description NHS Birmingham South Central Clinical Commissioning Group Digital Participation 
Organisation NHS Birmingham South and Central CCG
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution This project focused on the development of the Localnets.org Twitter-based public consultation software tool created by CX PhD researcher Jimmy Tidey and its application to gather public opinion on how local NHS services should be delivered. The project aimed to support the Birmingham South Central Clinical Commissioning Group's (CCG) Citizens Group, a newly formed group of six citizens, in gathering opinion from Birmingham citizens to make recommendations to the CCG regarding improvements to health services, informed by the feedback they have gathered from citizens. The software mapped out local Twitter activity in Birmingham, with a focus on health related tweets. Through this process, Twitter users who can be engaged in online consultation were identified and given opportunities to feedback on their experience of healthcare in Birmingham.
Collaborator Contribution Dan Lockton contributed expertise on participatory processes, assisting in the design of focus groups. Birmingham South Central Clinical Commissioning Group facilitated the project in conjunction with their 'Citizens Group' and through their Twitter account. TableFlip contributed software development expertise and productisation advice, visualisation and usability improvements to LocalNets, Houda Davis provided a link between the project and the NHS Citizen program, and gave expert advice and guidance on the research design and process.
Impact -
Start Year 2016
 
Description NHS Birmingham South Central Clinical Commissioning Group Digital Participation 
Organisation Tableflip
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution This project focused on the development of the Localnets.org Twitter-based public consultation software tool created by CX PhD researcher Jimmy Tidey and its application to gather public opinion on how local NHS services should be delivered. The project aimed to support the Birmingham South Central Clinical Commissioning Group's (CCG) Citizens Group, a newly formed group of six citizens, in gathering opinion from Birmingham citizens to make recommendations to the CCG regarding improvements to health services, informed by the feedback they have gathered from citizens. The software mapped out local Twitter activity in Birmingham, with a focus on health related tweets. Through this process, Twitter users who can be engaged in online consultation were identified and given opportunities to feedback on their experience of healthcare in Birmingham.
Collaborator Contribution Dan Lockton contributed expertise on participatory processes, assisting in the design of focus groups. Birmingham South Central Clinical Commissioning Group facilitated the project in conjunction with their 'Citizens Group' and through their Twitter account. TableFlip contributed software development expertise and productisation advice, visualisation and usability improvements to LocalNets, Houda Davis provided a link between the project and the NHS Citizen program, and gave expert advice and guidance on the research design and process.
Impact -
Start Year 2016
 
Description Near Miss 
Organisation Blaze
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Lancaster University: Represented by Joel Porter: Contribution of 10 days in-kind time
Collaborator Contribution • September 2014 - piloting of diary study by partners and volunteers, research ethics concluded (led by Rachel, all participating in pilot study) • October 2014 - project begins, near miss diary study participants signed up and design finalised. Website set up; use of Twitter and website to begin gathering, re-presenting and analysing information on near misses. One week incident diaries completed by participants both before and after clocks go back (18-24 October and 1-7 November); rapid response study with students; recruitment of research assistant (Rachel and Blaze involved in all these aspects with additional work on website by Katrina). • November 2014 - analysis of diary data and cleaning, analysis and mapping of Met Police data (Rachel, with Blaze and research assistant); further work on website (continues throughout: Blaze and Katrina). • December 2014 - finalising analysis of diary data, finalising analysis of Met Police data and writing report based on it (led by Rachel, with Blaze input). • January 2015 - Special episode of The Bike Show (Jack) recruiting additional public participation via Audioboo (people record near miss stories and upload them); additional work on website and start of work on handouts (led by Katrina, with Blaze and Rachel). Writing academic article based on project, to be submitted to a leading transport journal (Rachel to lead, with Katrina and other partners who wish to participate in this). • February 2015 - sifting and editing stories collected; uploading 20 to the website (Jack, with Rachel). Handouts developed with inclusion of new material collected via website (Katrina, with Rachel and Blaze). Further work on academic article. • March 2015 - public event, producing and uploading audiocast based on event (all). Partners to assist with publicising event and securing media coverage. Academic article submitted. • Following the end of funding, the website will continue to be maintained and updated (Rachel as lead) for at least another year. We will continue to seek coverage for the project, for example, by press-releasing the academic article when it is first published online, and by presenting work at conferences and invited talks.
Impact In progress
Start Year 2014
 
Description Near Miss 
Organisation Goldsmiths, University of London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Lancaster University: Represented by Joel Porter: Contribution of 10 days in-kind time
Collaborator Contribution • September 2014 - piloting of diary study by partners and volunteers, research ethics concluded (led by Rachel, all participating in pilot study) • October 2014 - project begins, near miss diary study participants signed up and design finalised. Website set up; use of Twitter and website to begin gathering, re-presenting and analysing information on near misses. One week incident diaries completed by participants both before and after clocks go back (18-24 October and 1-7 November); rapid response study with students; recruitment of research assistant (Rachel and Blaze involved in all these aspects with additional work on website by Katrina). • November 2014 - analysis of diary data and cleaning, analysis and mapping of Met Police data (Rachel, with Blaze and research assistant); further work on website (continues throughout: Blaze and Katrina). • December 2014 - finalising analysis of diary data, finalising analysis of Met Police data and writing report based on it (led by Rachel, with Blaze input). • January 2015 - Special episode of The Bike Show (Jack) recruiting additional public participation via Audioboo (people record near miss stories and upload them); additional work on website and start of work on handouts (led by Katrina, with Blaze and Rachel). Writing academic article based on project, to be submitted to a leading transport journal (Rachel to lead, with Katrina and other partners who wish to participate in this). • February 2015 - sifting and editing stories collected; uploading 20 to the website (Jack, with Rachel). Handouts developed with inclusion of new material collected via website (Katrina, with Rachel and Blaze). Further work on academic article. • March 2015 - public event, producing and uploading audiocast based on event (all). Partners to assist with publicising event and securing media coverage. Academic article submitted. • Following the end of funding, the website will continue to be maintained and updated (Rachel as lead) for at least another year. We will continue to seek coverage for the project, for example, by press-releasing the academic article when it is first published online, and by presenting work at conferences and invited talks.
Impact In progress
Start Year 2014
 
Description Near Miss 
Organisation The Bike Show
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Lancaster University: Represented by Joel Porter: Contribution of 10 days in-kind time
Collaborator Contribution • September 2014 - piloting of diary study by partners and volunteers, research ethics concluded (led by Rachel, all participating in pilot study) • October 2014 - project begins, near miss diary study participants signed up and design finalised. Website set up; use of Twitter and website to begin gathering, re-presenting and analysing information on near misses. One week incident diaries completed by participants both before and after clocks go back (18-24 October and 1-7 November); rapid response study with students; recruitment of research assistant (Rachel and Blaze involved in all these aspects with additional work on website by Katrina). • November 2014 - analysis of diary data and cleaning, analysis and mapping of Met Police data (Rachel, with Blaze and research assistant); further work on website (continues throughout: Blaze and Katrina). • December 2014 - finalising analysis of diary data, finalising analysis of Met Police data and writing report based on it (led by Rachel, with Blaze input). • January 2015 - Special episode of The Bike Show (Jack) recruiting additional public participation via Audioboo (people record near miss stories and upload them); additional work on website and start of work on handouts (led by Katrina, with Blaze and Rachel). Writing academic article based on project, to be submitted to a leading transport journal (Rachel to lead, with Katrina and other partners who wish to participate in this). • February 2015 - sifting and editing stories collected; uploading 20 to the website (Jack, with Rachel). Handouts developed with inclusion of new material collected via website (Katrina, with Rachel and Blaze). Further work on academic article. • March 2015 - public event, producing and uploading audiocast based on event (all). Partners to assist with publicising event and securing media coverage. Academic article submitted. • Following the end of funding, the website will continue to be maintained and updated (Rachel as lead) for at least another year. We will continue to seek coverage for the project, for example, by press-releasing the academic article when it is first published online, and by presenting work at conferences and invited talks.
Impact In progress
Start Year 2014
 
Description Near Miss 
Organisation University of Westminster
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Lancaster University: Represented by Joel Porter: Contribution of 10 days in-kind time
Collaborator Contribution • September 2014 - piloting of diary study by partners and volunteers, research ethics concluded (led by Rachel, all participating in pilot study) • October 2014 - project begins, near miss diary study participants signed up and design finalised. Website set up; use of Twitter and website to begin gathering, re-presenting and analysing information on near misses. One week incident diaries completed by participants both before and after clocks go back (18-24 October and 1-7 November); rapid response study with students; recruitment of research assistant (Rachel and Blaze involved in all these aspects with additional work on website by Katrina). • November 2014 - analysis of diary data and cleaning, analysis and mapping of Met Police data (Rachel, with Blaze and research assistant); further work on website (continues throughout: Blaze and Katrina). • December 2014 - finalising analysis of diary data, finalising analysis of Met Police data and writing report based on it (led by Rachel, with Blaze input). • January 2015 - Special episode of The Bike Show (Jack) recruiting additional public participation via Audioboo (people record near miss stories and upload them); additional work on website and start of work on handouts (led by Katrina, with Blaze and Rachel). Writing academic article based on project, to be submitted to a leading transport journal (Rachel to lead, with Katrina and other partners who wish to participate in this). • February 2015 - sifting and editing stories collected; uploading 20 to the website (Jack, with Rachel). Handouts developed with inclusion of new material collected via website (Katrina, with Rachel and Blaze). Further work on academic article. • March 2015 - public event, producing and uploading audiocast based on event (all). Partners to assist with publicising event and securing media coverage. Academic article submitted. • Following the end of funding, the website will continue to be maintained and updated (Rachel as lead) for at least another year. We will continue to seek coverage for the project, for example, by press-releasing the academic article when it is first published online, and by presenting work at conferences and invited talks.
Impact In progress
Start Year 2014
 
Description New Cloud Atlas 
Organisation Design and Research Studio Amber Frid-Jimenez and Joe Dahmen (AFJD)
Country Canada 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The New Cloud Atlas is a global effort to map each data place that makes up the cloud in an open and accountable way. As a related outcome of the Walk in the Park project, the Atlas was developed by RCA CX PhD student Ben Dalton, geospatial developer, Tim Waters, and the design and research studio of Amber Frid-Jimenez and Joe Dahmen. The Atlas sets out to map each warehouse data centre, internet exchange, connecting cable and switch of physical significance in the operation of the cloud for everyone to see and use.
Collaborator Contribution Tim Waters contributed geospatial development expertise and Amber Frid-Jiminez and Joe Dahmen contributed design expertise.
Impact New Cloud Atlas
Start Year 2013
 
Description Numbers that Matter 
Organisation FutureEverything
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Lancaster University: Represented by Christopher Boyko, Hannah Stewart*, Male Lujan*, Jeremy Davenport* Chris Boyko to assist with development of Numbers that Matter workshops and contribute to research outputs. Based on 4 days PhD students to develop and deliver workshops and open data hackdays in association with project partners, develop hardware prototype in association with project partners, and undertake academic research associated with the project. Based on 2-3 days per week per student across the project lifetime. Students will also provide overall project management of the project. *PhD students
Collaborator Contribution University of Dundee: Represented by Mel Woods To assist with development of Numbers that Matter workshops and contribute to research outputs. Based on 4 days FutureEverything: Represented by John O'Shea, Tom Higham, Julian Tate To assist with development and delivery of 3 'Numbers that Matter' workshops and 2 open data hackdays Represented by Hwa Young Jung, Dave Mee To develop, deliver and project manage 3 'Numbers that Matter' workshops and 2 open data hackdays including management of evaluation and feedback to participants Development of prototype device.
Impact Hackathon held resulting in start up company 'Made with Glove' and Fieldtrials. Also publications
Start Year 2013
 
Description Numbers that Matter 
Organisation University of Dundee
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Lancaster University: Represented by Christopher Boyko, Hannah Stewart*, Male Lujan*, Jeremy Davenport* Chris Boyko to assist with development of Numbers that Matter workshops and contribute to research outputs. Based on 4 days PhD students to develop and deliver workshops and open data hackdays in association with project partners, develop hardware prototype in association with project partners, and undertake academic research associated with the project. Based on 2-3 days per week per student across the project lifetime. Students will also provide overall project management of the project. *PhD students
Collaborator Contribution University of Dundee: Represented by Mel Woods To assist with development of Numbers that Matter workshops and contribute to research outputs. Based on 4 days FutureEverything: Represented by John O'Shea, Tom Higham, Julian Tate To assist with development and delivery of 3 'Numbers that Matter' workshops and 2 open data hackdays Represented by Hwa Young Jung, Dave Mee To develop, deliver and project manage 3 'Numbers that Matter' workshops and 2 open data hackdays including management of evaluation and feedback to participants Development of prototype device.
Impact Hackathon held resulting in start up company 'Made with Glove' and Fieldtrials. Also publications
Start Year 2013
 
Description On The Precipice 
Organisation Isis Arts
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Creative Exchange team at Newcastle University managed the project. A PhD student funded through the Creative Exchange led day-to-day research activities, additionally supported by a Research Associate. This involved an exploration of digital tools for capturing and expressing audience experience. The student liaised with partners to gain an understanding of how such technologies can be best applied in their areas of expertise and ran field trials to evaluate the tools.
Collaborator Contribution Isis Arts provided the deployment context for the first stage of the project, namely the On the Precipice installation in the Big M. They worked alongside the Creative Exchange team and other partners to develop technologies for experience capture, particularly by offering insights into their requirements for audience data. Ed Carter (Modular) worked alongside the Creative Exchange team to develop an installation based upon experience capture data. He was additionally be involved in earlier stages of the project to ensure that the tools in development can be utilised for this purpose. Chris Newell (University of Hull) provided expertise in the area of performing arts, HCI and digital media. He worked with the Creative Exchange team to provide supervision and creative input in exploring how existing technologies can be utilised in experience capture and contribute to field trials and evaluation.
Impact Nissen, B., Bowers, J., Wright, P., Hook, J., & Newell, C. (2014). Volvelles, Domes and Wristbands : Embedding Digital Fabrication within a Visitor's Trajectory of Engagement. In DIS 2014.
Start Year 2013
 
Description On The Precipice 
Organisation Mudlark
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Creative Exchange team at Newcastle University managed the project. A PhD student funded through the Creative Exchange led day-to-day research activities, additionally supported by a Research Associate. This involved an exploration of digital tools for capturing and expressing audience experience. The student liaised with partners to gain an understanding of how such technologies can be best applied in their areas of expertise and ran field trials to evaluate the tools.
Collaborator Contribution Isis Arts provided the deployment context for the first stage of the project, namely the On the Precipice installation in the Big M. They worked alongside the Creative Exchange team and other partners to develop technologies for experience capture, particularly by offering insights into their requirements for audience data. Ed Carter (Modular) worked alongside the Creative Exchange team to develop an installation based upon experience capture data. He was additionally be involved in earlier stages of the project to ensure that the tools in development can be utilised for this purpose. Chris Newell (University of Hull) provided expertise in the area of performing arts, HCI and digital media. He worked with the Creative Exchange team to provide supervision and creative input in exploring how existing technologies can be utilised in experience capture and contribute to field trials and evaluation.
Impact Nissen, B., Bowers, J., Wright, P., Hook, J., & Newell, C. (2014). Volvelles, Domes and Wristbands : Embedding Digital Fabrication within a Visitor's Trajectory of Engagement. In DIS 2014.
Start Year 2013
 
Description On The Precipice 
Organisation University of Hull
Department The School of Arts and New Media
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Creative Exchange team at Newcastle University managed the project. A PhD student funded through the Creative Exchange led day-to-day research activities, additionally supported by a Research Associate. This involved an exploration of digital tools for capturing and expressing audience experience. The student liaised with partners to gain an understanding of how such technologies can be best applied in their areas of expertise and ran field trials to evaluate the tools.
Collaborator Contribution Isis Arts provided the deployment context for the first stage of the project, namely the On the Precipice installation in the Big M. They worked alongside the Creative Exchange team and other partners to develop technologies for experience capture, particularly by offering insights into their requirements for audience data. Ed Carter (Modular) worked alongside the Creative Exchange team to develop an installation based upon experience capture data. He was additionally be involved in earlier stages of the project to ensure that the tools in development can be utilised for this purpose. Chris Newell (University of Hull) provided expertise in the area of performing arts, HCI and digital media. He worked with the Creative Exchange team to provide supervision and creative input in exploring how existing technologies can be utilised in experience capture and contribute to field trials and evaluation.
Impact Nissen, B., Bowers, J., Wright, P., Hook, J., & Newell, C. (2014). Volvelles, Domes and Wristbands : Embedding Digital Fabrication within a Visitor's Trajectory of Engagement. In DIS 2014.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Open Planning 
Organisation Liverpool Vision
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution An investigation of current limitations when engaging the public in the urban planning process, and developing new systems using narrative processes and digital technologies such as visualisation to better articulate and understand design proposals. This aims to improve transparency, public engagement, impact and communication. First 3 months: 1. A study of current practice (comprehensive report) 2. Talk to key stakeholders (organisation of symposium) 3. Definition of clear vision, measurable impact (incl. cost saving) Contingent on the results of the first three month period, this project may be extended in the following manner: Second 3 months: 4. Build a proof of concept new planning portal 5. Test this in a small pilot 6. Make recommendations/plans for a field trial Desired outcome: making planning applications more transparent, encourage public to participate, offering everybody engaged in planning to share the 'fullest picture' of the impact of the planning.
Collaborator Contribution An investigation of current limitations when engaging the public in the urban planning process, and developing new systems using narrative processes and digital technologies such as visualisation to better articulate and understand design proposals. This aims to improve transparency, public engagement, impact and communication. First 3 months: 1. A study of current practice (comprehensive report) 2. Talk to key stakeholders (organisation of symposium) 3. Definition of clear vision, measurable impact (incl. cost saving) Contingent on the results of the first three month period, this project may be extended in the following manner: Second 3 months: 4. Build a proof of concept new planning portal 5. Test this in a small pilot 6. Make recommendations/plans for a field trial Desired outcome: making planning applications more transparent, encourage public to participate, offering everybody engaged in planning to share the 'fullest picture' of the impact of the planning.
Impact Publications
Start Year 2013
 
Description Open Planning 
Organisation Red Ninja
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution An investigation of current limitations when engaging the public in the urban planning process, and developing new systems using narrative processes and digital technologies such as visualisation to better articulate and understand design proposals. This aims to improve transparency, public engagement, impact and communication. First 3 months: 1. A study of current practice (comprehensive report) 2. Talk to key stakeholders (organisation of symposium) 3. Definition of clear vision, measurable impact (incl. cost saving) Contingent on the results of the first three month period, this project may be extended in the following manner: Second 3 months: 4. Build a proof of concept new planning portal 5. Test this in a small pilot 6. Make recommendations/plans for a field trial Desired outcome: making planning applications more transparent, encourage public to participate, offering everybody engaged in planning to share the 'fullest picture' of the impact of the planning.
Collaborator Contribution An investigation of current limitations when engaging the public in the urban planning process, and developing new systems using narrative processes and digital technologies such as visualisation to better articulate and understand design proposals. This aims to improve transparency, public engagement, impact and communication. First 3 months: 1. A study of current practice (comprehensive report) 2. Talk to key stakeholders (organisation of symposium) 3. Definition of clear vision, measurable impact (incl. cost saving) Contingent on the results of the first three month period, this project may be extended in the following manner: Second 3 months: 4. Build a proof of concept new planning portal 5. Test this in a small pilot 6. Make recommendations/plans for a field trial Desired outcome: making planning applications more transparent, encourage public to participate, offering everybody engaged in planning to share the 'fullest picture' of the impact of the planning.
Impact Publications
Start Year 2013
 
Description Open Planning 
Organisation Stardotstar
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution An investigation of current limitations when engaging the public in the urban planning process, and developing new systems using narrative processes and digital technologies such as visualisation to better articulate and understand design proposals. This aims to improve transparency, public engagement, impact and communication. First 3 months: 1. A study of current practice (comprehensive report) 2. Talk to key stakeholders (organisation of symposium) 3. Definition of clear vision, measurable impact (incl. cost saving) Contingent on the results of the first three month period, this project may be extended in the following manner: Second 3 months: 4. Build a proof of concept new planning portal 5. Test this in a small pilot 6. Make recommendations/plans for a field trial Desired outcome: making planning applications more transparent, encourage public to participate, offering everybody engaged in planning to share the 'fullest picture' of the impact of the planning.
Collaborator Contribution An investigation of current limitations when engaging the public in the urban planning process, and developing new systems using narrative processes and digital technologies such as visualisation to better articulate and understand design proposals. This aims to improve transparency, public engagement, impact and communication. First 3 months: 1. A study of current practice (comprehensive report) 2. Talk to key stakeholders (organisation of symposium) 3. Definition of clear vision, measurable impact (incl. cost saving) Contingent on the results of the first three month period, this project may be extended in the following manner: Second 3 months: 4. Build a proof of concept new planning portal 5. Test this in a small pilot 6. Make recommendations/plans for a field trial Desired outcome: making planning applications more transparent, encourage public to participate, offering everybody engaged in planning to share the 'fullest picture' of the impact of the planning.
Impact Publications
Start Year 2013
 
Description Open Planning 
Organisation University of Liverpool
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution An investigation of current limitations when engaging the public in the urban planning process, and developing new systems using narrative processes and digital technologies such as visualisation to better articulate and understand design proposals. This aims to improve transparency, public engagement, impact and communication. First 3 months: 1. A study of current practice (comprehensive report) 2. Talk to key stakeholders (organisation of symposium) 3. Definition of clear vision, measurable impact (incl. cost saving) Contingent on the results of the first three month period, this project may be extended in the following manner: Second 3 months: 4. Build a proof of concept new planning portal 5. Test this in a small pilot 6. Make recommendations/plans for a field trial Desired outcome: making planning applications more transparent, encourage public to participate, offering everybody engaged in planning to share the 'fullest picture' of the impact of the planning.
Collaborator Contribution An investigation of current limitations when engaging the public in the urban planning process, and developing new systems using narrative processes and digital technologies such as visualisation to better articulate and understand design proposals. This aims to improve transparency, public engagement, impact and communication. First 3 months: 1. A study of current practice (comprehensive report) 2. Talk to key stakeholders (organisation of symposium) 3. Definition of clear vision, measurable impact (incl. cost saving) Contingent on the results of the first three month period, this project may be extended in the following manner: Second 3 months: 4. Build a proof of concept new planning portal 5. Test this in a small pilot 6. Make recommendations/plans for a field trial Desired outcome: making planning applications more transparent, encourage public to participate, offering everybody engaged in planning to share the 'fullest picture' of the impact of the planning.
Impact Publications
Start Year 2013
 
Description Participatory Production Technologies 
Organisation British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Department BBC Research & Development
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Creative Exchange team at Newcastle University will manage the project. A PhD student funded through the Creative Exchange will lead day-to-day research activities. This will involve an exploration of existing tools for amateur production and an assessment of how these tools can be configured to support participation in live events in a variety of contexts. The student will liaise with partners to gain an understanding of how such technologies can be best applied in their areas of expertise and run field trials to evaluate the tools.
Collaborator Contribution Chris Newell (University of Hull) will work with the PhD student to provide supervision and creative input in exploring how existing tools can be applied to the setting of opera and other live performances, utilising his existing knowledge of these domains. He will also act as a gateway to Co-Opera and contribute to the planning of field trials. The BBC will host a Creative Exchange PhD student on an internship under the supervision of Mike Evans. Through this placement, the student will be gain an understanding of existing professional tools, workflows and quality control that will inform the design of tools for other settings. Co-Opera will act as a deployment environment for participatory production technologies. This will involve working alongside the PhD student and Chris Newell to run an opera field trial.
Impact Invited presentation at iDoc Conference, 2014.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Participatory Production Technologies 
Organisation Co-Opera Company
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Creative Exchange team at Newcastle University will manage the project. A PhD student funded through the Creative Exchange will lead day-to-day research activities. This will involve an exploration of existing tools for amateur production and an assessment of how these tools can be configured to support participation in live events in a variety of contexts. The student will liaise with partners to gain an understanding of how such technologies can be best applied in their areas of expertise and run field trials to evaluate the tools.
Collaborator Contribution Chris Newell (University of Hull) will work with the PhD student to provide supervision and creative input in exploring how existing tools can be applied to the setting of opera and other live performances, utilising his existing knowledge of these domains. He will also act as a gateway to Co-Opera and contribute to the planning of field trials. The BBC will host a Creative Exchange PhD student on an internship under the supervision of Mike Evans. Through this placement, the student will be gain an understanding of existing professional tools, workflows and quality control that will inform the design of tools for other settings. Co-Opera will act as a deployment environment for participatory production technologies. This will involve working alongside the PhD student and Chris Newell to run an opera field trial.
Impact Invited presentation at iDoc Conference, 2014.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Participatory Production Technologies 
Organisation University of Hull
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Creative Exchange team at Newcastle University will manage the project. A PhD student funded through the Creative Exchange will lead day-to-day research activities. This will involve an exploration of existing tools for amateur production and an assessment of how these tools can be configured to support participation in live events in a variety of contexts. The student will liaise with partners to gain an understanding of how such technologies can be best applied in their areas of expertise and run field trials to evaluate the tools.
Collaborator Contribution Chris Newell (University of Hull) will work with the PhD student to provide supervision and creative input in exploring how existing tools can be applied to the setting of opera and other live performances, utilising his existing knowledge of these domains. He will also act as a gateway to Co-Opera and contribute to the planning of field trials. The BBC will host a Creative Exchange PhD student on an internship under the supervision of Mike Evans. Through this placement, the student will be gain an understanding of existing professional tools, workflows and quality control that will inform the design of tools for other settings. Co-Opera will act as a deployment environment for participatory production technologies. This will involve working alongside the PhD student and Chris Newell to run an opera field trial.
Impact Invited presentation at iDoc Conference, 2014.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Past Paths 
Organisation Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution This collaboration is an example of a collaboration that was developed in CX whilst funded from elsewhere. In our 2013 Stories, Archives and Living Heritage lab CX were unable to support a collaboration with Tyne and Wear Archive and Museums (TWAM) and instead worked with them to put in a proposal to NESTA to deliver the project they wanted which was to engage with Microsoft Research Labs to explore new models of archive search. The bid was successful and CX PhD student Andy Garbett suspended his PhD to deliver part 1 of the project - a new interface to TWAM's archive that moved away form traditional models of archive search to deliver a "visitor" experience centred on the metaphor of a digital journey through the collection involving serendipitous encounters with families of objects that would not normally be discovered by traditional search-based interfaces.
Collaborator Contribution Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums (TWAM) provided access to their digital archive and curatorial expertise in the development of the Past Paths system.
Impact Past Paths online discovery interface for Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums online collections
Start Year 2014
 
Description Paths of Desire 
Organisation Lancashire County Council
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Lancaster University: Represented by: Dr Paul Coulton, Dr Chris Boyko, Jonny Huck*, Lara Salinas*, Adrian Gradinar*, Serena Pollastri* *PhD partners
Collaborator Contribution University of Kent: Represented by: Prof Marialena Nikolopoulou - To provide expertise in Architecture and Environmental Design- - To contribute to the research design. Lancashire County Council: Represented by: - To provide insight for possible applications of the app with local authorities agenda, i.e. Lancaster Square Routes. Magnetic North: Represented by: Ian Wareing, Adam Todd, Matthew Lloyd - To provide consultation throughout different stages of the project (creative and technical). - To produce a map stylesheet to go with the app. Chas Jacobs: Represented by: Chas Jacobs - To consult on map artwork and design. - To create map stylesheet to go with the app.
Impact Paths of desire prototype app
Start Year 2015
 
Description Paths of Desire 
Organisation University of Kent
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Lancaster University: Represented by: Dr Paul Coulton, Dr Chris Boyko, Jonny Huck*, Lara Salinas*, Adrian Gradinar*, Serena Pollastri* *PhD partners
Collaborator Contribution University of Kent: Represented by: Prof Marialena Nikolopoulou - To provide expertise in Architecture and Environmental Design- - To contribute to the research design. Lancashire County Council: Represented by: - To provide insight for possible applications of the app with local authorities agenda, i.e. Lancaster Square Routes. Magnetic North: Represented by: Ian Wareing, Adam Todd, Matthew Lloyd - To provide consultation throughout different stages of the project (creative and technical). - To produce a map stylesheet to go with the app. Chas Jacobs: Represented by: Chas Jacobs - To consult on map artwork and design. - To create map stylesheet to go with the app.
Impact Paths of desire prototype app
Start Year 2015
 
Description Perceptive Media 
Organisation British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Department BBC Research & Development
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Represented by: Paul Coulton, Dan Burnett, Adrian Gradinar. Paul Coulton to contribute 15 days in-kind to the project. Adrian Gradinar and Dan Burnett to contribute 2 days per week to the project for the duration. Tasks include the following: • Build new development prototype based on existing perceptive radio GiTHub project. • Consider sensor new sensing options (with full team) • Consider sensing options in relation to practicality of development • Decide on sensing options to be developed (with full team) • Incorporate new sensors options • Incorporate sensor options into prototype • Evaluate Perceptive Media Demonstrator (with full team)
Collaborator Contribution Mudlark: Represented by Matt Watkins and other team members (see below) Tasks include the following: • Consider sensor new sensing options (with full team) • Decide on sensing options to be developed (with full team) • Develop UX demonstration tool kit to allow people to explore programme narrative concepts based new sensor options - breakdown of tasks below • Evaluate Perceptive Media Demonstrator (with full team) Breakdown of tasks: Task Details Role Days Scoping Meeting and Workshop General creative overview of the project Creative Director 1 Project Manager 1 UX Designer 1 UI & Documentation Design Design any UI interfaces and to create the documentation of the Toolkit Graphic Designer 4 UX Design Design the user experience scenarios UX Designer 3 UX Designer 2 Video production Production of video of User Journeys Visual Designer 2.5 Toolkit Document writing Writing up the content for the toolkit document Producer 1 Management Management of the project timescales and budget Project Manager 2.5 Billing Admin role Admin 0.5 Glasgow School of Art: Represented by Emma Murphy: To contribute 5 days to the project. Tasks include the following: • Consider sensor new sensing options (with full team) • Decide on sensing options to be developed (with full team) • Develop evaluation strategy • Evaluate Perceptive Media Demonstrator (with full team) BBC: Represented by Ian Forrester and Jasmine Cox: To contribute time in-kind to the project Tasks include the following: • Consider sensor new sensing options (with full team) • Decide on sensing options to be developed (with full team) • Evaluate Perceptive Media Demonstrator (with full team)
Impact In progress
Start Year 2014
 
Description Perceptive Media 
Organisation Glasgow School of Art
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Represented by: Paul Coulton, Dan Burnett, Adrian Gradinar. Paul Coulton to contribute 15 days in-kind to the project. Adrian Gradinar and Dan Burnett to contribute 2 days per week to the project for the duration. Tasks include the following: • Build new development prototype based on existing perceptive radio GiTHub project. • Consider sensor new sensing options (with full team) • Consider sensing options in relation to practicality of development • Decide on sensing options to be developed (with full team) • Incorporate new sensors options • Incorporate sensor options into prototype • Evaluate Perceptive Media Demonstrator (with full team)
Collaborator Contribution Mudlark: Represented by Matt Watkins and other team members (see below) Tasks include the following: • Consider sensor new sensing options (with full team) • Decide on sensing options to be developed (with full team) • Develop UX demonstration tool kit to allow people to explore programme narrative concepts based new sensor options - breakdown of tasks below • Evaluate Perceptive Media Demonstrator (with full team) Breakdown of tasks: Task Details Role Days Scoping Meeting and Workshop General creative overview of the project Creative Director 1 Project Manager 1 UX Designer 1 UI & Documentation Design Design any UI interfaces and to create the documentation of the Toolkit Graphic Designer 4 UX Design Design the user experience scenarios UX Designer 3 UX Designer 2 Video production Production of video of User Journeys Visual Designer 2.5 Toolkit Document writing Writing up the content for the toolkit document Producer 1 Management Management of the project timescales and budget Project Manager 2.5 Billing Admin role Admin 0.5 Glasgow School of Art: Represented by Emma Murphy: To contribute 5 days to the project. Tasks include the following: • Consider sensor new sensing options (with full team) • Decide on sensing options to be developed (with full team) • Develop evaluation strategy • Evaluate Perceptive Media Demonstrator (with full team) BBC: Represented by Ian Forrester and Jasmine Cox: To contribute time in-kind to the project Tasks include the following: • Consider sensor new sensing options (with full team) • Decide on sensing options to be developed (with full team) • Evaluate Perceptive Media Demonstrator (with full team)
Impact In progress
Start Year 2014
 
Description Perceptive Media 
Organisation Mudlark
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Represented by: Paul Coulton, Dan Burnett, Adrian Gradinar. Paul Coulton to contribute 15 days in-kind to the project. Adrian Gradinar and Dan Burnett to contribute 2 days per week to the project for the duration. Tasks include the following: • Build new development prototype based on existing perceptive radio GiTHub project. • Consider sensor new sensing options (with full team) • Consider sensing options in relation to practicality of development • Decide on sensing options to be developed (with full team) • Incorporate new sensors options • Incorporate sensor options into prototype • Evaluate Perceptive Media Demonstrator (with full team)
Collaborator Contribution Mudlark: Represented by Matt Watkins and other team members (see below) Tasks include the following: • Consider sensor new sensing options (with full team) • Decide on sensing options to be developed (with full team) • Develop UX demonstration tool kit to allow people to explore programme narrative concepts based new sensor options - breakdown of tasks below • Evaluate Perceptive Media Demonstrator (with full team) Breakdown of tasks: Task Details Role Days Scoping Meeting and Workshop General creative overview of the project Creative Director 1 Project Manager 1 UX Designer 1 UI & Documentation Design Design any UI interfaces and to create the documentation of the Toolkit Graphic Designer 4 UX Design Design the user experience scenarios UX Designer 3 UX Designer 2 Video production Production of video of User Journeys Visual Designer 2.5 Toolkit Document writing Writing up the content for the toolkit document Producer 1 Management Management of the project timescales and budget Project Manager 2.5 Billing Admin role Admin 0.5 Glasgow School of Art: Represented by Emma Murphy: To contribute 5 days to the project. Tasks include the following: • Consider sensor new sensing options (with full team) • Decide on sensing options to be developed (with full team) • Develop evaluation strategy • Evaluate Perceptive Media Demonstrator (with full team) BBC: Represented by Ian Forrester and Jasmine Cox: To contribute time in-kind to the project Tasks include the following: • Consider sensor new sensing options (with full team) • Decide on sensing options to be developed (with full team) • Evaluate Perceptive Media Demonstrator (with full team)
Impact In progress
Start Year 2014
 
Description Physical Playlist 
Organisation British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Department BBC Research & Development
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Lancaster University: Represented by Paul Coulton, Joel Porter*, Dan Burnett*, Male Lujan* Paul Coulton to contribute 20 days time for proof of concept development, interface design and market testing and prototype development PhD students to contribute time based on 2-3 days per week for proof of concept development, interface design and market testing and prototype development. Additionally to provide project management support for the project. *PhD Students
Collaborator Contribution BBC R&D Represented by Ian Forrester To contribute time in kind for proof of concept development and interface design
Impact Publications
Start Year 2013
 
Description Playful Narrative Realms 
Organisation English Heritage
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Creative Exchange team at Newcastle University will manage the project. A PhD student funded through the Creative Exchange will lead day-to-day research activities. This will involve a literature review of existing similar technologies and development of a prototype application. Matthew Grenby will provide expertise on storytelling and heritage as part of Care for the Future - e.g. How do we make the App relevant to the site? What is the link between the App, wild men and children's stories?
Collaborator Contribution University of Northumbria: Julie Trueman will advise on how the mobile App can make use of space - e.g. how and where it can be used on the site and how it can affect movement around the site. English Heritage: English Heritage will provide access to Belsay Hall as a site for the deployment. English Heritage staff will attend design and evaluation workshops as availability allows. Kevin Booth will provide content relating to the wild men and Middleton family at Belsay.
Impact Publications in review, ongoing collaborations in discussion.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Playful Narrative Realms 
Organisation Northumbria University
Department School of Design
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Creative Exchange team at Newcastle University will manage the project. A PhD student funded through the Creative Exchange will lead day-to-day research activities. This will involve a literature review of existing similar technologies and development of a prototype application. Matthew Grenby will provide expertise on storytelling and heritage as part of Care for the Future - e.g. How do we make the App relevant to the site? What is the link between the App, wild men and children's stories?
Collaborator Contribution University of Northumbria: Julie Trueman will advise on how the mobile App can make use of space - e.g. how and where it can be used on the site and how it can affect movement around the site. English Heritage: English Heritage will provide access to Belsay Hall as a site for the deployment. English Heritage staff will attend design and evaluation workshops as availability allows. Kevin Booth will provide content relating to the wild men and Middleton family at Belsay.
Impact Publications in review, ongoing collaborations in discussion.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Polyphonic Futures 
Organisation Imperial College London
Department Department of Life Sciences
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Veronica Ranner (Royal College of Art): - Workshop outlines, planning and execution of workshop activities and design; Event planning, networking, workshop participant recruiting & communication, creation of calls for application, contact to cooperators, liaise with venue, draft information for participants. Workshop participant selection; - Scientist workshop to generate feedback on prior workshop outcomes; Feedback session with SilkLab scientists for the digital silk platform; Content creation for the silk platform; Feedback to the project partners in London; Searching and appointing a web designer/ developer (paid through Arts Catalyst); Decision making on the web designer/ developer; - Planning of the field trial with the Arts Catalyst (symposium event): drafting of the speaker outline & symposium procedure; Writing a brief essay on the project for potential publication/ website feature); [Report writing/ project summary; Reporting to CX; all together with The Arts Catalyst] Prof. Fiorenzo Omenetto (SilkLab Tufts University, Boston, MA): - Feedback to proposal; Feedback on scientist workshop at SilkLab; Giving feedback on the platform mock-up; symposium speaker for the field trial event; promotion and circulation in Tufts Universities network and beyond; writing a brief essay on the project for potential publication/ website feature; Dr Derek Huntley (Imperial College, London): - Giving feedback on the platform mock-up; - Giving feedback on the platform mock-up; Promotion and circulation in Imperial College's network and beyond; Writing a brief essay on the project for potential publication/ website feature; Claudia Lastra and Nicola Triscott (The Arts Catalyst): - Curating, event planning, networking; Workshop participant recruiting & communication, publishing call for application, online advertisement and PR (e-bulletin & social media); Contact to cooperators, targeting online social media groups and online, liaise with venue, draft information for participants; Workshop participant selection; - Planning of the field trial with Veronica Ranner (symposium event); Feedback on content creation and platform design; Preparations for the symposium: drafting a speaker outline & procedure; Liaising with speakers; Writing a brief essay on the project for potential publication/ website feature); [Report writing/ project summary; Reporting to CX; all with Veronica Ranner]
Collaborator Contribution The collaboration with Prof Omenetto who heads provided the essential framework and full access as Visiting Scientist to the world-leading laboratory in silken technology implementation. The laboratory provides hereby unrestricted access to current research, technical guidance, and full financial support for material and consumables by Tufts University's Art & Science scheme. Dr Derek Huntley from Imperial College provided knowledge of and expertise in biology and the depiction of biological systems through computational approaches and digital interfaces, consultancy and support towards platform development through all stages. The Arts Catalyst provided the context and network for the purpose of the data collection (workshop event), the platform evaluation and its dissemination (symposium). As arts institution they have 21 years of knowledge and expertise in transdisciplinary, experimental, and critical engagement with science and technology. Expertise in commissioning, curation, and event planning, engagement with diverse audiences, and Art & Science projects and their evaluation.
Impact Polyphonic futures is a multi-disciplinary collaboration: Royal College of Art (Veronica Ranner): Design (Interaction Design, User Experience Design, Speculative Design) Arts Catalyst (Nicola Triscott, Claudia Lastra): Arts organisation (Specialism on art/design and science projects and art works) SilkLab at Tufts University (Prof Fiorenzo Omenetto & SilkLab members): Biomedical Engineering / Material Science (Science lab specialising on structural proteins, particularly on reverse engineered silk) 2016 Polyphonic Futures platform, online platform (in progress) 2016 Polyphonic Futures symposium, (in progress) 2015 Ranner, V., Lockton, D. "Reflective Silk -Behaviour change through better self-knowledge". Paper presented at the Digital Research in the Humanities and Arts Conference (DRHA 2015), Dublin City University, Ireland. 2014 Ranner, V. "Silken Selves". Paper presented in The Human After Anthropocentrism? Life. Matter. Being. strand at the London Conference of Critical Thought (LCCT), Goldsmith University, London, UK.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Polyphonic Futures 
Organisation Imperial College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This project focuses on the production of a digital 'silk library' platform to aggregate, visualise and share diverse views from scientific experts and public participants on the bio-digital material silk and its potential impact on society and self. Through a series of interdisciplinary workshops organised with UK commissioning body the Arts Catalyst, the project is developing the digital 'silk library' platform to contextualise and inform scientific research and create arts-science knowledge exchange and transmission. RCA CX PhD student Veronica Ranner contributed to the research, design and development of the workshops and related activities and the production of the digital platform.
Collaborator Contribution Professor Fiorenzo Omenetto (Tufts University) contributed expertise and access to facilities and materials. Dr Derek Huntley (Imperial College London) contributed knowledge of and expertise in biology and the depiction of biological systems through computational approaches and digital interfaces, consultancy and support towards the digital silk library development. Nicola Triscott and Claudia Lastra (Arts Catalyst) contributed the context and network for the project workshops and data collection, platform evaluation and dissemination.
Impact Silken Selves; UISilk - Towards Interfacing the Body
Start Year 2015
 
Description Polyphonic Futures 
Organisation The Arts Catalyst
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Veronica Ranner (Royal College of Art): - Workshop outlines, planning and execution of workshop activities and design; Event planning, networking, workshop participant recruiting & communication, creation of calls for application, contact to cooperators, liaise with venue, draft information for participants. Workshop participant selection; - Scientist workshop to generate feedback on prior workshop outcomes; Feedback session with SilkLab scientists for the digital silk platform; Content creation for the silk platform; Feedback to the project partners in London; Searching and appointing a web designer/ developer (paid through Arts Catalyst); Decision making on the web designer/ developer; - Planning of the field trial with the Arts Catalyst (symposium event): drafting of the speaker outline & symposium procedure; Writing a brief essay on the project for potential publication/ website feature); [Report writing/ project summary; Reporting to CX; all together with The Arts Catalyst] Prof. Fiorenzo Omenetto (SilkLab Tufts University, Boston, MA): - Feedback to proposal; Feedback on scientist workshop at SilkLab; Giving feedback on the platform mock-up; symposium speaker for the field trial event; promotion and circulation in Tufts Universities network and beyond; writing a brief essay on the project for potential publication/ website feature; Dr Derek Huntley (Imperial College, London): - Giving feedback on the platform mock-up; - Giving feedback on the platform mock-up; Promotion and circulation in Imperial College's network and beyond; Writing a brief essay on the project for potential publication/ website feature; Claudia Lastra and Nicola Triscott (The Arts Catalyst): - Curating, event planning, networking; Workshop participant recruiting & communication, publishing call for application, online advertisement and PR (e-bulletin & social media); Contact to cooperators, targeting online social media groups and online, liaise with venue, draft information for participants; Workshop participant selection; - Planning of the field trial with Veronica Ranner (symposium event); Feedback on content creation and platform design; Preparations for the symposium: drafting a speaker outline & procedure; Liaising with speakers; Writing a brief essay on the project for potential publication/ website feature); [Report writing/ project summary; Reporting to CX; all with Veronica Ranner]
Collaborator Contribution The collaboration with Prof Omenetto who heads provided the essential framework and full access as Visiting Scientist to the world-leading laboratory in silken technology implementation. The laboratory provides hereby unrestricted access to current research, technical guidance, and full financial support for material and consumables by Tufts University's Art & Science scheme. Dr Derek Huntley from Imperial College provided knowledge of and expertise in biology and the depiction of biological systems through computational approaches and digital interfaces, consultancy and support towards platform development through all stages. The Arts Catalyst provided the context and network for the purpose of the data collection (workshop event), the platform evaluation and its dissemination (symposium). As arts institution they have 21 years of knowledge and expertise in transdisciplinary, experimental, and critical engagement with science and technology. Expertise in commissioning, curation, and event planning, engagement with diverse audiences, and Art & Science projects and their evaluation.
Impact Polyphonic futures is a multi-disciplinary collaboration: Royal College of Art (Veronica Ranner): Design (Interaction Design, User Experience Design, Speculative Design) Arts Catalyst (Nicola Triscott, Claudia Lastra): Arts organisation (Specialism on art/design and science projects and art works) SilkLab at Tufts University (Prof Fiorenzo Omenetto & SilkLab members): Biomedical Engineering / Material Science (Science lab specialising on structural proteins, particularly on reverse engineered silk) 2016 Polyphonic Futures platform, online platform (in progress) 2016 Polyphonic Futures symposium, (in progress) 2015 Ranner, V., Lockton, D. "Reflective Silk -Behaviour change through better self-knowledge". Paper presented at the Digital Research in the Humanities and Arts Conference (DRHA 2015), Dublin City University, Ireland. 2014 Ranner, V. "Silken Selves". Paper presented in The Human After Anthropocentrism? Life. Matter. Being. strand at the London Conference of Critical Thought (LCCT), Goldsmith University, London, UK.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Polyphonic Futures 
Organisation The Arts Catalyst
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This project focuses on the production of a digital 'silk library' platform to aggregate, visualise and share diverse views from scientific experts and public participants on the bio-digital material silk and its potential impact on society and self. Through a series of interdisciplinary workshops organised with UK commissioning body the Arts Catalyst, the project is developing the digital 'silk library' platform to contextualise and inform scientific research and create arts-science knowledge exchange and transmission. RCA CX PhD student Veronica Ranner contributed to the research, design and development of the workshops and related activities and the production of the digital platform.
Collaborator Contribution Professor Fiorenzo Omenetto (Tufts University) contributed expertise and access to facilities and materials. Dr Derek Huntley (Imperial College London) contributed knowledge of and expertise in biology and the depiction of biological systems through computational approaches and digital interfaces, consultancy and support towards the digital silk library development. Nicola Triscott and Claudia Lastra (Arts Catalyst) contributed the context and network for the project workshops and data collection, platform evaluation and dissemination.
Impact Silken Selves; UISilk - Towards Interfacing the Body
Start Year 2015
 
Description Polyphonic Futures 
Organisation Tufts University
Department School of Engineering
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Veronica Ranner (Royal College of Art): - Workshop outlines, planning and execution of workshop activities and design; Event planning, networking, workshop participant recruiting & communication, creation of calls for application, contact to cooperators, liaise with venue, draft information for participants. Workshop participant selection; - Scientist workshop to generate feedback on prior workshop outcomes; Feedback session with SilkLab scientists for the digital silk platform; Content creation for the silk platform; Feedback to the project partners in London; Searching and appointing a web designer/ developer (paid through Arts Catalyst); Decision making on the web designer/ developer; - Planning of the field trial with the Arts Catalyst (symposium event): drafting of the speaker outline & symposium procedure; Writing a brief essay on the project for potential publication/ website feature); [Report writing/ project summary; Reporting to CX; all together with The Arts Catalyst] Prof. Fiorenzo Omenetto (SilkLab Tufts University, Boston, MA): - Feedback to proposal; Feedback on scientist workshop at SilkLab; Giving feedback on the platform mock-up; symposium speaker for the field trial event; promotion and circulation in Tufts Universities network and beyond; writing a brief essay on the project for potential publication/ website feature; Dr Derek Huntley (Imperial College, London): - Giving feedback on the platform mock-up; - Giving feedback on the platform mock-up; Promotion and circulation in Imperial College's network and beyond; Writing a brief essay on the project for potential publication/ website feature; Claudia Lastra and Nicola Triscott (The Arts Catalyst): - Curating, event planning, networking; Workshop participant recruiting & communication, publishing call for application, online advertisement and PR (e-bulletin & social media); Contact to cooperators, targeting online social media groups and online, liaise with venue, draft information for participants; Workshop participant selection; - Planning of the field trial with Veronica Ranner (symposium event); Feedback on content creation and platform design; Preparations for the symposium: drafting a speaker outline & procedure; Liaising with speakers; Writing a brief essay on the project for potential publication/ website feature); [Report writing/ project summary; Reporting to CX; all with Veronica Ranner]
Collaborator Contribution The collaboration with Prof Omenetto who heads provided the essential framework and full access as Visiting Scientist to the world-leading laboratory in silken technology implementation. The laboratory provides hereby unrestricted access to current research, technical guidance, and full financial support for material and consumables by Tufts University's Art & Science scheme. Dr Derek Huntley from Imperial College provided knowledge of and expertise in biology and the depiction of biological systems through computational approaches and digital interfaces, consultancy and support towards platform development through all stages. The Arts Catalyst provided the context and network for the purpose of the data collection (workshop event), the platform evaluation and its dissemination (symposium). As arts institution they have 21 years of knowledge and expertise in transdisciplinary, experimental, and critical engagement with science and technology. Expertise in commissioning, curation, and event planning, engagement with diverse audiences, and Art & Science projects and their evaluation.
Impact Polyphonic futures is a multi-disciplinary collaboration: Royal College of Art (Veronica Ranner): Design (Interaction Design, User Experience Design, Speculative Design) Arts Catalyst (Nicola Triscott, Claudia Lastra): Arts organisation (Specialism on art/design and science projects and art works) SilkLab at Tufts University (Prof Fiorenzo Omenetto & SilkLab members): Biomedical Engineering / Material Science (Science lab specialising on structural proteins, particularly on reverse engineered silk) 2016 Polyphonic Futures platform, online platform (in progress) 2016 Polyphonic Futures symposium, (in progress) 2015 Ranner, V., Lockton, D. "Reflective Silk -Behaviour change through better self-knowledge". Paper presented at the Digital Research in the Humanities and Arts Conference (DRHA 2015), Dublin City University, Ireland. 2014 Ranner, V. "Silken Selves". Paper presented in The Human After Anthropocentrism? Life. Matter. Being. strand at the London Conference of Critical Thought (LCCT), Goldsmith University, London, UK.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Polyphonic Futures 
Organisation Tufts University
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This project focuses on the production of a digital 'silk library' platform to aggregate, visualise and share diverse views from scientific experts and public participants on the bio-digital material silk and its potential impact on society and self. Through a series of interdisciplinary workshops organised with UK commissioning body the Arts Catalyst, the project is developing the digital 'silk library' platform to contextualise and inform scientific research and create arts-science knowledge exchange and transmission. RCA CX PhD student Veronica Ranner contributed to the research, design and development of the workshops and related activities and the production of the digital platform.
Collaborator Contribution Professor Fiorenzo Omenetto (Tufts University) contributed expertise and access to facilities and materials. Dr Derek Huntley (Imperial College London) contributed knowledge of and expertise in biology and the depiction of biological systems through computational approaches and digital interfaces, consultancy and support towards the digital silk library development. Nicola Triscott and Claudia Lastra (Arts Catalyst) contributed the context and network for the project workshops and data collection, platform evaluation and dissemination.
Impact Silken Selves; UISilk - Towards Interfacing the Body
Start Year 2015
 
Description RTD Data Things 
Organisation Research Through Design (RTD)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution During the biannual Research Through Design conference (RTD), CX PhD student Bettina Nissen created personalised artefacts of delegates' conference impressions.
Collaborator Contribution The organisers and delegates of the Research Though Design (RTD 2015) conference gave time and data to this activity, which enabled CX PhD student Bettina Nissen to experiment with new forms of data translation and user engagement.
Impact RTD Souvenirs
Start Year 2015
 
Description Red Ninja Collaboration 
Organisation Red Ninja
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Profs Paul Coulton and Nick Dunn collaborating on a project about the impact of hackathon methodologies
Collaborator Contribution Collaboration with design driven SME Red Ninja
Impact -
Start Year 2016
 
Description Red Tales 
Organisation Northumbria University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution CX researchers worked with a Red Squirrel conservation charity (Red Squirrels Northern England - RSNE), Bristol-based conservation charity Wildscreen, and academics from York and Northumbria Universitities, to build an interactive documentary (i-Doc) with a group of red squirrel conservationists. CX researchers contributed expertise in documentary film-making and participatory design, and developed workshop activities for engaging participants and a web-based 'i-Doc' platform for their use.
Collaborator Contribution Prof. Mark Blythe (University of Northumbria, Newcastle) brought experience of interaction criticism and participatory research design and analysis. He co-devised a 'Design Fiction' workshop to facilitate collective critical reflection with partners on i-Docs, and analysed observations of this workshop. Dr. Jonathan Hook (University of York) brought experience of participatory interaction design and interactive technology development. He was involved in the design and running of user engagement activities (workshops), design of the resulting iDoc, and participated in collective critical reflection workshops on the i-Doc production process. Katy Cook (Red Squirrels Northern England) facilitated access to conservationists, provided conservation expertise, and participated in collective critical reflection workshops on the i-Doc production process. Lucie Muir (Wildscreen) brought expertise in sharing media of endangered wildlife online and, through participation in the Design Fiction workshop, an industry perspective as potential publisher/distributor of i-Docs.
Impact A Documentary Ecology: Interaction - Contribution - Iteration (workshop paper); Red Tales iDoc
Start Year 2014
 
Description Red Tales 
Organisation Red Squirrels Northern England
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution CX researchers worked with a Red Squirrel conservation charity (Red Squirrels Northern England - RSNE), Bristol-based conservation charity Wildscreen, and academics from York and Northumbria Universitities, to build an interactive documentary (i-Doc) with a group of red squirrel conservationists. CX researchers contributed expertise in documentary film-making and participatory design, and developed workshop activities for engaging participants and a web-based 'i-Doc' platform for their use.
Collaborator Contribution Prof. Mark Blythe (University of Northumbria, Newcastle) brought experience of interaction criticism and participatory research design and analysis. He co-devised a 'Design Fiction' workshop to facilitate collective critical reflection with partners on i-Docs, and analysed observations of this workshop. Dr. Jonathan Hook (University of York) brought experience of participatory interaction design and interactive technology development. He was involved in the design and running of user engagement activities (workshops), design of the resulting iDoc, and participated in collective critical reflection workshops on the i-Doc production process. Katy Cook (Red Squirrels Northern England) facilitated access to conservationists, provided conservation expertise, and participated in collective critical reflection workshops on the i-Doc production process. Lucie Muir (Wildscreen) brought expertise in sharing media of endangered wildlife online and, through participation in the Design Fiction workshop, an industry perspective as potential publisher/distributor of i-Docs.
Impact A Documentary Ecology: Interaction - Contribution - Iteration (workshop paper); Red Tales iDoc
Start Year 2014
 
Description Red Tales 
Organisation University of York
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution CX researchers worked with a Red Squirrel conservation charity (Red Squirrels Northern England - RSNE), Bristol-based conservation charity Wildscreen, and academics from York and Northumbria Universitities, to build an interactive documentary (i-Doc) with a group of red squirrel conservationists. CX researchers contributed expertise in documentary film-making and participatory design, and developed workshop activities for engaging participants and a web-based 'i-Doc' platform for their use.
Collaborator Contribution Prof. Mark Blythe (University of Northumbria, Newcastle) brought experience of interaction criticism and participatory research design and analysis. He co-devised a 'Design Fiction' workshop to facilitate collective critical reflection with partners on i-Docs, and analysed observations of this workshop. Dr. Jonathan Hook (University of York) brought experience of participatory interaction design and interactive technology development. He was involved in the design and running of user engagement activities (workshops), design of the resulting iDoc, and participated in collective critical reflection workshops on the i-Doc production process. Katy Cook (Red Squirrels Northern England) facilitated access to conservationists, provided conservation expertise, and participated in collective critical reflection workshops on the i-Doc production process. Lucie Muir (Wildscreen) brought expertise in sharing media of endangered wildlife online and, through participation in the Design Fiction workshop, an industry perspective as potential publisher/distributor of i-Docs.
Impact A Documentary Ecology: Interaction - Contribution - Iteration (workshop paper); Red Tales iDoc
Start Year 2014
 
Description Red Tales 
Organisation Wildscreen
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution CX researchers worked with a Red Squirrel conservation charity (Red Squirrels Northern England - RSNE), Bristol-based conservation charity Wildscreen, and academics from York and Northumbria Universitities, to build an interactive documentary (i-Doc) with a group of red squirrel conservationists. CX researchers contributed expertise in documentary film-making and participatory design, and developed workshop activities for engaging participants and a web-based 'i-Doc' platform for their use.
Collaborator Contribution Prof. Mark Blythe (University of Northumbria, Newcastle) brought experience of interaction criticism and participatory research design and analysis. He co-devised a 'Design Fiction' workshop to facilitate collective critical reflection with partners on i-Docs, and analysed observations of this workshop. Dr. Jonathan Hook (University of York) brought experience of participatory interaction design and interactive technology development. He was involved in the design and running of user engagement activities (workshops), design of the resulting iDoc, and participated in collective critical reflection workshops on the i-Doc production process. Katy Cook (Red Squirrels Northern England) facilitated access to conservationists, provided conservation expertise, and participated in collective critical reflection workshops on the i-Doc production process. Lucie Muir (Wildscreen) brought expertise in sharing media of endangered wildlife online and, through participation in the Design Fiction workshop, an industry perspective as potential publisher/distributor of i-Docs.
Impact A Documentary Ecology: Interaction - Contribution - Iteration (workshop paper); Red Tales iDoc
Start Year 2014
 
Description Rhythmanalysis 
Organisation Amaze
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution This project developed an installation that combined self-tracking/sensing technology with a qualitative user interface/input in order to give clues about individual biorhythms, asking how using such data could act as a self-reflective tool to improve daily (work) life. The project was featured in the RCA/FACT 'Time and Motion: redefining working life' exhibition, symposium and related presentations. RCA CX PhD researcher Veronica Ranner contributed design research expertise and produced the installation.
Collaborator Contribution Richard Koeck (Liverpool University), Roger McKinley (FACT Liverpool) and Alistair Eilbeck (Amaze) contributed expertise, data collection in working environments in Liverpool, and disseminated the research in events. A publication focusing on the project was edited by Professor Richard Koeck (Liverpool University).
Impact Scientific Illustration v. the Quantified Self; A Cinematic Time and Motion Study; Rhythmanalysis; Silken Selves; 'Plans and Speculated Actions: Design, Behaviour and Complexity in Sustainable Futures' in "Routledge Handbook of Sustainable Product Design"; UISilk - Towards Interfacing the Body
Start Year 2013
 
Description Rhythmanalysis 
Organisation Foundation for Art and Creative Technology (FACT)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This project developed an installation that combined self-tracking/sensing technology with a qualitative user interface/input in order to give clues about individual biorhythms, asking how using such data could act as a self-reflective tool to improve daily (work) life. The project was featured in the RCA/FACT 'Time and Motion: redefining working life' exhibition, symposium and related presentations. RCA CX PhD researcher Veronica Ranner contributed design research expertise and produced the installation.
Collaborator Contribution Richard Koeck (Liverpool University), Roger McKinley (FACT Liverpool) and Alistair Eilbeck (Amaze) contributed expertise, data collection in working environments in Liverpool, and disseminated the research in events. A publication focusing on the project was edited by Professor Richard Koeck (Liverpool University).
Impact Scientific Illustration v. the Quantified Self; A Cinematic Time and Motion Study; Rhythmanalysis; Silken Selves; 'Plans and Speculated Actions: Design, Behaviour and Complexity in Sustainable Futures' in "Routledge Handbook of Sustainable Product Design"; UISilk - Towards Interfacing the Body
Start Year 2013
 
Description Rhythmanalysis 
Organisation University of Liverpool
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This project developed an installation that combined self-tracking/sensing technology with a qualitative user interface/input in order to give clues about individual biorhythms, asking how using such data could act as a self-reflective tool to improve daily (work) life. The project was featured in the RCA/FACT 'Time and Motion: redefining working life' exhibition, symposium and related presentations. RCA CX PhD researcher Veronica Ranner contributed design research expertise and produced the installation.
Collaborator Contribution Richard Koeck (Liverpool University), Roger McKinley (FACT Liverpool) and Alistair Eilbeck (Amaze) contributed expertise, data collection in working environments in Liverpool, and disseminated the research in events. A publication focusing on the project was edited by Professor Richard Koeck (Liverpool University).
Impact Scientific Illustration v. the Quantified Self; A Cinematic Time and Motion Study; Rhythmanalysis; Silken Selves; 'Plans and Speculated Actions: Design, Behaviour and Complexity in Sustainable Futures' in "Routledge Handbook of Sustainable Product Design"; UISilk - Towards Interfacing the Body
Start Year 2013
 
Description Seabreeze 
Organisation Imitating the Dog
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution • Research into the history of the Winter Gardens - particularly on any moving image archives. Research with the National Fairground Archive to explore what activities took place in the immediate environs of The Winter Gardens (AQ, LS, ML) • Further interviews and workshops with interested communities including Local Councils, English Heritage, Local Trusts and local historians (LS, ML) September 14: • Research into co-design practices with academic to outline parameters for the tool kit prototype (PA, AQ, LC, LS, ML). • Research into the history of tool kits and project 'cook books' (ML, LS, PA, LC). • Research into practices/concepts that negotiate place, memory and the digital to create a literature review that informs and supports key research questions (AQ, ML, LS). • Preliminary Interviews with Sea Breeze creative team (ML, LS). • Overseeing documentation of final rehearsals and production week (AQ, ML, LS). • Interviews with audiences after experiencing Sea Breeze (ML, LS). • Interviews with artists after the production week. • Preliminary development of the co-designed toolkit (PA, ML, AQ, LS, ML).
Collaborator Contribution Sheffield Hallam: Represented by Paul Atkinson • Research into co-design process of toolkit. • Research into co-design practices. • Contribution to workshop design and assessment of data from workshops. • Contribution to final report and findings. Raisin and Willow: Represented by Jonathan Raisin and Elizabeth Willow In relation to the CX project, Raisin & Willow will specifically take responsibility for: • Direction of devising and rehearsal process leading to performances of Sea Breeze • Writing and design of Sea Breeze book • Facilitation of initial meetings with participants, building/site managers and other interested communities • Sharing of all existing project related research (historical, participant interviews etc.) and documentation with other project partners, through interview, written material and discussion of methods and approaches • Co-design of toolkit and participation in testing process. Imitating the Dog: Represented by Simon Wainwright • Contribution to Digital Production during Sea Breeze development, rehearsal and production period. • Co-ordination of all technical aspects of the above during the three periods. • R&D for the toolkit • Design and delivery of the toolkit.
Impact Production of performance at the Morecambe Winter Gardens. Other outcomes in development
Start Year 2014
 
Description Seabreeze 
Organisation Raisin and Willow
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution • Research into the history of the Winter Gardens - particularly on any moving image archives. Research with the National Fairground Archive to explore what activities took place in the immediate environs of The Winter Gardens (AQ, LS, ML) • Further interviews and workshops with interested communities including Local Councils, English Heritage, Local Trusts and local historians (LS, ML) September 14: • Research into co-design practices with academic to outline parameters for the tool kit prototype (PA, AQ, LC, LS, ML). • Research into the history of tool kits and project 'cook books' (ML, LS, PA, LC). • Research into practices/concepts that negotiate place, memory and the digital to create a literature review that informs and supports key research questions (AQ, ML, LS). • Preliminary Interviews with Sea Breeze creative team (ML, LS). • Overseeing documentation of final rehearsals and production week (AQ, ML, LS). • Interviews with audiences after experiencing Sea Breeze (ML, LS). • Interviews with artists after the production week. • Preliminary development of the co-designed toolkit (PA, ML, AQ, LS, ML).
Collaborator Contribution Sheffield Hallam: Represented by Paul Atkinson • Research into co-design process of toolkit. • Research into co-design practices. • Contribution to workshop design and assessment of data from workshops. • Contribution to final report and findings. Raisin and Willow: Represented by Jonathan Raisin and Elizabeth Willow In relation to the CX project, Raisin & Willow will specifically take responsibility for: • Direction of devising and rehearsal process leading to performances of Sea Breeze • Writing and design of Sea Breeze book • Facilitation of initial meetings with participants, building/site managers and other interested communities • Sharing of all existing project related research (historical, participant interviews etc.) and documentation with other project partners, through interview, written material and discussion of methods and approaches • Co-design of toolkit and participation in testing process. Imitating the Dog: Represented by Simon Wainwright • Contribution to Digital Production during Sea Breeze development, rehearsal and production period. • Co-ordination of all technical aspects of the above during the three periods. • R&D for the toolkit • Design and delivery of the toolkit.
Impact Production of performance at the Morecambe Winter Gardens. Other outcomes in development
Start Year 2014
 
Description Seabreeze 
Organisation Sheffield Hallam University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution • Research into the history of the Winter Gardens - particularly on any moving image archives. Research with the National Fairground Archive to explore what activities took place in the immediate environs of The Winter Gardens (AQ, LS, ML) • Further interviews and workshops with interested communities including Local Councils, English Heritage, Local Trusts and local historians (LS, ML) September 14: • Research into co-design practices with academic to outline parameters for the tool kit prototype (PA, AQ, LC, LS, ML). • Research into the history of tool kits and project 'cook books' (ML, LS, PA, LC). • Research into practices/concepts that negotiate place, memory and the digital to create a literature review that informs and supports key research questions (AQ, ML, LS). • Preliminary Interviews with Sea Breeze creative team (ML, LS). • Overseeing documentation of final rehearsals and production week (AQ, ML, LS). • Interviews with audiences after experiencing Sea Breeze (ML, LS). • Interviews with artists after the production week. • Preliminary development of the co-designed toolkit (PA, ML, AQ, LS, ML).
Collaborator Contribution Sheffield Hallam: Represented by Paul Atkinson • Research into co-design process of toolkit. • Research into co-design practices. • Contribution to workshop design and assessment of data from workshops. • Contribution to final report and findings. Raisin and Willow: Represented by Jonathan Raisin and Elizabeth Willow In relation to the CX project, Raisin & Willow will specifically take responsibility for: • Direction of devising and rehearsal process leading to performances of Sea Breeze • Writing and design of Sea Breeze book • Facilitation of initial meetings with participants, building/site managers and other interested communities • Sharing of all existing project related research (historical, participant interviews etc.) and documentation with other project partners, through interview, written material and discussion of methods and approaches • Co-design of toolkit and participation in testing process. Imitating the Dog: Represented by Simon Wainwright • Contribution to Digital Production during Sea Breeze development, rehearsal and production period. • Co-ordination of all technical aspects of the above during the three periods. • R&D for the toolkit • Design and delivery of the toolkit.
Impact Production of performance at the Morecambe Winter Gardens. Other outcomes in development
Start Year 2014
 
Description Shakespeare in Shoreditch 
Organisation Falmouth University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This project and integrated field tests a range of interventions that bridge the gap between situated live performance and related online activity. The interventions will form part of a new service for engaging audience members actively in theatre performance. The objective is to develop new ways for audiences to engage with theatre that simultaneously allow producers, such as Shakespeare in Shoreditch and RIFT, to gauge audience participation and response to cultural productions. The project will allow audience members to contribute to an evolving 'story map' as part of an experience of live performance, at the same time as making social media activity tangible in playful and innovative ways. The physical space is treated as an analogous form of social media that offers new modes of interaction. It aims to bridge virtual and physical presence, responding to a need for innovative and meaningful ways of engaging audiences, before, during and after performance events.
Collaborator Contribution Peter Thomas (Middlesex University) is contributing expertise in site-specific writing and narrative experiences, Angus Main (Falmouth University) is contributing expertise in working with social media streams and developing new ways of making these experiential, Francesca Duncan (Shakespeare in Shoreditch) is contributing the context and site of production, project coordination and, with Josh Nawras (RiFT), expertise in facilitating immersive narrative experiences for diverse audiences.
Impact -
Start Year 2015
 
Description Shakespeare in Shoreditch 
Organisation Middlesex University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This project and integrated field tests a range of interventions that bridge the gap between situated live performance and related online activity. The interventions will form part of a new service for engaging audience members actively in theatre performance. The objective is to develop new ways for audiences to engage with theatre that simultaneously allow producers, such as Shakespeare in Shoreditch and RIFT, to gauge audience participation and response to cultural productions. The project will allow audience members to contribute to an evolving 'story map' as part of an experience of live performance, at the same time as making social media activity tangible in playful and innovative ways. The physical space is treated as an analogous form of social media that offers new modes of interaction. It aims to bridge virtual and physical presence, responding to a need for innovative and meaningful ways of engaging audiences, before, during and after performance events.
Collaborator Contribution Peter Thomas (Middlesex University) is contributing expertise in site-specific writing and narrative experiences, Angus Main (Falmouth University) is contributing expertise in working with social media streams and developing new ways of making these experiential, Francesca Duncan (Shakespeare in Shoreditch) is contributing the context and site of production, project coordination and, with Josh Nawras (RiFT), expertise in facilitating immersive narrative experiences for diverse audiences.
Impact -
Start Year 2015
 
Description Shakespeare in Shoreditch 
Organisation RIFT
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution This project and integrated field tests a range of interventions that bridge the gap between situated live performance and related online activity. The interventions will form part of a new service for engaging audience members actively in theatre performance. The objective is to develop new ways for audiences to engage with theatre that simultaneously allow producers, such as Shakespeare in Shoreditch and RIFT, to gauge audience participation and response to cultural productions. The project will allow audience members to contribute to an evolving 'story map' as part of an experience of live performance, at the same time as making social media activity tangible in playful and innovative ways. The physical space is treated as an analogous form of social media that offers new modes of interaction. It aims to bridge virtual and physical presence, responding to a need for innovative and meaningful ways of engaging audiences, before, during and after performance events.
Collaborator Contribution Peter Thomas (Middlesex University) is contributing expertise in site-specific writing and narrative experiences, Angus Main (Falmouth University) is contributing expertise in working with social media streams and developing new ways of making these experiential, Francesca Duncan (Shakespeare in Shoreditch) is contributing the context and site of production, project coordination and, with Josh Nawras (RiFT), expertise in facilitating immersive narrative experiences for diverse audiences.
Impact -
Start Year 2015
 
Description Sound Spaces 
Organisation Foundation for Art and Creative Technology (FACT)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution 'Sound Spaces' was a practical and creative exploration of the potential of spatialised ("3-D") sound through the making of spatialised sound environments that creatively respond to and gain perspectives on how we experience the urban environment. The project unpacked various elements of what the city is, how it might be (re)imagined as 'disappeared' or non-existent spaces and how it could be explored through sonic environments as material (Ingold, 2013). Through public and SME participation, the project also investigated how SMEs might incorporate spatialised sound in their own creative, technical and public engagement activities. The project was focussed on the city of Liverpool beginning with a four-day public making workshop as part of FACT Liverpool's Build Your Own: Tools for Sharing exhibition programme. During this workshop, participants explored the use of spatialised sound by, for example, creating a fictional map of Liverpool based on the sonic affinities of places within the city ('Soundlines' - one part leyline, one part songline). The workshop also explored the use of inexpensive, self-made technology and sophisticated ambisonic systems (Kinicho) for the creation of digitally spatialised sound environments. CX researchers facilitated the four-day workshop and a later week-long exhibition/residency at FACT. In these activities, CX researchers produced creative work in collaboration with partners and members of the public, and individually, bringing expertise in creative practice and practice-led research.
Collaborator Contribution The Foundation for Creative Technology (FACT) has an established interest in making, new technologies, the city of Liverpool, creative practice and methodologies for evaluating publically-engaged creative work. FACT provided access to a large public audience, creative consultation, local knowledge and premises to work in Liverpool. FACT also have strong links with local SMEs who were a target audience for this collaborative work. Stefan Kazassoglou, via his micro-SME Kinicho, brought expertise in contemporary sound diffusion technologies and access to a state of the art spatialised sound system - an array of 20 loudspeakers and associated software enabling the creation of immersive third order ambisonic spaces. During the project, Stefan constructed a larger version of his sound system (that was used to present work and stimulate new work) and made several impulse response recordings ('acoustic snapshots') of the locations used (also used as materials in the subsequent creative work). Dr. Magnus Williamson (Newcastle University) brought musicological expertise in European liturgical practices and institutional contexts, 1350-1650, and in the interaction between musical forms, books, ensembles and spaces; he also has brought interests in the role of sound in animating public encounters with lost or 'disappeared' spaces. Magnus contributed to critical reflections on the value of the collaborative work (both in Liverpool and in 'disappeared heritage spaces') throughout the project, and is developing further work with CX collaborators as a result.
Impact Sound Spaces exhibition/performance
Start Year 2015
 
Description Sound Spaces 
Organisation Kinicho Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution 'Sound Spaces' was a practical and creative exploration of the potential of spatialised ("3-D") sound through the making of spatialised sound environments that creatively respond to and gain perspectives on how we experience the urban environment. The project unpacked various elements of what the city is, how it might be (re)imagined as 'disappeared' or non-existent spaces and how it could be explored through sonic environments as material (Ingold, 2013). Through public and SME participation, the project also investigated how SMEs might incorporate spatialised sound in their own creative, technical and public engagement activities. The project was focussed on the city of Liverpool beginning with a four-day public making workshop as part of FACT Liverpool's Build Your Own: Tools for Sharing exhibition programme. During this workshop, participants explored the use of spatialised sound by, for example, creating a fictional map of Liverpool based on the sonic affinities of places within the city ('Soundlines' - one part leyline, one part songline). The workshop also explored the use of inexpensive, self-made technology and sophisticated ambisonic systems (Kinicho) for the creation of digitally spatialised sound environments. CX researchers facilitated the four-day workshop and a later week-long exhibition/residency at FACT. In these activities, CX researchers produced creative work in collaboration with partners and members of the public, and individually, bringing expertise in creative practice and practice-led research.
Collaborator Contribution The Foundation for Creative Technology (FACT) has an established interest in making, new technologies, the city of Liverpool, creative practice and methodologies for evaluating publically-engaged creative work. FACT provided access to a large public audience, creative consultation, local knowledge and premises to work in Liverpool. FACT also have strong links with local SMEs who were a target audience for this collaborative work. Stefan Kazassoglou, via his micro-SME Kinicho, brought expertise in contemporary sound diffusion technologies and access to a state of the art spatialised sound system - an array of 20 loudspeakers and associated software enabling the creation of immersive third order ambisonic spaces. During the project, Stefan constructed a larger version of his sound system (that was used to present work and stimulate new work) and made several impulse response recordings ('acoustic snapshots') of the locations used (also used as materials in the subsequent creative work). Dr. Magnus Williamson (Newcastle University) brought musicological expertise in European liturgical practices and institutional contexts, 1350-1650, and in the interaction between musical forms, books, ensembles and spaces; he also has brought interests in the role of sound in animating public encounters with lost or 'disappeared' spaces. Magnus contributed to critical reflections on the value of the collaborative work (both in Liverpool and in 'disappeared heritage spaces') throughout the project, and is developing further work with CX collaborators as a result.
Impact Sound Spaces exhibition/performance
Start Year 2015
 
Description States of Mind 
Organisation Foundation for Art and Creative Technology (FACT)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This project produced an interactive 'States of Mind' device for people to use to model and share their mental health states. Based on a physical interface, the device provides a platform for people to create digital 3D visual objects representing their states of mind in physical environments and using digital social media. The States of Mind device was produced in parallel with the design of the FACT Liverpool 2015 'Group Therapy: mental distress in a digital age' exhibition in which it was initially presented. A drop-in workshop 'Mapping the emotional landscape of Liverpool' was held during the exhibition, at which museum visitors and workshop participants were invited to talk about their individual journeys to the exhibition, using tangible and tactile rapid-prototyped versions of the digital 3D objects to reflect on their personal mental wellbeing. The States of Mind device was technically enhanced and featured in the 2015 London Design Festival. Across both events over 2,900 digital representations of people's states of mind were collected and shared using the TILO digital display system at FACT Liverpool and social media. RCA CX PhD researcher Ben Koslowski contributed research, design and project development/management.
Collaborator Contribution Professor Karen Ingham (University of Wales Trinity St David) and Dr Roberto Bottazzi (RCA) contributed expertise in forms of representation and how they might be used to elicit responses/offer space for reflection, and expertise in creatively communicating research outcomes and developing engaging experiences, Ana Botella (FACT Liverpool) contributed the context (Group Therapy exhibition/audiences), site, knowledge of and expertise in engaging with audiences, and evaluating exhibitions, project testing and evaluation, Claire Cook & Brendan Dawes (Nexus Productions) contributed expertise in prototyping and building interactive digital experiences; expertise in developing tools for creatively engaging audiences, narrative and storytelling, project development, testing and evaluation.
Impact States of Mind: Representational tools for audience engagement around well-being; States of Mind Interactive Console
Start Year 2015
 
Description States of Mind 
Organisation Foundation for Art and Creative Technology (FACT)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This project produced an interactive 'States of Mind' device for people to use to model and share their mental health states. Based on a physical interface, the device provides a platform for people to create digital 3D visual objects representing their states of mind in physical environments and using digital social media. The States of Mind device was produced in parallel with the design of the FACT Liverpool 2015 'Group Therapy: mental distress in a digital age' exhibition in which it was initially presented. A drop-in workshop 'Mapping the emotional landscape of Liverpool' was held during the exhibition, at which museum visitors and workshop participants were invited to talk about their individual journeys to the exhibition, using tangible and tactile rapid-prototyped versions of the digital 3D objects to reflect on their personal mental wellbeing. The States of Mind device was technically enhanced and featured in the 2015 London Design Festival. Across both events over 2,900 digital representations of people's states of mind were collected and shared using the TILO digital display system at FACT Liverpool and social media. RCA CX PhD researcher Ben Koslowski contributed research, design and project development/management.
Collaborator Contribution Professor Karen Ingham (University of Wales Trinity St David) and Dr Roberto Bottazzi (RCA) contributed expertise in forms of representation and how they might be used to elicit responses/offer space for reflection, and expertise in creatively communicating research outcomes and developing engaging experiences, Ana Botella (FACT Liverpool) contributed the context (Group Therapy exhibition/audiences), site, knowledge of and expertise in engaging with audiences, and evaluating exhibitions, project testing and evaluation, Claire Cook & Brendan Dawes (Nexus Productions) contributed expertise in prototyping and building interactive digital experiences; expertise in developing tools for creatively engaging audiences, narrative and storytelling, project development, testing and evaluation.
Impact States of Mind: Representational tools for audience engagement around well-being; States of Mind Interactive Console; Emotional Landscapes of Liverpool workshop; involving architecture, interaction design, physical computing
Start Year 2015
 
Description States of Mind 
Organisation Nexus
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This project produced an interactive 'States of Mind' device for people to use to model and share their mental health states. Based on a physical interface, the device provides a platform for people to create digital 3D visual objects representing their states of mind in physical environments and using digital social media. The States of Mind device was produced in parallel with the design of the FACT Liverpool 2015 'Group Therapy: mental distress in a digital age' exhibition in which it was initially presented. A drop-in workshop 'Mapping the emotional landscape of Liverpool' was held during the exhibition, at which museum visitors and workshop participants were invited to talk about their individual journeys to the exhibition, using tangible and tactile rapid-prototyped versions of the digital 3D objects to reflect on their personal mental wellbeing. The States of Mind device was technically enhanced and featured in the 2015 London Design Festival. Across both events over 2,900 digital representations of people's states of mind were collected and shared using the TILO digital display system at FACT Liverpool and social media. RCA CX PhD researcher Ben Koslowski contributed research, design and project development/management.
Collaborator Contribution Professor Karen Ingham (University of Wales Trinity St David) and Dr Roberto Bottazzi (RCA) contributed expertise in forms of representation and how they might be used to elicit responses/offer space for reflection, and expertise in creatively communicating research outcomes and developing engaging experiences, Ana Botella (FACT Liverpool) contributed the context (Group Therapy exhibition/audiences), site, knowledge of and expertise in engaging with audiences, and evaluating exhibitions, project testing and evaluation, Claire Cook & Brendan Dawes (Nexus Productions) contributed expertise in prototyping and building interactive digital experiences; expertise in developing tools for creatively engaging audiences, narrative and storytelling, project development, testing and evaluation.
Impact States of Mind: Representational tools for audience engagement around well-being; States of Mind Interactive Console; Emotional Landscapes of Liverpool workshop; involving architecture, interaction design, physical computing
Start Year 2015
 
Description States of Mind 
Organisation Nexus
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution This project produced an interactive 'States of Mind' device for people to use to model and share their mental health states. Based on a physical interface, the device provides a platform for people to create digital 3D visual objects representing their states of mind in physical environments and using digital social media. The States of Mind device was produced in parallel with the design of the FACT Liverpool 2015 'Group Therapy: mental distress in a digital age' exhibition in which it was initially presented. A drop-in workshop 'Mapping the emotional landscape of Liverpool' was held during the exhibition, at which museum visitors and workshop participants were invited to talk about their individual journeys to the exhibition, using tangible and tactile rapid-prototyped versions of the digital 3D objects to reflect on their personal mental wellbeing. The States of Mind device was technically enhanced and featured in the 2015 London Design Festival. Across both events over 2,900 digital representations of people's states of mind were collected and shared using the TILO digital display system at FACT Liverpool and social media. RCA CX PhD researcher Ben Koslowski contributed research, design and project development/management.
Collaborator Contribution Professor Karen Ingham (University of Wales Trinity St David) and Dr Roberto Bottazzi (RCA) contributed expertise in forms of representation and how they might be used to elicit responses/offer space for reflection, and expertise in creatively communicating research outcomes and developing engaging experiences, Ana Botella (FACT Liverpool) contributed the context (Group Therapy exhibition/audiences), site, knowledge of and expertise in engaging with audiences, and evaluating exhibitions, project testing and evaluation, Claire Cook & Brendan Dawes (Nexus Productions) contributed expertise in prototyping and building interactive digital experiences; expertise in developing tools for creatively engaging audiences, narrative and storytelling, project development, testing and evaluation.
Impact States of Mind: Representational tools for audience engagement around well-being; States of Mind Interactive Console
Start Year 2015
 
Description States of Mind 
Organisation Royal College of Art
Department School of Architecture
PI Contribution This project produced an interactive 'States of Mind' device for people to use to model and share their mental health states. Based on a physical interface, the device provides a platform for people to create digital 3D visual objects representing their states of mind in physical environments and using digital social media. The States of Mind device was produced in parallel with the design of the FACT Liverpool 2015 'Group Therapy: mental distress in a digital age' exhibition in which it was initially presented. A drop-in workshop 'Mapping the emotional landscape of Liverpool' was held during the exhibition, at which museum visitors and workshop participants were invited to talk about their individual journeys to the exhibition, using tangible and tactile rapid-prototyped versions of the digital 3D objects to reflect on their personal mental wellbeing. The States of Mind device was technically enhanced and featured in the 2015 London Design Festival. Across both events over 2,900 digital representations of people's states of mind were collected and shared using the TILO digital display system at FACT Liverpool and social media. RCA CX PhD researcher Ben Koslowski contributed research, design and project development/management.
Collaborator Contribution Professor Karen Ingham (University of Wales Trinity St David) and Dr Roberto Bottazzi (RCA) contributed expertise in forms of representation and how they might be used to elicit responses/offer space for reflection, and expertise in creatively communicating research outcomes and developing engaging experiences, Ana Botella (FACT Liverpool) contributed the context (Group Therapy exhibition/audiences), site, knowledge of and expertise in engaging with audiences, and evaluating exhibitions, project testing and evaluation, Claire Cook & Brendan Dawes (Nexus Productions) contributed expertise in prototyping and building interactive digital experiences; expertise in developing tools for creatively engaging audiences, narrative and storytelling, project development, testing and evaluation.
Impact States of Mind: Representational tools for audience engagement around well-being; States of Mind Interactive Console; Emotional Landscapes of Liverpool workshop; involving architecture, interaction design, physical computing
Start Year 2015
 
Description States of Mind 
Organisation University of Wales Trinity Saint David
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This project produced an interactive 'States of Mind' device for people to use to model and share their mental health states. Based on a physical interface, the device provides a platform for people to create digital 3D visual objects representing their states of mind in physical environments and using digital social media. The States of Mind device was produced in parallel with the design of the FACT Liverpool 2015 'Group Therapy: mental distress in a digital age' exhibition in which it was initially presented. A drop-in workshop 'Mapping the emotional landscape of Liverpool' was held during the exhibition, at which museum visitors and workshop participants were invited to talk about their individual journeys to the exhibition, using tangible and tactile rapid-prototyped versions of the digital 3D objects to reflect on their personal mental wellbeing. The States of Mind device was technically enhanced and featured in the 2015 London Design Festival. Across both events over 2,900 digital representations of people's states of mind were collected and shared using the TILO digital display system at FACT Liverpool and social media. RCA CX PhD researcher Ben Koslowski contributed research, design and project development/management.
Collaborator Contribution Professor Karen Ingham (University of Wales Trinity St David) and Dr Roberto Bottazzi (RCA) contributed expertise in forms of representation and how they might be used to elicit responses/offer space for reflection, and expertise in creatively communicating research outcomes and developing engaging experiences, Ana Botella (FACT Liverpool) contributed the context (Group Therapy exhibition/audiences), site, knowledge of and expertise in engaging with audiences, and evaluating exhibitions, project testing and evaluation, Claire Cook & Brendan Dawes (Nexus Productions) contributed expertise in prototyping and building interactive digital experiences; expertise in developing tools for creatively engaging audiences, narrative and storytelling, project development, testing and evaluation.
Impact States of Mind: Representational tools for audience engagement around well-being; States of Mind Interactive Console; Emotional Landscapes of Liverpool workshop; involving architecture, interaction design, physical computing
Start Year 2015
 
Description States of Mind 
Organisation University of Wales Trinity Saint David
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This project produced an interactive 'States of Mind' device for people to use to model and share their mental health states. Based on a physical interface, the device provides a platform for people to create digital 3D visual objects representing their states of mind in physical environments and using digital social media. The States of Mind device was produced in parallel with the design of the FACT Liverpool 2015 'Group Therapy: mental distress in a digital age' exhibition in which it was initially presented. A drop-in workshop 'Mapping the emotional landscape of Liverpool' was held during the exhibition, at which museum visitors and workshop participants were invited to talk about their individual journeys to the exhibition, using tangible and tactile rapid-prototyped versions of the digital 3D objects to reflect on their personal mental wellbeing. The States of Mind device was technically enhanced and featured in the 2015 London Design Festival. Across both events over 2,900 digital representations of people's states of mind were collected and shared using the TILO digital display system at FACT Liverpool and social media. RCA CX PhD researcher Ben Koslowski contributed research, design and project development/management.
Collaborator Contribution Professor Karen Ingham (University of Wales Trinity St David) and Dr Roberto Bottazzi (RCA) contributed expertise in forms of representation and how they might be used to elicit responses/offer space for reflection, and expertise in creatively communicating research outcomes and developing engaging experiences, Ana Botella (FACT Liverpool) contributed the context (Group Therapy exhibition/audiences), site, knowledge of and expertise in engaging with audiences, and evaluating exhibitions, project testing and evaluation, Claire Cook & Brendan Dawes (Nexus Productions) contributed expertise in prototyping and building interactive digital experiences; expertise in developing tools for creatively engaging audiences, narrative and storytelling, project development, testing and evaluation.
Impact States of Mind: Representational tools for audience engagement around well-being; States of Mind Interactive Console
Start Year 2015
 
Description StoryMap 
Organisation RIFT
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The StoryMap is an interactive device for people to share experiences of local environments by creating layered maps that are both physical and digital. The StoryMap uses personal anecdotes to build narrative media maps for local neighbourhoods. It reimagines the purpose of maps not for routine navigation or signposting, but for recording and experiencing physical places as they are seen by people who inhabit, visit or imagine them. Developed for the 2016 Shakespeare in Shoreditch Festival, this first StoryMap was a fictional rendition of the Isle of Hackney, London, as seen by festival-goers, dramatists and performers. It connected local landmarks with anecdotal records of memorable moments, potted histories and personal encounters, and helped people find their way through the festival's plays and performances. The StoryMap was a hybrid physical-digital platform that allowed contributors to type an anecdote on a typewriter, and to digitally add this to the fictionalised map of the local area.
Collaborator Contribution Context and site of production; project coordination of Shakespeare in Shoreditch Festival and key partner in leveraging this as research opportunity. Expertise in facilitating immersive narrative experiences for diverse audiences and in facilitating and coordinating immersive narrative experiences for diverse audiences in a range of contexts.
Impact Applying research into the use of architectural representations to help people make sense of digital privacy and social media, the StoryMap was created by Benjamin Koslowski and Jimmy Tidey with artist and developer Oliver Smith, physical-computing specialist Angus Main, writer Peter Thomas and theatre producers Francesca Duncan and Joshua Nawras of Shakespeare in Shoreditch and R-FT, encouraging cross-disciplinary knowledge exchange. The platform was the focus of the Festival hub at BL-NK space on Curtain Rd, where audiences gathered and socialised around the map. XXXX (to be updated) people attended the festival; 200 narrative contributions were made to the map. Many people browsed the map, without sharing a story themselves.
Start Year 2015
 
Description StoryMap 
Organisation RIFT Expeditions LTD
PI Contribution The StoryMap is an interactive device for people to share experiences of local environments by creating layered maps that are both physical and digital. The StoryMap uses personal anecdotes to build narrative media maps for local neighbourhoods. It reimagines the purpose of maps not for routine navigation or signposting, but for recording and experiencing physical places as they are seen by people who inhabit, visit or imagine them. Developed for the 2016 Shakespeare in Shoreditch Festival, this first StoryMap was a fictional rendition of the Isle of Hackney, London, as seen by festival-goers, dramatists and performers. It connected local landmarks with anecdotal records of memorable moments, potted histories and personal encounters, and helped people find their way through the festival's plays and performances. The StoryMap was a hybrid physical-digital platform that allowed contributors to type an anecdote on a typewriter, and to digitally add this to the fictionalised map of the local area.
Collaborator Contribution Context and site of production; project coordination of Shakespeare in Shoreditch Festival and key partner in leveraging this as research opportunity. Expertise in facilitating immersive narrative experiences for diverse audiences and in facilitating and coordinating immersive narrative experiences for diverse audiences in a range of contexts.
Impact Applying research into the use of architectural representations to help people make sense of digital privacy and social media, the StoryMap was created by Benjamin Koslowski and Jimmy Tidey with artist and developer Oliver Smith, physical-computing specialist Angus Main, writer Peter Thomas and theatre producers Francesca Duncan and Joshua Nawras of Shakespeare in Shoreditch and R-FT, encouraging cross-disciplinary knowledge exchange. The platform was the focus of the Festival hub at BL-NK space on Curtain Rd, where audiences gathered and socialised around the map. XXXX (to be updated) people attended the festival; 200 narrative contributions were made to the map. Many people browsed the map, without sharing a story themselves.
Start Year 2015
 
Description TILO 
Organisation MeYouandUs
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The CX hub's methodology, and collaborative approach offer an existing framework that could be the starting point for the layer of arts research requested by the AHRC for the TILO project. We propose an extension of this model, whereby the existing partners in TILO are considered similar to the partners within a standard cluster project and we propose two of the existing CX postgraduate researchers are allocated to the project alongside an academic, with Professor Rachel Cooper as a research sponsor and mentor and Dr Andrew Quick as the lead academic. Whereas the standard CX cluster consists of short, intense research projects running for a few months. We propose a longitudinal approach, whereby postgraduate researchers would be allocated for the 12-month lifecycle of the project at 20%. These researchers would be allocated in kind alongside a budgeted academic (Dr Quick). The IOCP are primarily researching the psychological and physiological reaction to the direct experience of interacting with TILO and its affect on brand perception and the locus of control. The CX research would be focused more on evaluating the Arts and cultural sector significance of the results and the strategic organizational opportunities. The emphasis would be on locating the research results within other related digital arts projects, disseminating the information within the arts community and looking at the potential and actual artistic and cultural impact. Both research timelines would run in parallel and be integrated and each strand would inform the other.
Collaborator Contribution Develop a hybrid display system for Arts and Cultural venues for marketing, currently intended to be called 'TILO' (the 'software'). alongside the software they will create a website supporting the project at tilo.org.uk which will distribute research and comment as well as providing an overview of the software. The project through the software and platform will explore how digital public space can have an emotional and personalised dialogue with visitors (public and stakeholders). The software will build on an industry standard digital signage system (called Scala) that centrally manages and schedules digital content. This will be tested with two arts organisations; The Phoenix Leicester, and The Foundation for Art and Technology in Liverpool ('FACT').
Impact Ongoing
Start Year 2013
 
Description TILO 
Organisation The Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg
Department Institute of Psychology
Country Germany 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The CX hub's methodology, and collaborative approach offer an existing framework that could be the starting point for the layer of arts research requested by the AHRC for the TILO project. We propose an extension of this model, whereby the existing partners in TILO are considered similar to the partners within a standard cluster project and we propose two of the existing CX postgraduate researchers are allocated to the project alongside an academic, with Professor Rachel Cooper as a research sponsor and mentor and Dr Andrew Quick as the lead academic. Whereas the standard CX cluster consists of short, intense research projects running for a few months. We propose a longitudinal approach, whereby postgraduate researchers would be allocated for the 12-month lifecycle of the project at 20%. These researchers would be allocated in kind alongside a budgeted academic (Dr Quick). The IOCP are primarily researching the psychological and physiological reaction to the direct experience of interacting with TILO and its affect on brand perception and the locus of control. The CX research would be focused more on evaluating the Arts and cultural sector significance of the results and the strategic organizational opportunities. The emphasis would be on locating the research results within other related digital arts projects, disseminating the information within the arts community and looking at the potential and actual artistic and cultural impact. Both research timelines would run in parallel and be integrated and each strand would inform the other.
Collaborator Contribution Develop a hybrid display system for Arts and Cultural venues for marketing, currently intended to be called 'TILO' (the 'software'). alongside the software they will create a website supporting the project at tilo.org.uk which will distribute research and comment as well as providing an overview of the software. The project through the software and platform will explore how digital public space can have an emotional and personalised dialogue with visitors (public and stakeholders). The software will build on an industry standard digital signage system (called Scala) that centrally manages and schedules digital content. This will be tested with two arts organisations; The Phoenix Leicester, and The Foundation for Art and Technology in Liverpool ('FACT').
Impact Ongoing
Start Year 2013
 
Description The News Where You Are 
Organisation British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Department BBC Research & Development
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Creative Exchange team at Newcastle University will manage the project. A PhD student funded through the Creative Exchange will lead day-to-day research activities. This will involve fieldwork to gain an understanding of professional and amateur journalism, participatory design activities, the development of a social platform for journalists, and evaluation of this platform
Collaborator Contribution University of Central Lancashire: Paul Egglestone will provide supervision of fieldwork and participatory design activities, and creative input onto the development of the social platform. This input will largely relate to existing knowledge of citizen journalism and access to existing citizen journalists and related resources. BBC: The BBC will host a Creative Exchange PhD student on an internship under the supervision of Maxine Glancy. Through this placement, the student will be gain access to BBC News personnel in order to conduct fieldwork. The BBC will provide creative input on the development of the social platform, particularly relating to its utility to traditional broadcast journalism.
Impact Garbett, A. T., Comber, R., Egglestone, P., Glancy, M., & Olivier, P. (2014). Finding "real people." In Proceedings of the 32nd annual ACM conference on Human factors in computing systems - CHI '14 (pp. 3015-3024). New York, New York, USA: ACM Press. Retrieved from http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2611247.2557114
Start Year 2013
 
Description The News Where You Are 
Organisation University of Central Lancashire
Department School of Journalism and Media
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Creative Exchange team at Newcastle University will manage the project. A PhD student funded through the Creative Exchange will lead day-to-day research activities. This will involve fieldwork to gain an understanding of professional and amateur journalism, participatory design activities, the development of a social platform for journalists, and evaluation of this platform
Collaborator Contribution University of Central Lancashire: Paul Egglestone will provide supervision of fieldwork and participatory design activities, and creative input onto the development of the social platform. This input will largely relate to existing knowledge of citizen journalism and access to existing citizen journalists and related resources. BBC: The BBC will host a Creative Exchange PhD student on an internship under the supervision of Maxine Glancy. Through this placement, the student will be gain access to BBC News personnel in order to conduct fieldwork. The BBC will provide creative input on the development of the social platform, particularly relating to its utility to traditional broadcast journalism.
Impact Garbett, A. T., Comber, R., Egglestone, P., Glancy, M., & Olivier, P. (2014). Finding "real people." In Proceedings of the 32nd annual ACM conference on Human factors in computing systems - CHI '14 (pp. 3015-3024). New York, New York, USA: ACM Press. Retrieved from http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2611247.2557114
Start Year 2013
 
Description Thinking Digital 
Organisation Codeworks
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution This was a partnership between CX PhD student Bettina Nissen and the Thinking Digital Conference (TDC), who engaged her to produce bespoke souvenirs for conference delegates. Thinking Digital is an annual conference focusing on future digital technologies and how they may shape our lives. Attendees at this conference form a small but involved community which every year engages with one another and the organisers in a personal and public way. In particular, discussions and conversations are broadcast via Twitter through an often trending hashtag #tdc14 so CX researcher Bettina Nissen developed a shape generating system to explore how online social interactions could be translated into physical forms to engage attendees in offline conversations. This digital design system allowed attendees to graph the amount of overall conference tweets alongside their individual tweets over a 24h period into wearable 'clip' forms that could be worn or used in multiple ways.
Collaborator Contribution The organisers of the Thinking Digital Conference enabled CX PhD student Bettina Nissen to engage their delegates (and their delegates Twitter data), which enabled her to experiment with new forms of data translation and user engagement.
Impact Digitally Fabricating Data-Things: A Participatory Approach to Making Data Physical (workshop paper); Data-Things: Digital Fabrication Situated within Participatory Data Translation Activities; Thinking Digital data things
Start Year 2014
 
Description This is How We Do It 
Organisation Beamish The Living Museum of the North
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The knowledge underpinning craft practice is often inherently tacit (not easily communicated through written or verbal description). Consequently, attempts to capture and communicate the heritage of crafts practices might miss important aspects of practitioners' skills and experiences. This project explored the design, development and utilisation of technologies to support the capture and presentation of these intangible aspects of craft practice in two ways. Firstly, by developing a sonification system which translates craft gestures into live audio feedback and secondly by making tangible artefacts from and with the practitioner's movement data. CX researchers faciliated a series of practical and discussion workshops with craft practitioners, developed and iteratively refined a sonification system (gesture-capture tools and software), and produced a series of tangible artefacts based on the gesture data captured.
Collaborator Contribution Arno Verhoeven (Edinbugh College of Art, University of Edinburgh) provided expertise in craft and design practice, and participated in critical reflection with CX researchers to develop insights from workshops throughout the project. Celyn Williams (Beamish Museum) provided access to heritage craft skills (Proggy and Hooky Matting) via crafts-person led workshops at Beamish Museum.
Impact Data-Things: Digital Fabrication Situated within Participatory Data Translation Activities; Exploring Gesture Sonification to Support Reflective Craft Practice; Growing Artefacts out of Making; All Makers Now; Gesture Sonification System
Start Year 2013
 
Description This is How We Do It 
Organisation Beamish The Living Museum of the North
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Creative Exchange team at Newcastle University will manage the project. A PhD student funded through the Creative Exchange will lead day-to-day research activities. This will involve a literature review of existing similar technologies and leading design and evaluation workshops.
Collaborator Contribution University of Edinburgh: Arno Verhoeven provided creative input on the design of the technology and guidance to PhD students. This included attending workshops and design sessions. Beamish Museum: Beamish Museum provided access to their facilities and workshops and act as a host for deployments.
Impact Publication outputs from TIHWDI: Nissen, B. (2014). Growing Artefacts out of Making. In All Makers Now (Vol. 1, pp. 113-119). Nissen, B., & Bowers, J. (2015). Data-Things. In Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - CHI '15 (pp. 2467-2476). New York, New York, USA: ACM Press. Retrieved from http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2702123.2702245 Smith, T., Bowen, S. J., Nissen, B., Hook, J., Verhoeven, A., Bowers, J., Olivier, P. (2015). Exploring Gesture Sonification to Support Reflective Craft Practice. In Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - CHI '15 (pp. 67-76). New York, New York, USA: ACM Press. doi:10.1145/2702123.2702497 Alongside additional associated engagement activities and developed technical and creative products
Start Year 2013
 
Description This is How We Do It 
Organisation Edinburgh College of Art (ECA)
Department School of Design
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Creative Exchange team at Newcastle University will manage the project. A PhD student funded through the Creative Exchange will lead day-to-day research activities. This will involve a literature review of existing similar technologies and leading design and evaluation workshops.
Collaborator Contribution University of Edinburgh: Arno Verhoeven provided creative input on the design of the technology and guidance to PhD students. This included attending workshops and design sessions. Beamish Museum: Beamish Museum provided access to their facilities and workshops and act as a host for deployments.
Impact Publication outputs from TIHWDI: Nissen, B. (2014). Growing Artefacts out of Making. In All Makers Now (Vol. 1, pp. 113-119). Nissen, B., & Bowers, J. (2015). Data-Things. In Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - CHI '15 (pp. 2467-2476). New York, New York, USA: ACM Press. Retrieved from http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2702123.2702245 Smith, T., Bowen, S. J., Nissen, B., Hook, J., Verhoeven, A., Bowers, J., Olivier, P. (2015). Exploring Gesture Sonification to Support Reflective Craft Practice. In Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - CHI '15 (pp. 67-76). New York, New York, USA: ACM Press. doi:10.1145/2702123.2702497 Alongside additional associated engagement activities and developed technical and creative products
Start Year 2013
 
Description This is How We Do It 
Organisation University of Edinburgh
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The knowledge underpinning craft practice is often inherently tacit (not easily communicated through written or verbal description). Consequently, attempts to capture and communicate the heritage of crafts practices might miss important aspects of practitioners' skills and experiences. This project explored the design, development and utilisation of technologies to support the capture and presentation of these intangible aspects of craft practice in two ways. Firstly, by developing a sonification system which translates craft gestures into live audio feedback and secondly by making tangible artefacts from and with the practitioner's movement data. CX researchers faciliated a series of practical and discussion workshops with craft practitioners, developed and iteratively refined a sonification system (gesture-capture tools and software), and produced a series of tangible artefacts based on the gesture data captured.
Collaborator Contribution Arno Verhoeven (Edinbugh College of Art, University of Edinburgh) provided expertise in craft and design practice, and participated in critical reflection with CX researchers to develop insights from workshops throughout the project. Celyn Williams (Beamish Museum) provided access to heritage craft skills (Proggy and Hooky Matting) via crafts-person led workshops at Beamish Museum.
Impact Data-Things: Digital Fabrication Situated within Participatory Data Translation Activities; Exploring Gesture Sonification to Support Reflective Craft Practice; Growing Artefacts out of Making; All Makers Now; Gesture Sonification System
Start Year 2013
 
Description Time & Motion: Redefining Working Life Exhibition 
Organisation Foundation for Art and Creative Technology (FACT)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution FACT (Foundation for Art and Creative Technology) Liverpool collaborated with the Royal College of Art to produce a major research, innovation and exhibition programme exploring the effects of digital technology - digital public space in particular - on patterns of working life. Entitled Time & Motion, this programme included an exhibition of artefacts and experiments (13 December 2013 - 24 February 2014 presented at FACT Liverpool), a symposium, film festival, talent lab and a publication. The purpose of Time & Motion was to re-examine the relevance of our traditional notions of the eight-hour working day. Amid the new realities of a globalised experience economy and a working environment that is increasingly distributed, virtualised and digital, our definitions of production and consumption, work and recreation are becoming increasingly blurred. RCA CX researchers Professor Jeremy Myerson, Dr Georgina Voss, Ben Dalton, John Fass, Veronica Ranner, Ben Koslowski, Susannah Haslam and Jimmy Tidey contributed research and design expertise and producation and organised events, a symposium and edited a publication.
Collaborator Contribution Mike Stubbs (FACT Liverpool) co-curated the exhibition, co-led the symposium and contributed to the events and symposium.
Impact -
Start Year 2013
 
Description Tuning In Listening Back in Time 
Organisation Newcastle University
Department School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution As a result of the T Dan Smith CX project, CX PhD student Clara Crivellaro applied with academics from Newcastle University's School of Architecture Planning and Landscape Armelle Tardivue, Daniel Mallo and Geoff Vigar for ESRC funding to develop public engagement as part of the DIY Street Fenham. The project used technologies and augmented DIY street furniture to engage the local community in re-imagining their street towards the development of planning proposals to submit to the local council. Clara contributed expertise in community-engagement.
Collaborator Contribution This project was led by Newcastle University's School of Architecture Planning and Landscape with support from CX PhD researcher Clara Crivellaro.
Impact -
Start Year 2014
 
Description Tuning-in to T. Dan Smith 
Organisation Amber Film and Photography Collective
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Creative Exchange team at Newcastle University will manage the project. A PhD student funded through the Creative Exchange will lead day-to-day research activities. This will involve a literature review of existing similar technologies and leading design and evaluation workshops. Martyn Dade-Robertson will contribute expertise on information architecture and contribute to the design process.
Collaborator Contribution Amblr LLP: Amblr will contribute expertise in building locative platforms and interfaces through attendance at design and evaluation workshops. Where appropriate, they can provide access to their own locative media platform. Amber Film and Photography Collective CIC: Amber Films will provide access to their film archive relating to T. Dan Smith and guidance on how this archive might be utilised. The Northern Architecture Centre: Northern Architecture will provide expertise in the current and historical development of Newcastle, and potential access to communities in Newcastle with whom they work.
Impact Paper publications in review, further collaborations in discussion. Successful Heritage Lottery Funding for Amber.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Tuning-in to T. Dan Smith 
Organisation Amblr
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Creative Exchange team at Newcastle University will manage the project. A PhD student funded through the Creative Exchange will lead day-to-day research activities. This will involve a literature review of existing similar technologies and leading design and evaluation workshops. Martyn Dade-Robertson will contribute expertise on information architecture and contribute to the design process.
Collaborator Contribution Amblr LLP: Amblr will contribute expertise in building locative platforms and interfaces through attendance at design and evaluation workshops. Where appropriate, they can provide access to their own locative media platform. Amber Film and Photography Collective CIC: Amber Films will provide access to their film archive relating to T. Dan Smith and guidance on how this archive might be utilised. The Northern Architecture Centre: Northern Architecture will provide expertise in the current and historical development of Newcastle, and potential access to communities in Newcastle with whom they work.
Impact Paper publications in review, further collaborations in discussion. Successful Heritage Lottery Funding for Amber.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Tuning-in to T. Dan Smith 
Organisation Northern Architecture Centre
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Creative Exchange team at Newcastle University will manage the project. A PhD student funded through the Creative Exchange will lead day-to-day research activities. This will involve a literature review of existing similar technologies and leading design and evaluation workshops. Martyn Dade-Robertson will contribute expertise on information architecture and contribute to the design process.
Collaborator Contribution Amblr LLP: Amblr will contribute expertise in building locative platforms and interfaces through attendance at design and evaluation workshops. Where appropriate, they can provide access to their own locative media platform. Amber Film and Photography Collective CIC: Amber Films will provide access to their film archive relating to T. Dan Smith and guidance on how this archive might be utilised. The Northern Architecture Centre: Northern Architecture will provide expertise in the current and historical development of Newcastle, and potential access to communities in Newcastle with whom they work.
Impact Paper publications in review, further collaborations in discussion. Successful Heritage Lottery Funding for Amber.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Visiting scientist: SilkLab at Tufts University 
Organisation Tufts University
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Lectures to students and participation in SilkLab
Collaborator Contribution Input into PhD research and collaboration on Creative Exchange mini-project BioDigital Silk Road
Impact Collaborative mini-project as part of the Creative Exchange programme
Start Year 2014
 
Description Where do you go to? 
Organisation Integrans Consulting
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Digital space has redefined working life, untethering workers from their desks and workplaces. It has enabled the opportunity to work anywhere, anytime. Yet digital space simultaneously lacks geographic substance; it is both nowhere and everywhere. This project responded to a growing need for design solutions that reduce psychological distance to foster a sense of connectedness in distributed working. It explored how digital visualisations of workspaces can create a sense of being local in digital space and enrich human experience independent of geography, and resulted in the development of a new prototype app. CX PhD researcher Ben Dalton contributed research and design expertise, produced a prototypical digital app, organised workshops and public activities, and disseminated the research at events and in publications.
Collaborator Contribution Dr Claire McAndrew (UCL) and Bridget Hardy (Integrans Consulting) contributed expertise in scoping the potential for creative visualisations of workspaces in digital public space, and generating new empirical knowledge of the social and economic benefits of a sense of 'connectedness' and 'knowing' via a prototype digital visualisation.
Impact Where do you go to...? Designing 'connectedness' in digital public space (paper); Time and Motion: Redefining Working Life (Book)
Start Year 2013
 
Description Where do you go to? 
Organisation University College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Digital space has redefined working life, untethering workers from their desks and workplaces. It has enabled the opportunity to work anywhere, anytime. Yet digital space simultaneously lacks geographic substance; it is both nowhere and everywhere. This project responded to a growing need for design solutions that reduce psychological distance to foster a sense of connectedness in distributed working. It explored how digital visualisations of workspaces can create a sense of being local in digital space and enrich human experience independent of geography, and resulted in the development of a new prototype app. CX PhD researcher Ben Dalton contributed research and design expertise, produced a prototypical digital app, organised workshops and public activities, and disseminated the research at events and in publications.
Collaborator Contribution Dr Claire McAndrew (UCL) and Bridget Hardy (Integrans Consulting) contributed expertise in scoping the potential for creative visualisations of workspaces in digital public space, and generating new empirical knowledge of the social and economic benefits of a sense of 'connectedness' and 'knowing' via a prototype digital visualisation.
Impact Where do you go to...? Designing 'connectedness' in digital public space (paper); Time and Motion: Redefining Working Life (Book)
Start Year 2013
 
Title Affinity app: Quantifying care of those living with Dementia 
Description The Affinity prototype consists of an ambient display that can be used as a clock face as well as a display that shows the person living with dementia an abstracted overview of where family members are and how close they might be to their current location. They can then send a notification to the carer's smartphone who will then be prompted to contact their loved one. The second part of the system is the quantification of care in which care providers are being tracked and statistics are used to critically encourage competition between care providers and empower the person living with dementia. The concept of tracking the those who track others raised questions around the negative implications of what might happen in the future and opened the debate into how we should proceed in the area of tracking those living with dementia. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact The Create4Dementia hack event hosted 50+ hackers with skills in software, design and healthcare to develop innovative technologies for those living with dementia in 24 hours. The team from Open Lab - Team Sonar - consisted of Andy Garbett, Ed Jenkins, Dan Richardson, Tom Nappey and Reuben Kirkham were awarded with the 'Most Provocative Concept' by the judges for their prototype location tracking and ambient display. 
 
Title App Movement: An online platform to community commission mobile apps 
Description App Movement turns the typical model of smart phone app development on its head. Rather software companies instigating the development of Apps, people come together to propose and design their own apps, which are then developed by the system. Via a website, App Movement makes the collective commissioning of smart phone Apps available to anyone, free of charge. To date, this has included Apps for rating dementia-friendly cafés, housing landlords, and safe areas for flying personal camera drones. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact App Movement launched in Feb 2015 and now has over 2,300 members who have supported 27 campaigns, 11 of which have been successful and (at present) resulted in 8 mobile apps being launched in the Google Play Store and App Store. The apps have accrued over 18,000 members who actively contribute content. This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
URL https://app-movement.com
 
Title Cold Sun: Game 
Description Cold Sun provides an example that illustrates how scientific and real world data can be integrated into game mechanics to enhance the rhetoric of the game by engaging the player at a more personal level. Thus Cold Sun allows players to effectively rehearse issues of climate change that will affect their plausible futures, and thus develop a greater understanding of some of these complex issues and consider ways to respond. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
 
Title Digital Collaboration Tool 
Description This is a tool that allows a group of people to easily create short slide presentations and for a group of them to collectively rate or judge the groups responses to a common question. While the code for this is not open source this is a free resource that anyone can access through a web in a manner analogue to 'doodle poll'. Users of the soft wear do not need to have an account, they can set up a facilitation question and use the service and at the end of the session it produces a PDF report of the activity and closes. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact This service / soft wear has only recently been made publicly available on the web. It has however been used in a wide range of eventual and activities in a locally available form. We are unsure as to how much demand for the tool we will experience (this is part of our research question). We do know that it has been used with very positive effects in a wide range of workshops and in 2 conferences led by the CX project. 
URL http://cx.tools
 
Title FACT fingerprint generating software 
Description This software was developed to generate unique 3D fingerprint shapes from visitors stories imagined during an exhibition engagement activity. Visitors could interactively generate personalised fingerprints from the words of their stories as unique souvenirs. This software was developed in Processing/Java. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Impact is described in the associated engagement activity 
 
Title Fax Machine Game 
Description This working prototype brings elements of digital game play into the physical world using a small printer. The player is a detective in a text-based adventure game, with instructions being received both within the game and through 'faxes' sent to the player outside the game, via the small printer. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact This game, along with related work on toy-controllers (see Toy Play Game) and sensor-based controllers (see Squidgy), is enabling the PhD researcher to develop insights into a broader integration of game controllers into game narratives, this opening up new opportunities for game design. 
 
Title FeedFinder mobile application: Helping women find, rate, and review suitable breastfeeding locations 
Description FeedFinder has been designed with breastfeeding mothers to provide an easy and convenient tool for finding and sharing good places for breastfeeding. We'll show you on a handy map all of the places near you that have been reviewed by other mothers. We've also carefully designed FeedFinder so that it can be used one-handed as much as possible so that you can even be adding a review of a breastfeeding place as you breastfeed your little one. You can use FeedFinder to find places around you where other mothers have had positive breastfeeding experiences. Every recommended place on the map will have been reviewed by someone who's breastfeeding. You'll be able to see not only how they have rated that place, but also any handy comments that they have added about their experience or the location, like whether they have toys and a menu for toddlers, or where the breastfeeding room is if it's a bit difficult to find. If you can't find somewhere near you, or have found a new gem be sure to add the new place to the map. You'll find the process easy and convenient with FeedFinder doing most the hard work, like locating the place on the map, or adding the address details - all you'll need to do is add a star rating and your own comments. FeedFinder is part of a research project based at the Digital Interaction group in Newcastle University, UK. Check out http://feed-finder.co.uk for more details about how we store, collect and use your anonymised data. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact The FeedFinder application has been widely received within the UK and further afield. The community of 6,000+ members have mapped over 5,500 suitable breastfeeding locations nationwide. The team have been awarded the EPSRC Impact award for Digital Economy and Innovation for developing the project. The FeedFinder app also became a finalist in the Roseline Franklin Appathon Award 2015. This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
URL http://feed-finder.co.uk
 
Title Fields Performance System 
Description Fields is an audio-visual composition performed through the audience's smartphones. Participants simply connect to a specially designed web page to enable the performers to use their phone as a loudspeaker within the performance. The specially made system allows for each phone to be controlled individually and for each audience member to hold their own distinctive part of the composition. Up to 300 people can connect simultaneously, the swarm of tiny speakers creates a collection of overlapping sound sources enabling listeners to gain a unique spatial perspective on their shared environment. Each phone also becomes a visual medium, screens flashing from white to black as sound is played. Coupled with the audio this creates an ever changing flickering of light and sound throughout the performance space. This work builds upon the Fields system which we have been implementing since early 2014, this provides the capabilities for network communication and sound diffusion necessary for this type of performance. Fields is released as an open- source program and benefits from a wealth of international performances in venues throughout Europe and the USA. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact Fields has been performed in the following venues Cafe OTO (London, UK) ? Piksel (Bergen, Norway) ? NK Projekt (Berlin, Germany) ? ZDB (Lisbon, Portugal) ? Third Space (Helsinki, Finland) ? Connect the Dots (Sheffield, UK) ? Sanctuary Festival (Dumfries, UK) ? Islington Mill (Manchester, UK) ? Music Hackspace (London, UK) ? Talbot Rice Gallery (Edinburgh, UK) ? Grundy Art Gallery (Blackpool, UK) ? Web Audio Conference (Paris, France) ? New Interfaces for Musical Expression (Baton Rouge, USA) ? Goldsmiths (London, UK) ? Culture Lab (Newcastle, UK) ? Durham Castle (Durham, UK) ? Sussex University (Sussex, UK) ? Green Door Store (Brighton, UK) ? Louisiana (Bristol, UK) ? International Computer Music Conference (Athens, Greece). This project has engaged over 3,000 people through workshops, talks and performances. 
URL https://github.com/sebpiq/fields
 
Title GNR souvenir generating software 
Description This algorithmic software was developed to generate unique shapes from the provided Great North Run data. Participants could interactively generate personalised shapes from their running data into unique souvenirs. This software was developed in Processing/Java. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Impact is described in the associated engagement activity 
 
Title Gesture Sonification System 
Description This system combines a WAX9 miniature sensor (gyroscope, accelerometer, bluetooth - see activity.com) with software to sonify the movement of the sensor. It was developed an employed in the This is How We Do It CX project to sonify the gestures of craft practitioners by attaching the WAX9 sensor to their hand tools. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact Data captured using this system was used to create materialisations of craft gestures in a subsequent project. 
 
Title Ghost Listener prototype 
Description GhostListener is an audio channel selection tool for multichannel video. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact Further developed by researchers at the University of Lincoln. 2nd prize in the TVX2014 Hackathon 
 
Title Good Day at Work mobile application 
Description Successfully maintaining high performance and wellbeing can be a challenge, so it's vital to understand what influences personal resilience and how to build it. It's a unique tool that provides tangible and personalised employee support, whilst also helping you hit the business' wellbeing goals. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
 
Title INDX Personal Data Store browser data App 
Description Through CX discussions with Ben Dalton on digital identity, web browser data and lifetime personal data stores the INDX research team at Southampton University developed and released a browser data app for their INDX PDS prototype. They also developed a number of data visualisations relating to browser data. The app consists of a continuous, real-time logging web history plug-in 'app' for the Google Chrome browser. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
URL https://sociam.github.io/indx/
 
Title Impact-o-meter - Providing overview to parliamentary bills and acts in the news 
Description A team of PhD students from Computing Science, Newcastle (Andy Garbett, Vasilis Vlachokyriakos, Ed Jenkins and Carlton Shepherd) developed Impactometer which brings together crime stats, news and twitter feeds and data on when bills are proposed and enacted. The app provides an easy way to see the impact of bills on crime and also what drives bills to be proposed/discussed. Rewired State Parliament Hackathon kicked off Parliament week with a two day hack weekend on the 16th and 17th of November Hub Westminster (http://westminster.impacthub.net/). The weekend attracted some of the best developers and designers from across the UK to build prototype apps using government data sets in an informal and fun hack day setting. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
 
Title Improving the Visualisation of Renal Blood Test Results to Enhance Patient - Clinician Communication 
Description Haemodialysis patients in the UK usually undergo routine monthly blood tests which support the medical team in assessing their ongoing condition. Based on these results, clinicians then advise the patients on appropriate changes to diet and / or medication to improve their health. While the results of these blood tests are made available to the patient via an online portal, their presentation is purely focused on the numerical side. This style is more applicable to medical professionals which means patients are not able to readily engage with their own results. The built prototype proposes a new approach to visualising blood test results for the patient with the aim of encouraging patients to be more actively involved in managing their own condition. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Enhancing the Patient-Clinician Communication 
 
Title In-Place 
Description Web based platform for connecting creative practice: A collection of creative projects using digital technologies to explore local heritage, place and memory. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
URL http://inplace.space/
 
Title LocalNets Web Application 
Description Localnets is a tool to find active local citizens & build democratic engagement. How it works :- 1 Identify a local issue that can benefit from public consultation 2 Localnets creates a list of local citizens engaged with that issue on Twitter 3 Use Localnets to organise online consultation and arrange focus groups 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Collaborations with DCLG, RSA, and UCLAN investigating local communities, as described in engagement activities. 
URL http://localnets.org
 
Title Mydex PDS (Personal Data Store) browser data plugin and visualisations 
Description Following CX discussions with Ben Dalton on digital identity, web browser data and lifetime personal data stores the company Mydex developed and released a browser data plugin for their online Mydex PDS. They also developed a number of data visualisations relating to browser data clustering and timelines. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact Following a workshop on Private Clouds, Public Good, Mydex have described how they developed data-sets spanning a lifetime of data for testing and development. This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
URL https://dev.mydex.org/
 
Title New Cloud Atlas 
Description The Atlas is a project by CX PhD student Ben Dalton, geospatial developer, Tim Waters, and the design and research studio of Amber Frid-Jimenez and Joe Dahmen. The Atlas sets out to map each warehouse data centre, internet exchange, connecting cable and switch of physical significance in the operation of the cloud for everyone to see and use. The website uses opendata from Open Street Map, and modifies open source and free software cartography and map contribution projects. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact The site has been presented at a number of public talks and has contributed back to the Open Street Map project community. This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
URL http://newcloudatlas.org
 
Title NewsDrop: a toolkit for supporting community journalism of parliamentary debates 
Description NewsDrop is a toolkit for supporting community journalism of parliamentary debates. It uses a physical installation that displays a live news paper, authored by community journalists through an online news production tool. The production tool aggregates related news, BBC programmes using iPlayer and twitter. The physical installation also allows citizen journalists to conduct surveys from the community readers of the live newspaper. National news coverage of Parliamentary debate is inherently non-local specific content and often communities are affected by these issues and are left without an outlet to discuss these issues. NewsDrop was envisaged as a way in which communities can become more aware of this discussion through supporting local community journalists in aggregating and disseminating local news about Parliamentary debates. 
Type Of Technology Physical Model/Kit 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact The prototype was exhibited at the #NewsHack 2013 event to leading media industry experts which resulted in winning the award for best academic submission. 
URL http://hack.sbl.io
 
Title OTP souvenir making system 
Description This algorithmic software was developed to generate unique shapes from audience experience questionnaires. Visitors could leave parametric feedback that would interactively generate personalised shapes of their visit as unique souvenirs. This software was developed in Processing/Java. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact Impact description is provided in the project description 'On The Precipice' 
 
Title Past Paths online discovery interface for Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums online collections 
Description In collaboration with Tyne & Wear Archives and Museums, Nesta and Microsoft Research a discovery search interface was developed that aims to improve public access and engagement with digital heritage collections. The exploratory web platform and novel search interface is implemented for Tyne & Wear Archives and Museums' online collections and aims to encourage people to search and discover museum content online. The seamless designed website invites users to dive into the collection and enables the experience of serendipity while browsing through artefacts. Adapting the users' scrolling speed the interface either keeps displaying related items or presents random new topics. Storing items that have been clicked on the website allows users to go back in their browsing experience. Also, a map view presents all items that are stored and their relations to each other. This feature provides the user with the opportunity to find more related content to collection items and to use this as a starting point for a new search. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact The interface has received over 13,000 visits and has been integrated with the online search system for Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums online collection. Our survey data suggests that almost 70% of users discovered something they were surprised by and would not have expected during their visit. Visitors also spent almost 4x longer (3.8 minutes on average) exploring items using the discovery interface than the existing search interface. The final discovery engine continues to be utilised as a primary discovery interface for the online digital collections of Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums. This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
URL http://collectionsdivetwmuseums.org.uk
 
Title Perceptive Media Prototype 
Description A 'perceptive radio' that is able to play specially designed content that adapts to the physical and social context in which the radio resides. 
Type Of Technology Physical Model/Kit 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
 
Title Physical Playlist: Android Player 
Description This research re-imagines the mix-tape for digital content as physical customizable jewellery that can once again embody values not generally attributed to digital content. This was the Android version of the Player app, that plays back the data stored on the jewellery. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
 
Title Physical Playlist: Android Writer 
Description This research re-imagines the mix-tape for digital content as physical customizable jewellery that can once again embody values not generally attributed to digital content. This was the app that wrote the data to the jewllery 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
 
Title Physical Playlist: Prototype 
Description This research re-imagines the mix-tape for digital content as physical customizable jewellery that can once again embody values not generally attributed to digital content. 
Type Of Technology Physical Model/Kit 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
 
Title Physical Playlist: RaspberryPi Controller 
Description This research re-imagines the mix-tape for digital content as physical customizable jewellery that can once again embody values not generally attributed to digital content. This is the controller software that plays back the stored data on the jewellery. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
 
Title Physical Social Network 
Description A webpage which allows a user to interact with a digital collection of Edwardian postcards. This is part of the Physical Social Network project and, whilst it can be used outside of the physical artefact, it makes little sense in doing so. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2017 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact
 
Title RTD impression generating software 
Description This algorithmic software was developed to generate unique shapes from conference attendees' feedback. Attendees could interactively generate personalised shapes from their experience as unique conference impressions. This software was developed in Processing/Java. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact Impact is described in associated engagement activity 
 
Title Squidge Game/Controller 
Description Squidge brings game play directly into the player's by making the form of the controller, and interactions with it part of the game narrative. Guide Squidge the baby monster back to his home by shielding his eyes when he is frightened and remaining calm (so that you pulse rate keeps him calm also). 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact This game, along with related work on toy-based controllers (see Squidge) and physical-digital game play (see Fax Machine Game), is enabling the PhD researcher to develop insights into a broader integration of game controllers into game narratives, this opening up new opportunities for game design. 
 
Title TDC shape generating software 
Description This algorithmic software was developed to generate unique shapes from the conferences hashtag twitter data. Participants could interactively generate a personalised shapes from their conference tweets. This software was developed in Processing/Java. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact Impact is described in the associated engagement activity 
 
Title The Wild Man Game 
Description The Wild Man game is an iOS compatible app that encourages young people to explore a country house from the perspective of ones of its hidden stories. The game resurrects the mythical Wild Man of Belsay who features in the Middleton family's coat of arms. With location beacons hidden around the rooms, the experience is played through visitors' mobile phones, the voice of the Wild Man guiding them through challenges and responding to the players' actions as they explore the old hall. This app takes users into a different time and place where wild creatures roam the rooms of Belsay Hall, challenging them to creep carefully through the halls to surprise the Wild Man - who listens and feels their every move. Typically visitors get their information via audio headsets or information boards but these are very isolating and don't encourage people to engage either with each other or their surroundings. The aim of the Wild Man Game is to get people to look beyond the mobile phone and explore their environment in a way they wouldn't otherwise, immersing themselves in the history rather than simply looking at it from a distance. The players in the game do not have to follow a set route around the house or look at things in a certain order. Instead it is about exploring in your own time and in your own way as the game develops around you. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact The augmented reality software from this App have been used in the Labella app which has achieved considerable success in the upcoming CHI 2016. 
 
Title Tor Toys 
Description Automated scanner image and story publishing scripts using the tor anonymity network on raspberry pi computers as part of a series of zine DIY publishing workshops. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact Used by participants in workshops as part of the Designing Digital Now exhibition at FACT gallery in Liverpool and in collaboration with DoES Liverpool co-working space. 
URL http://www.fact.co.uk/whats-on/current/tor-toys.aspx
 
Title Toy Play Game 
Description This working prototype combines sensors embodied in a child's toy combined with a customised version of the Minecraft multiplayer game. Physical play with toys outside the game influences game play within Minecraft. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2015 
Impact This game, along with related work on sensor-based controllers (see Squidge) and physical-digital game play (see Fax Machine Game), is enabling the PhD researcher to develop insights into a broader integration of game controllers into game narratives, this opening up new opportunities for game design. 
 
Title Where do you go to? app 
Description Through a process of co-design with the BBC R&D NorthLab, an Android (Cordova - portable to iPhone and Blackberry) app was developed to share continuous context between collaborators. Scripted to capture, process and upload participants' photographs in a shared environment, the app enabled digital expression of the performance of work between a networked set of collaborators. Participants were invited to contribute photographs of workspaces and desks at regular intervals over a two-week period, using the app made available on dedicated Android mobile phones or downloaded onto personal devices. We repeated a second period of testing with the app in our own design research group to experience the prototype ourselves. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf 
 
Title Whocites.com 
Description Searches Google Scholar to discover citation networks 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2016 
Impact Over 200 academic users 
URL http://whocites.org
 
Title i-dentity - Gavin Wood 
Description The i-dentity game was conceived at the CHI Game Jam in 2012. In this Game Jam we attempted to capture the values of play from our childhood and party games. In order to do this, we created the i-dentity game which was built upon the childhood play of "What time is it, Mr. Wolf", and "Sleeping Lions". In our game, four players that benefits from being played in front of an audience (Fig. 1). It is played with a set of Sony Move controllers and no screen. Players assume the role of an interrogator or one of three spies. The three spies each hold a Move controller. One Move controller is randomly selected by the game to represent the spies' leader. The leader's movements illuminate all three of the spies' controllers, while the spies' movements are ignored. Vibration feedback is discretely sent to the leader's controller when moved to let him/her know his/her role in the game. The leader's role is only known amongst the spies themselves. The interrogator, whose goal is to identify the spies' leader, conducts or asks the spies to perform movements. For example, we observed commands such as asking the group to jump up and down, they could be asked to "pretend they had just been shot", or to play air guitar. However, the interrogator can only address the spies together, as a group (so the interrogator cannot say "only the person in the middle should jump"). While the leader moves through acting out a command, everyone's light turns on. When the leader is stationary the lights go out. The spies copy their movements in an attempt to identify whose movements control the light. The game continues until the interrogator believes she/he knows the identity of the spies' leader. At this stage, the interrogator points towards the leader. The chosen leader waves their controller; if all the spies' controllers illuminate, the interrogator wins and the spies and interrogator switch roles, otherwise the leader and the spies win. Players often agreed upon a limit to the amount of commands that could be asked before requiring the interrogator to select a leader. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2014 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact The value of i-dentity has been its use as a digital tool to explore how movement in digital games is represented. To this end, we wrote software upon the PS3 Move Library that allowed a Mac OSX machine to connect to a number of PlayStation Controllers. This software now provides an exemplar of how you can write a game to use the PS3 Move controllers. These controllers represent one future of digital game control where the most important thing is the body-space, exercise and social engagement rather than being placed in front of a display and being given a prescriptive game experience. 
URL https://github.com/baawolf
 
Company Name Made with Glove 
Description MadeWithGlove is a UK wearable technology company designing fashionable heated gloves for women. 
Year Established 2014 
Impact Numbers that Matter brought together academics, companies and hackers with an interest in wearables, open data and civic wellbeing. Together they looked at how to design empathy and community into an open hardware product development life cycle. The central concern and motivator for the project and its research approach was civic wellbeing, bringing a new angle to the timely topic of wearable devices and open data, including demographics outside the usual young technology aware user base. There is a lot of data that is about individuals but not a lot of data that is for individuals and their communities. Numbers that Matter aimed to design more meaningful ways of accessing and building with that data - not limited to designing for the tech elite of early adopters and instead responding to the day-to-day needs and concerns of a locality. The Numbers That Matter project held a Hackathon in March 2014. The winner of this hackathon, with financial and business development support from The Creative Exchange, went on to found a startup company Made With Glove developing heated glove wearable devices, and was shortlisted for The Pitch top 100, Britain's biggest small business competition. http://www.thepitch.uk/shortlist/made-withglove-ltd/220. After receiving a £5,000 innovation voucher from Innovate UK to conduct prefeasibility studies, the company founder Michelle Hua is now applying for the SMART funding through Innovate UK and hopes to launch a commercial product during 2016. "Creative Exchange have been very supportive in progressing my idea to prototype stage. While the funding itself was to bring an idea to prototype stage, I have received more than a prototype which has added great value to my business. The value, I believe, has been in making the right connections and meeting the right people to support my business. This is so important in every entrepreneur's journey. I was invited to attend and exhibit my prototype at the Prime Conference at the Royal Institution of Great Britain. I was inspired by all the speakers and made valuable connections with people from the industry. I was also invited to attend the AHRC and Innovate UK meeting in London to discuss ways in which AHRC and Innovate UK can have better relationships and how Innovate UK can better service its customers. We also addressed the challenges of small and micro businesses' access to Innovate UK. Being a startup entrepreneur, it was very interesting learning about the issues of funding from the funder's perspective. I was invited to showcase my prototype at the Innovate UK exhibition at Old Billingsgate in London with over 2000 international delegates, providing me with many opportunities for my business. The support along the way from the team has been invaluable, answering questions in relation to funding, business ideas, models and introducing me to networks of contacts as well as discussing and brainstorming ideas. It has been a positive experience and I am grateful for the support." Michelle Hua
Website http://www.michellehua.co.uk/made-with-glove
 
Company Name Red Ninja 
Description Red Ninja is a Liverpool-based design-led technology company, who collaborated on the Open Planning project with Liverpool University academics, Liverpool City Council and two Creative Exchange doctoral researchers. 
Year Established 2011 
Impact When they started working with Creative Exchange they were, in their own words, 'a bootstrapped tech start up with 3 staff and little track record of working directly with local authorities and universities'. Not only did the Open Planning project develop an innovative app for new perspectives on engaging with the urban planning process, it caused significant shifts in the business practices of Red Ninja and their approach to collaborative work. Lee Omar, the CEO, describes the impact on the company as follows: "Having direct access to work with a local authority in a paid capacity gave us confidence and credibility, which enabled us to design and develop a solution that enables more visibility for citizens living in urban environments." "The Creative Exchange process was fantastic for us as we invested much more of our own time into the project to enable us to produce IP that we could commercialise. The learning of working with the city data sets as part of the Creative Exchange has enabled us to design and develop commercial products with a multinational energy company on a smart energy platform that will enable sustainable urban developments. Commercially this was valuable to us and is worth ten times the financial reward than the Creative Exchange project. This validates the extra work we did on the Creative Exchange project." Since engaging with Creative Exchange, Red Ninja employs five times as many staff and their turnover has increased six fold. The company is also continuing the collaborative approach to work, sponsoring a programme of PhD students embedded within their practices and developing their own research arm. Additionally, as a direct result of things learned from the Open Planning project, Creative Exchange is funding a new twelve-month collaboration to develop a new platform by which public data (such as that held by city councils) can be held and provided back to relevant parties in a way that can be truly open and beneficial. It will involve working with current data handling companies to develop a new system, with the aim of scaling it across the country. It will initially be trialled in three cities: Manchester, Lancaster and Liverpool.
Website http://www.redninja.co.uk
 
Description 'Design, Ecology, Politics: Towards the Ecocene', panel discussion, Bloomsbury Publishing, University of Westminster, London, UK. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact I have been invited by Dr Joanna Boehnert on a panel to discuss her book 'Design, Ecology, Politics: Towards the Ecocene'. Together with Jon Goodbun, Prof Lindsay Bremner and Prof Sharon Prendeville we discussed the notion of the Ecocene and the book itself. The event was hosted by Bloomsbury Publishing and took place at University of Westminster, London, UK. The event turned out to be a good format for lively discussion and engaged critical thinking. Several attendees approached me after the panel to find out more about my research and to exchange contact details for future opportunities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.eventbrite.com/e/design-ecology-politics-towards-the-ecocene-book-launch-tickets-4216747...
 
Description Audience Experience, invited public lecture - Peter Wright 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This event was organised by the CreativeWorks Hub. A number of networking contacts were made, and there were a number of follow-up conversations about possible collaborations .

A number of networking contacts were made, and there were a number of follow-up conversations about possible collaborations .
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Mapping the digital public Space, presentation & workshop FutureEverything 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This workshop presented and decoded the imagined media futures generated at the BBC Connected Studio event at City Fictions and seek to position them within a digital public space. Facilitated by writer and broadcaster Bill Thompson, this session was for professionals attending FutureEverything interested in the shape of tomorrow's media and opportunity to map the emerging landscape and engage with others around some of the key issues facing us today. Speakers included Tony Ageh, Bill Thompson, Hannah Stewart, Jake Berger. This event sparked questions and discussion and influenced future BBC and cultural sector archive and data projects.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://futureeverything.org/events/mapping-digital-public-space/
 
Description 'Gamification' Seminar at Design Network North 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact The Design Network North is a quarterly seminar that invites up 75 people comprising of North East business and a few students interested in games design. I was one of two presenters present for a day seminar on gamification. This was the description they used on the bill:

"Following 12 years as a games developer, Gavin is now conducting research into 'playful design' and the application of gaming technology in other areas of business. He will explain how deeper understanding of play will help interaction designers and game designers create richer and more engaging experiences."

I presented a 20 minute talk on how designing for experiences of play can change our approach toward computer games - and their benefits.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://www.designnetworknorth.webeden.co.uk
 
Description 16th October, 2014 - BBC London News - talking about the Near Miss Project. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Spoke about a new research project (funded by AHRC-Creative Exchange/Blaze).

Sparked lots of comments via social media, email, and stakeholder contact asking for involvement in the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://rachelaldred.org/media/
 
Description 1st workshop: Living Assemblies 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Living Assemblies workshop series explores the relationship between material morphologies, their future societal impact with regards to digitality, and the representational visualisation of such as critical practice.

This pilot workshop took place at Greenwhich University as part of the Digital Research in the Humanities and Arts (DRHA) Conference 2014 and was developed and led by Veronica Ranner (RCA) and Clemens Winkler (ZHdK).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.drha2014.co.uk/?p=725
 
Description 2nd Living Assemblies Workshop - "Transient Technologies / Local Resources" 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact This second, 1-week long workshop in "Living Assemblies" series focussed on 'Transient Technologies / Local Resources', tailored towards postgraduate students in MA Interaction Design at the Zurich University of the Arts in Switzerland.

2 guest speakers:
1 Materials Science researcher from ETH Zurich
1 Agricultural Engineer & Silkworm farmer, Switzerland

15 participants, transdisciplinary (Scientists, writers, artists, designers (fashion, UX, material, graphic, product)

This workshop attracted 15 participants across disciplines at the ZHdK and students eagerly followed up after the workshop week. This led eventually to a second invitation to teach at ZHdK, where I had the chance to refine the teaching method and to gain valuable information for my research in return.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.zhdk.ch/index.php?id=93808
 
Description 3rd Living Assemblies Workshop - Design Your Silken Self 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact International guest speakers:
1 from London (New Scientist)
1 from Slovenia (UR Institute)
2 from Switzerland (Zurich University of the Arts)

During this two-day workshop, organised in collaboration with The Arts Catalyst as part of the CX Polyphonic Futures project, participants collaboratively explored the potential of reverse engineered silk, currently confined to laboratories. Taking the body as the first site for investigation, Veronica Ranner asked participants to consider themselves as "Living Assembly" that can be hacked, enhanced and patched into through using bio-digital materials. Activities involved material experiments combined with a narrative design process to speculate on silk's possible future use in the world. The workshop took place at Furtherfield Commons in Finsbury Park, London.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.artscatalyst.org/living-assemblies-design-your-silken-self
 
Description 4th Living Assemblies Workshop "Transient Electronics / Local Resources" 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact 1 guest speaker
1 Materials Science researcher from EMPA
15 participants, trans-disciplinary from other University departments

In this workshop week we asked students to rethink and explore the full potential of biological materials and transience and what way and manifestations this contrasts existing fossil-fuel derived ones.

"At present, the origins of materials and resources used in our designed electronics and objects are unclear and difficult to trace back. This is mostly the case for fossil-fuel derived and raw materials, such as plastics and precious metals, which require long, complex supply chains all over the globe with multiple geographical sources.
These materials are problematic as such, as they cannot be returned into the ecological material cycle, but lead to hazardous landfills and pacific garbage patches instead. We would like you to develop an understanding how transient materials differ from our current material culture.
What does it mean to design temporary things that are programmable, melt, and disappear on demand and how would they look and feel like? The goal of this seminar week is to design an object that represents your take on transient materials."
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.zhdk.ch/index.php?id=93808
 
Description 5th workshop: Living Assemblies Roundtable Session 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Roundtable session with the scientists from SilkLab as part of the Polyphonic Futures project. The scientists were postgraduate students or staff at the School for Biomedical Engineering, Tufts University, Boston (MA), USA. The roundtable took place at 200 Boston Avenue, Medford (MA), USA.

Several participants followed up after the talk, showing an active interest in working across disciplines. Several meetings with interested students took place afterwards.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description A Future Vision Computer Games; Game Jam at CHI 2013 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Games developers, designers and researchers from across the World met to participate in a 'Game Jam.'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description A multi-vocal intervention of interventions 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The documented (film) presentation of the outcome of a week-long workshop, as part of the TRADERS summer school in Genk, Belgium.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL https://vimeo.com/109797064
 
Description AHRC Showcase - Imitarium presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The event, which aimed to highlight the vital relationship between the arts and humanities research base and the UK's Creative Economy, took place at King's Place Conference Centre in central London on 12th March 2014.

Keynote speakers included the Rt Hon David Willetts, Sebastian Conran (Designer), Professor Judy Simons (Emeritus Professor, De Montfort University), Dr David Docherty (CEO, National Centre for Universities and Business) and Professor Rick Rylance (CEO, AHRC). Among the creative sectors explored during the day were: design, videogames, digital technologies, fashion, dance, architecture, festivals, broadcasting, visual arts, archives, and many more.

The Imitarium Presents: The KE Hubs was presented as an artistic installation and viewed by many attendees.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-gwdsuvvFW0
 
Description AURIL 2013 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Doing things differently: Knowledge Exchange between Arts and Humanities and the creative economy - A presentation at AURIL 2013
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Accept Cookies (AHRC Digital Transformation Moot) - Ben Dalton 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact A technology and art performance/workshop formed part of the Maker spaces at the AHRC Digital Transformation Moot. We made edible cookies from digital cookies: "Have you noticed websites asking more about cookies recently? What information can browser fingerprint characteristics like these give away about online activity? What big data archives are being fed as people use the web? Bring your laptop along for a browser check-up."
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
URL http://www.ahrc.ac.uk/documents/publications/digital-transformations-moot-19-november-2012/
 
Description Accept Cookies (Abandon Normal Devices Fair) - Ben Dalton 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation of technology and art performance through the making, baking and eating of personalised web cookies in edible form. The AND Fair was part of the 2013 Abandon Normal Devices Festival ("a catalyst for new approaches to cinema, digital culture and art that launched in 2009") in Liverpool. Estimated 100 attendees engaged in the Fair, and an "active audiences of 80,066" in the festival as a whole (http://www.andfestival.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/AND_Advocacy-1.pdf).

"Ben Dalton wants to give AND Fair-goers a unique tracking cookie too, but his are edible. Take your laptop or phone along to generate a personal cookie, eat it or keep it, and have a discussion about the information that browser fingerprint characteristics give away about you and your online activity."
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://www.andfestival.org.uk/events/accept-cookies-ben-dalton/
 
Description AcrossRCA Workshop: MetaLondoners 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact 'Meta Londoners' tests the notion of hybrid topographies that span digital and physical space. The project used narrative to (re)interpret and (re)present digital information across digital and physical space. By exploring modes of interaction and co-production, this project aimed to connect bits of digital interaction with embodied experience and to develop innovative and playful ways to experience geographic data.

The project asked a series of questions: How can a Twitter-based fictional narrative reconstruct the experience of dwelling in the city? Which kind of textual, visual and tangible formats support the reading of data through narrative? And how might these shape or shift the experience of the city and of the digital streams of information that surround us, as they add to both?
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Activism in Sociology Conference at BSA in London - Clara Crivellaro 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Talk sparked interest in future collaborations from another University.

After my talk, I was approached by a senior research fellow for a potential collaboration with the department of criminology and sociology at Middlesex University. A group of Newcastle based researchers and activists came to visit Culture Lab, to scope potential collaborations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Activism in Sociology Forum (London) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact spoke about the research undertaken to understand activism in the digital age and to use digital technologies to facilitate grassroots democratic engagement. This raised provocative ideas about whether, sometimes, sociologists should take as their starting point the needs of activists, and develop research to meet the needs they identify.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://www.britsoc.co.uk/groups/activism-event-videos.aspx
 
Description Ageing Playfully: Our favourite things Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Patients, carers and/or patient groups
Results and Impact In our first in a series of workshops the team used playful and creative ways to explore the range and type of activities enjoyed by all. This led to the co-creation of a series of collages and moodboards of favourite past, present, indour and outdous activities.

In our next workshop we will be exploring some of the most favourtes activities that have emerged.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://thecreativeexchange.org/projects/ageing-playfully
 
Description Ageing Playfully: Our very own musical instrument workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Patients, carers and/or patient groups
Results and Impact This was by far the most playful and animated workshop the team has run. Workshop participants co-designed in groups very unique musical soundboard filled with musical instruments made from scratch. The session finished with people playing music using their soundboard and singing!
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://thecreativeexchange.org/projects/ageing-playfully
 
Description Ageing playfully: Our very own garden Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Patients, carers and/or patient groups
Results and Impact Following the success of our first workshop and our groups' shared interest in gardening, in the second workshop we explored the design of the perfect garden.

Our co-designers created a series of perfect gardens with very rich stories to accompany them. Using creative toolkits, such as textile material, plasticine and Lego three very unique gardens were co-created. Most importantly our co-designers had a wonderful time building these!
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://thecreativeexchange.org/activity/co-designing-perfect-garden-most-playful-way
 
Description Ageing playfully: Our very own musical band workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Patients, carers and/or patient groups
Results and Impact Following the success of our first workshop and our groups' shared interest in gardening, in the second workshop we explored the design of the perfect garden.

Our co-designers created a series of perfect gardens with very rich stories to accompany them. Using creative toolkits, such as textile material, plasticine and Lego three very unique gardens were co-created. Most importantly our co-designers had a wonderful time building these!
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://thecreativeexchange.org/activity/co-designing-musical-instruments-reveals-insights-user-parti...
 
Description App designed at Newcastle University brings historic Belsay Hall to life 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The Journal is a Newspaper with a circulation of over 250K.

This newspaper picked up the story of the Wild Man game which was used to allow the team to plan a popular open day which was used as part of the research.

This output formed part of The Creative Exchange, a broad programme of activities with notable impact in multiple areas. For full details please see The Creative Exchange final report, available online here: http://thecreativeexchange.org/reports/CX_Final_Report.pdf
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/north-east-news/app-designed-newcastle-university-brings-7531260
 
Description Art Hackathon 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact http://arthackathon.co.uk/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://arthackathon.co.uk/
 
Description Audience Experience Research Seminar Series 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact An invited public lecture by CX PI (Newcastle), at AHRC KE cross-hub event.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Austrian Science Council 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Formal working group member on Art and Design - History, Practice and Theory. Illustration on how creative industries connect to academia to Austrian universities knowledge exchange
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Authenticity and 'Real'? Bodies - Agency for the Dead: Drawing lines through resurrection, impersonation and authentication - Ben Dalton 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Featuring interactive performance lectures, screenings and debate, this dynamic half-day symposium examines the integration of the digital in the construction of the 'self', asking how this has complicated our experience of material reality. With the merging of the 'real' with the virtual on and off-line, 'play' with the creation of multiple 'selves' is now commonplace. This offers limitless opportunities for impersonation, deception and fakery; useful tools for political counter-strategies, but also the roots for anxieties regarding loss of control over issues of 'real' identity. So what are the implications for the material realities of the body in the mangled and mutable unreal 'real' of the virtual, digital realm?

Featuring presentations from Dr Shehnaz Suterwalla, Noam Toran, Onkar Kular, Ben Dalton and Leslie Kulesh, participants use the term 'authenticity' as a prism through which to explore and challenge questions regarding impersonation, politics and gendered resistance, addressing the question of whether the faked, forged, inauthentic multitude-identities afforded by the digital era are a cause for panic, or a point of potential?
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL https://www.ica.org.uk/whats-on/authenticity-real-bodies
 
Description Authenticity and 'Real'? Bodies - ICA Symposium Event 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Quote from organiser: "It was a fantastic audience of 150 - and they were enraptured during your 'set'."

n/a
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL https://www.ica.org.uk/whats-on/authenticity-real-bodies
 
Description Autonomous Labour - Ben Dalton 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact On November 3rd at 7:00 PM arebyte hosts Autonomous Labour a talk in relation to the on-going exhibition Autonomous Times created by artist Nelmarie du Preez. Nelmarie will present her work and ideas along with Ben Dalton, RCA Researcher and Principal Lecturer and Patrick Tresset an artist famous for his work with robotics. Writer and curator Bronac Ferran will introduce and chair the event; each presentation will focus on Autonomous Labour: asking how do technology and computational systems affect how we make artworks now and into the future? Can we still distinguish between how a robot works and how 'we' work? What are the social and ethical implications? The talk is free and there will be a chance for discussion and questions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/autonomous-labour-tickets-19039154624
 
Description BBC #NewsHack 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact #NewsHack is a BBC Connected Studios hack day where digital tinkerers and open data advocates are invited to create hacks within 24 hours. Open Labs's team consisted of Andrew Garbett, Tom Bartindale, Sebastian Mellor, Jan Kucera who hacked away using BBC, TheyWorkForYou, Yahoo! and Twitter API's to create NewsDrop (http://hack.sbl.io/).

The team presented their work to 150+ business leaders, policy makers, and other technologists in an event in which teams from industry and academia hacked away to create news related prototypes. The team was awarded best academic hack for their #NewsDrop prototype.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://bbcnewslabs.co.uk/2013/10/18/news-hack-1/
 
Description BBC North industry placement for 5 months 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Andrew Garbett was hosted at BBC North Research and Development lab for 5 months in order to interview professional journalists and their practices of incorporating citizen journalism within the national news agenda. The student spoke with 16 professional journalists ranging from local, regional, and national teams as well as 3 hyperlocal content providers within the manchester, newcastle, and lancashire area.

The resulting research was published at CHI 2014 (Human Factors in Computing) conference as a full paper.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Bar camp manchester (made with glove) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact 2014 saw the Manchester Girl Geeks hold their largest BarCamp to date. With the support of The Institute of Humanities and Social Science Research (IHSSR) at Manchester Metropolitan University. Michelle from spin off company Made with Glove presented about her experience taking a product from a hackathon to production.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Being In This From Not Within 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Presentation of the editorial introduction to the Why Would I Lie? publication, 'Being in This From Not Within', as part of the Why Would I Lie? conference.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Being There: Artists and Geeks workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact WE ARE CALLING
Designers, Artists, Makers, Hackers, Techies, Historians, Archivists, Cultural Researchers, people with wacky ideas, people with bad ideas, people interested on speculation as research method, people interested in representations of historical narratives, war - especially WW1, people who feel like sharing a good round table, people who want to make the most of a Friday morning or hungry people that feel like exchanging ideas for a good lunch!
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://thecreativeexchange.org/activity/call-participation-geek-artists-round-table-230115-10am-1pm
 
Description Beyond Time and Motion: Work Environments for the 21st century - Aimed at architects, technical experts, professional facility managers. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk and discussion with attendees

Yet unknown
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Brainplay: Curated Knowledge, Futures of Education and Knowledge Mobility 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Round table discussion part of an ongoing collaboration with THECUBE, London.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Brainplay: Knowledge Mobility & Post-Truth 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Round table discussion and launch of THECUBE's annual programme, part of an ongoing collaboration with THECUBE, London.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Brainplay: What Kind of Infrastructure Does Knowledge Mobility Require? 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Round table discussion part of an ongoing collaboration with THECUBE, London.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Bretton field trial 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In Bretton, we used the Localnets tool to discover citizens active in the community. We invited six citizens (teachers, parish councilors, a local librarian, a church minister) to a workshop to discuss community issues.

Many of the participants didn't know each other.

The parish council explained to the group that it was running a survey of local residents. Bretton has a large Polish community, and the parish council could not afford to translate the survey into Polish, which limited the effectiveness of the survey.

Teachers from the school said they could encourage bilingual polish-speaking students doing their Duke of Edinburgh award to help administer the survey more widely, as a result 50 extra surveys were completed.

Meeting community needs (survey translation) using an existing community resource (the DoE students) is an example of the value of creating new community connections.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://localnets.org
 
Description British Science Association - Science Communication Conference - Makerspaces 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Part of an expert panel on the role of makerspaces in relation to STEM and science communication. Presentation followed by Q&A
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Browser history comics 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 50 people drew comic book versions of their browser history lists as the result of three separate workshops in London, Nottingham, and Liverpool. This exercise revealed their own browser behaviour and activity to participants and allowed them to reflect on how much time they spend online and what they do during that time.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL https://researchimaginings.wordpress.com/2015/02/04/participative-generative-collaborative/
 
Description Building Portable Instruments with Raspberry Pi and Pure Data 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact 3 day workshop building musical instruments using Raspberry Pi and Pure Data. Culminated in public performance.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description CHI 2013 Game Jamming The Well Played (Computer) Game (submission to CHI workshop) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Playing in the Future was my submission for the CHI 2014 workshop -GameJam [4Research] .

This then led to the creation of the digital game Intangle in collaboration with RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.

The abstract follows:

Traditional play and its games offer a unique opportunity for game design research since its games are almost always engaging, creative and fun. They are typical of the well-played games described by Bernard DeKoven. As we look to capture the values of this play in computer games we need new approaches to game design. Game Jams provide a suitable approach; Games Jams are playful, they encourage exploration of rules and boundaries, and through seeking innovation they avoid the mainstays of computer game development.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description CHI 2013 Playing in the Future (submission to CHI workshop) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Playing in the Future was my submission for the CHI 2013 workshop - Games [4Design].

This then led to the creation of the digital game i-dentity in collaboration with RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.

The abstract follows:

Games are a type of play, but there is also an experience of play within games. This play is the experimental aspect of the game. It allows a person to be expressive and creative which makes these new experiences significant and meaningful [4]. It is why future games and new pervasive sensors will focus on play. These new interfaces will support play through an understanding of spoken language and the ability to determine the body position precisely without latency. They will recognise expressiveness, identify the player's mood and even read lips. This behavioural information will ensure the play in games is natural, spontaneous and appropriate.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description CHI 2015 Playing with embarassment (submission to CHI workshop) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Playing with Embarassment was my submission for the CHI 2015 workshop: Embarrassing Interactions.

This then led to plans for extending the game Intangle to a tool for playworkers and youth workers - Talk About Sex.

The abstract for this workshop submission follows:

We are interested in embarrassing interactions as part of wider research that is exploring how play-centric game design allows us to create new engaging play experiences between players and their environment. Embarrassing interactions are an important feature of play and an inevitable facet of games that can be played in the real world. In this abstract we discuss several innovative designs where digital play has given us the opportunity to explore, manage and leverage embarrassment. We describe our method for creating more "playful" games and discuss the type of interactions we expect to experience and capture. We then describe our Wild Man mobile phone game where we find our digital game provides a convenient alibi for unconventional play in a heritage space.

In the actual workshop we explored how designers can leverage embarrassing in order to encourage young people to explore important issues.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description CX Conference. The Knowledge Exchange: An interactive conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact There is a long tradition of academics working with businesses and other partners in the creative sector. As we become more connected, information and collaborations (enabled by new technology and business practice) further promote this fruitful exchange. This conference aimed to explore and propagate new mutually beneficial exchanges between academia and the creative industries.
Specifically we focussed on:
Academics developing new understandings of the creative sector
New and innovative forms of academic collaboration with creative sector partners
New processes, tools or approaches that facilitate knowledge exchange and collaboration
Members of the creative commercial sector who are interested in moving into academia and starting to undertake research.
This was not a traditional 'sit and listen' conference. There was a high degree of both experimentation in the form of the conference and interaction throughout the conference.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://thecreativeexchange.org/tkex
 
Description CX Overview at Synergize Conference, Lancaster University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards

N/A
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014