Troubled Waters- Reaching Out

Lead Research Organisation: Bath Spa University
Department Name: College of Liberal Arts

Abstract

This project's plans for positive social impact follows on from earlier research, the interdisciplinary project 'Troubled Waters, Stormy Futures: Heritage in Times of Accelerated Climate Change'. The original research project focused on ways in which coastal communities in the UK and in the low-lying island nation Kiribati were affected by coastal flooding and inundation. We sought to more fully recognise the ways in which heritage, whether built or natural, tangible or intangible, was directly affected by current or projected climate change. National and international discussion of climate adaptation was failing to fully acknowledge the ways in which climate change was affecting heritage, sense of self and place, and contributing to people's vulnerabilities. This project respond directly to the short, medium and long-term needs identified by diverse communities and partners, and plans to address these in collaborative and empowering ways.

There will be continued community-level engagement at two sites with our community partners. In the Durgan area in Cornwall, we will continue to facilitate dialogue within and between the local community, the National Trust, and the visitors who often form deep attachments to such coastlines. To support this endeavour in an enjoyable and meaningful way, an artist will be commissioned to helps those involved express their attachments to their coastal and cultural heritage, and to reflect upon their feelings about the future. The resulting work will be made available to the general public. This approach is based on the research finding that building relationships at a community level may contribute to social cohesion, resilience, feelings of belonging and effective co-stewardship of a better understood, dynamic coastline.

A different approach will be used in Kiribati. Here, we found that despite the long term threat of displacement, communities were focused on the everyday challenges of regular coastal inundation and various environmental problem directly affecting health and wellbeing. We encountered researcher-fatigue in Kiribati, and a feeling that constant external fascination nonetheless fails to produce direct benefits at a community level. Consequently, we will work with the local environmental organisation, Kirican, to deliver and resource a program of community-led initiatives, education and outreach. By working with Pelenise Alofa, affiliated with both Kirican and the Pacific Centre for Environment and Sustainable Development at the University of the South Pacific, we will also be supporting her ongoing effort to establish a locally managed climate change adaptation network. This is in keeping with one of the general principles of long-term community resilience: that this is something which needs to happen concretely and proactively at a local level, and with the support of local or regional organisations.

Within and between communities and heritage organisations, there is frustration at the challenges of communicating climate change. A number of our partners, including the International National Trusts Organisation and the Museum of World Culture, Sweden, also want a more pivotal role for heritage organisations in the arena of climate change and adaptation, public education and advocacy. Manchester Museum will host a workshop to combine expertise, and we will create a freely available toolkit to help heritage organisations with climate change communication in future. This project respond to a clear demand for heritage concerns to be mainstreamed in international climate change negotiation, by utilising partner networks and disseminating the multi-media resources created in the original project, which amplify urgent voices from Kiribati. There will be a cultural exchange opportunity, hosting a heritage specialist from Kiribati at UK museums to enhance capacity and networks for medium and long-term heritage management including, potentially, for a post-displacement future.

Planned Impact

1) Individuals and communities living in Kiribati will benefit directly from an opportunity to participate in an in depth-consultation with grassroots environmental organisation KiriCAN, whereby they can identify their own environmental priorities, and co-decide on suitable practical or educational strategies for addressing these. Proportional to the scale of funding, they will be able to work with KiriCAN to deliver tangible objectives, for example, by installing rain harvesting devices in their local community. Such strategies could enhance health and wellbeing, and also produce a foundation for further meaningful co-working in future.

2) Individuals and communities living in Durgan, as well as visitors to the area, will have the opportunity to participate in new or ongoing consultation about their own feelings about environmental challenges, such as coastal flooding, threat to coastal heritage, management responsibilities and planning for the future. Their views will be passed on to the landowner, the National Trust, with Dr Onciul acting as a facilitator between the residents and the National Trust. They- and others in the wider area- will have an opportunity to participate in an arts project with a commissioned artist, to celebrate their cultural heritage, and learn from each other. Visitors to the site will benefit from the opportunity to experience the resulting creative installation.

3) KiriCAN will benefit from an opportunity to apply their knowledge and networks of environmental expertise in a project driven by the local community. Their enhanced organisational capacity should produce long term benefits to both themselves, local communities in Kiribati, and strengthen the existing initiative to establish a locally managed climate change adaptation network. As co-founders of KiriCAN, Claire Anterea and Pelenise Alofa (also affiliated with the University of the South Pacific) have a long history of working to promote local resilience to climate change, and this project will further nurture them as environmental champions, playing an essential leadership role.

4) The National Trust will benefit as project partners. Locally, in Durgan, this project will support a deep local engagement to maintain and strengthen their relationship with local residents, and help to inform visitors to the area about coastal heritage and climate challenges. New ideas about effective engagement approaches could further benefit the National Trust more generally, and be used to devise new and effective ways to engage other coastal communities. This will be valued by the Trust, as one of their key objectives (as highlighted in their Shifting Shores report) is to engage local communities and the general public on coastal adaptation.

5) A range of specific heritage organisations involved in this project will value the fulfillment of their own ideas, initiatives and priorities, tied into the activities and networking in this project. For example, Manchester Museum welcome the opportunity to lead a process of creating a climate change communication toolkit for heritage organisation. The Newport Restoration Foundation value the creative audio-visual resources shared by the team for dissemination on their website, historabovewater.org, and the Museum and World Culture in Gothenburg are pleased to present the film 'Troubled Waters' in Sweden. The International National Trusts Organisation, with over seventy member organisations worldwide will find shared creative material useful for their presentations at future COPs, and will invite the team to contribute to an IPCC assessment report on the effects of climate change on coastal heritage. Many heritage organisations should benefit from the creation of a free, downloadable, climate communication toolkit, created with guidance by Climate Outreach, lead specialists on climate communication in Europe. We also provide opportunity for knowledge exchange for a heritage professional from Kiribati.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Title The Boat Shed Gallery 
Description Artist Matthew Walmsley created the arts sculpture the Boat Shed Gallery in our poject partner's hertiage site National Trust Glendurgan. Inside the sulpture Matthew reated a tiny art gallery where he showcased local artists on the theme of life by the sea and coastal change. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact The launch was well attended. The NT have reported high visitation and positive feedback in the comments book. A second exhibition has been commissioned and the current exhibition was extended from Oct 2017 to April 2018. The gallery has received lots of positive media coverage form the BBC and local newspapers. 
URL https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/glendurgan-garden/features/boat-shed-gallery
 
Description This was a project for impact (rather than research). However, the work reinforced the need for addressing the broader issue of who benefits from academic research. In this case, we realised that it is imperative that those who might often work as facilitators and 'subjects' for UK-based researchers should be offered equal opportunities for cultural exchange, travel, networking and learning. This produces richer and more equitable projects, where research and impact are often blurred. Rather, the interactions are collaborative, and a constant cycle of learning and action. For an overview of this body of research and impact, please see: https://heritage-research.org/case-studies/troubled-waters-stormy-futures-heritage-times-accelerated-climate-change/
Exploitation Route We have co-written a case study report on 'Mobilising Indigeous Knowledge' (AHRC/ESRC), based on a body of research and impact undertaken by the team. The main finding was the need for building reciprocity into research. This is key to decolonising interactions and enabling longer term, more meaningful, exchanges that allow for deeper research and more useful outcomes.
Sectors Education,Environment,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections

URL https://enduringconnections.com
 
Description 1) Supporting the heritage sector in communicating climate change: A workshop called 'We need to talk about climate change' was held at the Manchester Museum, UK on 7th April 2017. The aim of the event was to bring together a diverse group of UK heritage practitioners to explore strategies for communicating climate change to a mainstream audience. 15 individuals from a range of large and small heritage organisations attended the workshop, and there was representation from those working in or with local authority, national and university museums, world heritage sites, heritage advisory bodies, international heritage organisations and heritage conservation charities. These included Historic Scotland, Historic England and the International National Trust. Following this workshop, a range of resources were produced: i) A workshop facilitator's pack: This pack is aimed at heritage organisations (and others) who wish to hold similar events and discussions with their stakeholders or within their own organisations. ii) A workshop summary report: This captures the main issues that were raised on the day, and includes quotations and feedback from the participants. iii) A webinar held on July 25th 2017 led by George Marshall from Climate Outreach, experts in climate change communication and the project PI. This was recorded and uploaded along with the other resources to the project own website, and Climate Outreach's website. Participants fed back that they appreciated the opportunity that the workshop gave to "have a forum to think about climate change with passionate and knowledgable professionals", and look "at museum collections in a different way". One participant reported that they were "genuinely much more excited about the possibility for talking about climate change and heritage". 2) A mutually-beneficial cultural exchange: Cultural heritage expert Natan Itonga, from Kiribati, visited the UK as part of the project and toured historical UK museum collections from Kiribati with the team (led by Dr Bryony Onciul). They visited: RAMM, Exeter; the Kiribati embassy, Wales; Manchester Museum, Manchester; Pitt Rivers, Oxford, Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Cambridge; Horniman Museum, London, British Museum, London. At each museum they studied the collections, reviewed the archives and Natan contributed new information to the records and collections. They also made their own recordings to return and repatriate to the people of Kiribati. This influenced Natan and may impact upon his future work as a cultural heritage expert and artist. The visit will be shared with the Kiribati government by Natan in a formal report, which may then impact future work around heritage and UK collections. It built a new network between curators, academics, I-Kiribati diaspora and source community members. One museum curator in the UK commented: "We are interested in how we use collections to address contemporary issues, notably climate change and its impacts, on the environment and on people. It will certainly influence how we think about interpreting and discussing Kiribati people and communities in light of climate change If we don't change anything, nothing will change. We need to be open to letting people, and collections, deal with the meatier material than pleasant but often shallow museum experiences. When we are talking about climate change, and cultural heritage, we are talking about people's lives, and about the future." Other curators also recognised the value of the exchange: "It allows for new meanings outside of a museum context. It allows Indigenous peoples to reconnect with their material culture, and for museum professionals to understand material culture through their eyes. It builds strong relationships and networks and goes some way to healing problematic pasts inherent in the collections/collecting practices." (Nicolas Crowe, Pitt Rivers Museum, 2018). Natan also saw value in viewing and handling the collections in person: "Referring back to these items that have been kept in the museums is a kind of attaching yourself to ... your original identity. It's... good that they have it kept, to maintain and safeguard our heritage." (Natan Itonga, 2017) 3) Promoting sustainable development in Kiribati: The project resourced KiriCAN, a grassroots environmental organisation in Kiribati to identify and address the development priorities of three wards in Tarawa. Based on their local consultation, they decided on a strategy for waste collection. This will have a positive impact on the environment, marine life, human health, and potentially tourism in the longer term. "When you translate how that [the trucks] will impact people on a community level, it will have a lot of positive impact on children, you know, clean water... because the rubbish will end up in our drinking source, the spread of mosquitoes, and with the recent outbreak of dengue fever, diarrhea, so it will all connect to health. It won't solve the issue altogether, but help minimise it." (KiriCAN focus group, 2018). Most importantly, KiriCAN works to motivate communities to solve their own problems and know their rights. Working together to tackle problems can lead to other positive impacts. "When we talk about waste they [the villages] really want to do something to solve it, but they are losing hope, because their rubbish doesn't get picked up. So what is the point of picking up our rubbish if at the end there is no collection? The project with the trucks will give them hope, to say that we can really clean up our village." (KiriCAN focus group, 2018). Succeeding through local co-operation and action can lead to greater community engagement on a range of societal and environmental issue. As well as benefiting the local community, KiriCAN will also benefit from having a proven track record of delivering a waste-focused local project. They reported that this would enhance their own capacity, local reputation, and in particular their ability to attract overseas funding to do further work in this area. 4) Promoting ongoing interaction, and exploration of heritage loss in Durgan: Artist Matthew Walmsley created the arts sculpture the Boat Shed Gallery in our poject partner's heritage site, National Trust Glendurgan. Inside the sculpture, Matthew created a tiny art gallery where he showcased the work of twelve local artists on the theme of life by the sea and coastal change. The launch was well attended. The NT have reported high visitation and positive feedback in the comments book. A second exhibition has been commissioned and the current exhibition was extended from Oct 2017 to April 2018. The gallery has received positive media coverage form the BBC and local newspapers, bringing further attention to the issues it explores. 5) The project PI was invited to screen and discuss the film 'Troubled Waters' in a public event at the Museum of World Culture in Gothenburg, Sweden (2017). At the beginning of the event, hardly anyone in the audience had even heard of Kiribati. This was an opportunity to raise awareness with the general public and some heritage professionals in Sweden. Furthermore, discussions with museum curator Klas Grinell has instigated discussion of how to incorporate this film, exploring climate change, heritage and displacement in Kiribati, into a permanent museum exhibition. This potentially benefits people in Kiribati, through raised global awareness, and provides a useful resource for the museum and its diverse visitors over a long time-frame.
First Year Of Impact 2017
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Environment,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Economic,Policy & public services

 
Description Climate Outreach 
Organisation Climate Outreach and Information Network (COIN)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The team, led by Dr Anna Woodham, helped to connect Climate Outreach with a group of heritage professionals who are interested in working to communicate climate change. We achieved this by bringing Climate Outreach together with 15 individuals from a range of large and small heritage organisations. There was representation from those working in or with local authority, national and university museums, world heritage sites, heritage advisory bodies, international heritage organisations and heritage conservation charities. These included Historic Scotland, Historic England and the International National Trust. We then built on these connections by helping to host a live webinar on climate change communication, and collaborating on the production of a workshop facilitator's pack. Climate Outreach could also benefit from the facilitation work of community engagement and participatory research consultant Joanne Orchard-Webb, who is trained as a social scientists, and was employed by the project to help deliver these tangible outputs..
Collaborator Contribution Climate Outreach provided expertise on effective communication on climate change in a presentation at our project workshop in Manchester Museum on 7th April 2017. They also helped to move the conversation forward and deliver the outputs that the original workshop's participants deemed most useful: a live webinar and workshop facilitation pack. They were also able to offer an extensive network of contacts with whom they shared the outputs.
Impact The outputs are connected to a central question: How can the heritage/museum sector engage the mainstream public with climate change? They include a workshop in Manchester Museum on April 7th, 2016, and freely available online resources: a Worshop facilitation pack; Workshop summary; live webinar, uploaded online and promoted through networks. Each draws on the disciplines of heritage, media and communication, and social science.
Start Year 2017
 
Description INTO 
Organisation International National Trusts Organisation
PI Contribution The team supplied INTO with custom-made edited videos for use at two UN Climate Change conferences (Marrakech in 2016 and Bonn in 2017). These were a shorter, subtitled versions of the 'Troubled Waters' film, shown on each occasion at several side events and on a loop at their exhibition stand. The team offered the opportunity for INTO's director, Oliver Maurice, to attend the project's workshop on communicating climate change in more efficient ways (at Manchester Museum, April 2017).
Collaborator Contribution The director of INTO, Oliver Maurice helped to publicise the research through his social media, his outreach work at two UNCCC conferences, and he also participated in the project's knowledge-exchange workshop on communicating climate change to a mainstream audience (Manchester Museum, April 2017).
Impact 7 screenings of creative research from 'Troubled Waters' at side-events in two UN Climate Change Conferences (2016, 2017), as well as the screening of the film on a loop at the INTO exhibition stand. INTO made a contribution to a set of resources responding to the question: 'how can the heritage sector communicate climate change to a mainstream audience'. They did this by participating in the original workshop exploring this topic in Manchester Museum, April 2017, after being invited by the project co-i Dr Anna Woodham.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Manchester Museum: How can the heritage sector communicate climate change? 
Organisation University of Manchester
Department Manchester Museum
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The research team, led by Dr Anna Woodham, helped to connect a group of heritage professionals who are interested in working to communicate climate change (including Manchester Museum) with Climate Outreach. We achieved this by bringing Climate Outreach together with 15 individuals from a range of large and small heritage organisations. There was representation from those working in or with local authority, national and university museums, world heritage sites, heritage advisory bodies, international heritage organisations and heritage conservation charities. These included Historic Scotland, Historic England and the International National Trust. We then built on these connections by helping to host a live webinar on climate change communication, and collaborating on the production of a workshop facilitator's pack. Manchester Museum benefited from the expertise and network of Climate Outreach, and also from the facilitation work of community engagement and participatory research consultant Joanne Orchard-Webb, who is trained as a social scientists, and employed by the project to help deliver these tangible outputs..
Collaborator Contribution Manchester Museum, and curator Henry McGhie in particular, has been engaged with, and supportive of the ongoing research and impact (Troubled Waters; Enduring Connections and follow-on impact). As well as feeding into the original research conducted by Dr Anna Woodham with heritage organisations across the UK, he has helped to stimulate an ongoing dialogue through participation in relevant events for heritage professionals, and through his online media (personal and organisational). He helped to organise and facilitate a workshop exploring 'How can the heritage sector communicate climate change to a mainstream audience', held at Manchester Museum in April 2017. Manchester Museum also helped host a cultural exchange visit from Natan Itonga, a heritage expert from Kiribati, who was able to view the museum's Kiribati collection, and share insights with MM and the relevant ministries in Kiribati. This meant working closely with project Co-i Dr Bryony Onciul, who was leading this exchange. Henry McGhie was also filmed by the project PI Sara Penrhyn Jones, to create a resource for mutual benefit, and to further stimulate awareness within the heritage sector in future.
Impact One output was a workshop on how the heritage sector can communicate climate change in Manchester Museum, April 2017. Other resources include are freely available and downloadable online: Workshop summary pdf report, facilitation pack to stimulate dialogue within heritage organisations and beyond. There has also been some audio-video material generated for future editing and dissemination to raise awareness within the heritage sector, and beyond.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Museum of World Culture, Gothenburg, Sweden 
Organisation Museum of World Culture
PI Contribution Project PI Sara Penrhyn Jones visited the museum in Gothenburg in order to view the museum and it's exhibitions, and to discuss future collaboration. She screened the film 'Troubled Waters' and talked about research in both 'Troubled Waters' and the follow-on research project 'Enduring Connections'. This was a public event.
Collaborator Contribution The Museum of World Culture hosted Sara Penrhyn Jones at the museum for two days, publicised and organised the pubic screening and Q & A. They also engaged in discussions about future collaboration.
Impact Outcomes include a public screening and Q & A session about the research (Troubled Waters and Enduring Connections). There is also a high likelihood of the creative research being incorporated into a future permanent exhibition at the museum.
Start Year 2017
 
Description National Trust Partnership 
Organisation National Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution My expertise, intellectual input, commissioning of artist, installation and launch of the Boat Shed Gallery.
Collaborator Contribution Hosted the artist, allowed me access to the sites, staff and information, hosted and marketed the Boat Shed Gallery and its launch.
Impact The Boat Shed Gallery
Start Year 2017
 
Description Newport Restoration Foundation 
Organisation Newport Restoration Foundation
PI Contribution Dr Anna Woodham from the project team supplied written content for the NRF's blog 'Keeping History Above Water', and helped share strategies and content for disseminating the ongoing research and impact activities.
Collaborator Contribution Interns at the NRF (with the full support of their organisation) helped to disseminate the project's ongoing research and impact activities, and helped to facilitate a lively online dialogue under the hashtag #heritage4climate.
Impact Output include blog posts (by Dr Anna Woodham) on the NRF's website 'Keeping History Above Water' and a series of social media interactions. The relationship developed organically after the Project PI Sara Penrhyn Jones was an invited speaker to the inaugural 'Keeping History Above Water' event in 2016, where she presented research from 'Troubled Waters'.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Royal Albert Memorial Museum, Exeter, hosting Cultural Exchange 
Organisation Royal Albert Memorial Museum
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The project enabled Kiribati cultural heritage expert, Natan Itonga, to visit RAMM's Kiribati collection. In an exchange led by Dr Bryony Onciul, the museum was able to benefit from new insights provided by Natan Itonga, to better understand the cultural meaning and context of their own collection.
Collaborator Contribution RAMM curator, Mr Tony Eccles, generously offered his time to allow Natan Itong and the research team access to Kiribati artefacts held in storage at the museum. This benefited Natan Itonga, who was then able to feed this information back to the relevant ministries in Kiribati. The exchange also offered Dr Bryony Onciul an opportunity to observe first hand what such an exchange could offer both parties, which is also of direct relevance to her own current (and future) research interests.
Impact Cutrator Tony Eccles was able to document new information regarding the object from Kiribati held in storage by the museum, in a way which may enhance future public displays, as well as improve his own understanding of the meaning of such objects. Natan Itonga has also created a report about the cultural exchange more generally, which will be shared with the relevant ministries and cultural organisations in Kiribati. He will be able to share knowledge of which objects are held in British Museums, and how they are cared for. In witnessing and hosting such exchanges, Dr Bryony Onciul's disciplinary expertise in heritage and public history is enriched, which can also be shared further through her teaching, and in future research projects and publications.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Conference paper 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Around 12 people attended a talk by CI Bryony Onciul about the projects at the European Society of Oceanist's conference in Munich, Germany 29th June - 2 July. This created new contacts (Academic, source community and professional) which led to the development of a small network in which we exchange ideas/information etc. It also resulted in a request for our work to be included in international policy reports.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://esfo-org.eu/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/ESfO_booklet.pdf
 
Description Conference paper given at the AHRC and Association of Critical Heritage Studies conference in London 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk given by CI Bryony Onciul about the projects to a room full of academics, post grads and professional heritage practitioners, as part of the Heritage Studies: Critical Approaches and New Directions conference. This led to requests for further information and ideas for potential future collaborations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://ahrcheritage.wixsite.com/ahrcheritage/conference-heritage-studies-critica
 
Description Interview and short boardcast for BBC Spotlight and online about the Boat Shed Gallery at Glendurgan 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact BBC news journalist interviewed CI Bryony Onciul and project partner National Trust Tamsin Hennah about the project funded Boat Shed Gallery by artist Matthew Walmsley and 12 local artists. It was broadcast on local BBC news Spotlight, on BBC radio and online on the BBC website.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-england-cornwall-41432976/tiny-art-gallery-hidden-in-cornish-garden
 
Description Public Screening: Troubled Waters film at Museum of World Culture in Gothenburg, Sweden 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The film Troubled Waters was screened to the general public at the Museum of World Culture, follow by a talk and Q & A. Current research in Kiribati (Enduring Connections) was also shared with the audience, which also included heritage professionals from the museum. As part of the same trip there was a meeting between Sara Penrhyn Jones and a curator at the Museum, Klas Grinell. Plans were made to incorporate the creative research into a permanent exhibition on climate change and migration at the museum.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://enduringconnections.com/filmscreening-at-the-museum-of-world-culture-gothenburg-dec-06-2017/
 
Description Screenings of Troubled Waters (short version) at UN Climate Change Conference 2017 (Bonn) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Our partners the International National Trusts Organisation used our custom-made five minute film (extracted from the film 'Troubled Waters') at four different side events at the UNCCC. They also played the film on a loop in their booth, which would have been seen by many conference attendees from all over the world. They reported that the film went 'down very well' and was an extremely valuable resource for them in communicating the link between threatened heritage and climate change. They deem this useful in emphasising the more cultural ramifications of climate change.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.motherchannel.com/cop-22-culture-move-sea-level-rise-cultural-heritage-climate-mobility/
 
Description Webinar: How can the Heritage/Museum sector engage the mainstream public with climate change? 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Participants on an earlier workshop for heritage and museum professionals held at Manchester Museum were asked for their views on how we can all work together to address climate change and the communication challenge. They expressed their need for more multi-media resources and further, national and international dialogue. With this in mind the project team worked with Climate Outreach to create an international dialogue through an online webinar that any one could register for. Over 200 people registered for this live, interactive event, which now also exists online as a resource. Climate Outreach has promoted this resource to their own extensive, international networks. They reported a request for more information and a desire for future collaboration from new contacts due to this work.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://climateoutreach.org/resources/webinar-and-guides-climate-change-can-heritage-sector-engage-m...
 
Description Workshop in Manchester Museum: We need to talk about climate change 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The 'We need to talk about climate change' workshop was held at the Manchester Museum, UK on 7th April 2017. The aim of the event was to bring together a diverse group of UK heritage practitioners to explore existing heritage sector practices and share collective wisdom relating to new approaches to engagement and communication around climate change. A community engagement and participatory research consultant, Joanne Orchard-Webb, facilitated dialogue between project researchers, Head of Collections at Manchester Museum, Henry McGhie and George Marshall from Climate Outreach.

The premise of the day emerged from the findings of the "Troubled Waters, Stormy Futures: heritage in times of accelerated climate change" research conducted in the UK and Kiribati during 2015-16: [http://www.corddirdyfroedd.org/]. The research surfaced a number of key questions relating to the often challenging role of heritage organisations in climate change debates and these questions were used to guide the workshop structure:

15 individuals from a range of large and small heritage organisations attended the workshop There was representation from those working in or with local authority, national and university museums, world heritage sites, heritage advisory bodies, international heritage organisations and heritage conservation charities. These included Historic Scotland, Historic England and the International National Trust. Further action and outputs were co- decided (a workshop facilitation pack and webinar, detailed elsewhere), with very positive feedback from participants, for example that the workshop left them 'genuinely much more excited about the possibility for talking about climate change and heritage'. The dialogue was extended online, and internationally, through the #heritage4climate, with examples of interaction collated here: https://storify.com/annawoodham1/we-need-to-talk-about-climate-change
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://enduringconnections.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/HERITAGE-AND-CLIMATE-CHANGE-WORKSHOP-SUMM...