Disseminating "Design Thinking for Prison Industries" through Teaching Resources, Delivery Models and Training for Trainers

Lead Research Organisation: University of the Arts London
Department Name: Central Saint Martin's College

Abstract

This Follow-on Funding (FoF) application seeks to develop for dissemination the models, methods, tools and approaches piloted and iterated within the AHRC-funded 'Design Thinking for Prison Industries' project, led by Professors Gamman and Thorpe at the Design Against Crime Research Centre (DACRC), University of the Arts London, in collaboration with Praveen Nahar, at the National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad.

The aim of the project is to extend the positive impact of the 'Design Thinking for Prison Industries' (DTPI) programme by 'scaling out' the delivery model to prison staff and those delivering criminal justice education programmes from public, private and third sector organisations in the UK. We will do this by developing the educational resources for digital dissemination and further refining the delivery, volunteering and enterprise models created and tested within the pilot project. Fulfillment of this aim requires the development and dissemination of three elements of the DTPI programme:

A. Models
i. The unique DTPI model for design education developed within a prison industries setting, communicating the 'theory of change' linked to 'design thinking and making' as restorative/transformative enterprise. This approach can help inmates understand different ways of being self-employed and the entrepreneurial opportunities available to them.
ii. The model for equipping postgraduate prison volunteers with the necessary skills to provide mentoring and one-to-one facilitation of inmate learners, within a design-led DTPI programme, is unique. This model also offers a proven and pragmatic way of delivering the 'graduates into prison agenda' recommended by the Coates Review (2016), commissioned by the Ministry of Justice (MOJ) to improve effective education in prison.
iii. The social enterprise model developed within the existing DTPI programme offers a new way for prison industries to meet the additional costs of programmes such as 'Makeright', a DTPI sub-project which enables inmates to co-design and produce commercial anti-theft bags (www.makeright.org) to support sustainability in a climate of economic austerity.

B. Resources
The FoF project will further develop and share the Makeright learning and teaching resources that deliver design thinking education that aims to build inmate empathy, resilience and entrepreneurship, as well as teaching for anti-theft bag design within UK prison textiles studios. The existing resources have been iteratively developed via the AHRC/British Council (Unbox) and Serco-funded pilot at HMP Thameside, London, and Sabarmati Jail, Ahmedabad. Whilst our evaluation of them shows that they are effective, we now need to re-design them in a form that is appropriate and accessible for use by other qualified delivery agencies in prison industry settings. The objective is to work with these agencies in the development and testing of the resources before finalisation.

C. Continuous Professional Development (CPD) and DTPI Training Module
The project will also develop and test a 'train the trainer' programme for those in prison, design education and third sector agencies wanting to deliver similar projects based on our resources connected to local prison industry settings. Inmates who have worked on Makeright, when interviewed, tell us that they recognise that self-employment may be the most viable route to employment for them once they leave prison, in part because of stigma attached to being an ex-offender. Consequently, the Makeright knowledge exchange model and strategy has the capacity to build resilience and so is incredibly useful to prisons struggling to find employment for inmates.

Planned Impact

The press interest in the project to date is a strong indicator of its potential for impact; our ambition is to bring four constituencies into dialogue, including:
- The crime and justice community, which is interested in what works in prison and how it might lead to 'desistance' (Maruna 2001; Laub & Sampson 2001); in particular those who are looking to build inmate resilience for the world of work.
- The academic design research community, which is interested in how social design education and action research can be applied, linked to innovative methodologies and cross-disciplinary approaches to help democratise innovation and transform lives.
- The business and entrepreneurial communities, which can contribute to enterprise strategies and learn how projects such as this enhance public services in sustainable ways, which may lead to improve service delivery, economic benefits and employment opportunities for inmates.
- Social innovators, such as Forum for the Future, which are interested in how to manage change and change leadership, and to help communities build resilience.

The DTPI/Makeright project has already received press attention internationally, but our new focus on dissemination intends to join up diverse communities in prison that do not usually connect in order to deliver impact by explaining how the process of the project is significant, more significant than the anti-theft bags generated. It will do this by:
- providing more inmates in the national context with educational process resources aimed at finding new ways to catalyse change and reduce repeat offending, through design education, in particular design thinking skills
- publishing account/s of how inmates' personal, social, artistic and professional skills including building empathy, trust and teamwork that impact on their lives and their engagement with wider society can be understood and addressed by prison industries and prison education
- introducing inmates to new opportunities linked to self-employment narratives that will be further researched
- helping to build empathy for crime victims and understanding of RJ processes. There is significant evidence that design processes, methods and tools generate empathy for users when they design objects for others; the team intends to develop these links and create systemic follow-on programme/course opportunities for inmates interested in RJ.

The creative outputs generated by the project (not just anti-theft bags designed by inmates but system design and process methods about design creativity synthesised by the research team and built into the Makeright educational materials created) are likely to be further exhibited by museum education and learning teams who already engage with criminal justice exhibitions, including the Koestler Foundation, ClinkArts and NCJAA. It is also likely that the creativity of the inmates and the objects they produce in numerous prisons linked to Makeright programmes will lead to further opportunities for exhibition in diverse spaces including the Design Museum and possibly the Tate, and thus directly address every level of education. Formal learning groups such as secondary school programmes in design and technology will benefit from new forms of design analysis that this project offers, linked to accounts of the design process, as well as to the impact of 3D visualisations of anti-theft bags. Museum visitors may be another audience segment who will gain from learning about how creativity can transform lives, in addition to prison staff who will see from the project outputs how design thinking can make a difference and produce functional and beautiful commercial objects as well as change behaviour and mindsets. Beyond these likely impacts and gains, there are more speculative ones relating to how social cohesiveness can by supported by (and can support in turn) a wider state of community safety and perception of fair and satisfying justice.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Title Abel & Cole website distribution of Makeright "improved" bags 
Description The engagement and improvement to bag prototypes with Abel & Cole customers (March 2018) and the strong market-led feedback persuaded Abel & Cole to take on the role of distributor of the bags. This means they will order and buy bags direct from HMP Kilmarnock and let us know of any profits accruing from them. In July 2018 they launched the Makeright range to their customers via their website (https://www.abelandcole.co.uk/blog/post/try-a-makeright-bag-for-us). In the period July 2018-January 2019 the bags have sold slowly but to positive effect, all monies raised will be donated to charity and we are in the process of figuring out how to take Makeright forward as a charity. In January 2019 Abel & Cole confirmed that DACRC will receive in due course £582.71 pounds as first profits returned to the project, so we can either donate this to the charity Sue Ryder, who we have worked with, or set up a new charity for Makeright. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact A distributor for the Makeright bags gives real credibility to the project. Any member of the public can purchase the bags from this website. The first five designs are still manufactured in HMP Kilmarnock prison, but there is a pool of further designs that could be developed and marketed in future. In future, depending on continued interest from Abel & Cole, we are wondering whether a day release scheme could be set up for inmates to make the bags outside of prison as part of new pathways as returning citizens. 
URL https://www.abelandcole.co.uk/tazul-tote-bag-makeright-abel-cole.
 
Title Design Research for Change at London Design Fair 2018 
Description This display of Makeright project was part of Arts and Humanities Research Council's (AHRC) 'Design Research for Change' at London Design Fair 2018, 20th - 23rd September 2018 and the project was included in the showcase catalogue (pp 114-115). 'Design Research for Change' is a showcase of 67 AHRC-funded design research projects which "illustrates the breadth and depth of Design research in the UK and celebrates the amazing work of talented researchers working on complex challenges." (Design Research for Change showcase catalogue, ed. Paul A. Rodgers). 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact Makeright display was highlighted in Design Week article titled 'Top picks of exhibitors to see at London Design Fair 2018' (see: https://www.designweek.co.uk/issues/17-23-september-2018/top-picks-of-exhibitors-to-see-at-london-design-fair-2018/). 
URL https://www.designweek.co.uk/issues/17-23-september-2018/top-picks-of-exhibitors-to-see-at-london-de...
 
Title Makeright anti-theft bag prototypes (improved) 
Description First anti-theft bag prototypes were co-designed by the Design Against Crime Research Centre team and inmates at HMP Thameside in 2015 (led by Prof Lorraine Gamman) and by the NID Product Design Discipline team and Inmates at Sabarmati Central Jail, Ahmedabad in 2015-2016 (led by Co-I Nahar). These prototypes include suggested improvements by Abel & Cole customers in 2017/18. Designs which were improved and tweaked included: Tote Bag, Messenger Bag, Holster Bag, Arm Lock Bag and Laptop Case, finalised in 2018. See bag images here: https://makerightorg.wordpress.com/images/. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact Prototypes included improvements suggested by Abel & Cole customers. Later sale of finished product by Abel & Cole were of positive impact to the the project and to raising monies for charity. 
URL http://www.makeright.org
 
Title Makeright bags display at HMP Thameside 
Description Makeright bags were added as a permanent exhibit at HMP Thameside prison. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact This small display was located in Reception in 2017 but subsequently moved to Textiles in 2018. 
 
Title Makeright teaching materials 
Description The Makeright teaching materials are available online at makeright.org and can be downloaded for free. They are aimed at two groups: (1) Prison staff and (2) Educators who wish to teach design in prison. The downloadable pack consists of all the teaching materials either group would require to run the Makeright design course independently, including information about how to train existing trainers. There is also a link to an editable version of the material so the audience is able to add their specific comments/feedback regarding content. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2018 
Impact We have received some comments on what works and what does not, although it is too early to gauge actual impact. The fact that this material is available is unique in this field and has received some publicity from NCJAA and perhaps this is the most notable impact. 
URL https://makerightorg.wordpress.com/teaching-materials-4/
 
Title Making Bags to Make Good exhibition at Central Saint Martins 
Description 'Making Bags to Make Good' exhibition at Central Saint Martins Window Galleries (22 September - 31 October 2017) as part of London's Design Festival. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2017 
Impact The exhibition was launched during London Design Festival attended and was exhibited at Central Saint Martins Window Galleries with estimated daily footfall of 2,750 people. 
URL http://www.makeright.org
 
Description Having repeated the Makeright course almost 10 times in 3 prisons (at HMP Thameside, London, UK from 2016-2018, Sabarmati Jail, Ahmedabad, India in 2016 and HMP Doncaster, UK in 2018) we have learned that:

(i) Our Makeright design teaching materials work well to build innovative capacity in inmates.
(ii) Inmates enjoy engaging with the Makeright design education exercises. These exercises are online as an open resource and have now been tested in 3 prisons so we are confident that they work well to catalyse designs from inmates, some of which could be commercialised to raise monies for charity.
(iii) It is possible to use Makeright teaching materials to develop creative and entrepreneurial qualities in inmates.
(iv) Some of the Makeright teaching materials we have developed can be utilised by facilitators in prison to work on other creative projects.
(v) Makeright design volunteers who can work as facilitators are an important source of transferable learning (in addition to the teaching materials we have created) and can utilise the materials to run new design projects. Volunteers are vital to the project because they start new conversations with inmates that are rehabilitative. In this setting, it is not only the inmates that benefit as the volunteers gain important professional experience from such engagements developing strong social engagement skills that will serve them well in their professional practice. But, we have found setting up such volunteer schemes and student engagements extremely time consuming and this may be a barrier to scaling the project. We will propose, in a different policy era, something like a national designer in residence scheme.
(vi) The Makeright project is transferable from one design institution to another as well as from one prison to another, but it requires a lot of leg work, cooperation, meetings and most importantly an internal champion, as well as buy in by the textiles staff in prison. Using the materials to help support other design and creative projects as they emerge in prison is a goal of Makeright.

The barriers to the Makeright project working well in prison include:

(vii) Operational issues in each prison are context-specific and can adversely influence the success of the project so textiles staff who work on the project need to be given adequate training and time to deliver the project. This work should not be additional to their existing duties, but they should self-select and be given an additional time allowance for the Makeright project.
(viii) Operational capacity for a project such as Makeright needs to be carefully assessed and adequately resourced (including materials for prisoners to work with) or it will fail.
(ix) For the Makeright project to run effectively in any prison it needs a senior management champion to help staff make strong connections with local design institutions and to iron out early problems, also to provide a budget for resources.
(x) The scaling within prison contexts works well for inmates and volunteers but is very dependent on the good will of the staff and their creative needs and opportunities should be included in any account of the value of the project.

We are still working to best understand how some of the issues above can be addressed but have made progress on the works packages as below:

Work Package 1 - Educational Material Dissemination Strategy: Material is now online and we have publicised its availability via NCJAA networking events.

Work Package 2 - Train the Trainer Programme: This material is now online and we have publicised its availability via NCJAA networking events.

Work Package 3 - Enterprise Engagement: As the project progressed our work in this area changed from what we originally anticipated. We recognised the importance of the entrepreneurial learning within the Makeright course, understanding the co-design process as a proxy for skills development in entrepreneurial effectuation. We engaged with the Centre for Entrepreneurs to better understand the teaching they were delivering on entrepreneurship in HMP Ranby and get their feedback on our own practices and observations. By July 2018 we still had not received any meaningful data about the entrepreneurial teaching being delivered in HMP Ranby, or the specific curriculum that was being delivered. In part this may have been linked to the fact that this training was being delivered by private subcontractors. However, the Centre for Entrepreneurs did evaluate our Makeright course and their report is located here. Linked to these reflections and discussions it became apparent that 'franchising' - training inmates to deliver commercial activities and granting them authorisation to deliver those commercial activities e.g. training as a barista and providing them with a coffee wagon on release - was one of the common enterprise models (as opposed to employment models) being applied within inmates as emerging citizens. Aware of the emerging open design and manufacture paradigm, an emergent enterprise model in design and manufacture that links designers, makers and customers, the team started to explore whether such a model could be prototyped linked to the Makeright bag project. The core of the idea is that designs co-designed on the Makeright course would be made available to customers online and returned citizens would be able to manufacture the designs locally to the buyer. It is thought that this model has potential for the following reasons:

1. It markets designs and identifies customers

2. It links customers with makers emerging from the prison system

3. It localises production and distribution offering benefits in terms of social and environmental sustainability

We continue to prototype a platform for this approach working with our partners in India and Italy.

Work Package 4 - Empathic Restorative Engagement: Work on this has changed direction from what we originally anticipated and has been incorporated into the teaching materials which are downloadable.

Work Package 5 - Write Up of Project Learning: We have put online a data set of Makeright interviews (27 interviews and over 200 pages of transcription). We have written a peer-reviewed journal article 'Makeright-Bags of Connection: Teaching Design Thinking and Making in Prison to Help Build Empathic and Resilient Communities' (She Jie, Spring 2018, Vol 4, Issue 1, pp 91-110). We also gave the conference paper 'Makeright: Transforming Prison Systems Through Reflective Design-Led Entrepreneurial and Intrapreneurial Action' which was published as part of the conference proceedings of the National Institute of Design Insight conference in 2018, Ahmadabad.
Exploitation Route We hope other prisons, in addition to those we are engaging with, will run Makeright and/or use our open design educational resource to deliver different types of community design activity inside and outside of prison. Whilst the arts are well represented in terms of purposeful learning opportunities in prison, the potential for design and designers to contribute to prison industries was under explored and so we hope our action research approach will address a gap in knowledge. Additionally, we believe that our project partners, already mentioned, will take Makeright forward in different ways and in the national context we have other design schools interested in working with prison through the events we have created and run. Ultimately, we think that the Makeright project has addressed a gap in prison education by focusing on prison industries and we can help the design community better understand what is at stake in social design, including new roles for designers where prison engagement affords a unique but mutually beneficial experience. Indeed, some design students have gone on to be employed in prison linked to this project's activities (see https://www.arts.ac.uk/colleges/central-saint-martins/stories/life-after-makeright-the-power-of-patchwork:), a subject we intend to review and analyse in terms of the implication for design education. Also, to consider how to get more ex-offenders into art school.
Sectors Creative Economy,Education,Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Other

URL http://www.makeright.org
 
Description Makeright has been invited into other prisons (such as HMP Doncaster) to deliver prison industries education and to engage with students from Sheffield Hallam University. Makeright bags have found a distributor in Abel & Cole who will sell the bags for us and so give longevity to the project because it will (a) continue to provide purposeful learning for inmates, (b) raise monies for charity and (c) provide useful education methods to other creative projects. Consequently, Makeright activity and the efforts of the Design Against Crime team reached the attention of the MoJ (Ministry of Justice) who invited us to apply for funding and in July 2018 we were awarded £238k funding by the MoJ to work on a collaborative project with staff and inmates to redesign prison furniture.
First Year Of Impact 2018
Sector Education,Government, Democracy and Justice
Impact Types Cultural

 
Description Improving Safer Custody (Theme 6)
Amount £236,904 (GBP)
Funding ID ITT_1837 
Organisation Ministry of Justice 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2018 
End 02/2020
 
Title Makeright inmate interviews. 
Description In 2017 Erika Renedo completed interviews with Makeright inmates (who agreed to participate) linked to semi-structured interview research questions agreed with Lorraine Gamman, who also created and developed ethics protocols and consent forms which were approved by UAL's ethic committee. These interviews were transcribed at the end of 2017 and sent to the MoJ for permission to publish. In Spring 2018 we gained permission via Keith Jarvis at HMP Thameside to publish and have loaded interviews online via the Makeright website as a data set and form of evaluation (https://makerightorg.wordpress.com/interviews/). We have also loaded films by Stretch who were commissioned by DACRC as a further form of evaluation (https://makerightorg.wordpress.com/images-and-videos/). 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The publications we have generated have incorporated some of the above data information - most notably She Jie article from Spring 2018 - although the data set from the interviews has potential to be further utilised. 
URL http://www.makeright.org
 
Description Bath Spa University 
Organisation Bath Spa University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Meetings attended by the team figuring out how best to set up an evaluation for Makeright.
Collaborator Contribution In terms of in kind support £1000 of time and subsequent meetings (including Laura Caulfield) figuring out how best to set up an evaluation for Makeright. Collaboration still active but Laura Caulfied has moved to University of Wolverhampton as Chair of Community Research and we are continuing discussions.
Impact We have managed to meet with other design schools who are working in prison (London College of Fashion (2017) and Manchester Institute of Technology (2018) to explore possibilities of scaling Makeright to the prisons they work with and also to discuss evaluating the different design projects we have produced to work in prison as a part of a joint funding bid.
Start Year 2017
 
Description HMP & YOI Doncaster 
Organisation HMP Doncaster
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution DAC contribution was teaching inmates and training staff. Lorraine Gamman (10 days), Adam Thorpe (4 days), Pras Gunasekera (3 days), James Winston (5 days) and Erika Renedo (3 days). Danni O'Malley attended HMP Doncaster on one day only but has been working on the project as a freelance designer to turn teaching materials linked to design resources (based on direction from team) into graphic design outputs.
Collaborator Contribution HMP & YOI Doncaster contribution was to learn about the project and be trained to use our teaching materials (we recognised from our engagement with HMP Wandsworth a "train the trainer" programme was essential) but also to advise us on operational issues so we could scale Makeright resources and customize them to needs of this prison specifically. £10000 of direct support was provided to scale Makeright. These monies were given to DACRC following discussion with our business manager to finance travel and accommodation of Gamman, Gunasekera, Thorpe and Renedo who needed to stay near the prison to deliver first week of Makeright in Doncaster and attend 1 day per week between February - end March. This money also covered freelance research days worked (not covered by AHRC grant ) and cost of additional labour (Danni O'Malley and James Winston) who also attended HMP Doncaster. Additionally, £5000 approx. of in kind support from SERCO staff which included one week each time of HMP Doncaster staff members who were taken away from other duties and allocated to this project so they could benefit from both learning and training. These staff included Brenda Frazer and 2 other Families team members, Mike from print and Venessa and Vanice from Media as well as line manager Michelle Boast (who replaced Kevin Sobrielski who originally commissioned us). Consequently 7 members staff of different levels of seniority spent approximately 5 days with the team learning about the project engaging with teaching methods that were used to support 8 inmates who opted to attend Makeright. Additionally Christine Kennedy, textiles tutor at HMP Doncaster, was allocated time to attend 7 more weeks, 5 days per week working on the project (time allocated by SERCO). Subsequently she took responsibility for Makeright Doncaster. She collected DACRC staff and Sheffield Hallam staff and student volunteers and escorted them in and out of the building (which requires special security arrangements); arranged inmate schedules and timesheets so they could attend the Makeright classes; was present during the period the classes run and advised us when we trained staff to learn more about how to run project without us, also she worked with inmates when team were not there (to help them develop their designs) and to help us figure out how best to scale this project.
Impact First Makeright course at HMP & YOI Doncaster currently in progress.
Start Year 2017
 
Description HMP Kilmarnock 
Organisation HM Prison Service
Department HM Prison Kilmarnock
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution In May 2017 Gamman, Thorpe and Gunasekera travelled to HMP Kilmarnock and spent 2 days in discussion with staff at the prison including Craig Maxwell, governor and other senior team members including Ian McMillan, Neill Bolland, Paul Dickie, Wendy Pender, Rosemary Millar, Kevin Davidson, Angela Gibson and Lesley Anderson. SERCO also arranged for Keith Jarvis from HMP Thameside to travel to Scotland to be involved in 2-days of meetings with us and aforementioned HMP Kilmarnock staff (this is funded by SERCO) to figure out how to scale the project from Thameside to Kilmarnock (because Thameside was to become a remand prison in 2018 and Makeright course duration could no longer be accommodated there). Team spent further 1 day of this meeting time with prison industries (Rosemary Millar, Lesley Anderson and Angela Gibson) figuring out how to scale the project and run Makeright at Kilmarnock plus engaging in classroom discussion with inmates about their interest in Makeright (which was very positive). Also discussing how to deliver further entrepreneurial activity with prison industries there (possibly "Innovate Inside") as a follow-on or prequel course. This discussion did not lead to an invitation to fund Makeright but in 2018 staff from HMP Kilmarnock; Rosemary Millar; Lesley Anderson and Angela Gibson (3 days each) Skyped and telephoned about prototyping and manufacturing. This discussion about scaling Makeright as product range is ongoing, but is dependent on local design college involvement, which Gamman, Thorpe and Gunasekera have tried to set up with Glasgow School of Art (see engagement activities). Although to our knowledge there has been little follow up by Kilmarnock.
Collaborator Contribution Prison staff have provided free consultancy and advice to project regarding (1) advising on operational issues regarding scaling the project which included 1 days of meets with governor and 9 prison staff and (2) 1 day of engagement with prison industries staff on manufacturing issues linked to making bags in prison regarding the Makeright range. Discussions on both subjects have been on-going and the actual bags (designs from HMP Thameside) have been tweaked and manufactured several times in HMP Kilmarnock prison in 2017 and 2018 linked to different manufacturing specifications, and incorporating Kilmarnock staff advice about improvements. In terms of in kind contribution: £1000 approx. of travel time for Keith Jarvis from Thameside to travel to Kilmarnock. + £5000 of in-kind time allocated for attendance of approx. 9 staff at HMP Kilmarnock to engage in 2 days of meetings regarding scaling Makeright. Total £6000 but given staff of different levels of seniority hard to gauge precisely.
Impact Development of modified designs. Development of a price range for our bags.
Start Year 2017
 
Description HMP Thameside 
Organisation HM Prison Service
Department HMP Thameside - Serco Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In Spring 2017 the team met independently with Keith Jarvis who set up discussions with HMP Thameside and HMP Kilmarnock and helped us arrange visit there in regards to scaling. In May 2017 we started discussion with HMP Kilmarnock, we also put a call out to former HMP Thameside Makeright volunteers to propose new projects to work with prison. Two students came forward with two projects (emotionally intelligent postcards and patchwork fidget mats for dementia patients) that eventually ran in Thameside in 2018. We also worked on an application for Queens Award prize with aforementioned team regarding our Makeright prison work.
Collaborator Contribution Partner contributions include 5 full days each of meetings and phone call discussions. Circa £2000 of time of Keith Jarvis, Head of Prison Industries, plus his line manager Andy Charalambous and Mike Teesdale who have been involved in advising us on how to develop shorter Makeright engagements for HMP Thameside. This is because although Makeright continued to run until July 2017 the impending change of this prison status to "Remand" only means that Makeright can no longer run over 8 weeks. The prison team came to CSM in Spring 2017 tell us about this and to work with us to develop new courses for HMP Thameside as well as offering to help us scale up the existing Makeright project to other SERCO prisons, given its success to date. Also there has been some engagement with Craig Thomson, Director of HMP Thameside regarding an invited application for Queen's Award prize.
Impact Good feedback from Keith Jarvis and Thameside prison staff and inmates wanting to continue to work on Makeright in future if elements of it could be customised to fit prison's changing needs. Two projects were subsequently developed (and run) that drew on the work Makeright had delivered - building empathy with inmates and finding new ways for them to emotionally relate to others, and to review reoffending. This included a project where a range of "Makeright emotionally intelligent postcards" was generated and run as a project with print industries at HMP Thameside; 30 x "Made in Thameside" postcards have subsequently been produced by a CSM student volunteer who, facilitated by DACRC, user-tested them with inmates. She subsequently gave a free licence to prison for such postcards to be printed and used as a HMP Thameside "Made in prison" range. Her work also helped DACRC to prototype the value of a "designer in residence" scheme which is linked to entrepreneurial research focus, and which we will eventually write up. Additionally, Zannah Cooper, former MA student at CSM after volunteering with us in 2017 applied for a job in textiles and has subsequently been employed since 2017/18 making patchwork fidget blankets with inmates for the benefit of dementia patients. A CSM press release about this is being developed. We learned in 2017 that were unsuccessful in our bid to secure a Queen's Award prize for work on Makeright with HMP Thameside.
Start Year 2017
 
Description HMP Wandsworth 
Organisation HM Prison Service
Department HMP Wandsworth
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution In January /June 2017 the team met with Claire Skeet and Julia Fitzgerald of HMP Wandsworth Education who introduced us to staff in textiles and announced Makeright could run at Wandsworth in September 2017. Before Makeright started, because of logistics, we were encouraged to run a shorter course we had developed to run with Makeright at HMP Thameside ("Innovate Inside") at HMP Wandsworth as a "trial run" as it didn't need textiles studio and could run for 1 week as form of action research to understand the operational issues of the prison and to better understand how to prepare for the 8 week Makeright to run in textiles there, as a regular course. These colleagues shared much experience; 3 full days each of meetings and phone call discussions; also introduction to rest of staff in textiles we would be working with, in addition to Gamman, Gunasekera and Renedo working in prison over 5 days (unpaid by prison but covered by our grant) to teach "Innovate Inside" as a trial to scaling Makeright.
Collaborator Contribution In 2014 we started a conversation with Wandsworth that stalled because of operational issues at the prison. In January 2017 we became more definite about working with Wandsworth and thereafter were setting up plans to scale Makeright. In July 2017 this relationship was ended without warning when Ian Bickers (Governor of prison) left abruptly (June 2017) and we read in newspaper that special reform powers of prison were revoked by MOJ (with no public explanation). Julia Fitzgerald, our main contact subsequently resigned soon after (again with no explanation). We were not able to go forward as Claire Skeet who we also worked with (in education) as she was not clear whether Makeright could happen in September as we had agreed; as things at HMP Wandsworth seemed to be on "pause". Eventually, we realised we would need to seek a new prison partner to scale the Makeright project, as so many problems. This situation meant we lost a lot of time that team members Gamman, Gunasekara and Rendedo had put in to figure out how to scale the Makeright. Partner contributed in kind circa £2000 of time of Claire Skeet and Julia Fitzgerald (senior staff).
Impact Good feedback from inmates about "Innovate Inside" and good staff feedback from prison staff we were introduced (and presented Makeright to) about prospect of running Makeright in textiles. Whilst Claire Skeet said she was keen to go forward, the senior management changes in June 2017 at the prison prevented anything happening and by September 2017 Claire Skeet resigned too, and we realised we had to extend deadline of our project and seek a new prison partner.
Start Year 2017
 
Description London College of Fashion 
Organisation University of the Arts London
Department LCF London College of Fashion
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Attendance of meetings with Claire Swift (LCF).
Collaborator Contribution Advice, and attendance of meetings by Claire Swift (LCF).
Impact The team are currently working with Claire Swift and colleagues from other Universities to open up a discussion about working with design focussed (rather than art focussed) projects in prison. Also to consider whether or not to apply for Network funding.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Making Bags to Make Good 
Organisation National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad
Country India 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Meetings about better understanding of how to work with Camden Kala 2017/ write up of material for dissemination.
Collaborator Contribution We met with Praveen's team online to prepare for the handout and booklets for the Camden Kala event. Praveen flew to London and talked about his work with Sabarmati Jail at one of the launch events of the expo (his plane was late so missed first event) and also continued talks about running further prison projects with NID in future. Changes at Sabarmati Jail have meant we have been unable to finalize a future date to run Makeirght there.
Impact http://lovecamden.org/index.php/makeright
Start Year 2017
 
Description RSA 
Organisation Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Lorraine Gamman and Adam Thorpe met with Sevra Davis, Rachel O'Brien and Jack Robson from the RSA about scaling the Makeright project and creating an open design challenge brief to encourage other design schools to engage with prison in the national context. Sevra is moving to Design Museum but has advised us that Rebecca Ford will be taking over her role and we are endeavoring to meet.
Collaborator Contribution Sevra Davis has agreed to support a national call to design schools and a prison event curated by Gamman at CSM to run in 2019, this is still under discussion.
Impact Being developed.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Sheffield Hallam University 
Organisation Sheffield Hallam University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In order to scale the Makeright project in the north of UK, Lorraine Gamman and Chryssi Tzanetou, Business Development Manager, met with Dr. Roger Bateman of Sheffield Hallam University, as he said he was interested in working with us at Doncaster. A collaboration was agreed upon and Gamman travelled to Sheffield funded by AHRC for several meetings; also to spend 1 day introducing Makeright project to Roger's colleagues, training students to prepare to go inside prison to work with inmates, basically to help Sheffield Hallam University develop a partnership with HMP Doncaster so in future they could run Makeright without DACRC.
Collaborator Contribution In terms of in kind support circa £7500 approx. - 15 days of Roger Bateman's time; plus contribution of project from 5 MA students who have contributed 25 days each to the Makeright HMP Doncaster course. Dr Roger Bateman of Sheffield Hallam University and Prof. Gamman of Design Against Crime Research Centre at Central Saint Martins (CSM) also spent 5 days working out how to build the Makeright project into Sheffield Hallam's MA Design course linked to course requirements (for student to engage with clients) and other public engagement activities. This collaboration has helped Gamman research how to scale Makeright with future design colleges who may want to engage with Makeright. Also, to observe the subsequent Sheffield Hallam student involvement in the Makeright Doncaster project which started in Spring 2018 and has worked successfully to date although still finalizing. The opportunity now is for Sheffield Hallam design school to replace DACRC at CSM (as Sheffield geographically nearer), as a regular delivery partner so Makeright and other design projects can continue to run with prison industries. This approach, when reflected upon, will be written up as we hope it can it offer a blueprint in the national context of how Makeright can be scaled from one design school (CSM) to another (Sheffield Hallam) and from one prison (Thameside) to another (Doncaster).
Impact First Makeright course at HMP Doncaster currently being run.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Stretch 
Organisation Stretch Digital
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution DACRC are currently figuring out how to produce further digital outputs for our website in particular of Abel & Cole customers using bags made in prison; Carlotta Allum is advising on this. Our discussions have also unexpectedly led to Carlotta successfully applying to do a PhD with DACRC supervised by Lorraine Gamman at Central Saint Martins; she has subsequently made an application to LDOC to fund this work and at time of writing is awaiting a decision about her application.
Collaborator Contribution Carlotta Allum has been advising on the digital outputs of the project and the value of working on design in prison. Advice and support and offer to work as a freelance for DACRC, which is important as an ex-offender she runs a prisoner-led activity.
Impact Being developed.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Zannah Cooper 
Organisation HM Prison Service
Department HMP Thameside - Serco Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In 2019 we were in talks with Zannah Cooper about how best to transfer her dementia Fidget Blankets course to prisons, utilising the online teaching material from Makeright. Like Makeright, the course will teach inmates design disciplines/design thinking/design development and personas. Ultimately, it will be a meaningful/therapeutic course to increase empathy and reduce violence with male/female inmates which will use much of the learning from Makeright.
Collaborator Contribution Zannah has been given 6 days of work to develop the course. It was successfully taught at HMP Thameside and attracted further interest from HMP Wormwood Scrubs.
Impact The Fidget Blankets have been exhibited.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Better Lives lecture 1 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact Lorraine Gamman gave the presentation "Empathy" as part of the Better Lives Lecture Series, London College of Fashion (14 Feb 2019). She discussed the Makeright project and what value creating empathy experiences might have for designers of the future.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://replay.arts.ac.uk/video/5c68631e3362d90a2d8b4593
 
Description Engagement with Peabody Trust (2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact We first met with Adriana Marques (Head of Cultural Strategy for Thamesmead at Peabody) at HMP Thameside prison in March 2017. This meeting with Adam Cooper of the Mayor's office and Keith Jarvis and Andy Charalambous of HMP Thameside discussed the goals we had about connecting ideas about entrepreneurship and self-employment. We agreed there was mutual interest in the resettlement agenda and the development of a Fab Lab we had previously proposed (in published writing). We arranged another meeting for further discussion when all the appropriate staff from Peabody could be present. This meet took place on 22nd August 2017 to discuss mutual interests and in attendance were Paula Hines and her team from Peabody; Lucy Webb, Kate Batchelor and David Bussey, Keith Jarvis of HMP Thameside and Sarah Wigglesworth of Sarah Wigglesworth Architects. At this meeting we resumed the conversations about the potential of a Fab Lab. We met again in November 2017 and agreed to write a letter of support for Peabody to apply to the Good Growth Fund based on our expression of interest in being located within one of the new spaces, once they have been developed by Peabody. Early indications are the Good Growth fund application for 1.2m is through to the next round; if successful, the funding will endeavour to include a collaboration with HMP Thameside and Central Saint Martins's Design Against Crime Research Centre and its Public Collaboration Lab. We suggested in our letter for support to the Mayor's office that, based loosely on the 'Fab Lab' model, the aspiration is to persuade Peabody to provide a space within the Thamesmead area that will enable the provision of an innovative skills offer, drawing on the technological skills, printing and digital fabrication skills offered within the prison and through Central Saint Martins' programmes in Camden and elsewhere. Such an offer will be intended to serve those prisoners trying to resettle into the community following their release, as well as providing a tailored offer to a wider cohort local residents including those suffering from mental health and social isolation issues. The ambition is to explore the opportunities that the HMP Thameside/ Central Saint Martins collaboration could provide as a learning and skills offer within the new spaces through dialogue and co-design with the local community, the Royal Borough of Greenwich and wider agencies. However, although this bid was successful, it was only for capital expenditure and this meant there were not funds for us and we could not progress. Worse, in the intervening period, HMP Thameside learned they were to become a remand prison which scuppered our future aims for the Makeright course due to the dismantling of the textile studio.

We met with Kate Bachelor and Paul Hines of Peabody on the 15th November 2018 to figure out how we might work together in future, funding permitted.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description LDOC keynote presentation (November 2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact London Doctoral Design Centre's (LDOC) 10th Keynote lecture titled 'What can participatory design contribute to participatory democracy: A response to the call to Stand Up for Democracy' by Lorraine Gamman and Adam Thorpe was presented on 23rd November 2017. This presentation discussed the potential contribution of participatory design to democracy in local government and criminal justice, presenting Makeright as one of the case studies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://ldoc-cdt.ac.uk/keynote-10-what-can-participatory-design-contribute-to-participatory-democracy...
 
Description Makeright coverage by NCJAA 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Makeright coverage by NCJAA: https://www.artsincriminaljustice.org.uk/makeright-bags-changing-lives-by-design/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation at Arts and Criminal Justice research meeting, Bath Spa University (April 2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Presentation at Arts and Criminal Justice research meeting, Bath Spa University (April 2017) plus meetings and discussion with Laura Caulfield about the possibility in future of setting up an evaluation project and applying for funding to support this.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation at Bigger Picture event (November 2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact "Makeright - Making Bags to Make Good" presentation at the Bigger Picture event, Central Saint Martins (14th November 2017) by Lorraine Gamman to over 500 undergraduate students from Central Saint Martins as an exemplar social design project with a view to attracting more design volunteers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation at ICPA conference (October 2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact We were recommended by the Ministry of Justice (who hosted this international event) to apply to present Makeright at the 19th International Corrections and Prisons Association (ICPA) annual conference in October 2017. Our application was successful and we delivered the presentation at the event, it was circulated by the ICPA afterwards and received some international attention (e.g. USA interest in the project).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation at Insight 2018 (November 2018) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Lorraine Gamman, Adam Thorpe and Praveen Nahar presented "Makeright: Transforming Prison Systems through Reflective Design-Led Entrepreneurial and Intrapreneurial Action" in the Contemporary and Evolving Models of Design Research stream of the conference.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://nid.edu/insight2018/programme.php
 
Description Presentation at NCJAA conference (December 2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presentation of Makeright by Lorraine Gamman at the National Criminal Justice Arts Alliance's annual conference: What's Next for Arts in Criminal Justice? (4th December 2017). The presentation was subsequently circulated.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation at NCJAA meeting (October 2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Lorraine Gamman presented Makeright at the NCJAA (National Criminal Justice Arts Alliance) research meeting, London (19 October 2017). The overall aim was to focus on one of the key priority research areas and help develop NCJAA future policy.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation at Sheffield Hallam University (November 2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Presentation by Lorraine Gamman with Kevin Sobieralski of HMP Doncaster at Sheffield Hallam University (SHU) (16th November 2017).
This was a presentation to staff and 60 SHU design MA students about volunteering on the Makeright project led by DACRC at CSM in partnership with Sheffield Hallam. 6 students signed up to work with HMP Doncaster. These students have subsequently been into prison with first rate reports about the experience.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation at Unlocking Pentonville event (June 2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Lorraine Gamman gave the presentation "Making Bags to Make Good" at the Unlocking Pentonville event (17th June 2017). The invitation came from Sarah Wigglesworth RDI MBE (Director, Sarah Wigglesworth Architects) and Gamman spoke under the Equality and Justice Stream which sought papers that investigate incarceration and freedom, equality and access, learning and lifelong opportunity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation of Makeright to C of E Prison Entrepreneurship Network, Mayfair (September 2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Short presentation of Makeright research to entrepreneurship community followed by networking afterwards.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation to Centre of Entrepreneurs (2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presentation of Makeright to Centre of Entrepreneurs (CoE) in January 2017. Adam Thorpe and Lorraine Gamman met with Matt Smith and Maximillan Yoshioka to see whether we could connect our projects to their focus on entrepreneurship in HMP Ranby (funded by the MoJ) given we are in agreement that so much creative talent goes to waste in prison. We arranged for Max to visit HMP Thameside in March 2017 to see the Makeright project in action as it was running there. We presented at the CoE Prison Networking workshop and invited them to collaborate on further events we are planning.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation to Creative Innovation Across Disciplines, Nottingham Trent University (April 2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Presentation of Makeright to Research community at Nottingham Trent University (5th April 2017) to gauge whether any interest in their design community working with prison.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation to Glasgow School of Art (May 2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Presentation of Makeright project (3rd May 2017) to Paul Cosgrove, Craig Whitlet and Irene Bell at Glasgow School of Art by Gamman, Thorpe and Gunasekara in order to figure out how HMP Kilmarnock could run Makeright without the DACRC team and to attract design volunteers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation to Heatherwick studio (January 2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Following the "Making bags to make good" expo launch during London Design Festival, Rebecca Ramos, Lisa Finlay of Heatherwick Studio were introduced to Lorraine Gamman and Adam Thorpe by the designer Michael Wolff. In October 2017 Heatherwick Studio invited Gamman and Thorpe to present our work with Makeright to their team and subsequently advise on a confidential prison project they are creating for a philanthropist, but subject to NDA terms. This consultation and advice is ongoing.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation to Ministry of Justice (MoJ) (January 2018) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact In January 2018 Lorraine Gamman and Adam Thorpe were invited by Ian Bickers (Deputy Director of MoJ), following a recommendation by Jason Swettenham, to talk about developing a "Made in HMP" website to sell products made in all MoJ prisons. They subsequently met in February at the MoJ to present the Makeright experience and discuss taking this further. Discussion is ongoing as the MoJ are still scoping.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Presentation to SERCO (February 2018) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Lorraine Gamman presented to Julia Rogers, Managing Director of Justice and Immigration at SERCO, on 13th February 2018. They discussed scaling the Makeright Design Academy across all SERCO-run prisons and the potential for developing further Makeright teaching and research projects (including the new design project currently running at HMP Thameside) as well as an AHRC leadership fellowship to scale the project across all SERCO prisons. Gamman is required to submit a business plan by January 2019 for SERCO to consider.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Presentation to SERCO (January 2018) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Presentation of Makeright to Sarah Mallender and Mike Buxton of SERCO in January 2018. The meet was about a Prison Education Framework funding proposal to government. In particular, to explore how Makeright can be built into SERCO's model for the Prison Education Framework, and also the delivery of arts and design programmes on a wider scale that could add value to SERCO's business case for support. In March 2018 the team completed a bid to Ministry of Justice but it was not successful. We anticipate further discussions with SERCO in future.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Presentation to Sheffield Hallam University students (16th November 2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact A presentation of the Makeright project to Roger Bateman and the MA Design team at Sheffield Hallam by Lorraine Gamman in order to figure out how they might work with HMP Doncaster and the DACRC team and take MA design volunteers into prison.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation: Makeright and Ethical Considerations 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact 450 students from varying disciplines (BA (Hons) Architecture, Product Design, Graphic Communication and Ceramics) attended the presentation on Makeright and Ethical Considerations as part of their Bigger Picture collaborative unit. The presentation facilitated smaller group discussion as to how to ethically approach students own socially led design projects for the unit. The presentation was also commented on in students assessed reflective essays, which were submitted at the end of the unit.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Presentation: Makeright and Ethical Considerations 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact c.40 new PhD students at UAL attended a presentation on Makeright and Ethical considerations. After the presentation students were given vignettes of past student projects to discuss potential ethical issues and then reflect/discuss/question their own areas of research and ethical considerations that would be required.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019