A feminist international law of peace and security

Lead Research Organisation: London School of Economics & Pol Sci
Department Name: Centre for Women, Peace and Security

Abstract

This project develops the theoretical foundations and normative content of an international law that can more effectively deliver on gender equality and sustainable peace. For over a century, these two goals have defined the women's peace movement and, as early as 1915, activists were calling on states to recognize that neither equality nor peace could be fully secured without acknowledging the intimate relationship between the two. In the aftermath of WWII states sought to advance these goals but through parallel international law projects starting with the adoption of the UN Charter in 1945 and the Universal Declaration of Human Right in 1948. Notwithstanding a plethora of efforts, progress over the last seven decades on both fronts has been patchy and partial. Across the globe, equality is far from being realized and measures to prevent conflict have all too often failed.

In 2000, the UN Security Council adopted Resolution 1325 when, at long last, states formally acknowledged the link between the two objectives and, in doing so, founded the UN's Women, Peace and Security Agenda (WPS Agenda). In the intervening 17 years, the Council has adopted a further seven resolutions leading to significant advances on some fronts, most notably, international action to tackle sexual violence in armed conflict. However, women's groups and scholars are increasingly doubtful that the potential for transformative change and radical reform as originally envisaged by Resolution 1325 will materialize. This scepticism is due to a number of reasons including the ambiguity of the texts of the resolutions and a lack of political commitment. The very fact that states regard the WPS agenda as a set of policy objectives rather than as a political framework founded on legal obligations means that progress is likely to be slow at best. Our project addresses these two core problems by elaborating on the legal content of the agenda. In that process, we will pave the way for what we ambitiously describe as a 'feminist international law of peace and security'. In short, this proposal represents the initial stage of a long-term vision that builds on the legacies of the past to develop the foundations and content of a feminist international law of peace and security that offers an alternative gender-sensitive account of international law that can make a real and lasting difference to the lives of women, not least those in conflict affected zones.

The project is divided into two inter-related research streams. The first focuses on the conceptual and normative ambiguities of the WPS agenda and interrogates our understandings of 'peace' and 'security' through different disciplines and traditions to craft an enriched feminist reading of what is implicated by both concepts under international law. In the second stream we turn our attention to the notion of conflict prevention and ask whether a feminist international law would open up the possibilities for a broader understanding of conflict prevention thereby providing a normative framework that more effectively delivers on prevention. Over the 3 year project cycle, we will undertake desk-based and archival research, convene workshops involving a wide range of stakeholders, including scholars from other disciplines and policy-makers and -shapers at domestic and international levels and convene a WPS Global Congress. Our dissemination strategy has been planned to maximize the impact of our findings and to reach the widest possible audience, not least women's groups operating in conflict-affected regions. We will created a one-stop global resource hub that will host our research outputs including articles for an academic audience; reports and briefing papers to assist policy-makers develop law and policies with transformative potential; advocacy and litigation tools aimed at further empowering women's groups; and comments and blogs for all audiences including, importantly, the general public.

Planned Impact

In developing the theoretical foundations and normative content of an international law that can more effectively deliver on gender equality and sustainable peace, our research is projected to benefit policy-makers, public sector actors, civil society organisations, legal practitioners, the media and the general public in the ways outlined below.

Our outputs and activities will inform and assist policy-makers and public sector actors, at national and international levels, to craft strategies that more effectively deliver on the two core goals of equality and sustainable peace to which states are committed pursuant to the UN's Women, Peace and Security Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The critical role of law in securing both objectives has been expressly acknowledged by states. By producing accessible studies mapping the applicable legal frameworks complemented by an enriched gender-sensitive interpretation of the relevant norms, our outputs will equip states to design and develop progressive law, policy and strategies to meet needs and obligations and to deliver on their political goals. We will provide expert analyses, insights into protection gaps, and options and recommendations that are innovative, practical and feasible. Our activities, not least the Global Congress, will offer these stakeholders an invaluable opportunity to hear directly from a broad spectrum of women's groups operating in the field.
Our outputs will enable civil society organisations, legal practitioners and the media to more effectively hold states and international organisations accountable by providing enhanced clarity as to how the multiple policy initiatives and legal regimes intersect. We will furnish additional tools, highlight good practices and develop different entry points to enhance the ability of those involved in advocacy and litigation work to influence policy and secure implementation. Through the Global Congress we will bring together activists from a cross-section of professions including academics, advocates and litigators from around the world to promote knowledge exchange. In particular, our free and open-access one-stop resource website will assist women activists in conflict and post-conflict environments to better understand what mechanisms and tools are available and how to utilize them to secure improved rights protection. Our publications and activities will provide the media with expert knowledge, alternative perspectives (including the lived experience of women in conflict and conflict-affected areas), pinpoint protection gaps, and identify the linkages between international ambitions and local impact thereby equipping them to better inform public opinion.

Our research will contribute to the social and intellectual capital of the expanding global knowledge economy by enhancing public awareness and understanding of the ways in which international law can be harnessed to better secure gender equality and sustainable peace for all. Around the world there has been a rising tide of women's movements calling for change and thus our outputs and activities will complement, advance and prompt further debate, participation and engagement among the general public. Working in collaboration with the third sector we will promote a deeper appreciation of our shared history through the prism of women's peace movements across time and space and develop new directions in representing the interplay between law and history.

As this project will be embedded with the LSE's WPS Centre, it will consolidate the School's reputation as a leading global research and resource hub on women, peace and security thereby presenting UK-based researchers at the forefront of debate and shapers of policy in these critical areas of public and political concern.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Title Visions of Feminist Peace programme: Amrit Kaur Lohia, a singer-songwriter, Sarangi player and vocalist in genres of Punjabi folk, R&B and soul. 
Description From 14th September - 2nd October 2020, the Visions of Feminist Peace Programme (Congress) ran in partnership with the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF), to explore the potentialities of 'feminist peace' as an analytic framework and political aim, as well as its inherent limitations and exclusions. Musician Amrit Kaur Lohia performed some of her songs as part of this programme, linking them with poetry as a way to explore a particular understanding of feminist peace. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact We saw increased engagement from non-academic audiences on social media regarding our Visions of Feminist Peace programme as a result of artistic performances. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lIAxnvtv_xs
 
Title Visions of Feminist Peace programme: Citizens of the World Choir 
Description From 14th September - 2nd October 2020, the Visions of Feminist Peace Programme (Congress) ran in partnership with the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF), to explore the potentialities of 'feminist peace' as an analytic framework and political aim, as well as its inherent limitations and exclusions. As part of this programme, the Citizens of the World Choir performed three songs in an event hosted by the LSE Centre for Women, Peace and Security. The Citizens of the World Choir is a choir for people who are refugees, asylum seekers, migrants and the wider community of Londoners. This performance brought an essential voice into the programme and discussions on feminist peace. 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact We saw increased engagement from non-academic audiences on social media regarding our Visions of Feminist Peace programme as a result of artistic performances. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zeeMONOaznE
 
Title Visions of Feminist Peace programme: Millicent Chapanda, traditional mbira player, percussionist, singer, dancer and storyteller. 
Description From 14th September - 2nd October 2020, the Visions of Feminist Peace Programme (Congress) ran in partnership with the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF), to explore the potentialities of 'feminist peace' as an analytic framework and political aim, as well as its inherent limitations and exclusions. Musician Millicent Chapanda performed three songs for the programme, using the songs as a means to explore and explain a vision of feminist peace. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact We saw increased engagement from non-academic audiences on social media regarding our Visions of Feminist Peace programme as a result of artistic performances. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZTmylpqVzMI
 
Title Visions of Feminist Peace programme: Suhaiymah Manzoor-Khan, poet 
Description From 14th September - 2nd October 2020, the Visions of Feminist Peace Programme (Congress) ran in partnership with the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF), to explore the potentialities of 'feminist peace' as an analytic framework and political aim, as well as its inherent limitations and exclusions. Poet Suhaiymah Manzoor-Khan performed two of her poems for this programme, providing alternative means through which to engage audiences in a discussion on feminist peace, as well as different mediums through which to articulate a feminist peace. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2020 
Impact We saw increased engagement from non-academic audiences on social media regarding our Visions of Feminist Peace programme as a result of artistic performances. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yq7S5jPMyMk&feature=emb_title
 
Title Women, weapons and disarmament. Virtual exhibition (created by Louise Arimatsu) 
Description This exhibition was designed to stimulate interest in the often-neglected stories around women, weapons and disarmament. The topic has been the subject of study by researchers on the Feminist International Law of Peace and Security project who have asked: - How, if at all, can war be prevented? - What have weapons and disarmament got to do with conflict prevention and advancing peace and security? - How might feminist approaches to international law provide different answers to age old problems? The exhibition reflects the intellectual journey of the researchers who have been involved in this work and integrates archival material together with the research outputs generated through hyper-links in the text. The exhibition is structured around four sub-themes: i) Conflict prevention & investing in peace; ii) Feminist activism; iii) Reframing the discourse; iv) Rethinking international law 
Type Of Art Artistic/Creative Exhibition 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact
URL https://www.lse.ac.uk/women-peace-security/research/Disarmament-Exhibition/Homepage-Women-Weapons-an...
 
Description This periodic report builds on the preliminary key findings recorded in March 2020 and looks ahead to the final report at the end of the grant period in June 2021.

From the outset, we fully recognised that the goal we set ourselves was hugely ambitious. The UN Charter - the key constitutional document of contemporary international law - was intended to privilege law as the conduit through which to resolve inter-State disputes and to prohibit the use of force in international relations and promote international peace and security. Instead, States have used the Charter to legitimate force and military action has become the standard way through which the Security Council seeks to give effect to its primary responsibility for the maintenance of international peace and security. Our goal was to contribute to advancing the theoretical foundations and normative content of an international law that would more effectively deliver on transformative change, gender equality and sustainable peace. As set out in our proposal, the structure of the project, the multiple methods and approaches selected, the cross-cutting nature of the streams and the concrete objectives identified made delivery even more challenging.

We have endeavoured to respond positively to these challenges throughout the lifetime of this grant. We have generated a body of work - individually and collectively, directly and indirectly - to reveal the transformative potential of international law in this regard. Although as feminist scholars we remain critical of the law, this project has enabled us to reimagine our discipline and to identify entry points to advance both scholarship and practice dedicated to equality and peace. Feminist methodologies have also opened up opportunities to engage with international law through different perspectives, other disciplines and to explore different mediums through which to promote new thinking and understanding.

The value of feminist methodologies
To the extent that feminist work is always both a critical and a political enterprise, the value of engaging with international law informed by insights from feminist scholarship and praxis cannot be overstated. Feminist methods have enabled us to draw out international law's transformative potential and to show how, with a shift in the mindset of State decision-makers and in orthodox renderings of the discipline, the law and its institutions can be redirected toward prioritising peace, social justice and equality. Through our work we have demonstrated how feminist methods are adept at disrupting assumptions (including orthodox approaches to the law), breaking down siloes, drawing linkages that have gone unnoticed, and bridging theory and practice. Feminist methodologies subvert and transcend disciplinary and professional compartmentalisation. Use of feminist methodologies has allowed us to interrogate what is implicated by 'peace' and 'security' in international law through different lenses; facilitate dialogue and knowledge sharing; create new avenues of understanding (including disrupting our own pre-conceptions); and enrich our thinking around peace and security in international law enabling us to craft new insights and solutions through a reimagined international legal order.
One of the key findings from our research is that a transformative understanding of international law that espouses a feminist peace must be grounded in:

i) the silenced histories of international law and of women's peace activism from the local to the global; and
ii) contemporary feminist struggles for peace, justice and freedom.

Accordingly, our work has been directed at surfacing the long histories of women's activism for peace and connecting this with contemporary feminist work (in academia, in international institutions and in advocacy, activist and policy circles, as well as the lived reality of differently situated women's day-to-day lives, not simply the perspective of experts) towards developing a socially just, feminist and sustainable peace.

In this reporting period we have continued to strengthen this finding through inter-disciplinary and inter-professional outputs and events such as:

• The Visions of Feminist Peace programme, in particular, the panel on archiving memory;
• Seminars on women's peace activism in 1915 and after World War I and on women's resistance and struggles for peace under invasion and occupation; events on the meaning of Greenham Common and its legacy; histories of women's peace activism in the Middle East; events on the historical struggles for disarmament and their linkage with women's contemporary peace activism, including a visual output currently underway; work on the history of women's engagement with the origins and early years of the ILO; a Letter to UN Member States on a Feminist Peace drawing on women's historic collective action on this issue.
• Engagements through downloadable concept notes and blogs such as those on the history of women and weapons; Women and the Right to Peace; women's activism in Yemen; article on Transformative Disarmament; book chapter on Enhancing the impact of international norms: Which way forward? (history of women's engagement with the origins of the ILO).

These (and other) activities have shown that the blind spots and biases of international law are not only due the silencing of women (through history, processes and norms) but also suppress other intersecting histories of race (imperialism and colonialism) and of class (capitalism) and that it is a closed, self-referential system now dominated by the politics of the UN Security Council. It was to challenge these biases that the Letter to UN Member States on a Feminist Peace was produced within the framework of the Visions of Feminist Peace programme. Highlighting these biases was seen as even more pressing in the midst of the global pandemic. The Letter was subsequently packaged through a video output integrating multiple voices in different languages as a means to communicate with a broader audience.

An ongoing feature of our work has been engagement with third sector organisations such as human rights, women's rights, and peacebuilding organisations. A central finding has been the feminist dilemma common to both scholarship and activism: that in the need to utilise international law and engage with international bodies in the struggles for justice, feminists can unwittingly legitimate agendas that ultimately subvert long-term goals. This applies to the treaty-making process (for example, the Arms Trade Treaty); the development of the Women Peace and Security (WPS) agenda (CVE, participation in peace negotiations); and indeed norms applicable in the cyber realm.

A further key finding is that any moves towards gender just peace must involve those working on the ground and that the WPS agenda in particular must engage with women's civil society organisations without any predetermined model with respect to local women's priorities, or how they should engage with the international community. Inclusion by the latter of 'women' or 'gender' (in texts or institutional programmes and policies) all too frequently fails to engage with the transformative ambitions and innovations of women peacebuilders. Nor does the goal of 'peace' deal with fundamental issues of social injustice but rather is used by international peacemakers as a blanket term that progresses the neo-liberal agenda. The need to listen to, learn from, and create platforms to amplify the voices of feminist peace activists has been a core finding and thus also a core component of our work (for example through our collaborative work with WILPF, WIPC and with Peace Track Initiative).

As a critical enterprise, feminist methodologies have enabled us to question the assumptions that frame our disciplinary understandings, how knowledge is understood, collated and reproduced. In particular, they demonstrate how traditional conceptualisations of what 'counts' as international law and how it is practiced have shaped the extent to which it can deliver on the promises made relating to women's rights and gender justice (eg in the WPS agenda and in women's human rights instruments; but also in associated agendas such as those relating to human trafficking, disarmament, and climate change). Challenging these assumptions - conceptual and participatory - has been an integral part of our work. Our use of feminist methodologies, the development of innovative outputs and dissemination techniques (such as the Letter on a Feminist Peace, visual dissemination and artistic interpretation of our work) and of a trove of historical and contemporary sources (collated in the public Zotero library) contributes to an expanded understanding of what 'is' international law and how this might be used to develop a feminist, just and sustainable peace. This is both a finding and a contribution.

In interrogating the relationship between peace and security and law and policy, feminist methods have enabled us not only to critique but to draw important connections that might otherwise go unnoticed. The work streams that we identified in the application are inter-related in ways we had not fully appreciated. Another finding is that we need both to pursue them separately and also to explore further their interactions. For example, the findings of the work on Gender, Nature, Peace are applicable to our findings in other projects: while the research methods focused on gender and environmental conflict, the findings can be broadened to make institutional demands for change, for instance on gender integrated peacebuilding and conflict prevention, especially with respect to intersectionality, inclusion, funding, capacity building and challenging centralised power bases. Other findings from the Gender, Nature, Peace project that are generalisable are how corporate power is antithetical to a feminist peace and the need for an integrated and coordinated approach across all the work streams for a feminist peace.

Another finding relates to the disruption of our own preconceptions as much as those of others and, to this end, we have consistently challenged ourselves as to whether we are 'asking the right question'. This approach engages 'feminist curiosity' and has enabled us to pose questions of international law and of peace that are not asked within mainstream accounts and to reframe discussions. For example, we have asked 'why is the Security Council not called a Peace Council' and how doing so might reshape debate; in our conversations with the OHCHR we asked why peace was not a lens through which to develop programmes for the advancement of women's human rights; why is universal and general disarmament not a part of the Declaration on the Right to Peace?

Of the nine concrete objectives we identified in the original proposal, only two have not been fully realised. The first was to establish a global digital hub on the Women, Peace and Security agenda. We have not been able to realise this as planned primarily due to technical obstacles and an under-estimation of the costs entailed in producing a free standing website. However, within what is technically and financially feasible, we have managed to create an online resource that is rich in content and accessible to a global audience (Zotero Library). We will continue to add material to the site for the foreseeable future.

The second objective that has likewise only been partially realised was "to examine the histories of women's civil society movements from different corners of the world". Our original plan - to create a 'model' chart/timeline of women's activism in collaboration with the Temple of Peace - had to be postponed (and eventually cancelled) as our partners were furloughed.
Exploitation Route As stated in our 'case for support', we have always sought to engage with and influence a wide range of stakeholder communities. As the project has continued different stakeholders have reached out to us for input and advice. Through the co-production of knowledge, policy makers and shapers within international and national circles are already using the material generated through this project. Likewise, women's groups and other activist organisations operating in conflict-affected environments are using our outputs in synergy with their own materials, to shape and inform their advocacy and litigation strategies. We are in ongoing conversations with such bodies about future collaborative work that draws upon and gives effect to our findings. Within academic circles, our work has and continues to shape conversations and publications.
Sectors Education,Government, Democracy and Justice,Security and Diplomacy

URL https://www.lse.ac.uk/women-peace-security/research/Feminist-International-Law-of-Peace-and-Security
 
Description The work conducted in this reporting period has significantly strengthened the project's impact and consolidated both the findings and thematic threads that were emerging at the time of our previous report. Methodologies Our use of feminist methodologies throughout the project has had significant impact in generating knowledge that reframes feminism and peace through international law. We have done this in a number of ways: • Used a conversation format as an approach to cross-disciplinary discussions and work that has been threaded throughout the project, particularly demonstrated by: the seminar series for which we sought out contributors from a range of disciplines, backgrounds and professions, seeking inclusivity and diversity in voices; public events, especially those with the LSE Library; the Visions of Feminist Peace programme; and a forthcoming edited collection titled 'Feminist Conversations on Peace' (publication agreement with Bristol University Press). • Developed events and outputs that bring into the academic space a range of voices of individuals, organisations, collectives and professions that are traditionally shut out of academia, especially legal academia. This has included: the research community (British Academy; colleagues from different disciplines in universities in the UK and abroad); civil society actors in the UK and abroad (GAPs, Women's International Peace Centre (Uganda), Peace Track Initiative (Yemen), WILPF, Museums for Peace; Women's Active Museum on War and Peace (Japan); Oxfam; ICRC; UK government representatives and policy makers and shapers (FCDO; APPG on WPS; MOD, A-G's Office, security services; ODI); foreign government representatives (Canada, Germany, Belgium); international and regional bodies (UNSC; ILO; UNIDIR; UNHCR; OHCHR, UNEP; members of the CEDAW Committee; UNEP; AU); sub-regional organisations (Strategic Initiative for Women in the Horn of Africa (SIHA), Eastern African Sub-Regional Support Initiative for the Advancement of Women (EASSI), Kaabong Women Peace Forum); international and national courts (Inter-American Court of Human Rights; Colombian Constitutional Court; Seoul Central District Court); visual and performative arts individuals and groups. The impact is demonstrated in the continuing partnerships and collaborative work with these groups, such as the work on WPS, disarmament, Gender, Nature, Peace, the International Labour Organisation, among others. • Used diverse formats to progress work and engage multiple voices through different arenas and formats. For instance, our work on disarmament commenced with a public event with speakers from an international institution (UNIDIR), NGOs (ICAN and WILPF). This led to conversations in the UN and a workshop in partnership with the Graduate Institute in Geneva where we piloted an alternative framing to disarmament whilst bringing in other voices. This provided further opportunities including a presentation to diplomats in Geneva; archival work through which we consolidated our working relations with archivists in the UN and ILO archives in Geneva, the Temple of Peace in Wales, the Women's Library in London and establishing new relations with archivists at Swarthmore College in the US and the People's History Museum, Manchester, among others); additional public events (CAAT); and a journal article with legal analysis and recommendations directed at states (US State department) and UN bodies responsible for disarmament. Similarly the work on Gender, Nature, Peace included workshops in London and Colombia, partnership with Columbian academics for the writing of journal articles and blogs, collaboration with advocacy organisations based in the UK (GAPS) and in Uganda (WIPC) for production of 'Defending our Future Gender, Conflict and Environmental Peace', a report with recommendations based on the findings that was launched by the FCDO. Dissemination Our dissemination strategies have drawn in a breadth of audiences that would not normally be included in conversations on feminist peace and international law and we have strategised our dissemination practices to maximise opportunities for collaborative knowledge production and exchange. Accessibility and relatability of our findings are crucial to our impact in law and policy change. Strategies have included, but are not limited to: • producing a letter to UN Member States setting out a framework for a feminist peace, based on the aforementioned findings and continuing research. The letter format and its visual representation in multiple languages make the findings of our project accessible to a wide range of audiences and frames them as actions required of particular actors. An additional document, that sets out the feminist methodology of writing and producing the letter (reported separately), makes visible the process of drafting the letter. This makes the approach replicable for activists and researchers who are seeking to produce non-traditional outputs utilising feminist methods; • developing visual and aural dissemination techniques such as artistic rendering of findings through song, poetry and moving images. These included promoting the voices of performers and poets from diverse geographical backgrounds in articulating an international law of feminist peace. Their contributions were woven throughout the Visions of Feminist Peace programme, enriching its content and becoming accessible for different audiences. • artistic contributions similarly gave significant insight into alternative conceptualisations of 'feminist peace' and broadened the understandings within the project. For example, illustrated renderings of our findings in the Letter to UN Member States strengthens it through adding a visual dimension to the text; explanations from the artist are included in the LSE Festival programme (and on the project website). The inclusion of this Letter in the LSE's Festival on Shaping the Post-COVID World means it has become part of a wider research initiative that explores the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. The report on Gender, Conflict and Environmental Peace is also enhanced through vivid illustrations. These methods (unusual for work in international law) have meant we have reached wider and more diverse audiences in disseminating our findings. Using illustrations in dissemination of the report significantly broadened the impact of its findings. They were used especially in Uganda where focus groups were conducted by partners in order to communicate research findings to audiences that were unable to read the report in English. • Advocacy and training, such as providing expert opinions and briefs to international and national courts and bodies on gender justice and feminist peace; training for UK Defense Academy, and peacekeepers from Central Asian states; expert opinions on the intersection of WPS and cybersecurity to international government security institutions. Partnerships Connected to methodologies, the partnerships reported in the previous period have been strengthened, consolidated and expanded over the last year, deepening the project's impact in a number of areas. We have consistently sought out and engaged with others working on complementary areas to identify commonalities and opportunities for further amplification (LSE Festival; LSE Library; British Academy; FCDO). The work in Gender, Nature, Peace continued to grow out of partnerships developed in lectures and seminars in the UK and Colombia, leading to a co-authored article with a Colombian academic and a collaborative, international report published in early 2021, among other outputs. This work has engaged conversation with numerous stakeholders in the worlds of climate change, peace and WPS. The work conducted on the ILO and women's contributions to its work on peace has led to key partnerships with the International Museums for Peace, leading to speaking engagements and other outputs. The pandemic prevented a proposed research trip to a number of Peace Museums in Japan but ongoing conversations continue. Over the last year, we have strengthened our working partnership with the Yemeni women's Peace Track Initiative (co-authoring blogs and public events) and we will continue to engage in collaborative work with them. Collaboration with WILPF on numerous contemporary issues that threaten gender justice and peace is ongoing. These include peacekeeping and sexual exploitation and abuse, women's participation in peacemaking, peacekeeping and post-conflict social and economic reordering, and countering the push-back to women's rights during the pandemic. We have proactively reached out to and collaborated with multiple departments within LSE to provide a platform to advance knowledge sharing and the co-production of knowledge. This has included work and events with: the LSE Library, the Middle East Centre, the Gender Department, the Department of Development, the Global Health Department, the Institute for Global Affairs, the Philosophy Department, the Law Department, the Film and Audio Unit, and working with the LSE Festival team on their project 'Shaping the Post-Covid World'. Expertise within the project also continues to attract requests for commentary and expert engagement. For example, Christine Chinkin and Dr Keina Yoshida were requested to submit expert opinions to the Seoul Central District Court and the Colombian Constitutional Court on cases involving conflict-affected sexual violence in the context of peace processes. In both cases the Court gave innovative rulings that have contributed to reimagining legal doctrine and to gender justice and gender peace. Professor Chinkin discussed the implications for international law of the ruling of the Seoul District Court at a symposium organised by the Korean Council for Justice and Remembrance for the Issues of Military Sexual Slavery by Japan. Louise Arimatsu continues to provide input to legal advisors within the UK government on the international law implications of cyber operations following her presentation in 2019. Invitations have also been received for membership to groups where such influence will be ongoing. For instance Louise Arimatsu is an invited member of: the Centre for Feminist Foreign Policy's UK Working Group to develop a manifesto on a British Feminist Foreign Policy; and the Offensive Cyber Working Group (network comprising experts from universities across the UK) to advise on the international law and gender implications of offensive cyber operations. Dr Keina Yoshida was asked to become a member of the Berkeley Center on Comparative Equality and Anti-Discrimination Law, comprising practitioners and academics from around the world, based on her expertise on equality and international human rights law. Dr Sarah Smith was an invited expert in a community of practice session hosted by DCAF (Geneva Centre for Security Governance) on the policy and academic research on women s meaningful participation in peace operations. Each of these engagements have significant policy and/or legal impact.
First Year Of Impact 2019
Sector Government, Democracy and Justice,Security and Diplomacy,Other
Impact Types Policy & public services

 
Description 'Framework of International Law and WPS', UK Higher Command and Staff Course, Defence Academy
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Prof Christine Chinkin provided expert guidance on the 'Framework of International Law and WPS' in the UK Higher Command and Staff Course, Defence Academy, Feb 2021. Followed up March 2022 with expert guidance on WPS within a human security framework as part of the MOD's focus on Human Security
 
Description 'Prioritising women, peace and security. Are some more vulnerable than others during an armed conflict? Protecting the vulnerable' UK MOD Training Symposium, The Role of the Armed Forces in Upholding International Law Obligations
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Prof Christine Chinkin gave a presentation titled 'Prioritising women, peace and security. Are some more vulnerable than others during an armed conflict? Protecting the vulnerable' in March 2021 at the UK MOD Training Symposium titled The Role of the Armed Forces in Upholding International Law Obligations. This was a follow up from the session in Kazakhstan in October 2019
 
Description Advice to Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women on rape under international law for her annual report to the UNHRC
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
Impact Contributed to report (acknowledged within the report) and to the model legislation included in it.
 
Description Amici Curiae Observations on Duress and the Standards Applicable to Assessing Evidence of Sexual ViolenceContribution to
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
Impact (need to describe the impact)
 
Description Amicus brief to Colombia's Constitutional Court on the sexual and reproductive rights of ex FARC Combatants
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
Impact Determination of legal right to reparation programmes in Colombia for survivors of sexual violence during the armed conflict who were associated with FARC with implications for their access to healthcare, psychosocial care and other services.
URL http://www.lse.ac.uk/women-peace-security/assets/documents/2020/Colombia-Amicus-Brief.pdf
 
Description Citation of project output in Australian Strategic Policy Institute monthly review of Women, Peace and Security
Geographic Reach Australia 
Policy Influence Type Citation in systematic reviews
URL https://www.aspistrategist.org.au/the-month-in-women-peace-and-security-september-2019/
 
Description Contribution to Centre for Feminist Foreign Policy guidance "Make Foreign Policy Feminist"
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
URL https://static1.squarespace.com/static/57cd7cd9d482e9784e4ccc34/t/61432508e0c62f33f0a54cea/163179035...
 
Description DCAF's Community of Practice webinar "Taking stock of policy and academic research on women s meaningful participation in peace operations"
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
URL https://www.linkedin.com/groups/12162292/
 
Description Expert opinion submitted to Seoul Central District Court, October 2020 in the case of Kwak Ye-Nam et al v. Japan
Geographic Reach Asia 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
Impact Contributed to progressive development of law and gender analysis
 
Description Joint opinion: Legality under international law of the United Kingdom's nuclear policy as set out in the 2021 integrated review
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact The opinion led to public discussion and was reported on in the following news articles: https://www.express.co.uk/news/politics/1461471/Boris-Johnson-nuclear-weapons-UK-illegal-international-law-Faslane-arms-race https://morningstaronline.co.uk/article/b/cnd-report-ukgov-un The opinion led to a question being raised in parliament (reported separately).
URL https://www.lse.ac.uk/women-peace-security/assets/documents/2021/CND-opinion-28.04.21.pdf
 
Description Legal advisor to Council of Europe drafting Committee for the Council of Ministers Recommendation on Preventing and Combating Sexism
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact Prof Christine Chinkin was invited by the Council of Europe, Gender Equality Division, Human Dignity, Equality and Governance to be the Legal advisor to its drafting Committee for the Council of Ministers Recommendation on preventing and combating sexism. In this role Prof Chinkin advised on drafts, participated in drafting meetings, and prepared background papers on the issues - drafting meetings took place throughout 2018 and the final Recommendation was adopted by the Committee of Ministers on 27 March 2019.
 
Description Offensive Cyber Working Group
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
URL https://offensivecyberorg.files.wordpress.com/2020/12/ocwg_scoping_workshop_report.pdf
 
Description Particiaption in expert group to the Global Gender Environmental Outlook 2016, UN Women
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
 
Description Participation of Dr Keina Yoshida in 72nd Session of CEDAW Committee's examination of the UK
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact Fed into the CEDAW Policy report and furthered NGO focus on need for CEDAW incorporation into domestic law as seen through the CEDAW Peoples Tribunal held July 2021 and in which Christine Chinkin participated as an expert advisor.
 
Description Presentation on cyberweapons to policymakers and experts in Government Communications Headquarters, MI5, Foreign Commonwealth Office, Ministry of Defence and the Attorny-General's Office
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
 
Description Rape as a grave and systematic human rights violation and gender based violence against women
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
URL https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Issues/Women/SR/Call_on_Rape/EGM_EN-SR_Report.pdf
 
Description Reference to CND joint opinion in parliamentary questions
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
URL https://hansard.parliament.uk/Commons/2021-09-20/debates/8780723D-A556-4258-BB4C-997ECDA43DF6/Topica...
 
Description Training to Central Asian senior armed forces in Kazakhstan
Geographic Reach Asia 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Prof Christine Chinkin was invited by the Ministry of Defence and British Embassy in Kazakhstan to provide training to Central Asian senior armed forces in Kazakhstan on 'The Role of the Armed Forces in Protecting Human Rights', 9 to 11 October 2019, Nur Sultan, Kazakhstan. The training included a session on prioritising women, peace and security prior to their deployment as peacekeepers; about 40-50 of them from across Central Asia; involved lectures and practical exercises.
 
Description Gender, Climate Change and Environmental Conflicts
Amount £37,000 (GBP)
Organisation Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 12/2019 
End 03/2020
 
Description Gender, Nature, Peace
Amount £10,000 (GBP)
Organisation The British Academy 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2019 
End 05/2020
 
Description Faculty of Jurisprudence, University of Rosario 
Organisation National University of Rosario
Country Argentina 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution LSE obtained the funding alongside Rosario University for the Gender, Nature, Peace project from the British Academy. Both institutions organised two workshops together in collaboration and partnership. Dr Keina Yoshida created the concept of the project, drafting the background paper and research in the fields of international law and Women, Peace and Security which led to the identification of the research gap in the area of environmental peacebuilding (lack of gender) and Women, Peace and Security (lack of the environment).
Collaborator Contribution Lina Cespedes at Rosario Law School contributed to the project, particularly for the Colombia workshop, which focused on the situation in Colombia and where rich research is being carried out on the issue. Lina has contributed to the background papers and brings knowledge of land law and property law. The research partnership with Rosario has been incredibly fruitful given their combined recognised expertise in environmental matters. The contributions of this partnership has significantly advanced the projects research on Gender, Nature, Peace and has helped disseminate the research outputs from this project further (for example, Gender, Nature, Peace blogs have been published in both English and Spanish - see publications list). At the same time, Lina Munoz, the head of the masters programme at Rosario on environmental law has credited the collaboration as the first time she had brought together the environment and gender in her research and teaching.
Impact An academic article is in process co-authored between Keina Yoshida and Lina Cespedes.
Start Year 2019
 
Description GAPS UK 
Organisation Gender Action for Peace and Security
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution LSE obtained funding alongside GAPS UK on Gender, Environment and Conflict. The first work in this partnership was a scoping exercise with the Foreign Commonwealth Office which led to the eventual granting of funding from the FCO to GAPS and the project for the research. Following this, a roundtable was jointly held which included civil society experts and academics to discuss the core themes to the research topic and how to develop this stream. A workshop in Uganda is also planned for June 2020 to be hosted at the University of Makerere. All partners have contributed to the background paper and concept note for the workshop.
Collaborator Contribution LSE obtained funding alongside GAPS with Women's International Peace Centre (Uganda) becoming a partner to organise focus group discussions and a workshop in Uganda to be hosted at the university of Makerere in June 2020. GAPS UK has contributed their civil society expertise and networks to develop the research stream on Gender, Environment and Conflict which has supported the project developing outcomes with impact on policy and practice in this area. The core outcome of the Uganda workshop is proposed to be a jointly authored policy report and recommendations.
Impact The core outcome of the Uganda workshop is proposed to be a jointly authored policy report and recommendations.
Start Year 2019
 
Description LSE Library 
Organisation London School of Economics and Political Science (University of London)
Department LSE Library
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The project has contributed significant conceptual and academic guidance to the library as it develops its collections on feminism, peace and women's peace activism. This has led to a number of collaborative events on the history of women's peace activism and also on the politics of archival work and what stories can be found in archives.
Collaborator Contribution LSE Library has supported the project in a number of collaborative events and showcased the work of the project in library events and exhibitions. This has helped us reach a wider audience, in particular students, historians and activists.
Impact Conversation event with Madeliene Rees (WILPF) & Christine Chinkin, and subsequent blog: https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/wps/2019/03/04/1805/ Event 'Can we archive memory' as part of the Visions of Feminist Peace programme, recording available here: https://richmedia.lse.ac.uk/library/20200922_canWeArchiveMemories.mp4 Event 'Foreign relations law from the ground up' with visiting fellow Karen Knop Event 'Challenging the arms trade' with co-PI Louise Arimatsu: https://web.archive.org/web/20200227164812/http:/www.lse.ac.uk/library/events/general/challenging-the-arms-trade
Start Year 2019
 
Description Oxfam 
Organisation Oxfam GB
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The project hosted the launch of Oxfam's essays on feminist peace, leading to continuing collaborative discussions around the concept of feminist peace and how to implement it. This has been particularly useful to cross boundaries between academia and advocacy work.
Collaborator Contribution They have provided insight into the challenges faced in implementing what might be understood as feminist peace.
Impact na
Start Year 2020
 
Description Partnership with University of Makerere 
Organisation Makerere University
Country Uganda 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Keina Yoshida developed the conceptual framework for the workshop to take place in June 2020
Collaborator Contribution University of Makarere is hosting a workshop on Gender, Environement and Conflict in June 2020
Impact Workshop held at University of Makerere in June 2020 Subsequent outputs will be policy focused
Start Year 2020
 
Description WILPF 
Organisation Women's International League for Peace and Freedom
Country Switzerland 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Prof Christine Chinkin and Dr Louise Arimatsu have worked closely with WILPF on some key aspects of this research project. Prof Chinkin and Dr Arimatsu have contributed their academic and legal expertise to enhance the partnership which has involved co-hosting workshops, knowledge exchange and leading up to a global event in September 2020. WILPF has been able to engage extensively with the academic and legal networks offered by its connection to the LSE Centre for Women, Peace and Security.
Collaborator Contribution WILPF has co-hosted workshops and thus provided access for the research team to key project beneficiaries (such as members of WILPF's global network).
Impact Christine Chinkin and Madeleine Rees OBE (Secretary General of WILPF) co-authored the report title 'I lost my dignity: sexual and gender-based violence in Syria'. Madeleine Rees has been a participant in project workshops and event.
Start Year 2019
 
Description 'The meaning of state immunity in relation to gender and human rights perspectives', International Symposium on Korean Court's Historic Ruling on Japanese Military "Comfort Women": Restoring the Right to Justice and Truth 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Prof Christine Chinkin gave an invited talk at the above-named conference.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://womenandwar.net/kr/feb-26-international-symposium-korean-courts-historic-ruling-on-japanese-...
 
Description 100 years of peace activism: linking the International Labour Organisation with the WPS agenda 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact In this blog Professor Christine Chinkin reflects on a century of women's activism at the International Labour Organisation and looks at what lessons can be gained for the current Women, Peace and Security agenda. This blog is an adapted version of a chapter that appears in ILO 100: Law for social justice titled 'Enhancing the impact of international norms with special reference to women's labour rights and the Women, Peace and Security agenda'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/wps/2019/12/16/100-years-of-peace-activism-linking-the-international-labour-...
 
Description A Feminist Approach to the International Law of Peace and Security 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Keina Yoshida writes on the launch of the Feminist International Law of Peace and Security project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/wps/2018/09/28/a-feminist-approach-to-the-international-law-of-peace-and-sec...
 
Description A Letter on Feminist Peace 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact In September 2019, the Feminist International Law of Peace and Security project convened a workshop involving 19 legal academics and practitioners with the idea of drafting an alternative Security Council resolution to coincide with a number of anniversaries in 2020. The aim of the exercise was to reclaim the Women, Peace & Security agenda and to recast it as a transformative peace agenda, as originally envisaged by many women's civil society groups at the time of its adoption. A year later, members of the team finalised the wording of a letter to the Member States of the General Assembly, released on 21 September, International Peace Day (letter and the methodology are reported in the publication section). In order to disseminate the letter to a wider audience and engage with conversations occurring at LSE, we partnered with the LSE Festival to produce a short video in which the letter was read by feminist and women's rights activists in multiple languages against a backdrop of illustrations and archival footage. The theme of the LSE Festival was 'shaping the post-Covid world'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lclce3Hf2jI&list=PLK4elntcUEy0oojTqkM2fH7-ZxfQGw8w7&index=4
 
Description A vision for feminist peace 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Across the world, women's and feminist groups are using legal and policy tools creatively to advance equal rights. Yet transformative change remains slow. Women are still fighting for equality in all spheres of life. Peace remains an elusive goal. Ahead of a digital programme of events "Visions of Feminist Peace" Louise Arimatsu, Christine Chinkin and Keina Yoshida discuss how visions of feminist peace can address these issues, re-centre the principles of peace in international law and help transform everyday structural inequalities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/wps/2020/07/14/a-vision-for-feminist-peace/
 
Description African migration, human rights and literature 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Project hosted event that launched Professor Fareda Banda's publication African migration, human rights and literature (Bloomsbury, 2020). In the book, Professor Banda examines the topic of migration through the prism of law and literature, using a rich mix of novels, short stories, literary realism, human rights and comparative literature to explore the experiences of African migrants and asylum seekers. As well as discussion among the panel members, author Meron Hadero performed a reading of her short story The Wall.
Speakers were: Fareda Banda, Chaloka Beyani, John Eekeler, Ambreena Manji, Meron Hadero. Chaired by Christine Chinkin.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.lse.ac.uk/women-peace-security/events/Previous-Events/2021/African-migration-human-right...
 
Description After eight years, why are we still waiting for a legal commitment to eradicate violence against women in the UK? 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The Istanbul Convention focusses exclusively on eliminating all forms of violence against women (VAW), creating a holistic and comprehensive legal framework to prevent VAW, protect survivors of violence and end impunity for perpetrators, yet after eight years the UK is not yet legally bound to the treaty. Lisa Gormley and Christine Chinkin detail the Convention, the UK's approach, and why it is needed now more than ever as domestic violence levels increase.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/wps/2020/06/08/after-eight-years-why-are-we-still-waiting-for-a-legal-commit...
 
Description Are we asking the right questions? Reframing peace and security 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Reflecting on the LSE Library exhibition 'Give Peace a Chance' and a public conversation with Madeleine Rees and Louise Arimatsu, Christine Chinkin questions the basis on which we talk about war, conflict and women's experiences.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/wps/2019/03/04/1805/
 
Description Arms Control, Disarmament and the Women, Peace and Security Agenda 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Blog published by Christine Chinkin based on her presentation to UNIDIR.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.unidir.org/commentary/arms-control-disarmament-and-women-peace-and-security-agenda
 
Description Beijing Platform for Action at 25: Progress, retreat and the future of women's rights 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Christine Chinkin was an invited speaker at the conference "Beijing Platform for Action at 25: Progress, retreat and the future of women's rights", co-hosted by the Institute for International Law and the Humanities, Melbourne Law School together with the Australian Human Rights Institute, UNSW Sydney.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://conference.unsw.edu.au/en/beijing-platform-for-action-at-25#speakers
 
Description Blog page 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The project has developed a dedicated space on the LSE WPS blog page that supports discussion around core themes of the project. It takes submissions on a rolling basis and seeks contributions from postgraduate students, policy makers, practitioners and academics alike - the space has become one in which a range of voices can engage around the themes of feminist peace and engage with expertise in the project. By taking contributions from outside the project, we broaden the reach of the project as well as engage in continuing conversation with audiences of project outputs.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019,2020,2021
URL https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/wps/grants/
 
Description Campaign Against Arms Trade event 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Louise Arimatsu chaired a conversation held at the LSE Library on the Campaigns Against Arms Trade with Ann Feltham (Parliamentary Coordinator for Campaign Against Arms Trade). The discussion examined the arms trade, focused on the UK, over the past four decades and how opposition to it has been growing.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2020
URL https://web.archive.org/web/20200227164812/http://www.lse.ac.uk/library/events/general/challenging-t...
 
Description Climate Change is a Women's Human Rights Issue 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact General Recommendation 37 (GR37) marks the first time a UN body has addressed the links between human rights and the gendered impact of climate change. Keina Yoshida and Lina M. Céspedes-Báez review GR37 and address the growing conversation on climate change in the context of the Women, Peace and Security agenda.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/wps/2019/07/04/climate-change-is-a-womens-human-rights-issue/
 
Description Conference presentation at Making International Law Work for Women Post-Conflict: New Voices 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Three members of the research team participated in this event - Prof Christine Chinkin, Dr Louise Arimatsu and Dr Keina Yoshida. Prof Chinkin and Dr Arimatsu were commentators on papers during the workshop. Dr Keina Yoshida gave a paper title 'The Nature of Women, Peace and Security' at the above named conference, held at Amnesty International, Human Rights Action Centre, London. This talk contributed to the working paper 'The nature of Women, Peace and Security' (published 2019) and in turn provided the foundation for the partnership with GAPS UK.

Contacts were also made with young scholars and civil society representatives, including Helen Kezie-Nwoha who subsequently visited LSE WPS as an expert on the project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://web.archive.org/web/20200228135432/http://law-school.open.ac.uk/events/making-international-...
 
Description Conflict Related Sexual Violence and the Responsibility to Protect, Centre for Geopolitics, University of Cambridge 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact This panel took stock of how and where international responses to conflict-related sexual violence have fallen short and ask what specific tools the Responsibility to Protect affords to policy makers and practitioners, both in prevention and response. Sexual violence is routinely used in conflict spaces as 'a weapon of war'. Ongoing conflicts marked by conflict-related sexual violence include those in the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Libya, Syria and Yemen, to name but some. This is despite important advances in understanding the patterns of sexual violence, its causes and its consequences and in international legal and political efforts to combat it. It is clear that sexual violence is not an inevitable corollary of conflict; its usage by armed groups varies widely between the nature and prevalent modes of abuse, the identities of targeted victims and in levels of intensity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.cfg.polis.cam.ac.uk/events/CRSV-and-R2P
 
Description Conversation: Asking the Right Questions 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Louise Arimatsu and Christine Chinkin were in conversation with the General Secretary of the Women's League for International Peace and Freedom, Madeleine Rees OBE in an event co-hosted by Feminist International Law of Peace Project and the LSE Library. The conversation explored questions that are asked about peace and war in particular whether the different lived experiences of men and women in conflict mean that different questions are asked and what important implications follow. For example, in the lead up to World War II Virginia Woolf responded to the question 'how in your opinion are we to prevent war' not with an answer, but with another question drawn from women's lived experience: 'Why fight?' The event was part of a range of events related to LSE Library's current exhibition Giving Peace a Chance: From the League of Nations to Greenham Common, which includes WILPF.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Defending our future: gender, conflict and environmental peace 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact There is a growing recognition of the need for the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) agenda to take into account how the climate crisis poses risks to women and girls' peace and security, particularly in conflict and post-conflict contexts. Food security, water insecurity and displacement are issues affecting women and girls due to extreme weather and the climate emergency. The intersection of WPS, climate change, ecological destruction and conflict or post-conflict situations thus raises a myriad of issues. This event addressed these issues and launched the report "Defending our future: gender, conflict and environmental peace".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.lse.ac.uk/women-peace-security/publications/Defending-the-Future-Gender-Conflict-and-Env...
 
Description Discussion group on the meaning of feminist peace 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The workshop brought together a group of experts drawn from a range of disciplines (international law, media studies, gender studies), from different countries (Australia, N Ireland, the Gambia, Japan) to begin a conversation and to think about and interrogate the idea of 'peace' through the prism of feminist methodologies that will/may enable us to craft an enriched reading of what is implicated by the term under international law., This provoked considerable discussion, raised questions for further consideration and helped us to determine future activities.

ideas from the workshop were also raised at a plenary session of the European Society of International Law to an audience of several hundred mainly academic international lawyers but also practitioners and activists.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Draft Resolution workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Our aim is to draft a feminist resolution on Women Peace and Security (WPS) that: centres peace rather than security; that goes back to the civil society origins of Security Council resolution 1325 as a peace agenda and as a women's human rights agenda; and that demonstrates what a WPS
resolution could look like if peace is put as the goal rather than security. This workshop was the first step in the process of producing such a draft resolution. The aim of the workshop was to identify:
• The scope and substantive content of the alternative resolution
• Detailed content on some specific topics, perhaps even some preliminary drafting
• A plan for ongoing work on the resolution, including how to make the process more inclusive
. Planning for dissemination of the resolution
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Event co-hosted with LSE Library - Are we asking the right questions? 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact This was a public event co-hosted with the LSE Library as part of their exhibition 'Give Peace a Chance' - it brought together project PIs Prof Christine Chinkin and Dr Louise Arimatsu in conversation with Secretary General of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Madeleine Rees OBE. The event highlighted that feminists (including the feminist lawyers) want to ask different questions about law, peace, and security from those that are traditionally put to the forefront: for instance not how can we prevent war but rather 'why fight'? Why don't we recognise that war can never be made safe for women? How can the law be interpreted to further justice? Or secure transformative change? This event is also the subject of a blog titled 'Are we asking the right questions?' that is reported in the Publications category.

This first event with the LSE Library has resulted in ongoing collaboration and other public events on the aims, modes and strategies of women's activism and how it can be represented and disseminated - through films, through archival work, through examining how international law could be shaped from the bottom up and what that might mean for the understandings of peace within the framework of international law and the strategies for advancing it through the peace workshops.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Event: Climate Justice & Conflict: Gender, Peace and Environmental Rights 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Keina Yoshida spoke at this event hosted by Gender Action for Peace and Security (GAPS). The event explored the links between women's rights and environmental peace, with brilliant speakers including local women's rights organisations from the Global South, academics and government representatives from the Global North.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://gaps-uk.org/post-event-recording-climate-justice-conflict-gender-peace-and-environmental-rig...
 
Description Expert group meeting - a feminist analysis of the draft treaty on Crimes Against Humanity 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was an expert group meeting that consisted of project PIs as well as experts from the International Criminal Court; members of the Human Rights and Gender Justice Clinic, City University of New York; criminal law and International Humanitarian Law academic experts; and legal practitioners. It was working on a response to the International Law Commission's work on crimes against humanity and its inclusion of gender persecution as a crime against humanity and definition. We worked on a critique of the ILC draft, especially relating both to the definition of gender and to the failure to integrate a gender perspective throughout the draft; contributed to a strategy to have this changed - working with other groups - with the result that the ILC removed its definition of gender, although it failed to draft an alternative definition that better reflected contemporary understandings of gender (ie it simply failed to include any definition at all).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Feminist International Law of Peace Manchester Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Activity was a broad ranging discussion of the parameters of a feminist peace with academics , students and others from a range of countries (Australia, Gambia, Japan, UK) that had as its objective to inform a wider group of interested persons about the project, to exchange and create knowledge about feminist understandings of peace and to think creatively about future activities. As a result participants at the workshop have remained engaged with the project; there was an interview with the European Society of Women in International Law and themes from the workshop were fed into a keynote speech at the European Society of International Law's annual meeting held on the following day.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Feminist peace, WPS and intersectionality 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Sarah Smith gave an invited seminar at Monash University Gender, Peace & Security Institute (Monash GPS) on International Women's Day, 2021. In it Sarah discussed the work undertaken on feminist peace within the project, discussing the various outputs and approaches, and how this could connect with work undertaken at Monash University. The aim of the seminar was to disseminate information about the project further within academia and to potentially connect with work being undertaken on Monash GPS. Several requests for further information and ongoing conversation were made by the members of Monash GPS.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
 
Description Gender & Human Rights Panel: 10th International Conference of Museums for Peace 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Christine Chinkin was invited to participate at the 10th International Conference of Museums for Peace, titled The Role of Museums for Peace in Conveying Memories for Generations to Come, held at Ritsumeikan University, Kyoto University of Art and Design, Kyoto Seika University and Ikenobo College.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://sites.google.com/view/inmp-2020/web-04_gender
 
Description Gender, nature, peace - Colombia workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Organised between the project and University of Rosario to inform explore research gaps between issues of environmental conflict, gender, and peacebuilding. This workshop also provided space for civil society, academia and other stakeholders such as the UN Environment Programme to engage in knowledge exchange and discuss knowledge gaps.

A co-authored article between Keina Yoshida (Research Officer) and Lina Cespedes (Roasario) is in process.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Gender, nature, peace - London workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Organised by the research project to explore research gaps between issues of environmental conflict, gender, and peacebuilding. This workshop brought together academics and civil society experts to engage in knowledge exchange and led to the development of this research stream. From this workshop the subsequent workshop in Colombia was held, which in turn has contributed to the development of the Uganda workshop to be held in June 2020. The outcomes of this research include a working paper (published 2019) and a co-authored article that is currently in process.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/wps/2019/07/04/climate-change-is-a-womens-human-rights-issue/
 
Description Groundhog day at the UN Security Council: the 2021 WPS Open Debate 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Project PI Christine Chinkin wrote this blog to reflect on the Women, Peace and Security Agenda today and the continued promises followed by failed implementation as we see the persistent set back of women's human rights globally.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/wps/2021/11/30/groundhog-day-at-the-un-security-council-the-2021-wps-open-de...
 
Description Guest of podcast Better Human 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Keina Yoshida was a guest on the Better Human podcast on the topic of 'Why climate change is a human rights emergency', and was specifically requested based on her expertise in women's rights and the rights of nature
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://anchor.fm/better-human/episodes/8---Why-climate-change-is-a-human-rights-emergency-e9nm04/a-...
 
Description Holding the state to account: reflections on CEDAW 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The event "Where Would Women Be Without CEDAW" focused on violence against women and girls and holding governments to account, following a public lecture by Mauritian Supreme Justice and CEDAW member, Aruna Narain. The two sessions celebrated CEDAW's successes, assessed its limitations, and looked towards the future, recognising the important work that still must be carried out. The following is a summary of the second panel by Sheri Labenski and Keina Yoshida.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/wps/2019/10/25/holding-the-state-to-account-reflections-on-cedaw/
 
Description In times of crisis 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Louise Arimatsu and Rasha Obaid tell us Yemen's story. With crisis after crisis, emergencies unfolding within emergencies, the complexities of tackling disease in war and the legal responsibilities of leadership to protect life are ever starker and ever more urgent. This two-part piece offers poignant reflections on privilege and the realities of embedded political and economic interests that leave communities broken.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/wps/2020/06/09/in-times-of-crisis/
 
Description Innovation in public engagement - Imperial War Museum 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This presentation took place at the Imperial War Museum and examined the question of how to engage and disseminate to diverse audiences in research practice and outcomes. The audience consisted of museum staff, students, artists, and the general public. Prof Christine Chinkin, using the example of the Tokyo Tribunal, discussed feminist approaches to research dissemination and practices that link activist and scholarly work, such as feminist judgments in international law.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Integrating a gender perspective into commissions of inquiry 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact In this blog, Sheri Labenski and Louise Arimatsu argue that impact that CoIs can have is significant. They have the potential to assist in mapping conflicts; documenting violations; designing the content and trajectory of peace processes, accountability and transitional justice mechanisms; and facilitate post-conflict transformation in furtherance of peace and security for all. Undertaking a robust and holistic gender analysis is therefore of critical importance if the potential of such reports are to be fully realised.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/wps/2019/12/20/integrating-a-gender-perspective-into-commissions-of-inquiry/
 
Description Inter-American Court reaches landmark decision on torture and sexual slavery 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Christine Chinkin, Gema Fernández Rodríguez de Liévana and Keina Yoshida with the first in a series of posts analysing Lopez Soto and Others v Venezuela, a ground-breaking case concerning gender based violence in Venezuela.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/wps/2018/12/06/inter-american-court-reaches-landmark-decision-on-torture-and...
 
Description International & regional standard to address rape & perspectives on challenges to states upholding them. Expert Group Meeting: Rape as a grave and systematic human rights violation & gender-based violence against women 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact -
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Issues/Women/SR/Call_on_Rape/EGM_EN-SR_Report.pdf
 
Description Joint All-Party Parliamentary Group on Women, Peace and Security and on Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict, event "Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict" 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Prof Christine Chinkin was a panelist at this event co-chaired by Baroness Fiona Hodgson, Co-chair of the APPG-WPS and Anthony Mangnall MP, Chair of the APPG-PSVI. This event provided a valuable and important dialogue to explore challenges and opportunities of the Women, Peace and Security agenda and tackling sexual violence in conflict.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://gaps-uk.org/appg-on-women-peace-and-security-covid-19-conflict-and-sexual-violence/
 
Description Kofi Annan's legacy and the need for inclusive peace 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact On 2018 International Day of Peace, Ruby Weaver, Research Assistant on the Feminist International Law of Peace and Security project, considers the legacy of Kofi Annan.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/wps/2018/09/21/kofi-annans-legacy-and-the-need-for-inclusive-peace/
 
Description LSE Forum for Philosophy: Peace 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Peace is highly valued, but how is it achieved? Why are some periods in world history relatively peaceful compared to others? What, if anything, can be done to ensure peace now? Are there limits to what we are justified in doing to ensure peace? Is pacifism a justified response to war? Louise Arimatsu was an invited expert to this event, which discussed the history, ethics, and politics of peace.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/theforum/peace/
 
Description Launch of Christine Chinkin's Women, Peace and Security and International Law 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Institute for International Law and Justice, the LSE Centre for Women, Peace and Security, and the Erik Castrén Institute at the University of Helsinki co-hosted a launch of Christine Chinkin's ground-breaking book on Women, Peace and Security and International Law (CUP, forthcoming). Commentators-Eyal Benvenisti, Hilary Charlesworth, Radhika Coomaraswamy, Monica Hakimi, Mary Kaldor, Karen Knop, and Keina Yoshida-across five time zones discussed Professor Chinkin's new book with the author and interested participants. Gráinne de Búrca ended the session with some remarks.

Team members Christine Chinkin and Keina Yoshida spoke at the event.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.iilj.org/events/christine-chinkin-book-event/
 
Description Leader of thematic workshop at the Preventing Sexual Violence Initiative Film Fesitval 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof Christine Chinkin led a thematic workshop titled 'Has UN Security Council Resolution 1325 reduced instances of sexual violence in conflict?' at the Preventing Sexual Violence Initiative Film Festival. - introduced the topic, and engaged in extensive discussion with members of the audience.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Lecture visit to Mauritius 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Lectures given at the University of Mauritius and to the Institute for Judicial and legal Studies on the linkage between combating violence against women, good practices for combating violence against women and sustainable peace. The lectures attracted wide media attention resulting in three media interviews for national newspapers and national television coverage.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://www.lemauricien.com/article/professeure-christine-chinkin-de-la-london-school-of-economics-la...
 
Description Our male leaders declared war on the pandemic. Our response must match that 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Since the pandemic began the language used has been one of war where militarism has been the default position in our response. Christine Chinkin and Madeleine Rees tell us why we must seek an alternative to this militarised thinking, and why now is the time to challenge the current system of power and patriarchy, to revive the women, peace and security agenda, and set a post-pandemic framework based on wellbeing not political gain.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/wps/2020/05/11/our-male-leaders-declared-war-on-the-pandemic-our-response-mu...
 
Description Presentation to UK Embassy Berlin on Feminist Foreign Policy 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Co-PI Dr Louise Arimatsu gave an invited presentation to the UK Embassy Berlin on Feminist Foreign Policy. The aim was to inform politicians and policymakers of key gender concerns in foreign policy development and how foreign policy can address gender inequality.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Preventing and punishing sexual violence in war post-Bemba 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Following the acquittal of Jean-Pierre Bemba Gombo by the International Criminal Court, Louise Arimatsu reflects on what steps might be taken to more effectively address sexual violence in conflict.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/wps/2018/11/01/preventing-and-punishing-sexual-violence-in-war-post-bemba/
 
Description Prof Christine Chinkin presentation to UNIDIR 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Based on her work on Women and Weapons and following the Geneva workshop on this topic, Prof Christine Chinkin was invited to speak at a meeting with United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research of the International Gender Champions Disarmament Impact Group. The audience comprised of ambassadors from a number of countries and Prof Chinkin spoke about Disarmament and Women, Peace and Security.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.unidir.org/commentary/arms-control-disarmament-and-women-peace-and-security-agenda
 
Description Professor Christine Chinkin in conversation with Nahla Haidar 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was a public event hosted by a leading Chambers and widely attended by members of the legal profession. Conversation between a member of the UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women, Nahla Haider and Christine Chinkin, chaired by Keina Yoshida, about the continuing importance of CEDAW, how it can be used by lawyers as a tool for enhancing equality and thus contributing to sustainable peace.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.doughtystreet.co.uk/event/celebration-40th-anniversary-cedaw
 
Description Reclaiming the WPS Agenda: it's time to talk about the elephant in the room 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Displacement levels in Bangladesh as a result of the influx of Rohingya refugees has had a detrimental impact upon the local environment. The arrival of some 700,000 refugees to a country already marred by the impacts of climate change and the occurrence of frequent natural disasters raises complex questions around the protection of the displaced population and the protection of the eco-system within which sanctuary is sought. Mohbuba Choudhury and Louise Arimatsu explore the relevance of the Security Council's Women, Peace and Security (WPS) agenda to the protection of the eco-system.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/wps/2019/09/27/reclaiming-the-wps-agenda-its-time-to-talk-about-the-elephant...
 
Description Reproductive violence and forced recruitment: Colombia's landmark ruling for ex-combatant women and girls 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In this blog, Christine Chinkin and Keina Yoshida discuss the significance of a recent ruling by Colombia's Constitutional Court on the sexual and reproductive health rights of women and young girls in armed groups and in post-conflict peace processes. Christine Chinkin submitted an amicus brief based on her expertise to the court. You can read the Constitutional Courts decision on full here.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/wps/2019/12/18/reproductive-violence-and-forced-recruitment-colombias-landma...
 
Description Roundtable on Gender, Climate Insecurity and Peace 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Keina Yoshida participated in a roundtable discussion with academics and stakeholders
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Sexual Slavery: Linda Loaiza López Soto v Venezuela 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In the third blog in a series analysing the Inter-American Court's landmark decision of Linda Loaiza López Soto v Venezuela, Christine Chinkin, Keina Yoshida and Gema Fernández Rodríguez de Liévana looks specifically at the Court's decision on sexual slavery under Article 6 of the American Convention on Human Rights which provides that "No one shall be subject to slavery or to involuntary servitude, which are prohibited in all their forms, as are the slave trade and traffic in women".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/wps/2020/01/29/sexual-slavery-linda-loaiza-lopez-soto-v-venezuela/
 
Description The nature of women, peace and security - towards a more inclusive peace 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact This is a blog piece based on a journal article, intended to disseminate the findings of the article with a wider audience.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://medium.com/international-affairs-blog/the-nature-of-women-peace-and-security-towards-a-more-...
 
Description The nature of women, peace and security: lessons from Colombia 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact In 2020, the UN Security Council will mark the 20th anniversary of Security Council's adoption of Resolution 1325 (2000) which marked the official beginning of the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) agenda. This anniversary presents an important opportunity to glance back at the development of the agenda but also to consider areas which remain underdeveloped in relation to conflict prevention and peace. The talk focuses on Colombia as a case study to explore how women activists and human rights defenders, NGOs, the judiciary, and academics in the country have drawn connections between gender-based violence, the environment and climate justice in the context of the internal armed conflict and subsequent peace process. It follows a workshop which took place at the University of Rosario in Bogota on the 9 and 10 December 2019 as part of the British Academy small grant on Gender, Nature and Peace and the AHRC project on the Feminist International Law of Peace and Security (LSE).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.law.ox.ac.uk/events/online-seminar-nature-women-peace-and-security-lessons-colombia
 
Description Transformative Peace and National Action Plans: Yemen's story 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact In December 2019, nearly two decades after the adoption of Security Council Resolution 1325, the Yemeni Government approved its first Women Peace and Security National Action Plan (NAP). The adoption of the NAP has generated mixed feelings among Yemeni women's groups given that it was drafted with little effort to consult with civil society organizations (CSOs). In particular, the evidence gathered by women's groups through on-the-ground consultations have been ignored as have the opinions of gender experts including those who were actively involved in the Yemeni Women National Committee, a government body responsible for advancing women's rights. With the war in its sixth year, the panellists explored both the potential of and gaps in Yemen's NAP during these uncertain times and drew on examples from similar contexts. How international partners can best support Yemeni women's groups to secure a transformative peace was also considered. The panellists were:

Rasha Jarhum, Gender, Peace, and Security Expert. She is co-founder and Director of the Peace Track Initiative hosted at the Human Rights Research and Education Centre, at the University of Ottawa. Rasha was invited among seven women by the UN Special Envoy to Yemen to support the peace talks held in Kuwait in 2016, and has briefed the UN Security Council on Yemen and Women's Rights to push for peace. She has more than 15 years' experience working to advocate women's, children's and refugees' rights with many organisations including UNICEF, ESCWA, UNDP, and JICA, in Yemen and the Middle East and North Africa region.

Aisling Swaine, Associate Professor of Gender and Security at the Department of Gender Studies. Aisling's research and teaching interests are in the areas of feminist examination of conflict-related violence against women, feminist legal theory and gender theory of armed conflict, international security and peacebuilding.Aisling has been commissioned to produce multiple UN Expert Papers and policy guidance on implementation of the WPS agenda and specifically on NAPs by UN Women, has developed guidance for developing NAPs and has published academically on the global proliferation of NAPs.

Chair: Louise Arimatsu is Distinguished Policy Fellow in the Centre for Women, Peace and Security, where she works on the AHRC project 'A Feminist International Law of Peace and Security'.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.lse.ac.uk/women-peace-security/events/Previous-Events/Transformative-Peace-and-National-...
 
Description Violencia reproductiva y reclutamiento forzoso: nueva jurisprudencia colombiana para excombatientes mujeres y niñas 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A Spanishg translation of the blog Reproductive violence and forced recruitment
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/wps/2020/02/06/violencia-reproductiva-y-reclutamiento-forzoso-nueva-jurispru...
 
Description Visions of Feminist Peace Programme: (co-hosted with LSE Library) Can we archive memory? Greenham Common women's peace camp and beyond 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact From 14th September - 2nd October 2020, the Visions of Feminist Peace Programme (Congress) ran in partnership with the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF), to explore the potentialities of 'feminist peace' as an analytic framework and political aim, as well as its inherent limitations and exclusions. This was a co-hosted event with the LSE Library as part of this programme. "Greenham Woman Everywhere" is a project to interview the women who formed the Greenham Common Peace Camp, which was established to protest nuclear weapons being placed at RAF Greenham Common in Berkshire, between 1981 - 2000. This special panel event included a discussion from the organisers of the Greenham Woman Everywhere project alongside LSE Library archivists, where we will explore some of the issues around archiving memories such as those of Greenham Common and beyond.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.lse.ac.uk/women-peace-security/events/Current-Events/Visions-of-Feminist-Peace
 
Description Visions of Feminist Peace Programme: (co-hosted with Oxfam) Transforming power to put women at the heart of peacebuilding 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact From 14th September - 2nd October 2020, the Visions of Feminist Peace Programme (Congress) ran in partnership with the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF), to explore the potentialities of 'feminist peace' as an analytic framework and political aim, as well as its inherent limitations and exclusions. This was a co-hosted event with Oxfam as part of this programme. This event launched Oxfam's publication 'Transforming power to put women at the heart of peacebuilding', a collection of regional-focused essays on Feminist Peace and Security.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://oxfamilibrary.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10546/621051/dp-feminist-peace-security-es...
 
Description Visions of Feminist Peace Programme: (co-hosted with WILPF) How Feminist Peace Can Transform Power, People, and Our Planet 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact From 14th September - 2nd October 2020, the Visions of Feminist Peace Programme (Congress) ran in partnership with the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF), to explore the potentialities of 'feminist peace' as an analytic framework and political aim, as well as its inherent limitations and exclusions. This was a co-hosted event with WILPF as part of this programme. Feminist peace activists and WILPF leaders Joy Onyesoh, Amani Beainy, Jamila Afghani, Melissa Torres and Madeleine Rees conducted a frank discussion and critical analysis of how feminist peace can transform the systems of power within our societies that generate inequality, violence, and environmental degredation. Together, panelists explored feminist analysis, stories, and alternative paths toward change that centre the lived realities and experiences of women around the world.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fprx7vLhJvA
 
Description Visions of Feminist Peace Programme: International Institutions - what mandate for a gender-just peace? 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact From 14th September - 2nd October 2020, the Visions of Feminist Peace Programme (Congress) ran in partnership with the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF), to explore the potentialities of 'feminist peace' as an analytic framework and political aim, as well as its inherent limitations and exclusions. This panel explored strategies and practices of feminist peace from the perspective of international mandate holders and institutions. It queried how such a vision might be secured, not least in the contemporary political climate and in light of the current global pandemic. The panel was chaired by Dr Keina Yoshida (Research Officer) with speakers Jane Connors (Victims' Rights Advocate for the UN), Yakin Ertürk (former director of UNDAW and INSTRAW) and Nahla Haidar (member of the UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women and Commissioner of the International Commission of Jurists).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.lse.ac.uk/women-peace-security/events/Previous-Events/International-and-inter-government...
 
Description Visions of Feminist Peace Programme: International Law and a Gender-Just Peace 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact From 14th September - 2nd October 2020, the Visions of Feminist Peace Programme (Congress) ran in partnership with the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF), to explore the potentialities of 'feminist peace' as an analytic framework and political aim, as well as its inherent limitations and exclusions. A discussion among international lawyers and experts, this panel explored what might be the components of a feminist peace, how such a vision might be possible in today's international law and what changes to the structures of international law might be needed. The panel was chaired by Louise Arimatsu (co-PI) with speakers Monica Feria-Tinta (Barrister at Twenty Essex), Patricia Viseur Sellers (International criminal lawyer), Cordula Droege (Chief legal officer and head of the legal division of the ICRC) and Mohbuba Choudhury (Policy Officer at the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in Bangladesh).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.lse.ac.uk/women-peace-security/events/Previous-Events/International-Law-and-a-Gender-Jus...
 
Description Visions of Feminist Peace Programme: Strategies and Practices for Gender-Just Peacebuilding 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact From 14th September - 2nd October 2020, the Visions of Feminist Peace Programme (Congress) ran in partnership with the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF), to explore the potentialities of 'feminist peace' as an analytic framework and political aim, as well as its inherent limitations and exclusions. This panel was a discussion among women peacebuilders, exploring the strategies pursued by peacebuilders in reimagining and rearticulating peaceful geographies. The discussion explored what constitutes a feminist peace and strategies to pursue it, as well as how we might articulate peace as plural, complex, intersectional and multi-sited. The panel was chaired by Dr Elena B. Stavrevska with speakers Visaka Dharmadasa (Founder of the Association of War Affected Women), Helen Kezie-Nwoha (Executive Director at the Women's International Peace Centre) and Lepa Mladjenovic (anti-war activist).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.lse.ac.uk/women-peace-security/events/Previous-Events/Strategies-Practices-for-Gender-Ju...
 
Description Where Would Women Be Without CEDAW 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The event "Where Would Women Be Without CEDAW" focused on violence against women and girls and holding governments to account, following a public lecture by Mauritian Supreme Justice and CEDAW member, Aruna Narain. The two sessions celebrated CEDAW's successes, assessed its limitations, and looked towards the future, recognising the important work that still must be carried out. The following is a summary of the first panel by Sheri Labenski and Keina Yoshida.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/wps/2019/09/04/where-would-women-be-without-cedaw/
 
Description Where would we be without CEDAW 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This was a day event that consisted of a public lecture and two panel discussions. The public lecture was given by Aruna Devi Narain, Puisne Judge of the Supreme Court of Mauritius and a member of the UN CEDAW Committee. In this lecture, Aruna Devi Narain spoke of this history of CEDAW, demonstrating through the work of its monitoring Committee, the Convention has transformed the understanding of sex and gender-based discrimination. This has been instrumental in bringing violence against women and girls onto the international agenda, which made governments accountable for the ways in that women are treated through national legal systems and practices and for their failure to exercise due diligence with respect to the acts of non-state actors. This lecture was attended by upwards of 100 people.

Following the lecture, two open panels were hosted, the first titled 'CEDAW and violence against women and girls', the second titled 'Holding states to account'. These were open panels that engaged students, legal professionals, and staff and faculty at the LSE.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://www.lse.ac.uk/women-peace-security/events/Previous-Events/2019/Where-Would-We-Be-Today-Withou...
 
Description Women and Weapons 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A public event to launch the project,A Panel of four speakers drawn from academia, UNIDR, civil society researcher and civil society activism explored the ways in which feminists engage with questions of arms control and disarmament. In particular the panelists engaged with the questions: 'As feminists what should be our preferred strategy over the coming decades: to seek disarmament? To seek further arms control even while acknowledging that this assumes the continued existence of arms? Or to craft new strategies and adopt new agendas?' The international audience comprised students (undergraduate and postgraduate); academics, journalists, policy makers, civil society. A lively discussion followed the presentations with questions and comments from the audience to which the panelists responded that lasted for about 40 minutes. A podcast was made of the event.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://player.fm/series/london-school-of-economics-public-lectures-and-events/women-and-weapons-audi...
 
Description Women and the right to peace 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact In this blog Christine Chinkin argues that the UN General Assembly's 2017 Declaration on the Right to Peace overlooks women and their security concerns by failing to incorporate key aspects of the Women, Peace and Security agenda, and by ignoring a long history of women's peace activism.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/wps/2020/04/21/women-and-the-right-to-peace/
 
Description Women and weapons 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This workshop, held in Geneva, explored how international law might be more effectively harnessed to further feminist disarmament goals and further peace.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL http://www.lse.ac.uk/women-peace-security/assets/documents/2019/ERC-Women-and-Weapons-Concept-note.p...
 
Description Women and weapons - Geneva workshop co-hosted with Women's International League for Peace and Freedom 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This workshop engaged policymakers and practitioners on the topic of Women and Weapons, leading to the continued development of this key research stream.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Women and weapons LSE event 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Launching the Arts and Humanities Research Council research project, A Feminist International Law of Peace and Security, that asks how a feminist reading of International Law can further disarmament and promote sustainable peace, a panel of leading experts discuss the role of women and disarmament.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.lse.ac.uk/lse-player?id=4576
 
Description Women's peace activism can end conflict 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact There is a need to take stock of current global developments in the field of disarmament, reflect on the successful strategies that have been pursued and identify additional entry points to advance disarmament through international law. Louise Arimatsu and Keina Yoshida look at what a feminist approach to disarmament would look like, and how international law can be more effectively harnessed to further disarmament goals and peace, with commentary from the recent Women, Peace and Security (LSE) and Graduate Institute in Geneva co-hosted workshop.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/wps/2019/07/22/womens-peace-activism-can-end-conflict/
 
Description Women's rights during the pandemic. Peace Brigades International Webinar 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Prof Christine Chinkin chaired a webinar titled Women's Rights During the Pandemic, hosted by Peace Brigades International, which contextualised the rise in gender-based violence and looked at how women human rights defenders are responding.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://peacebrigades.org.uk/webinar-5-women%e2%80%99s-rights-during-pandemic
 
Description Workshop participation at University of Hamburg 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Keina Yoshida presented a paper titled 'Gender Equity and the Environment - How Can the Law Assist' at the Protection of the Environment in Relation to Armed Conflict' workshop held at University of Hamburg.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Zotero library 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact This is a library being created by the project to serve as a hub for WPS and WPS-related documents, focuing on the core themes of the project. It is still currently in development but will be made public in 2021. The library will provide a resource for educators, academics, students and practitioners, and will be searchable.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.zotero.org/filps-lse_wps/library