Systems Cognitive Neuroscience of Healthy Ageing: Population-Representative Studies of Functional Plasticity and Neural Change

Lead Research Organisation: University of Cambridge
Department Name: Psychology

Abstract

As greater numbers of us are living longer, it is increasingly important to understand how we can age healthily. Growing older involves dramatic changes to all aspects of our lives, but one of the most important concerns is our mental or 'cognitive' health. This research focuses on the cognitive abilities that enable us to function in the world, including memory, attention, emotion, language, action. We aim to understand how individuals can best retain these abilities into old age. Addressing this issue requires us to understand how brain structure and function support cognitive performance. Recent developments in neuroimaging technology show that as we age there is widespread loss of brain tissue in regions important for everyday cognition. Much research has focused on this tissue loss, and its role in cognitive decline in later life. However, other findings paint a more positive picture. While some cognitive abilities decline with normal ageing, many are spared. Moreover, cognitive decline doesn't occur abruptly at a pensionable age: cognitive abilities follow different trajectories across the lifespan, some remaining stable into our 80s, and some beginning to decline even in our 30s. Underpinning this complex pattern of spared and impaired cognition are complex interactions between neural structure and activity. A growing number of studies show that the brain responds flexibly to tissue loss, recruiting other brain regions to support neural function. This functional plasticity is possible because cognitive abilities, like memory or attention, are not underpinned by single brain regions, but by networks of regions. Successful ageing is therefore characterised by successful functional plasticity. Although ageing is often stereotyped as a time of mental restriction and inflexibility, cognitive neuroscience reveals that across the adult lifespan individuals make flexible use of available resources, including recruiting other regions and cognitive processes when necessary. Research Aims and Objectives Our aim is to identify what determines successful flexibility. This requires us to sample across the adult lifespan, measuring different aspects of neural structure and activity, and of cognitive performance. We will study a cohort of 700 participants aged 18 to 88, who will have a structural brain scan and perform key cognitive tests. Some members of this cohort will also participate in functional neuroimaging experiments to measure brain activity during cognitive tasks. We will ask (1) Is functional plasticity maintained across the lifespan and does it vary across cognitive abilities? (2) Are the distributed neural networks that support different cognitive abilities preserved in ageing? (3) Does the preservation of different cognitive functions vary, given the variability of neural change in different brain regions? Potential applications and benefits Our research will generate a unique resource of neuroimaging and cognitive measures about change across the adult lifespan, generating important benefits for academic researchers, the older community, and wider society. It will provide major contributions to ageing research, and provide a 'virtual brain and behaviour bank' acting as a continuing international resource for future research. Our focus on healthy ageing will be educationally important for all older adults. Few studies of ageing focus on healthy ageing, and the prevalent view of ageing is of deficit and ill-health. Our focus is on what characterizes older adults with preserved performance, a perspective with huge implications for how society views the ageing process. Moreover, our detailed analysis of neural and cognitive flexibility will help identify the conditions under which older adults may be aided by interventions. Finally, because our findings will help specify normal age-related deficits, they will show how normal ageing differs from pathological ageing in conditions such as Alzheimer's Disease.

Technical Summary

A population-based cohort of 3000 adults will be recruited with demographic and basic cognitive assessments (LoLa3000 cohort). Of these, 700 will be selected for the Virtual Brain and Behaviour Bank (LoLa700 cohort) comprising structural and functional neuroimaging (MRI & MEG), standardised neuropsychological tests, and specialised cognitive tests. From the multi-faceted neuroimaging data, several measures of neural structure and function will be derived, using a broad array of analysis tools, techniques and expertise. Structural MRI data will be analysed using SPM8 and the Dartel toolbox; FMRI using SPM8; DTI using FSLs probabilistic tractography; connectivity with PPI & DCM; and custom Matlab. MEG data will be analysed using tools from Elekta Neuromag, SPM8 (including DCM), Fieldtrip; and custom Matlab. Our 'automatic analysis' parallel processing tools will be used to facilitate rapid processing of the large quantities of MRI and MEG data. We will measure both local neural integrity and neural integration across cortical regions taking care to control for factors that are not related to neural function but which influence neuroimaging, such as changes in neuro-vascular coupling. The derived neural measures will be related to age and performance, and to current models from cognitive neuroscience. On a subset of 280 adults (LoLa280 cohort) further investigations of neuro-cognitive functions will use FMRI, MEG/EEG and further behavioural testing. These will allow investigation of the effect of ageing on the specific cognitive domains of Attention, Language, Motor & Learning, Memory, Emotion, and the relationship between these different domains. Formal statistical models will be used to examine the changes that occur with healthy ageing, and the reorganisation in terms of strategies and structures invoked to compensate for them. This approach offers hypothesis-driven insights into healthy ageing that are relevant to the general population.

Planned Impact

Life expectancy in the UK has increased by over 30 years in the last century. This reflects a wider international trend with major implications for the development of economic, social and health policy at local, national, and international levels. Cognitive change through the healthy lifespan is a topic of urgent scientific and social concern. Our team brings together highly experienced groups from Cambridge University Departments of Experimental Psychology, Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, the Institute of Public Health and MRC Units in Cognition and Brain Sciences and Biostatistics, with a strong track record in top rank research publication and dissemination, and a common interest in understanding neurocognitive changes in healthy ageing. Beneficiaries of the research: Data derived from the three cohorts (LoLa3000, LoLa700, and LoLa280) and the Virtual Brain Bank will provide unique and rich resources. LoLa3000 will constitute a large, population-representative data sample on health and basic cognition; LoLa700 will include a uniquely detailed sample representing development across the adult human lifespan, relating major domains of cognitive function to structural and functional measures of brain function. LoLa280 offers a set of targeted intensive investigations of specific cognitive changes. The project's novel outcomes, methods, and database resources, will impact at multiple levels of a large and widely varied international community. These include academic research concerned with the epidemiology of neuro-cognitive change across the lifespan change; the development of pharmacological interventions for age-related disorders of cognitive function within both academic and private sectors; the formation of government policy, such as long-term care modelling and pensions; and the preparation of third-sector organisation reports, such as Dementia-UK, commissioned by the Alzheimer's Society. The project will also provide a world class training environment for members of the research support team to acquire specific skills in epidemiological and cognitive neuroscience research, including state-of-the-art neuroimaging analysis, and more general skills in time management, written and oral presentations and working as a team. Lay persons of all ages will benefit from the public dissemination of knowledge about the positive aspects of lifelong development of brain and cognition. Ensuring the benefits of this research?: The project's success is not only ensured by the track record of the applicants, but also by the substantial expertise of the collaborators who consist of highly respected researchers in cognitive ageing (Prof Patrick Rabbitt, University of Oxford), uni- and multi-variate statistics (Dr Ian Nimmo-Smith, MRC CBSU), functional connectivity analysis of neuroimaging data (Prof Paul Fletcher, University of Cambridge), MR physics (Dr Christian Schwarzbauer. MRC CBSU), human motor control (Prof Daniel Wolpert, University of Cambridge), emotional regulation (Dr Tim Dalgleish, MRC CBSU), and psychiatry (Prof Ian Goodyer, University of Cambridge). Behavioural and neuroimaging data from the LoLa 3000, LoLa700, and LoLa280 will be made into publicly available web-based, data resources for the international research community (see Data sharing and preservation) which we expect to form a significant, lasting international resource. In addition to dissemination of results through open-access peer-reviewed journals and conference presentations, where appropriate, the media will be informed of novel findings, through the University Press Office. Members of the LoLa cohorts will be kept informed of the research through a dedicated website and annual newsletter, highlighting the progress of the project and its results. The website will also be accessible by the wider public. Our work will be promoted at public events such as The Cambridge Science Festival and British Science Festival.

Publications

10 25 50

publication icon
Campbell KL (2016) Robust Resilience of the Frontotemporal Syntax System to Aging. in The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience

publication icon
De Mooij SMM (2018) Age Differentiation within Gray Matter, White Matter, and between Memory and White Matter in an Adult Life Span Cohort. in The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience

publication icon
Geerligs L (2015) State and Trait Components of Functional Connectivity: Individual Differences Vary with Mental State. in The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience

 
Title Cam-CAN promotional videos 
Description BBSRC made five promotional videos about the project displayed on the BBSRC website, Cam-CAN website, and You-Tube 
Type Of Art Film/Video/Animation 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact no actual impacts realised to date 
URL http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=msiHdCsUq2s&feature=youtu.be
 
Description The Cam-CAN project promotes an approach to ageing that differs from most current conceptions of ageing in which ageing is considered to be a process of inevitable cognitive and physical decline. In contrast, our focus is on maturational changes across the lifespan and the dynamic and interactive nature of lifelong neural and cognitive changes that underpin the preservation of cognition throughout life. Our starting assumption is that good cognitive health is underpinned by the brain's ability to respond flexibly across the lifespan. To test this assumption we have obtained a unique set of in-depth imaging, cognitive and demographic data on a population-derived set of 700 individuals. The recruitment of these participants and the collection of such a vast array of data took 5 years. Our initial analyses and preliminary findings focus on understanding the range of factors that affect neural flexibility and their interaction. Some of our scientific highlights to date are: 1. Cognitive variability: Although ageing is widely believed to result in inevitable and across-the-board cognitive decline, in the Cam-CAN data we find a nuanced set of relationships, some of which change across age groups, reflecting the range of cognitive domains covered by our tasks and the specificity of our measures, which have been previously refined by experts within each domain. a. We find that ageing is associated with considerable variability across individuals in patterns of cognitive preservation and loss. b. The finding that some cognitive functions are preserved in some older individuals raises the key issue of why some people age successfully: a primary focus of our research. In younger adults, we find that good cognition is associated with good physical and brain health and high income, whereas in older people, brain health (particularly white matter) is the strongest predictor of cognitive preservation. 2. Brain structural changes a. Many studies have reported global age-related declines in Grey Matter (GM). In our cohort however, overall GM reduction across the age groups is weaker than typically reported. Our sample may provide a more accurate assessment of age-related GM changes because it is i) more uniform and population-representative, ii) minimizes cohort effects by sampling a wide range of abilities/education levels across the lifespan, and iii) excludes people with premorbid dementia. b. We find that the brain becomes less structurally connected with age. c. Results of our novel method for assessing patterns of in vivo myelin - a tissue that is an important component of WM tracts, and which continues developing well into later adulthood - provided new evidence that myelin mediates age-related changes in cognitive function. 3. Brain functional changes a. The dynamic range of an individual's neural activity (as measured in fMRI and MEG) is emerging as a key indicator of cognitive health in our sample, with increased neural responsivity important for maintaining cognitive function, and reduced responsivity being associated with poorer physical health (e.g. poor vascular dynamics), especially for fluid cognitive abilities. b. Cognitive processes are enabled by interactions within and between neural networks. This functional connectivity is important for maintaining cognition throughout life. Decreases in GM at older ages alters the functional connectivity architecture of the brain, with lower connectivity within domain-specific functional networks but increased connectivity between networks. In addition, we find that ageing seems to be associated with reduced flexibility of "reorganizing" functional networks in the face of changing cognitive demands (different tasks). 4. Differentiating age-related vascular and neural changes: Unique to our cohort, we obtain MEG as well as fMRI data. MEG is a more direct measure of neural activity than fMRI, and is essential for separating neural and vascular effects that are confounded in the fMRI signal. We find that vascular reactivity is lower in the older age groups, and this is independent of any age-related changes in neural reactivity. This provides us with methods for uncoupling neural and vascular effects in neurocognitive studies. 5. Lifestyle factors a. Preliminary results reinforce the beneficial effects of exercise: people who engage in vigorous recreational exercises like jogging, swimming or regular physical activity (e.g. via active transport for their journey to/from work) have increased heart rate variability and reduced resting heart rate, both markers of good physical health. Exercise also shows both direct cognitive benefits to long-term memory, as well as indirect benefits to simple reaction time tests, through the mediating benefits to the brain's white matter. The association of exercise with good neurocognitive health suggests a role in delaying the onset of age-related and dementia-related cognitive decline.
Exploitation Route The Cam-CAN project is continuing to develop a number of resources that have been made available to others in our recent protocol paper (Shafto et al, BMC Neurology, 2014; Taylor et al, Neuroimage, 2017). This describes our recruitment methods, research framework, and research design (cohort characteristics). Specific statistical and methodological developments, and the 700 datasets are being developed for open use and in collaborations. Our framework - aimed at identifying preservation and flexibility across the adult lifespan- contributes a new approach that can be used by future researchers, and provides examples that are an alternative to studies which consider ageing as analogous to disease processes. In addition to published examples of our findings, a detailed description of our protocol is now published online (Shafto et al, 2014) which provides a detailed description of how we measure a range of cognitive, neural, and epidemiological factors that contribute to successful cognitive ageing. Because our approach requires measuring complex cognitive and neural measures on a large scale, and the nature of their interactions, we have developed and continue to develop statistical and data processing tools which are likely to be very useful to others. For example: (1) new tools for large-scale processing of multimodal data which is often done by hand, including identifying artefacts in MEG data, processing outliers in behavioural data, and automating onset identification in fMRI data; (2) comparing across imaging modalities not only for simple event processing or resting state network characteristics, but for complex cognitive tasks including language comprehension; (3) developing approaches for comparing across and combining measures from a very wide range of diverse cognitive domains which is rare in studies of cognitive ageing. Finally, much of the Cam-CAN data has been made publically available, and to date has been downloaded to 260 users around the world - in the USA, Asia, Australia and Europe. This has resulted in 3 publications from researchers outside the Cam-CAN Research Team (all currently in press/under review). CamCan has also been integrated into a large consortium of European cohorts under the "Lifebrain" initiative. Lifebrain integrates data from 6000 European participants collected in 7 European countries. The goal is to determine the risk and protective factors influencing brain health in order to better prevent mental illness and neurodegenerative disorders. We are continually seeking funding for another wave of testing to turn the CamCan into a longitudinal study, which would substantailly increase its value as a neuroscientifically importnat aging cohort.
Sectors Healthcare

URL http://www.cam-can.org/
 
Description Because the aims of the Cam-CAN project are about driving basic research into healthy cognitive ageing and changing attitudes and stereotyes of ageing, the impact of our findings is likely to be seen over the long term. So far we have given a large number of public lectures in a variety of contexts. In these lectures we discuss our findings in the context of resilience and preservation, a framework which the public enjoys and takes seriously. Over time, we expect that our findings will have economic, societal, and public policy implications over and above the scientific impact of our research. Our findings provide a detailed characterization of the brain functions which remain flexible and therefore potentially amenable to underpin learning, retraining and preservation. We anticipate that these findings will support evidence-based development of lifespan education programs, products, and policies relevant to social programmes to aid the preservation of cognitive functions across the lifespan and maintain employment in older people. More broadly, as our research focuses on the factors underpinning successful ageing across the life span, our findings have the potential to overturn negative stereotypes of ageing and improve well being in later life.
Sector Healthcare
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Economic,Policy & public services

 
Description BB/H008217/1 BBSRC LoLa Scheme (PI L Tyler) Systems Cognitive Neuroscience of Healthy Ageing: Population-Representative Studies of Functional Plasticity and Neural Change - shared with L Tyler, F Matthews, W Marslen Wilson, J Duncan, R Henson, A Calder
Amount £4,990,000 (GBP)
Funding ID BB/H008217/1 
Organisation Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2010 
End 09/2015
 
Description European Research Council Advanced Investigator Grant. Language dynamics: a neurocognitive approach to incremental interpretation.
Amount € 2,185,000 (EUR)
Funding ID 669820 
Organisation European Research Council (ERC) 
Sector Public
Country European Union (EU)
Start 10/2015 
End 09/2020
 
Description Horizon 2020 Personalised Medicine H2020-SC1-2016-2017, Topic SC1-PM-04-2016
Amount € 9,500,000 (EUR)
Funding ID 732592 
Organisation European Union 
Sector Public
Country European Union (EU)
Start 01/2017 
End 12/2021
 
Description Isaac Newton Trust. Language Dynamics: A Neurocognitive Approach to Incremental Interpretation.
Amount £20,121 (GBP)
Funding ID MINUTE 15.40(K) 
Organisation University of Cambridge 
Department Isaac Newton Trust
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2017 
End 12/2017
 
Description LifeBrain: Healthy minds from 0-100 years: Optimising the use of European brain imaging cohorts
Amount € 10,000,000 (EUR)
Funding ID 732592 
Organisation European Commission H2020 
Sector Public
Country Belgium
Start 01/2017 
End 12/2021
 
Description Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) Rubicon grant: Linda Geerligs
Amount £134,371 (GBP)
Funding ID 446-13-013 
Organisation Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) 
Sector Public
Country Netherlands
Start 09/2014 
End 08/2016
 
Description Wellcome Trust Fellowship: Rogier Kievit
Amount £250,000 (GBP)
Organisation Wellcome Trust 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2015 
End 07/2019
 
Title CamCAN data access portal 
Description We have made the raw data from a unique dataset of cognitive and brain measures from nearly 700 adults from 18-88 years of age drawn from a population-representative cohort (CamCAN) available to researchers (subject to web-based agreement and committee review) 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2016 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Approximately 130 researchers have requested the data for their research in the first 6 months since the data were released, with more requests being received all the time. 
URL https://camcan-archive.mrc-cbu.cam.ac.uk/dataaccess/
 
Title New multivariate measure of connectivity for fMRI 
Description Matlab code associated with a published methods paper for a novel way of measuring functional connectivity with fMRI 
Type Of Material Data analysis technique 
Year Produced 2016 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Several researchers have asked about it, and some twitter discussion - do not know how many have downloaded code from website below 
URL http://imaging.mrc-cbu.cam.ac.uk/imaging/Geerligs_DistCor
 
Description Cam-CAN Collaboration: Affiliated members from University of Cambridge 
Organisation University of Cambridge
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This collaboration consists of a number of researchers and graduate students who are not employed on the Cam-CAN project but have an interest in the data and who are willing to make a useful contribution to the analysis and data interpretation. Such researchers are given affiliated status with the project and access to relevant parts of the data.
Collaborator Contribution Expertise and a useful contribution to the analysis and data interpretation.
Impact Outputs will be recorded under relevant Researchfish sections
Start Year 2011
 
Description Cam-CAN Collaboration: Affiliation at Duke University, USA 
Organisation Duke University
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This collaboration is with a post-doctoral researcher employed on the Cam-CAN project until he moved on to a new role in Duke University in 2013. Although no longer employed on the Cam-CAN project, he has a continued interest in the data and is willing to make a useful contribution to the analysis and data interpretation. As an ex-member of staff he has been given affiliated status with the project.
Collaborator Contribution Expertise and a useful contribution to the analysis and data interpretation.
Impact Outputs will be reported on relevant sections in Researchfish.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Cam-CAN Collaboration: Affiliation at University of Manchester 
Organisation University of Manchester
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This collaboration is with a post-doctoral researcher employed on the Cam-CAN project until he moved on to a new role in the University of Manchester in 2013. Although no longer employed on the Cam-CAN project, he has a continued interest in the data and is willing to make a useful contribution to the analysis and data interpretation. As an ex-member of staff he has been given affiliated status with the project.
Collaborator Contribution Expertise and a useful contribution to the analysis and data interpretation.
Impact Outputs will be recorded in the relevant Researchfish section.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Cam-CAN Collaboration: Donders Institute 
Organisation Radboud University Nijmegen
Department Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour
Country Netherlands 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This collaboration consists of a team of researchers from the Donders Institute who are not employed on the Cam-CAN project but who are willing to lend their expertise to analyse relevant sections of Cam-CAN data which they will be given access to.
Collaborator Contribution Expertise and a contribution to the analysis and data interpretation.
Impact Outputs will be reported under relevant sections of Researchfish.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Cam-CAN Collaboration: University of Edinburgh 
Organisation University of Edinburgh
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This is a research collaboration with Dr Alexa Morcom, whereby a Cam-CAN dataset is shared to investigate a specific research question.
Collaborator Contribution Expertise and a contribution to data analysis and interpretation.
Impact Outputs will be reported on the relevant section of Researchfish.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Cam-CAN Collaboration: University of Oxford 
Organisation University College Oxford
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This is a research collaboration between Dr Cader and Dr Symmonds at University of Oxford and project Co-I Professor Henson, using Cam-CAN data to address a specific research question.
Collaborator Contribution Expertise and a useful contribution to the analysis and data interpretation.
Impact Outputs will be added to relevant sections of Researchfish.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Cam-CAN: student visitor 
Organisation University of Jyvaskyla
Country Finland 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Cam-CAN team hosted a visiting PhD student, Juho Strommer, from the University of Jyvaskyla, Finland, for 6 months, providing training, support, and data access.
Collaborator Contribution He will make a useful contribution to the analysis and data interpretation.
Impact Outputs will be recorded in relevant sections on Researchfish.
Start Year 2014
 
Description CamCAN 
Organisation University of Cambridge
Department Department of Pathology
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution CamCAN started in 2010 with a BBSRC LoLa grant to Tyler (PI) - I was a PI. Staff employed at CBU by this grant contributed to data acquisition, analysis and reporting. Since the grant finished in 2015, CamCAN has continued with one post-doc for 2 years plus half of my open-ended RA, both funded by my CBU QQ programme, to continue data analysis and maintain CamCAN momentum. Small costs also covered for website development and domain name.
Collaborator Contribution Prof Tyler at the University of Cambridge Psychology Department continues to lead the project and make executive decisions. Her grant has supported some further administration and research support for publications. Prof Brayne and IPH, and Bullmore at Psychiatry, also occasionally contribute some time (as do PLs Duncan and Dalgleish, and PLT Kievit)
Impact Taylor, J.R., Williams, N., Cusack, R., Auer, T., Shafto, M.A., Dixon, M., Tyler, L.K., Cam-CAN, Henson, R.N. (2017). The Cambridge Centre for Ageing and Neuroscience (Cam-CAN) data repository: Structural and functional MRI, MEG, and cognitive data from a cross-sectional adult lifespan sample. NeuroImage. 144, 262-269. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.09.018. Wolpe, N., Ingram, J., Tsvetanov, K., Geerligs, L., Kievit, R., Henson, R., Wolpert, D., Cam-CAN & Rowe, J. (in press). Ageing increases reliance on sensorimotor prediction through structural and functional differences in frontostriatal circuits. Nature Communications. [Cam-CAN Author list 12] Kievit, R. A., Davis, S. W., Griffiths, J., Correia, M., Cam-CAN, Henson, R. N. A. (in press). A watershed model of individual differences in fluid intelligence. Neurophychologia. [Cam-CAN Author list 12] Henson, R.N., Campbell, K.L., Davis, S.W., Taylor, J.R., Emery, T., Erzinclioglu, S., Cam-CAN & Kievit, R.A. (2016). Multiple determinants of lifespan memory differences. Scientific Reports, 6(32527) [Cam-CAN Author list 12] Blenkmann, A., Hughes, L. E., Kochen, S., Bekinschtein, T. A., Cam-CAN, Rowe, J. B. (2016). Convergent evidence for hierarchical prediction networks from human electrocorticography and magnetoencephalography. Cortex. 82, pp. 192-205. [Cam-CAN Author list 12] Ronan, L., Alexander-Bloch, A. F., Wagstyl, K., Farooqi, S., Brayne, C., Tyler, L. K., Cam-CAN, Fletcher, P. C. (2016). Obesity associated with increased brain-age from mid-life. Neurobiology of Ageing. [Cam-CAN Author list 12] Geerligs, L., Cam-CAN & Henson, R.N. (2016). Functional connectivity and structural covariance between regions of interest can be measured more accurately using multivariate distance correlation. Neuroimage, 135, 16-31. [Cam-CAN Author list 12] Shafto, M. A., James, L. E., Abrams, L., Cam-CAN. Tyler, L. K. (2016). Age-Related Increases in Verbal Knowledge Are Not Associated With Word Finding Problems in the Cam-CAN Cohort: What You Know Won't Hurt You. Journals of Gerontology B: Psychological Sciences. 0(0), 1-7. DOI: 10.1093/geronb/gbw074. [Cam-CAN Author list 12]. Campbell, K. L., Samu, S., Davis, S. W., Geerligs, L., Mustafa, A., CamCAN, Tyler, L. K. (2016). Robust Resilience of the Frontotemporal Syntax System to Aging. Journal of Neuroscience. 36(19): 5214-5227; doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4561-15.2016. [Cam-CAN Author list 12]. Tsvetanov, K. A., Henson, R. N. A., Tyler, L. K., Razi, A., Geerligs, L., Ham, T., Rowe, J. (2016). Extrinsic and intrinsic brain network connectivity maintains cognition across the lifespan despite accelerated decay of regional brain activation. The Journal of Neuroscience. 36(11), 3115-3126. [Cam-CAN Author list 12]. Green, E., Shafto, M. A., Matthews, F. E., Cam-CAN., White, S. R. (2015). Adult Lifespan Cognitive Variability in the Cross-Sectional Cam-CAN Cohort. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health<. 2015, 12(12), 15516-15530. doi: 10.3390/ijerph121215003. [Cam-CAN Author list 12]. Campbell, K. L., Shafto, M.A., Wright, P., Tsvetanov, K.A., Geerligs, L., Cusack, R., Cam-CAN, & Tyler, L.K. (2015). Idiosyncratic responding during movie-watching predicted by age differences in attentional control. Neurobiology of Aging. doi: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2015.07.028 [Cam-CAN Author list 11]. Geerligs, L., Rubinov, M., Cam-CAN, & Henson, R.N. (2015). State and trait components of functional connectivity: individual differences vary with mental state. Journal of Neuroscience, 35(41), 13949 -13961. doi:10.1523/jneurosci.1324-15.[Cam-CAN Author list 11]. Tsvetanov, K.A., Henson, R.N.A., Tyler, L.K., Davis, S.W., Shafto, M., Taylor, J.R., Williams, N., Cam-CAN, & Rowe, J.B. (2015). The effect of ageing on fMRI: correction for the confounding effects of vascular reactivity evaluated by joint fMRI and MEG in 335 adults. Human Brain Mapping, 36(6), 2248-2269. doi: 10.1002/hbm.22768 [Cam-CAN Author list 11]. Shafto, M.A., Tyler, L.K. (2014). Language in the aging brain: The network dynamics of cognitive decline and preservation. Science, 346(6209), pp. 583-587. DOI: 10.1126/science.1254404. Kievit, R.A., Davis, S.W., Mitchell, D.J., Taylor, J.R., Duncan, J., Cam-CAN, & Henson, R.N.A. (2014). Distinct aspects of frontal lobe structure mediate age-related differences in fluid intelligence and multitasking. Nature Communications, 5, 5658. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms6658. [Cam-CAN Author list 7]. Shafto, M.A., Tyler, L.K., Dixon, M., Taylor, J.R., Rowe, J.B., Cusack, R., Calder, A.J., Marslen-Wilson, W.D., Duncan, J., Dalgleish, T., Henson, R.N., Brayne, C., Cam-CAN, & Matthews, F.E. (2014). The Cambridge Centre for Ageing and Neuroscience (Cam-CAN) study protocol: a cross-sectional, lifespan, multidisciplinary examination of healthy cognitive ageing. BMC Neurology, 14(204). doi:10.1186/s12883-014-0204-1. [Cam-CAN Author list 10]. 5 U-tube videos: https://youtu.be/msiHdCsUq2s
Start Year 2010
 
Description CamCAN collaboration Oslo 
Organisation University of Oslo
Country Norway 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This is a research collaboration between Prof Fjell at University of Oslo and project Co-I Professor Henson, using Cam-CAN data to address a specific research question.
Collaborator Contribution Prof Fjell will compare data on a few CamCAN tasks with those from several other European ageing cohorts on similar tasks.
Impact This may serve as pilot data for an EU Horizon 2020 bid.
Start Year 2016
 
Description CamCAN student projects 
Organisation University of Cambridge
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution 6 Part II (3rd Year) University of Cambridge undergraduate student projects, and 3 Summer Students, contributed to CamCAN research
Collaborator Contribution Research findings
Impact Contributions to papers
Start Year 2013
 
Description Collaboration: Affiliated members at MRC Biostatistics Unit 
Organisation University of Cambridge
Department MRC Biostatistics Unit
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution This collaboration consists of a number of researchers and graduate students who are not employed on the Cam-CAN project but have an interest in the data and who are willing to make a useful contribution to the analysis and data interpretation. Such researchers are given affiliated status with the project under the guidance of Co-Is at the Unit.
Collaborator Contribution Expertise and a useful contribution to the analysis and data interpretation.
Impact Outputs will be recorded in relevant sections of Researchfish.
Start Year 2011
 
Description Collaboration: Affiliated members from MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC)
Department MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution This collaboration consists of a number of researchers and graduate students who are not employed on the Cam-CAN project but have an interest in the data and who are willing to make a useful contribution to the analysis and data interpretation. Such researchers are given affiliated status with the project and are working under direction of project Co-Is.
Start Year 2011
 
Description Collaboration: Affiliated members from University of Western Ontario 
Organisation Western University
Country Canada 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution This collaboration consists of a number of researchers and graduate students who are not employed on the Cam-CAN project but have an interest in the data and who are willing to make a useful contribution to the analysis and data interpretation. Such researchers are given affiliated status with the project. They are working under one of the project Co-I's, Rhodri Cusack
Collaborator Contribution Expertise and a useful contribution to the analysis and data interpretation
Impact Outputs will be recorded in appropriate Researchfish sections.
Start Year 2011
 
Title Automated Analysis (AA) of neuroimaging data 
Description The CamCAN project necessitated several extensions of the AA software used around world for batching large, multimodal neuroimaging datasets, particularly DTI and MEG 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2015 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact Enabled all our analysis and publications, and other sites in future 
URL https://github.com/rhodricusack/automaticanalysis
 
Title Software Toolbox for converting volumes to surfaces 
Description Converts MNI space volumes to high-res FreeSurfer surfaces 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2015 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact 200-300 downloads 
URL https://github.com/dprice80/mni2fs
 
Description BBSRC YouTube videos 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A series of videos created by BBSRC about CamCAN project and released on You Tube

http://youtu.be/msiHdCsUq2s (Part #1: Cam-CAN project overview)
http://youtu.be/fexu3VNzY-k (Part #2: MRI brain imaging)
http://youtu.be/eq8wHT8qYJs (Part #3: MEG brain waves)
http://youtu.be/-DhCfxn_XnA (Part #4: Motor learning experiment)
http://youtu.be/HRSTrioN-EE (Part #5: Hitchcock emotional movie response)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://youtu.be/msiHdCsUq2s
 
Description Buzzfeed featured article based on BBSRC press release, Oct-2015 (Campbell et al) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Campbell, K. et al. BuzzFeed featured article (http://www.buzzfeed.com/arranafrood/scary-science-a-geekas-guide-to-halloween-1mmog) based on the press release (http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/health/2015/150814-pr-young-minds-think-alike-older-people-more-distractible/), Campbell et al. (2015) "Young minds think alike - and older people are more distractible".

Dissemination of results
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Cam-CAN Newsletter 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Newsletter distributed to all participants who have completed a Cam-CAN Home Interview. Provides updates on the project progress. See http://www.cam-can.org/takingpart/index.html for copies.

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011,2012,2013,2014,2015
 
Description Cambridge Science Festival 2013 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The Cambridge Science Festival is a city-wide event which showcases to the general public the variety of science going on across Cambridge. Prof. Tyler was invited to give a keynote speech entitled 'Healthy ageing and the brain: the good news.' Feedback on the day was very positive.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL https://www.sciencefestival.cam.ac.uk/
 
Description Cambridge University Newsletter 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Participants in your research or patient groups
Results and Impact 'On the shoulders of volunteers': Article in Newsletter distributed to staff of the University of Cambridge which discusses use of human participants in research and includes information on the Cam-CAN research project Newsletter

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011
 
Description Cheltenham Science Festival 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Dr Meredith Shafto gave a short talk and participated in the panel discussion at the Times Cheltenham Science Festival - Session S34 'Your Ageing Brain'. Wednesday 8th June 2011, 6.30pm, at Cheltenham Town Hall

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011
URL http://www.sciencenewsline.com/biology/2011122004440047.html
 
Description First BBSRC Showcase for Industry Event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Cam-CAN project presented by poster by Dr Shafto at First BBSRC Showcase for Industry Event in Cambridge on 28th September 2012.

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Invited talk - Max Planck Institute (Kievit et al) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Invited talk at the Max Planck institute for Human Development, Berlin, titled 'Relating mind to brain using psychometric models: Theory and applications for neurocognitive aging.'

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Invited talk: Joint determinants of prefrontal ageing: Selective frontal grey and white matter differentially mediate age-related changes in fluid intelligence and multitasking 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Invited talk at the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit Wednesday Lunchtime Seminar talk, Cambridge, 7 May 2014. Authors: Kievit, R.A., Davis, S.W., Mitchell, D.M., Taylor, J.R., Duncan, J., Cam-CAN, & Henson, R.N.A.

no impact to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Invited talk: Max Planck Institute, Nov2014 (Henson) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Henson, R. Cambridge Centre for Ageing & Neuroscience: Preliminary Results. Invited talk given at Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany, 12 November 2014.

Dissemination of results and collaborative research discussion tool
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Invited talk: University of Giessen, Dec2014 (Kievit) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Kievit, R.A. Integrating brain and behaviour in ageing populations using Structural Equation Modelling: Theory and applications. Invited talk at the University of Giessen, Germany, 4 December 2014.

Dissemination of results
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Invited talk: University of Plymouth, Jan2015 (Kievit) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Kievit, R.A. The frontal lobe hypothesis revisited: A psychometric approach to neurocognitive ageing. Invited talk given at Dept of Psychology, University of Plymouth, 14 January 2015.

Dissemination of results and discussion about research
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description James Rowe CamCAN Talks 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Talk: Is it enough to be BOLD? FMRI across the lifespan, copenhagen University 28/1/16

Public engagement: "Meg and Me" ISSF award and presentation at Cambridge Science Festival March 2015, Saber Sami, Tim Rittman, James Rowe

MRC workshop on Vascular Ageing, March 2015

DPUK national symposium, May 2015,delegate and lead for Synaptic Health Theme
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Kamen CamCAN Talks 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact • Tsvetanov KA, Henson RNA, Tyler LK, Razi A, Geerligs L, Ham T, Cam-CAN, Rowe JB."Increased extrinsic and intrinsic connectivity maintains cognition across the lifespan coupled with age-related decay in regional neuronal activity". Society for Neuroscience Annual Scientific Meeting, Chicago, USA, 17-21 October 2015 [Conference Talk]
• Tsvetanov KA. "The effect of extrinsic and intrinsic brain network connectivity on cognition across the lifespan", Cambridge Connectome Consortium, Cambridge, UK, 24 November 2015 [Invited Talk]
• Tsvetanov KA. "fMRI studies of ageing: correction for the confounding effects of vascular reactivity evaluated by joint fMRI and MEG", International Conference on Aging and Cognition, Dortmund, Germany, 23-25 April 2015 [Conference Talk]
• Tsvetanov KA. "Using MEG to disentangle neural and vascular contributions to BOLD resting state variability", MEG UK Annual Meeting, Nottingham, UK, 8-10 January 2014 [Conference Talk]

Media interest about HBM article
• Human brains age less than previously though, Cam-CAN Newsletter 2015 [cites Tsvetanov et al. 2015 HBM]
• Interview with MedicalReaseach.com, March 20, 2015 [cites Tsvetanov et al 2015 HBM]
• Your brain might not be as 'old' as you think, University of Cambridge Research Features, Mach 09, 2015 [cites Tsvetanov et al. 2015 HBM]
• BBSRC news stories and features, March 05, 2015 [cites Tsvetanov et al. 2015 HBM]
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description MRC-CBU Open Evening 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Open Evening for the Cambridge Science Festival

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Matthias CamCAN MEG 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact SfN invited talk: "Brain networks subserving cognition decline with age", followed by question and answer press conference
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.sfn.org/Press-Room/News-Release-Archives/2015/Research-Reveals-New-Insights-Into-the-Agi...
 
Description Media Interest: Nature Communications Kievit et al 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact The Medical Research Council issued a press release following publication of the of Kievit et al. Nature Communications, 5, 568, paper - http://www.mrc.ac.uk/news-events/news/cognitive-abilities-age-at-different-rates-because-our-brains-age-differently/.
The same article was picked up and reported by additional agencies/organisations:
o BBSRC: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/health/2014/141218-pr-cognitive-abilities-age-different-rates.aspx.
o British Geriatrics Society, 17 December 2014: http://www.bgs.org.uk/index.php/fallsresources-315/3501-different-rates-cognitive-deterioration
o The Times, 19 December 2014: http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/health/news/article4301407.ece
o The Daily Mail, 18 December 2014: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2878849/Different-parts-brain-age-different-rates-Older-people-multitask-long-lose-ability-pay-bill.html
o Alzheimer UK, 18 December 2014: http://www.alzheimersresearchuk.org/news-detail/11222/Thinking-skills-decline-at-different-rates-as-we-age/
o Women's Brain Health Initiative, 18 December 2014: http://womensbrainhealth.org/think-outside-the-box/different-parts-of-the-brain-age-at-different-rates
o Health Canal, 18 December 2014: http://www.healthcanal.com/brain-nerves/58593-cognitive-abilities-age-at-different-rates-as-our-brains-get-older.html
o National Headlines, 18 December 2014: http://www.nationalheadlines.co.uk/862264/different-parts-of-the-brain-age-at-different-rates-older-people-can-still-multitask-long-after-they-lose-the-ability-to-pay-a-bill/
o GM journal, 18 December 2014: http://www.gmjournal.co.uk/cognitive_abilities_age_at_different_rates_because_our_brains_age_differently_25769818814.aspx
o Fitzwilliam College: https://www.fitz.cam.ac.uk/about/newsitem-5-242
o Panorama Armenian news, 20 December 2014: http://www.panorama.am/en/popular/2014/12/20/brain-ageing/
o University of Cambridge daily news digest, 22 December 2014: http://universityofcambridge.cmail1.com/t/ViewEmail/j/AE7F077A0D268A41/DFD295083F34F412C9C291422E3DE149
o Cambridge Neuroscience, 22 December 2014: http://www.neuroscience.cam.ac.uk/news/article.php?permalink=0a50eef884


Public engagement in the research being conducted
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Media: BBC Radio 4 Frontiers 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Professors Tyler & Henson, and two of our research participants, contributed to the science feature show 'Frontiers' episode 'Ageing and the brain' broadcast on BBC Radio 4 on 11 June 2014. The show examined the latest understanding of age-related cognitive decline. Included an interview with Professor Tyler.

Increase in interest in our research from the public, recorded by increase in e-mail enquiries.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/frontiers
 
Description Media: BBSRC Business Magazine 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Article in BBSRC Business Magazine, Autumn 2013, pp16-17 'Brain imaging provides clues on how to age well'.

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Media: South Bank Show 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Professor Tyler provided advice for the preparation of a South Bank Show film about King Lear, regarding how the brain changes with age.

no actual impacts realised to date.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Public engagement - U3A (Henson et al) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Presentation to the Science Group of the U3A Sevenoaks Branch, Kent, titled 'Age, Brain & Cognition'.

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Public lecture - British Academy, London, September 2011 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Public lecture given by Professor LK Tyler entitled "The resilient brain: cognition and ageing". This was a Joint British Academy/British Psychological Society Prize Lecture, given at the British Academy, London, in September 2011.

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011
 
Description Public lecture - Newcastle, October 2011 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Public lecture given by Professor LK Tyler entitled "The resilient brain: cognition and ageing". This was a Joint British Academy/British Psychological Society Prize Lecture in association with the School of Psychology, Newcastle University (part of the InSights Public Lecture series), in October 2011.

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011
 
Description Public lecture: Cambridge Science Festival 2015 "Aging artists and creativity" 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Joint lecture exploring psychology and art, generated interesting questions and discussion with public audience.

no notable impact
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Question Time-style discussion on the topic of ageing 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Prof LK Tyler was a panel member of the Babraham Institute Conference on Ageing and Basic Bioscience Conference BBSRC supported Public Event: Question Time-style discussion on the topic of ageing. The Guildhall, Cambridge, UK, 22 September 2012.

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Radio broadcast: 'Health Matters' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Meredith Shafto gave 15min interview on radio station Swindon 150.5FM

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2010
 
Description Radio broadcast: 'Naked Scientists' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Professor Tyler interviewed on BBC Radio Cambridgeshire 'The Naked Scientists' programme on 30 September 2012. Broadcast focused on ageing 'Why senior moments are not inevitable'.

no impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
URL http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/podcasts/show/20120930/
 
Description Rik Henson CamCAN Talks 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact - Invited talk by Henson for CamCAN at 2015 DALLAS AGING & COGNITION CONFERENCE, USA: "Combining MRI, fMRI and MEG to study neural bases of age-related changes in cognition: evidence from the CamCAN project". http://vitallongevity.utdallas.edu/events/dacc
- Invited talk by Henson for CamCAN at the 2015 Memory Disorders Research Society (MDRS) conference: "Multiple determinants of ageing memories: results from a large, population-representative cohort" UK: http://www.mdrs2015.psychol.cam.ac.uk/
- Invited talk by Henson for CamCAN at the 2016 IBRO workshop in Budapest: "Cambridge Centre for Ageing & Neuroscience (CamCAN): some preliminary results" UK: http://www.ibro2016.hu/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
 
Description Rogier Lab News 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Kievit, R. A. & Henson, R. N. A. (2015). How age is affecting your mind. Laboratory News. http://www.labnews.co.uk/features/how-age-is-affecting-your-mind-23-04-2015/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.labnews.co.uk/features/how-age-is-affecting-your-mind-23-04-2015/
 
Description Speaker at British Academy/British Museum event: Old Masters: creativity and the aging brain 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Drilling down into the subjects of lifelong creative endeavour, the neuroplasticity of the older brain and the correlation between ageing and heightened risk-taking, Prof. Tyler took part in panel discussion (including Martin Gayford, Writer and art critic for The Spectator; and Dr Angus Lockyer, Lecturer in the History of Japan, SOAS) exploring ageing and creativity across global art history, as well as the enduring example of Katsushika Hokusai, the self-declared 'old man crazy to paint'.The event was recorded and is available online (see link below).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.britac.ac.uk/events/old-masters-creativity-and-ageing-brain
 
Description Talk - University of Oxford 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Invited Departmental Seminar, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford titled 'Neurobiology of language: a dual systems approach'

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Talk: A watershed model for executive functions: Theory, application and extensions for psychopathology 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Kievit, R.A. A watershed model for executive functions: Theory, application and extensions for psychopathology. Informal talk given at the Department of Developmental Psychiatry, 8 October 2014.

Dissemination of results
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Talk: Cambridge Centre for Ageing & Neuroscience (CamCAN): Some Prelim Results 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Informal talk given by Prof Henson at the Oxford Centre for Human Brain Activity, University of Oxford, 4 June 2014.

no impact to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Talk: Healthy ageing and the brain: the good news 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Lecture given by Professor LK Tyler at University of Cambridge Science Festival, March 2013.

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Talk: MEGUK, Jan2015 (Treder) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Treder, M., Kitzbichler, M., Price, D., Geerligs, L., Cam-CAN & Bullmore,E. Spectral similarity analysis of resting state MEG in healthy ageing. Talk given at MEG UK, Aston University, Birmingham, UK, 9 January 2015.

Dissemination of results
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Talk: The science (and art) of imaging a population 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Talk given by Dr FM to the Rotary Club of South Cambridge, 26 November 2012.

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012
 
Description Talk: UMC, Groningen, Netherlands, July 2015 (Geerligs) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Geerligs, L. Functional networks in the healthy ageing brain. Talk given to undergraduate and masters students at the Summer School on Healthy Ageing, University Medical Center, Groningen, The Netherlands, 6-10 July 2015.

Dissemination of results
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Treder SfN press conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Our research on relating resting-state brain activity (recorded with MEG) to cognitive performance across the ages was reported in a symposium at the 2015 annual meeting of the international Society for Neuroscience (approx 20,000 scientists attending), which then attracted a subsequent press conference.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Tyler CamCAN Talks 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact • Language function and the resilient aging brain. Invited talk at 33rd
European Workshop on Cognitive Neuropsychology "An Interdisciplinary approach", Bressanone, Italy, 25-30 January 2015.
• Language function and the ageing brain. Invited talk in symposium
"The Changing Brain - Insights from Lifespan Cognitive Neuroscience" at the 22nd Cognitive Neuroscience Society Annual Meeting, San Francisco, USA, 28-31 March 2015.
• The Resilient Brain: Cognition and Ageing. Invited talk given to the
Reform Club, London, 16 September 2015.
• The adaptive brain: brain and cognition in ageing . Invited talk in
symposium: 'Language and the aging brain". Society for the Neurobiology of Language, Chicago, October 2015
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015