Genetic improvement of wheat to reduce the potential for acrylamide formation during processing.

Lead Research Organisation: Rothamsted Research
Department Name: Plant Biology & Crop Science

Abstract

The formation of the chemical contaminant, acrylamide, during high-temperature cooking and processing of wheat, rye, potato and other mainly plant-derived raw materials was reported in 2002, and the presence of acrylamide in foods is now recognized as a difficult problem for the agricultural and food industries. Acrylamide causes cancer in laboratory animals and is therefore considered to be probably cancer-causing in humans. It also affects the nervous system and reproduction. Cereals, of which wheat is the most important, generate half of the acrylamide in the European diet, with biscuits, snacks and breakfast cereals being of particular concern. The FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives has recommended that dietary exposure to acrylamide should be reduced and the European Commission is expected to issue guidance values on acrylamide levels in food before the end of 2010. The current draft of the guidance values proposes levels that will not be consistently achievable for many products. The proposed guidance level for breakfast cereals, for example, is 400 parts per billion (ppb), while levels in some wheat-based breakfast cereals are over 1000 ppb. Furthermore, many Member States support these guidance values becoming regulatory limits. The food industry therefore requires both short-term solutions and a long-term programme of reduction in the acrylamide forming potential of wheat in order to comply with this regulatory situation as it evolves. Methods for reducing acrylamide formation during processing have proven to be difficult to apply to wheat products, either being ineffective or having an unacceptably adverse effect on product quality. The development of commercially viable wheat varieties that are low in acrylamide-forming potential but retain grain characteristics that are important for end product quality would help to address, at source, the problem of acrylamide formation in food manufacture, catering and home cooking, without the need for additives or potentially costly changes to processes. The high-temperature degradation of an amino acid, asparagine, in the presence of sugars (glucose, fructose and maltose) has been shown to be the major route for acrylamide formation and the limiting factor in wheat products is free asparagine. Wheat contains significantly higher levels of asparagine than most other grains. Furthermore, whole wheat grain and wheat bran, which have important health promoting properties, tend also to have higher asparagine levels than refined wheat flour. This project seeks to identify currently available varieties and genotypes of wheat that are low in asparagine and provide wheat breeders with the genetic tools to reduce the concentration of asparagine further. This application is being submitted through the BBSRC's stand-alone LINK scheme. The project will benefit from the involvement of a major European/GB wheat breeder and a consortium of wheat supply chain businesses, allowing for the identification and review of key targets by the industrial partners. The level of industry support is indicative of the importance of the acrylamide issue to wheat supply chain businesses and the potential impact of the project. A letter of support has also been provided by the Food Standards Agency. The project will use state-of-the-art techniques for analysing amino acid concentrations in wheat flour, exploit the genetic resources in wheat that have been developed at Rothamsted and the John Innes Centre, including mapping populations, wheat genetic modification (as a research tool) and high-throughput screening of mutant populations, and utilise the latest DNA sequencing techniques to study differences in gene expression between high and low asparagine genotypes. The impact of reductions in acrylamide-forming potential of grain on performance in industrial processes will be assessed by food industry partners.

Technical Summary

This LINK project involves groups from Rothamsted Research, the John Innes Centre and wheat supply chain businesses. It addresses the formation of the contaminant, acrylamide, during high-temperature cooking and processing of foods. Cereals generate half of dietary acrylamide. The European Commission is about to issue guidance values on acrylamide levels in food and the current draft proposes levels that will not be achievable for many products. Methods for reducing acrylamide formation during processing are difficult to apply to wheat. Attention has therefore turned to the raw material, wheat grain. The thermal degradation of free asparagine in the presence of reducing sugars during the Maillard reaction is the major route for acrylamide formation and the limiting factor in wheat is free asparagine. This project will identify genotypes of wheat with 'high' and 'low' acrylamide-producing potential. The site for synthesis of the free asparagine that accumulates in wheat grain under normal and stress conditions will be identified. Metabolite and gene expression profiles will be obtained to compare a low asparagine DH line, SR3, with one of its parents, variety Spark; these genotypes differ in grain asparagine concentration by 40 %. This will identify the enzymes and genes that determine free asparagine concentration in wheat grain. QTL for free asparagine concentration that are being identified within a current PhD project (ends 2010) will be narrowed. Genetic markers for low free asparagine concentration will be identified. Targeted mutagenesis and genetic modification will be used to change the activity of key enzymes and produce very low asparagine genotypes. The impact of reductions in grain asparagine on performance in industrial processes will be assessed by industrial partners. The programme builds on substantial previous work and will be facilitated by the availability of mapping and TILLING populations, and support provided by industrial partners.

Planned Impact

The formation of acrylamide during high-temperature cooking and processing of plant-derived raw materials was reported in 2002 and the presence of acrylamide in foods is now recognized as a difficult problem for the agricultural and food industries. Acrylamide is classified as probably carcinogenic to humans, based on its carcinogenic action in rodents; it also has neurological and reproductive effects. Cereals, of which wheat is the most important, generate half of the acrylamide in the European diet, with biscuits, snacks and breakfast cereals being of particular concern. This project will identify currently available varieties and genotypes of wheat that are low in free asparagine and provide wheat breeders with the genetic tools to reduce the concentration of free asparagine further. The effect of reductions in acrylamide-forming potential of grain on performance in industrial processes will be assessed by food industry partners. The project will generate new knowledge and understanding of the genes and processes that control asparagine accumulation in wheat. Other outputs will be the development of QTL and gene-specific markers for use in breeding programmes, and the production of new, very low asparagine genotypes. The project focusses on wheat but it is anticipated that the knowledge and understanding gained in this project will be applicable to other cereals, such as rye, barley, oats and maize. Potential beneficiaries include: Consumers. Dietary intake of acrylamide is estimated to be approximately 0.3 to 0.6 microgram per kg of body weight per day, with the intake for teenagers and children being higher on a per bodyweight basis. The FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives has recommended that dietary exposure to acrylamide should be reduced. Wheat producers. Wheat contains significantly higher levels of asparagine than most other grains, including rice and maize, meaning that raw material substitution is an option for food processors. Not a lot of rice or maize is grown in the UK. Food processors. The European Commission is expected to issue guidance values on acrylamide levels in food before the end of 2010. The current draft of the guidance values proposes levels that will not be consistently achievable for many products. The guidance level for breakfast cereals, for example, is 400 parts per billion (ppb), while a recent survey by CEEREAL found acrylamide levels in some wheat-based breakfast cereals to be over 1000 ppb, with the 95th centile at 465 ppb. Furthermore, many Member States support these guidance values becoming regulatory limits. The food industry therefore requires both short-term solutions and a long-term programme of reduction in the acrylamide-forming potential of wheat in order to comply with this regulatory situation as it evolves. Regulators. The project will give an indication of how low asparagine can be reduced to in wheat grain, and the range of concentrations in current varieties. This will help regulators to set reasonable and achievable targets for acrylamide formation in wheat products. The data generated in the project will be disseminated through publication in the scientific literature and presentation at international and national conferences. While publication will be subject to any necessary delay to allow appropriate Intellectual Property (IP) protection, in accordance with BBSRC guidelines, delays will be kept to a minimum. Data relating to the QTL and adjacent genetic markers will be made available using databases being developed for the MONOGRAM cross-institute programme. The populations developed as part of the project will be made available via the JIC Genebank and listed as a public resource on the WGIN (Wheat Genetic Improvement network) and MONOGRAM web sites. Knowledge transfer to breeders, end users and other stakeholders will be facilitated by partiparticipation of CEEREAL, HGCA, ACFM and SNACMA.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description Free asparagine concentration, which is the determining factor for acrylamide-forming potential in cereals, was measured in grain from wheat grown in field trials in t 2011-2012 and 2012-2013. There were 25 varieties in 2012 and 59 in 2013, with eleven present in both trials. The trials were split-plot, with half of each plot supplied with sulphur and the other half not. Eight varieties were identified as having consistently low free asparagine concentration. There was a differential response of varieties to sulfur, and much higher levels of free asparagine in 2012-2013 versus 2011-2012. A key conclusion of this study was that, given the short commercial lifespan of some wheat varieties, information on free asparagine concentration should be made available when a variety is launched. We also investigated the effect of fungicide application on free asparagine accumulation in wheat grain. Free amino acid concentrations were measured in flour from 47 varieties of wheat grown in a field trial in 2011-2012 and treated with fungicide. Acrylamide formation was measured after heating the flour at 180 °C for 20 min. Flour was also analysed from 24 (of the 47) varieties grown in adjacent plots that were treated in identical fashion except that no fungicide was applied, resulting in visible infection by Septoria tritici, Yellow rust and Brown rust. Free asparagine concentration was much lower in the fungicide-treated wheat than the untreated wheat, resulting in less acrylamide formation in flour when it was heated. Indeed, acrylamide increased by 370 due to lack of fungicide treatment in one variety. The study showed disease control by fungicide application to be an important crop management measure for mitigating the problem of acrylamide formation in wheat products. Asparagine synthesis occurs by the amidation of aspartate, catalysed by asparagine synthetase, and we therefore studied the expression of asparagine synthetase (TaASN) genes in wheat. The expression of three genes, TaASN1-3, was measured in different tissues and in response to nitrogen and sulphur supply. The expression of TaASN2 in the grain during mid to late development was the highest of any of the genes in any tissue. Both TaASN1 and TaASN2 increased in expression through grain development, and in the grain of field-grown plants during mid-development in response to sulphur deprivation. However, only TaASN1 was affected by nitrogen or sulphur supply in pot-based experiments, showing complex responses. A possible regulatory motif was found in the promoter of TaASN1 genes from several cereal species. As the study was completed, a fourth gene, TaASN4, was identified from recently available genome data. Phylogenetic analysis showed that other cereal species have similar asparagine synthetase gene families to wheat. Next, asparagine synthetase-encoding DNA sequences from wheat were used to produce their encoded proteins in Escherichia coli. The proteins were shown to react with two monoclonal antibodies raised to distinct epitopes. The reaction catalysed by asparagine synthetase was modelled using publicly-available data from various species to generate a series of differential equations to describe the reaction stages. The TaASN1, TaASN2 and TaASN3 proteins were purified and found to be active, synthesising asparagine and glutamate from glutamine and aspartate. Data from the reactions was entered into the model, enabling enabled values to be determined for kinetic parameters within the differential equations. The experiment confirmed a prediction of the model, in that the enzymes continued to produce glutamate even when the synthesis of asparagine had ceased. Other highlights: Detailed analysis of the effect of sulphur deficiency on free asparagine accumulation (and therefore acrylamide risk) in wheat grain. Taken with the fungicide experiment described above, together studies demonstrate the contribution that crop management can make to acrylamide control. Identification of targets for genetic intervention to reduce acrylamide risk. Development of a model for asparagine metabolism that far exceeds anything in the literature. Production of huge RNAseq datasets to enable the comparison of high and low asparagine genotypes. These are being analysed to enable the model of asparagine metabolism to be refined and to identify additional targets for genetic intervention. Identification of mutations in all three asparagine synthetase-2 genes in the wheat TILLING population. Bulking up of low asparagine wheat grain for testing in industry processes.
Exploitation Route Our findings will be used to develop genetic and agronomic approaches to reducing the risk of acrylamide formation during the processing grain from wheat and other cereals. For example a CASE studentship has been awarded through the South West DTP to use genome editing to knock out the genetic targets that were identified in this study. This studentship is supported by the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board and five wheat breeding companies. This studentship will also cross TILLING lines to produce a genotype that is null for ASN2. The findings will also enable end users to select wheat varieties with consistently low acrylamide-forming potential for processes/products where the risk of acrylamide formation is high. The RNAseq data will be of use to many wheat researchers working on any aspect of wheat grain development.
Sectors Agriculture, Food and Drink

 
Description Our work on the effect of sulphur deficiency on free asparagine accumulation in wheat grain has led to the updating of the AHDB advice to farmers on levels of sulphur to apply to wheat and has been incorporated into Food Drink Europe's Acrylamide Toolbox. The model of asparagine metabolism that we have generated is being used by industry partners to identify targets for crop improvement. Our information on varietal differences in free asparagine content of wheat grain is being used by industry partners to control the formation of acrylamide in their products. Our work showing the key role of free asparagine concentration in determining the acrylamide-forming potential of wheat is being used by stakeholders to develop a code of practice for cereal food manufacturers to mitigate acrylamide risk in cereal products in order to comply with indicative levels set by the European Commission. Our work showing the importance of effective disease control in preventing the accumulation of high concentrations of free asparagine in wheat grain has been forwarded to Food Drink Europe for incorporation into the Acrylamide Toolbox. In April 2018, the European Commission revised its risk management measures for acrylamide with Commission Regulation (EU) 2017/2158 establishing mitigation measures and benchmark levels for the reduction of the presence of acrylamide in food. The regulation included compulsory risk management measures, including ensuring that wheat has sufficient sulphur during cultivation and that good phytosanitary practice is carried out. Both of these arose directly from the results of this project.
First Year Of Impact 2012
Sector Agriculture, Food and Drink
Impact Types Societal,Economic,Policy & public services

 
Description Influence of results and advice on Commission Regulation (EU) 2017/2158 establishing mitigation measures and benchmark levels for the reduction of the presence of acrylamide in food
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
Impact The findings of our work had a direct influence on the compulsory mitigation measures incorporated into Commission Regulation (EU) 2017/2158 establishing mitigation measures and benchmark levels for the reduction of the presence of acrylamide in food, notably ensuring sulphur sufficiency and good phytosanitary practice in the cultivation of wheat in order to avoid the presence of high levels of acrylamide in wheat products. The regulations came into force on 11th April 2018.
URL https://eur-lex.europa.eu/eli/reg/2017/2158/oj
 
Description BBSRC Pathfinder
Amount £16,728 (GBP)
Funding ID BB/P017541/1 
Organisation Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 11/2016 
End 02/2017
 
Description Effect of sulphur fertilisation on the acrylamide-forming potential of wheat
Amount £7,978 (GBP)
Funding ID 217-0001 
Organisation Home Grown Cereals Authority (HGCA) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2013 
End 10/2013
 
Description LINK: Genetic improvement of wheat to reduce the potential for acrylamide formation during processing. 
Organisation Agricultural and Horticulture Development Board
Department Cereals and Oilseeds
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Refer to the outputs associated with this project
Collaborator Contribution Refer to the outputs associated with this project
Impact Refer to the output associated with this project
Start Year 2011
 
Description LINK: Genetic improvement of wheat to reduce the potential for acrylamide formation during processing. 
Organisation Cereal Partners UK
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Refer to the outputs associated with this project
Collaborator Contribution Refer to the outputs associated with this project
Impact Refer to the output associated with this project
Start Year 2011
 
Description LINK: Genetic improvement of wheat to reduce the potential for acrylamide formation during processing. 
Organisation Conagra Brands Inc.
Country United States 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Refer to the outputs associated with this project
Collaborator Contribution Refer to the outputs associated with this project
Impact Refer to the output associated with this project
Start Year 2011
 
Description LINK: Genetic improvement of wheat to reduce the potential for acrylamide formation during processing. 
Organisation John Innes Centre
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Refer to the outputs associated with this project
Collaborator Contribution Refer to the outputs associated with this project
Impact Refer to the output associated with this project
Start Year 2011
 
Description LINK: Genetic improvement of wheat to reduce the potential for acrylamide formation during processing. 
Organisation Kellogg's
Country United States 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Refer to the outputs associated with this project
Collaborator Contribution Refer to the outputs associated with this project
Impact Refer to the output associated with this project
Start Year 2011
 
Description LINK: Genetic improvement of wheat to reduce the potential for acrylamide formation during processing. 
Organisation Lantmännen
Country Sweden 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Refer to the outputs associated with this project
Collaborator Contribution Refer to the outputs associated with this project
Impact Refer to the output associated with this project
Start Year 2011
 
Description LINK: Genetic improvement of wheat to reduce the potential for acrylamide formation during processing. 
Organisation Nestlé Research Center
Country Switzerland 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Refer to the outputs associated with this project
Collaborator Contribution Refer to the outputs associated with this project
Impact Refer to the output associated with this project
Start Year 2011
 
Description LINK: Genetic improvement of wheat to reduce the potential for acrylamide formation during processing. 
Organisation PepsiCo
Country United States 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Refer to the outputs associated with this project
Collaborator Contribution Refer to the outputs associated with this project
Impact Refer to the output associated with this project
Start Year 2011
 
Description LINK: Genetic improvement of wheat to reduce the potential for acrylamide formation during processing. 
Organisation Saaten-Union Biotec GmbH
Department Saaten-Union UK Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Refer to the outputs associated with this project
Collaborator Contribution Refer to the outputs associated with this project
Impact Refer to the output associated with this project
Start Year 2011
 
Description LINK: Genetic improvement of wheat to reduce the potential for acrylamide formation during processing. 
Organisation Snack, Nut and Crisp Manufacturers Association
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Refer to the outputs associated with this project
Collaborator Contribution Refer to the outputs associated with this project
Impact Refer to the output associated with this project
Start Year 2011
 
Description LINK: Genetic improvement of wheat to reduce the potential for acrylamide formation during processing. 
Organisation United Biscuits Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Refer to the outputs associated with this project
Collaborator Contribution Refer to the outputs associated with this project
Impact Refer to the output associated with this project
Start Year 2011
 
Description LINK: Genetic improvement of wheat to reduce the potential for acrylamide formation during processing. 
Organisation Weetabix Limited
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution Refer to the outputs associated with this project
Collaborator Contribution Refer to the outputs associated with this project
Impact Refer to the output associated with this project
Start Year 2011
 
Company Name Curtis Analytics 
Description Curtis Analytics provides an analytical service for the measurement of free asparagine, other free amino acid and sugar concentrations in food raw materials. It was founded by Dr Tanya Curtis who was previously a member of my team (PhD student and post-doc). This arose directly from the funding provided for this short project. The company is located in the Daniel Hall Building, Rothamsted Centre for Research and Enterprise (RoCRE). 
Year Established 2017 
Impact It is early days but the company has business from major food processing companies, mostly in the cereal sector. It is clearly providing a much-needed service and has already taken on one employee.
Website https://www.linkedin.com/in/tanya-curtis-28066814/
 
Description Conference: Wheat - genetic improvement of end use quality. Invited speaker 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited speaker at conference: Wheat - genetic improvement of end use quality. 9-10 February 2016. Association of Applied Biologists, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Herts.
Presentation title: Food safety: Reducing the acrylamide-forming potential of wheat
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Interview with Newstalk ZB (New Zealand) on acrylamide issue, 23rd January 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact I was interviewed live on Newstalk ZB, New Zealand's largest news radio station, on the FSA's 'Go for Gold' campaign
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Interviewed by CNN on acrylamide issue 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact I was interviewed on the phone by a reporter from CNN who was doing a piece on the FRSA's 'Go for Gold' campaign. The reporter wrote an article for CNN on-line but part of the interview was also broadcast in the US (so I have been told). Quotes from the interview were used by 64 other media outlets, mostly in the US.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://edition.cnn.com/2017/01/23/health/burnt-toast-cancer-risk-roast-potatoes-acrylamide-bn/
 
Description Invited 'Expert speaker' at a meeting of the European Commission's Civil Dialogue Group: CDG ARABLE CROP, 4th July 2017, DG-Agri, Rue de la Loi, Brussels. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I was nominated by CEEREAL/FoodDrinkEurope as an 'Expert Speaker' on acrylamide, which was debated at a meeting of the European Commission's Civil Dialogue Group: CDG ARABLE CROP, 4th July 2017, DG-Agri, Rue de la Loi, Brussels. There were a lot of questions and pressure was put on the DG-Agri secretariat to support research in the area to enable industry to comply with the evolving regulatory situation. There was also participation by DG-Sante.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://ec.europa.eu/agriculture/sites/agriculture/files/civil-dialogue-groups/arable-crops/2017-07-...
 
Description Invited speaker and session chair at 2nd Global Summit on Plant Science, London, October 6th - 8th 2016. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited speaker and session chair at the 2nd Global Summit on Plant Science, London, October 6th - 8th 2016. Presentation title: Genetic and agronomic approaches to reducing the acrylamide-forming potential of wheat.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Invited speaker at BBSRC showcase, Campden BRI, 6th July 2016. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Invited speaker at: BBSRC showcase, Campden BRI, 6th July 2016. Presentation title: Genetic improvement of wheat to reduce the potential for acrylamide formation during processing.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Invited speaker at Food Safety 2016: 2nd International Conference on Food safety and Regulatory Measures. London, June 6th-8th 2016. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited speaker at Food Safety 2016: 2nd International Conference on Food safety and Regulatory Measures. London, June 6th-8th 2016. Session on 'Formation and analysis of food-borne toxicants'. Presentation title: Reducing the acrylamide-forming potential of wheat, rye and potato.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Invited speaker at: Food Security Annual Conference 2016 - Lancaster University, 19th - 20th April 2016. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Invited presentation at the Food Security Annual Conference 2016, Lancaster University, 19th - 20th April 2016. Presentation title: Acrylamide and food safety. The conference forms part of the University of Lancaster's DTP activities, with most of the audience being post-grads on the programme.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Invited speaker, Food, Nutrition and Agricultural Genomics Congress, London, April 20th - 21st 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation was very well received

Several discussions on possible future collaborations
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Invited speaker, Healthgrain Forum 2017 Spring Workshop, Leuven, Belgium, 2nd - 3rd May 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I was an invited speaker at the Healthgrain Forum 2017 Spring Workshop in Leuven, Belgium, 2nd - 3rd May 2017. The audience was primarily academic but with some industry/business representation.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.healthgrain.org/events/hgf_spring_workshop_2017
 
Description Invited speaker, SELECTBIO on-line, October 2015: Advances in Plant Genomics (APG 2015) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Good on-line Q and A session afterwards

Several inquiries for more information on the acrylamide issue
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://selectbiosciences.com/conferences/index.aspx?conf=APG2015
 
Description Invited speaker: Acrylamide workshop, European Commission, 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presentation at European Commission Acrylamide Workshop, Directorate General for Health and Consumers, Unit E3: Chemicals, Contaminants and Pesticides. Brussels, 13th-14th January 2014.

Title: Genetic and agronomic approaches to acrylamide reduction: progress and prospect

Data that was presented was included in EFSA's 'opinion document' on dietary acrylamide later in 2014
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Invited speaker: Cereal Partners Worldwide, Grain Summit, Orbe, Switzerland, June 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation: Genetic and agronomic approaches to acrylamide reduction in wheat and rye.

Maintained excellent relationship with CPW
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Presentation at Federation of Bakers Workshop on Acrylamide, May 11th 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact There was a lot of discussion of the implications of the acrylamide issue for the baking industry

Several delegates will be attending a meeting on participation in and support for work on the acrylamide issue in cereals
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Presentation by Tanya Curtis to American Chemical Society Meeting, Boston, August 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Lots of discussion on the acrylamide issue with respect to wheat

Plans for future collaborations, for example through EU funding
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Presentation to Campden-BRI Cereals, Milling and Baking Members Interest Group Meeting, May 6th 2015. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact There was a lot of discussion on the acrylamide issue and its implications for the wheat supply chain

Several delegates are attending a meeting on possible participation in and support for a future project
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Presentation, NABIM Research and Development Workshop, December 2nd 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Stimulated interest in the acrylamide issue amongst bakers and millers

Several delegates are attending meeting on possible collaboration in a LINK project
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description SIK meeting, Gothenburg, invited speaker 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Swedish Food Industry focus group presentation: Genetic and agronomic approaches to acrylamide reduction: progress and prospects for potato, wheat and rye

no actual impacts realised to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Speaker: HGCA Annual Progress Meeting, Cambridge, February 2014 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation: Genetic improvement of wheat to reduce the potential for acrylamide formation during processing

Maintained good relationship with HGCA, who are supporting the wheat acrylamide project
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Visit to Grain Science and Industry Department, Kansas State University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Much discussion afterwards on possible areas of collaboration

Intention to apply for BBSRC USA funding for next call
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description WEBINAR to CEEREAL Technology Group on acrylamide in cereals. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact I made a presentation to the CEEREAL Technology Group via a Webinar. As a result, CEEREAL will alert me if EU funding on the acrylamide topic becomes available.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017