Protein for Life: Towards a Focused Dietary Framework for Healthy Ageing

Lead Research Organisation: Newcastle University
Department Name: Institute of Cellular Medicine

Abstract

Western society is living a lot longer, and 'ageing well' is now becoming a very important priority for public health. Ageing goes hand in hand with a loss of muscle size and strength (known as sarcopenia). This loss of muscle affects people's balance, ability to walk, and overall ability to complete daily living tasks. This can lead to a loss of independence and mobility, which can impact on quality of life, well-being and increase health-care costs. Physical inactivity and poor nutrition are known to speed up the loss of muscle size and strength, however, we are all able to change these aspects of our lifestyle and become more active and consume a healthier diet.

A diet low in protein is one of the main causes of sarcopenia, and it has been recommended that older individuals eat more protein than is currently advised. However, a key dietary deficiency for the ageing population is the widespread failure to achieve recommended intakes for protein consumption. Food intakes, including protein-rich foods, are known to decline with age and this is attributable to a range of factors including loss of appetite, changes in perceptions and taste, living conditions and financial reasons. Being aware of factors that may prevent older adults from increasing their total daily protein intake, we should focus on strategies to increase protein intake across the day rather than at just one meal.

There is a severe lack of mainstream food products that can help meet the protein needs of an ageing population that are functional, taste good and are affordable. The purpose of this research is therefore to identify and develop guidelines for protein products for healthy ageing that are sustainable, cost effective and enjoyable. This information will then inform the food industry for new product development and reformulation of existing products that are appropriate for this population.

Our study will take a number of different approaches to ultimately develop and disseminate guidelines to the food industry for the formulation of palatable higher-protein foods. First, we will take different sources of existing data to develop a profile of the type, quantity, quality and timing of protein intake in the . Alongside this, we will undertake a series of focus groups with members of the public (aged 40-54 years, 55-69 years and 70+ years) to further understand the barriers to and the facilitators of the consumption of protein rich foods in mid-life and later life. We will also run a series of experiments to further understand drivers of food choice and decision making in different age groups with a focus on the role of protein. A further objective is to collate information available in the academic literature and from the food industry on the optimal sources of protein that could be used in new products. This will include consideration of the composition of the proteins, palatability, sustainability, cost and public acceptance.

All of this information will then be used to provide the food industry with a set of 'design rules' for new products. Working with our industry partners, we will then develop and trial some exemplar products based on the design rules. The products will then be tested for palatability and acceptability in groups of mid-life and older adults and then refined accordingly.

Importantly, we will ensure that the findings of the study are then disseminated to key stakeholders including the public, policy makers and the food industry. We hope that this research will also provide a more general roadmap to inform future product development.

Technical Summary

The UK is transitioning to an ageing population. By 2039 it is estimated that 43% of the UK population will be aged over 60 (ONS 2015). Ageing well across the life course is a major public health priority.

Ageing is associated with sarcopenia (a decline of muscle mass and strength), which can affect physical functioning as well as being a key determinant of quality of life and premature mortality. Sarcopenia is a complex, multi-factorial syndrome caused by a number of contributing processes. One key factor associated with sarcopenia is protein deficiency. Increasing protein intake throughout the life course may help to reduce the rate of muscle decline and the onset of associated health conditions. Furthermore, the benefits of increased protein intake for older adults for promoting muscle mass have led to recommendations that protein intake should be greater than the recommended daily allowance for older adults.

While there has been some investigation of the levels of protein intake by age group, there is a lack of understanding of the social, demographic and psychological drivers of food choices surrounding protein intake. This is despite a wide range of evidence demonstrating the importance of these factors in determining broader nutrition behaviours. Examining how the influence of these factors vary by age will also be important for tailoring interventions to encourage healthy ageing at different points of the life course. As such, it is necessary to develop a strong multidisciplinary evidence base to gain a deeper understanding of the drivers of and the barriers to increased protein intake. Only through such an ambitious approach can an effective set of guidelines be developed to inform useful products to promote healthy ageing.

Planned Impact

The overall aim of the proposed work is to develop and disseminate a set of design rules for formulation of palatable higher-protein foods suitable for an ageing population. This research will have far-reaching impact across the following sectors:

Food and Drink Industry: This proposal has been developed with food industry stakeholders who have identified a significant market gap for high protein products to support healthy ageing. The stakeholders understand the need for multidisciplinary empirical information to inform new product development and reformulation with the ultimate aim to increase sales in this market area. The pre-competitive nature of this research means that the findings will be relevant across the food and drink industry and may also provide a roadmap for approaches to new product development and reformulation using other foods and ingredients. This research will lead to further collaborative funding opportunities for industry with academics and help to develop a network of academics and industry partners committed to developing effective nutrition for healthy ageing. Through our knowledge launch we will disseminate our main findings to key industry partners who are members of Campden BRI helping to maximise our impact.

The National Health Service (NHS): It is anticipated that the development of convenient new food products that are high in protein, palatable and cost effective will improve the protein status of older individuals. Increasing protein intake will help to support the maintenance of muscle size and strength and reduce the incidence of sarcopenia. Prevention of sarcopenia, particularly earlier in the ageing process would reduce the risk of falls, illness and injury. This would result in significant reductions in patient admissions and hospital care in the elderly and also result in less dependency on in-home carers. The reduction of falls alone would have important financial implications for NHS. It is estimated that falls cost the NHS over £2billion every year therefore significant cost reductions could be made through initiatives such as this that can help to support fall prevention in an ageing population.

The ageing population: Improving the choice of palatable, cost-effective protein-rich food will support individuals in achieving their daily recommended protein intakes which will help to maintain good health across the life-course. Improvements in quality of life through improved functional activity, prolonged independence, ability to maintain social interactions and enjoyment of food are all important outcomes of maintaining good health throughout the ageing process.

Training of Postdoctoral Research Associates: This work takes a novel multidisciplinary approach towards addressing an overarching scientific challenge of relevance to the food and drink industry. This project will therefore offer experience and training across a range of techniques and discipline areas therefore building the skills and capacity of the next generation of healthy ageing researchers. The opportunities to engage with the food industry stakeholders involved in this project will also support future collaborations, knowledge transfer with industry and raise awareness of potential career opportunities in the food and drink industry.
 
Description Protein for life has enabled us to better understand the barriers and opportunities to increase protein intake in the diet of older adults. Specifically we have identified that breakfast and between meal snacks are important opportunities to increase overall daily protein intake and the importance of cost and taste in influencing purchasing decisions. We have identified how food preferences and choice change with age and how the value of different foods altering through the ageing process. From a food industry perspective, the project has helped to identify opportunities for new product development and reformulation of higher protein products for an ageing population. The project has also highlighted the technological barriers and constraints relating to the inclusion of higher amounts of protein (from a variety of sources) into standard food products whilst maintaining taste and texture.
Exploitation Route The findings of this study will help to inform the food industry on new product development and reformulation of higher protein products for an ageing population. It is hoped that the findings may be used to develop educational tools and strategies to educate the public on the benefits of increased protein intake for healthy ageing. The findings will also help academics to develop effective intervention studies to further investigate the role of protein in skeletal muscle health and healthy ageing.
Sectors Agriculture, Food and Drink,Education,Healthcare,Pharmaceuticals and Medical Biotechnology

URL http://www.proteinforlife.co.uk
 
Description The findings of the Protein for Life project were used to develop a White Paper in collaboration with the Knowledge Transfer Network. The White Paper is entitled 'Protein for Life: A framework for action' and was presented at a Parliamentary and Scientific Committee meeting in 2019.
First Year Of Impact 2019
Sector Agriculture, Food and Drink,Government, Democracy and Justice
Impact Types Policy & public services

 
Description Presentation to Parliamentary and Science Committee in the House of Commons on Protein for healthy ageing by Prof Emma Stevenson
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Arthritis Research/MRC
Amount £120,000 (GBP)
Organisation Centre for Integrated research into Musculoskeletal Ageing 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2019 
End 08/2023
 
Description Centre for integrated research into musculosceletal ageing
Amount £120,000 (GBP)
Organisation Versus Arthritis 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2018 
End 08/2022
 
Description Centre for integrated research into musculosceletal ageing
Amount £120,000 (GBP)
Organisation Versus Arthritis 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2019 
End 08/2022
 
Description Collaboration with Dunbia (Dawn Meats) on work package 2 
Organisation Dunbia
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The project has contributed to analysis and interpretation of data provided by dawn meats. The findings are pre-competitive but will be used by Dawn Meats for commercial purposes.
Collaborator Contribution Dawn meats have supplied consumer data which assesses the robustness of findings from focus groups in work package two.
Impact Data was produced for work package two where ~ 100 consumers responded to 15 questions based on findings from focus groups. Output is validation of the themes found in work package one.
Start Year 2018
 
Description All Party Parliamentary Group - The Parliament and Science Committee meeting on Protein 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact All Party Parliamentary Group - The Parliament and Science Committee meeting co-organised by Prof Bernard Corfe on protein intake - included data from Protein for Life
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Appearance on Bristol Ageing Better radio programme on Ujima radio 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Charlotte Buckley appeared on the Bristol Ageing Better radio programme on Ujima radio (a local radio station in Bristol) discussing the project on 5th February.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Article in food navigator 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Healthy ageing article about the NPD side of the protein for life project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.foodnavigator.com/Article/2018/02/22/Healthy-ageing-healthy-business-Protein-for-Life-se...
 
Description Blog article 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A blog article to highlight the importance of protein intake. Published by the Rowett Institute, University of Aberdeen.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://rowettinstitute.blogspot.com/2018/12/eating-biscuits-in-name-of-science.html
 
Description Blog article in FoodSpark.com 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact An article was written in Food spark outlining the industry toolkit for delivering high-protein products to older adults created by the protein for life project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.foodspark.com/Health-Lifestyle/An-industry-toolkit-for-delivering-high-protein-products-...
 
Description Campden BRI Member Interest Group for Nutrition and Health 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Presented the Protein for Life project to about 35 food industry representatives. Explaining why the project had be set up and how industry could use the output.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Campden BRI Plant-based protein ingredients and foods seminar - keynote presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Keynote presentation at Campden BRI event on plant-based protein ingredients and foods focussed on understanding the issues around developing plant-based food products and provide solutions to the challenges of using plant-based protein. This was an Industry focussed event and was an opportunity to highlight the key findings from Protein for Life and promoted the importance of industry / academia collaborations and the benefits of a multidisciplinary approach to a public health issue.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.campdenbri.co.uk/pr/plant-based-protein.php
 
Description Emma stevenson Article in food spark 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Emma Stevenson produced an article for Food spark magazine. - Age before beauty: making protein products palatable for older people
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.foodspark.com/Health-Lifestyle/Age-before-beauty-making-protein-products-palatable-for-o...
 
Description Food Matters Live 2019 Presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Food Matters Live in November 2019 - London on Protein intake and appetite in ageing adults: latest insight delivered by Prof Alex Johnstone
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Food protein vision industry conference- Amsterdam. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Presentation by Emma Stevenson, outlining the project to industry.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://foodproteinvision.com
 
Description Industry Strategy Challenge Fund Deep Dive Workshop - Nutrition and Health for an Ageing Society 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact invitation to attend a UKRI ran Deep Dive Workshop on the Industry Strategy Challenge Fund Nutrition and Health for an Ageing Society bid based on a successful EOI that was written by Prof Stevenson in collaboration with Protein for life Industry Partner Sainsbury's PLC to further develop the Protein for Life research area
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Interactions with HC-One care home chefs 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Anthony watson outlined the project and discussed the need for new innovative products for an ageing population with chefs from a leading care home provider
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Invited presentation - Moy Park 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Invited presentation to Moy Park June 2019 - On behalf of the Team In Belfast about 100 food sector employees - presentation delivered by Prof Alex Johnstone
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Presentation at AgeingFit 2020 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Presentation at AgeingFit 2020 on Protein for Life by Dr Bernard Corfe -
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
URL https://www.ageingfit-event.com/2020-conference-programme
 
Description Presentation at Food Matters Live by Emma Stevenson 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Presentation at Food Matters Live by Emma Stevenson. Outlining the P4L project and how industry and academics can use the output.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Presentation at International Sport and Exercise Nutrition Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation of the study aims and objectives and main outputs. Resulted in discussion and potential further collaboration with international practitioners and researchers in the field.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Presentation at SSIB 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation my Professor Jeff Brunstrom entitled Body composition is predicted by subtle yet measurable differences in 'protein valuation'

Protein is more satiating than carbohydrate and fat. However, it remains unclear whether macronutrients are equally valued. To explore this proposition, participants (N= 92) assessed 25 foods in 300 binary-choice trials. Total calorie content predicted choice. However, calorie-for-calorie, protein and carbohydrate influenced choice to a greater extent than fat (F(2,246)= 17.26, p< .001), suggesting an underlying difference in macronutrient 'valuation.' Importantly, participants varied considerably, and these differences were preserved in a second test session, one week later (week 1 vs week 2; protein r= .83, p< .001; carbohydrate, r= .90, p<.001; fat r= .90, p< .001). Many adults experience a loss of muscle mass as they age, and acute protein supplementation is known to improve muscle function. Therefore, we reasoned that fat-free mass might be predicted by protein valuation. In a second study we incorporated assessments of expected satiety and healthiness, as simultaneous predictors of choice. In this older sample (N= 91, range 40-85 y), protein was a better predictor (more valued) of choice than fat or carbohydrate (F(2,270)= 8.95, p< .001), and this remained the case after controlling for the weighting placed on expected satiety and healthiness (F(2,270)= 6.66, p=.002). As hypothesized (pre-registered), variation in this protein valuation positively predicted fat-free mass (ß = 0.004, p<.001), after controlling for age, gender, and habitual protein consumption. By contrast, carbohydrate valuation was a negative (ß= -.0.0003, p<.001) predictor. Together, these findings suggest that humans place a different value on calories derived from protein, carbohydrate, and fat, and that the tendency to value protein might offer protection from sarcopenia.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.ssib.org/2018/
 
Description Presentation at Scottish Food and Drink Federation event held by INTERFACE 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact A presentation about Protein for Life with industry (particularly SME's) and policy makers in Scotland around foods for healthy ageing
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://interface-online.org.uk/
 
Description Presentation by Dr Liz Williams at Vitafoods, Geneva. May 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact The presentation was titled Nutritional Approaches to support healthy ageing: Protein for Life project. The talk was given in an education session on Healthy ageing with most of the audience coming from the Food Industry. The presentation generated lots of discussion and resulted in a useful knowledge exchange with protein food suppliers from the Netherlands.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.vitafoods.eu.com/en/exhibiting/Sales-Brochure-2018.html
 
Description Presentation to Nutrition & Health Members Interest Group, Campden BRI 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Nutrition & Health Members Interest Group, Campden BRI, 2nd Oct 2019 presented by Dr Liz Williams
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Presentation to Nutrition & Health Members Interest Group, Campden BRI 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Nutrition & Health Members Interest Group, Campden BRI, 8tH Oct 2019 by Professor Jeff Brunstrom
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Presentation to Tesco senior innovation committee on protein for life 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Presented the findings of Protein for Life to the Tesco Senior Innovation Committee at a Healthy Ageing Workshop organised by Samworth Brothers (Kerry Whiteside) who are P4L industry stakeholder partners. This was to discuss product innovation for healthy ageing over the next 5-10 years.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Presentation to the Human Nutrition Research Center PI seminar. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Presentation of the Protein for Life methods at an academic meeting at Newcastle University
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Protein for Life Launch event. Hosted by Campden BRI 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact The Protein for Life launch day was hosted by Campden BRI. The purpose was to introduce the project to commercial stakeholders and the wider community.

Lorna BBSRC - Overview of the sand pit
• Partnership building best in a sandpit environment because it brings everyone together.
• Help the sector respond to global food security threats
• Support production of nutritious food and drink
• Enable uptake of innovation and new tech
• Generating enterprise
• Connect and collaborate
• Fund spinouts from universities
• Lead and partner priming partnerships
• Through collaborative research
• Through collaborating training
• People and knowledge exchange
Priming food partnerships
• Interdisciplinary research to understand challenges. - Precompetitive with academics and commerce
o Open, collaborative and multidisciplinary
o Key note speakers addressing research topics
o Challenge driven networking
BBSRC hoping to host an event in early 2018 -
o Open, collaborative and interdisciplinary
o Keynote speakers addressing research topics
o Research highlights from DRINC and Priming Food Partnerships initiatives
o Challenge driven networking
o Any ideas on event format should be sent to foodpartnering@bbsrc.ac.uk
Intro by Emma Stevenson
Overview of the project
• Number of adults aged 65+ projected to rise
• 50% do not consume enough protein.
o Industry are well placed to have a large influence on this
Key questions and outcomes of the project
• How do we maintain a healthy protein intake?
• Multi-disciplinary evidence base around protein intake and decision making in older adults
• Identify academic and industry design constraints
• Use outcomes to set design rules for a high protein product,
• Make and test at least one exemplar product

WP1 Mark Green
• Using national diet and nutrition survey to assess how people engage with protein and trends of consumption. Identify areas where consumers do not engage with protein.
o Protein type and quality
o Protein per kg of BW
o Protein intake related to % of energy expenditure.
• Consumer data from large industry leaders
• Two smaller projects from Sheffield which will provide detailed 3-day food diaries
• Data separated into three groups 3 age groups 40-55, 57-69, 70+

WP2 Emma Stevenson
• Focus groups to explore reasons for consumption and non-consumption of protein
o Assessing psychological and behavioural drivers for food choice and preferences.
? Cost
? Nutritional knowledge
? Health beliefs

• Sample of community dwelling adults from 3 age groups 40-55, 57-69, 70+
o Male and female participants
o Engaged from different socioeconomic groups
• Use of a food frequency questionnaire to link frequency and type of protein sources.
o Industry partners and academics invited to give advice on other outcomes, which could be assessed.

WP3 Jeff Brunstrom
Imperial quantitative focus on choice architecture of protein intake. Using methods and outcomes from the Nudge-it project.
• Physiological theories behind food choice
• 18 snack foods including predictors of choice
• Replicate previous work and include predictors to assess choice
• Healthy volunteers in phase 1
• Phase 2 age related changes and map changes in psychological changes in food choice
o Technique to identify individual differences in preference of protein
o A broader understanding of choices
o Set of recommendations to lead into WP5
There could be many factors such as time of day which should be assessed- not enough time.

WP4 Alex Johnstone
To identify design constraints for academic and industry partners. Create an informative report for industry and academia.
• What's the best format for the recommendations?
• Where is best to publish
• How to collect and collate information
Key themes for food choice have been added to a questionnaire that were handed out and collated at the launch event

WP5 Bernard Corfe
Integrate WP1-4 to develop a design brief for an exemplar product
• Using industry data to gain industry insight
• Assess fundamentals about the product
o Types of products
o Types of protein
o Optimisation of BCAA which sits will in the sustainability framework
o Consider implications of preparation and storage
• Assess which existing products can be modified to include more protein

WP6 Emma
Production of exemplar products and assessments by the consumer
• Exemplar products
• Formulate and trial products based on work packages 1-5
• Number of products depends on WP1-5 outcomes
• Involvement from all industry partners required
• Anticipated 3 exemplar products - lead by industry
o Technical and commercial expertise
? Mouth feel
? Texture
? Product stability
? Mixing, thickening techs etc.
Consumer testing
? Using the exemplar products
? At least 50 participants at each site Aberdeen, Newcastle, Sheffield and Bristol.
? 3 defined groups40-55, 57-69, 70+
? Need to consider what the comparison products are
Project designed to test if the design rules work. Using as a feedback loop to identify changes which need to be made to the framework.

WP7 dissemination
• How do we disseminate the info
• Key outcomes of the work
• Toolkit for key holder agreement
• Most important part to industry- key nutrition messages
• Members invited to give feedback all the way through the project and to the final report.

Round table discussions
Q1 - What do you perceive are the merits of a multi-disciplinary academic approach and what is the role of basic science in the development of acceptable novel products?
• Avoiding duplication and replication
• Multidisciplinary team and research
• Communicating is the key
• Cost risk is shared
• Cross country and continent collaboration enables globalisation.
• Better use of resources by taking the strengths across teams and not needing all teams to have all skill
• Outcomes have more gravitas with consumers than just food industry alone
• Avoids market driven behaviour which may undermine consumer confidence in the sector.
• Good networking capabilities
• Good breadth of disciplines involved in a project helps to avoid pitfalls
• Engagement past academies
• Multidisciplinary approach - "it's good to see different and sometimes conflicting opinions" in the same room. Shows knowledge gaps - which is helpful.

Role of basic science
• Underpins product development
• Provides understanding behind why some things work and some things don't
• Translation
• Communication to the consumer
• Aids credibility of companies
• Supports evidence bases
• Link scientific concepts to products with real value
• Assess consumer trends, understanding how to maintain them and build them
• Translation - Catalyst Useful to help focus direction of internal applied projects priorities
• Recognition that investment at the point of product conception can minimise long-term risk

Q2 - What are the barriers and constraints to designing new products and what are the pathways used in industry design processes?
• Money
• Cost per unit
? Willingness of the consumer to pay more for higher quality
• Nutrient density vs cost
• Cost of updating systems and machinery
• Consumer demand
• Market research
• Processing stability
• Shelf stability
• Consumer expectations of a brand
• Regulatory
• ingredients sourcing
• quality
• Variability
PATHWAYS
• How does what we have learnt apply with a company's capital resources, skillset and market channel reach.
• Can we command a change that justifies investments in capital expenditure?
• Can we convince retailers and consumers to purchase?

Q3 - Academics need to demonstrate impact when working with the food industry. How can they do this? What does impact mean to the food industry?
• Useful information with translatable outcomes.
• Dissemination and communication
• Delivery of manufacturing to health claim
• Clear and consistent outputs
o Outputs which challenge current status quo of science and media
• Product development guidelines based on rational science.
• UK based science to support UK agenda on nutrition and healthy ageing.
• Gaining contracts
• Getting a product on shelf
• Research collaboration - multiple follow on
• Patents
• Sales

Q4 - Are there other industry challenges that Protein4Life team might be well suited to address?
• Novel consumer research methods
• Sugar reduction
• Technical
• Health
• Change of behaviour
• Food chain and consumer food waste
• Consumer education around proteins including challenging current legislative restrictions on health claims.
• Understand which channels consumers would find a trustworthy source of nutritional info on proteins.

Sum up- Simon Pension
Three key outcomes of the day
1- Educate the public that protein is an essential part of the diet!
2- Assess why consumers make the choices they do
3- Industry- use info to make better products
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.campdenbri.co.uk/protein-for-life.php
 
Description Protein for life presentation at the BDA 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation of the headline protein for life findings to the British Dietitian Association
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Publication of the Protein for life project website 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact A project website has been published at www.proteinforlife.co.uk. The website is used to outline the purpose of the project and publish work package output.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018
URL http://www.proteinforlife.co.uk
 
Description Rank prize fund symposium presentation - Malnutrition across the life-course 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentation on the current protein for life findings by Anthony Watson
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Two presentations at Food Matters Live 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Two talks delivered at Food Matters Live 2018 focussed on Protein for Life and the project aims, objectives and outcomes.
Presentation 1 - 'Fit for the Future' Seminar
Presentation 2 - 'Developing the market for sustainable and alternative proteins'

Both presentations stimulated discussions with health professionals (e.g. dieticians) and representatives from the food industry. Following this event, Prof Stevenson has been invited to present the Protein for Life study to Kerry Foods in Ireland with the aim to discuss further research and funding opportunities in the area of protein and healthy ageing.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.foodmatterslive.com/visit/2018-schedule
 
Description Workshop - Why do we like the foods we like? 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Seminar at the British Science Festival 2017. Delivered by Jeff Brunstrom.

The behaviour of eating is fundamental to health as it determines the amount of energy and types of nutrients that are brought into the body. In this session chaired by Martin Yeomans, Jeff Brunstrom and Lucy Chambers it was discussed how our eating behaviours are learnt from life experiences that start as early as in the womb and continue throughout life. Methods form the protein for life project were discussed.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.britishsciencefestival.org/event/why-do-we-like-the-foods-we-like/
 
Description presentation By Gael Delamare at JTIC. 7th and 8th of November in Paris. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Campden BRI has been approached by someone organising a session at the JTIC (Journées Techniques des Industries Céréalières) in Paris in November. The aim is to present in front of people from academia and from the industry on case studies and how we can increase the protein content of baked goods using plants.
The conference being held in French, GaeI Delamare from Campden BRI will be presenting

The presentation will be "Increasing the protein content of baked goods with plants" ("Augmentation de la teneur en protéines des produits boulangers à l'aide des plantes" in French).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.jtic.eu
 
Description radio interview on health benefits of protein - Prof Emma Stevenson 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact short interview on the benefits of protein and mention of Protein for Life project
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019