THE FUTURE COMPOSITES MANUFACTURING HUB

Lead Research Organisation: University of Nottingham
Department Name: Faculty of Engineering

Abstract

Advanced composite materials consist of reinforcement fibres, usually carbon or glass, embedded within a matrix, usually a polymer, providing a structural material. They are very attractive to a number of user sectors, in particular transportation due to their combination of low weight and excellent material properties which can be tailored to specific applications. Components are typically manufactured either by depositing fibres into a mould and then infusing with resin (liquid moulding) or by forming and consolidation of pre-impregnated fibres (prepreg processing).

The current UK composites sector has a value of £1.5 billion and is projected to grow to over £4 billion by 2020, and to between £6 billion and £12 billion by 2030. This range depends on the ability of the industry to deliver structures at required volumes and quality levels demanded by its target applications. Much of this potential growth is associated with next generation single-aisle aircraft, light-weighting of vehicles to reduce fuel consumption, and large, lightweight and durable structures for renewable energy and civil infrastructure. The benefits of lightweight composites are clear, and growth in their use would have a significant impact on both the UK's climate change and infrastructure targets, in addition to a direct impact on the economy through jobs and exports. However the challenges that must be overcome to achieve this growth are significant. For example, BMW currently manufacture around 20,000 i3 vehicles per year with significant composites content. To replace mass produced vehicles this production volume would need to increase by up to 100-times. Airbus and Boeing each produce around 10 aircraft per month (A350 and 787 respectively) with high proportions of composite materials. The next generation single aisle aircraft are likely to require volumes of 60 per month. Production costs are high relative to those associated with other materials, and will need to reduce by an ordermagnitude to enable such growth levels.

The Future Composites Manufacturing Hub will enable a step change in manufacturing with advanced polymer composite materials. The Hub will be led by the University of Nottingham and University of Bristol; with initial research Spokes at Cranfield, Imperial College, Manchester and Southampton; Innovation Spokes at the National Composites Centre (NCC), Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre (AMRC), Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC) and Warwick Manufacturing Group (WMG); and backed by 18 leading companies from the composites sector. Between the Hub, Spokes and industrial partners we will offer a minimum of £12.7 million in additional support to deliver our objectives. Building on the success of the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Composites (CIMComp), the Hub will drive the development of automated manufacturing technologies that deliver components and structures for demanding applications, particularly in the aerospace, transportation, construction and energy sectors. Over a seven year period, the Hub will underpin the growth potential of the sector, by developing the underlying processing science and technology to enable Moore's law for composites: a doubling in production capability every two years.

To achieve our vision we will address a number of research priorities, identified in collaboration with industry partners and the broader community, including: high rate deposition and rapid processing technologies; design for manufacture via validated simulation; manufacturing for multifunctional composites and integrated structures; inspection and in-process evaluation; recycling and re-use. Matching these priorities with UK capability, we have identified the following Grand Challenges, around which we will conduct a series of Feasibility Studies and Core Projects:
-Enhance process robustness via understanding of process science
-Develop high rate processing technologies for high quality structures

Planned Impact

There are numerous beneficiaries outside the six academic groups involved. The 18 initial industrial partners (OEMs, Tier 1 Suppliers and SMEs) and four HVM Catapult Centres (NCC, AMRC, MTC and WMG) who are financially supporting the Hub to the tune of £9M will benefit directly from the research outcomes through close interaction at project level, by representation on the Advisory Board, and by frequent engagement with the Hub's Business Development staff and Platform Fellows. This interface allows industry the best opportunity to support the research and advise on direction in order to best serve industry's productivity requirements for the medium to long term. The Hub will offer the understanding and fundamental technology developments necessary to deliver growth in established sectors, develop technologies and supply chains for increased volumes, and diversify to take advantage of emerging sectors. It will feed into the relevant HVM Catapult Centres, providing a rapid route to exploitation for UK industry. In particular, £1.3M funding from the NCC for a Technology Accelerator Fund will support the transfer and development of Hub technologies into the NCC with a strong UK industry involvement.

The wider composites manufacturing community will benefit by regular research updates via newsfeeds on our website, participation in national and international shows and events, and Open Days and sponsored conferences organised by the Hub. We will have a strong focus on ensuring cross-sector involvement: manufacturing advances resulting from the research will balance generic and process specific outcomes, ensuring benefits across a broad range of sectors. Many applications will offer opportunities for weight saving leading to, for example, significant improvements in performance and reduction in emissions in transportation, offering major benefits to society. Other societal benefits will include the development of recycling and re-use technologies to process waste and endf-life components.

The Hub seeks to enable a step-change to the UK composites manufacturing industry by enhanced process robustness via understanding of process science and novel process technology developments. This will greatly enhance efficiency, quality and productivity in composites manufacturing technologies, therefore opening up a broad range of applications for advanced composites. This will assist UK industry to achieve the upper estimate of composites sector growth to £12 billion by 2030. All academic partners have an excellent track record of publication in high impact factor journals and of achieving real impact with industry, ensuring rapid take up of our ideas alongside a high standing within the international academic community. The training programme developed by the Hub's Industrial Doctorate Centre for its community of researchers will be extended to staff from key industrial partners. In addition new companies will be recruited as partners in the development of our research programme and as hosts for future EngD students. Our research students and staff will have opportunities to undertake both international academic and UK industrial placements, to support their personal development and to facilitate knowledge exchange. In this way the Hub will act as a focus for training of a new generation of composites engineers and will enhance the UK skills base in the vitally important Composites Manufacturing sector.

Organisations

 
Description Since January 2017, the Hub has funded 10 Feasibility Studies and 3 Core Projects. Below is a list of key findings for each

Core Projects (Still Active)

Project 1: New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures
• Numerical framework for multi-objective optimisation of fibre reinforcements
• Novel meshing technique which will be published as an open-source code
• Novel multiaxial preforming concepts have been demonstrated. New textile machinery will be developed based on these concepts.

Project 2: Manufacturing Multifunctional Composites
• The process for manufacturing carbon aeogel-reinforced structural power devices has been scaled up, enabling batch production of laminates to be made with a higher carbon aerogel content than had previously been achieved.
• Trials involving direct printing of polylactic acid (PLA) to mask carefully selected regions of dry carbon fabric prior to the carbon aerogel manufacturing process have demonstrated that we can create internal domains that can conform to a curved tool.
• Electrochemical deposition has been used to coat active elements onto the carbon aerogel to futher enhance the electrochemical performance. Preliminary studies have been performed to optimise the deposition conditions to achieve the maximum electrochemical performance.
• Two suitable separator materials: spread glass fabric and a non-woven ceramic reinforced polyester, have been selected and aquired. Small scale multifunctional devices using these separators have been made and tested electrochemically, demonstrating energy and power performance (1.4 Wh/kg and 1.1 kW/kg) exceeding the original aspirations.
• Conceptual designs have been developed for two structural supercapacitor aircraft door frames to demonstrate the capabilities to manufacture (a) curved components and (b) components having continuity of the load transfer between monofunctional and multifunctional zones.
• A finite element model of the multifunctional fabric-reinforced composites has been developed. The model realistically represents the internal architecture of the composite through consolidation process modelling.
• Combined experimental and computational studies have demonstrated complex intra-yarn nesting of electrode and glass fabric plies to be a key microstructural feature of these composites, which arises during their consolidation. The increased nesting may enhance their delamination resistance as well as power density of these hybrid composites.


Project 3: Technologies Framework for Automated DFP
Too early to report


Feasibility Studies :
Project 1: Microwave (MW) heating through embedded slotted coaxial cables for composites manufacturing (M-Cable)

Key Findings
• Slotted cables did not produce a uniform temperature distribution in the composite: The combinations tried in the feasibility study resulted in temperature variations higher than 15°C. This does not mean that an optimised distribution of slotted cables could not result in an even temperature profile
• A fractal antenna was manufactured on a PCB board and slotted in a ceramic tool. The resulting temperature distribution of cured laminates was within 10°C
• The laminates manufactured using MW heating had the same glass transition temperature to laminates manufactured using conventional oven
• The heating rates achieved using MW heating were between 7°C/min - 9°C/min. This is almost double to the 4°C/min achieved using conventional oven

Evidence
• The potential for faster curing of composites has been shown compared to current manufacturing processes, without loss of quality. This means faster production rates and reduction of resources (energy and labour)

Project 2: Layer by layer curing

Key Findings
The main outcomes of the project are
? Simulation and experimental demonstration showed that the new process proposed is feasible.
? Manufacturing of thick and ultra-thick laminates can be carried out at a fraction of the time required in conventional processing. The cure stage is accelerated by 50% and the overall process acceleration implied is 75%.
? The LbL Process allows sufficient compaction and removal of porosity
? Partial cure at the interface can be controlled to result in preservation of interlaminar properties
? New concept can operate in currently inaccessible regions of the processing landscape in terms of thickness, cure time and temperature overshoot

Evidence
This work has demonstrated that it is possible to manufacture composite laminates by placing and partially curing sublaminates sequentially. This allows the manufacturing of thick structures to be carried out significantly faster compared to current processes.
The main challenge addressed was to find an optimal compromise between accelerating the process and preserving the adherence of adjacent layers. This was achieved through LbL curing study by the development and application of a dedicated simulation methodology for the process and the characterisation of interfacial behaviour as a function of processing parameters and was demonstrated at lab level through process trials.

Project 3: Can a composite forming limit diagram be constructed?

Key Findings
The project aims to understand how composite fabric can be formed without forming wrinkles. We have been able to develop a technique to measure wrinkle formation effectively while forming, which will form the basis of a tool to understand how to avoid these defects.
Objective 1 - Use existing measurements of wrinkle formation in woven and NCF fabrics to develop a preliminary forming limit diagram; The project has successfully developed measurement techniques in order to allow development of a preliminary forming limit diagram. Difficulties in identifying appropriate failure criteria highlight the need for a better micromechanical model of wrinkling to inform the forming limit diagram development. A process-specific forming limit diagram has been produced, which can form the basis for a proposed hybrid experimental and modelling approach to FLD development.
Objective 2 - Extend the range of test configurations to explore the generality of the derived forming limit diagrams; Only preliminary work has been done in this area, due to the challenges of developing the forming limit diagram. However the FE model has successfully been applied to other test configurations, albeit without validation.
Objective 3 - Examine the feasibility of using a range of canonical finite element calculations to interpolate and extrapolate the forming limit diagram from a limited set of tests; This objective has not been met, with the focus of research remaining on the first objective.
Objective 4 - Use the results to inform a full-scale proposal which will develop the concept of forming limit diagrams to include a wider range of materials and forming situations; The feasibility study has successfully identified an experimental route to forming limit diagram measurements, highlighting deficiencies in our understanding of wrinkling which need to be tackled to develop the concept further. Hence this key objective, of informing a full-scale proposal, has been met.

Project 4: Manufacturing Thermoplastic Fibre Metal Laminates (FML) by the In-Situ Polymerisation Route

Key Findings
• Suitable surface treatment conditions were identified for the Al alloy sheets (10% NaOH treatment for 20 min, atmospheric plasma treatment with 2 mm/s scan speed, 1 scan and source(nozzle)-to-substrate distance 0.5 mm). Anodisation was done from an external agency.
• VARTM manufacturing of the TPC-FMLs was successfully carried out using Elium® liquid thermoplastic resin.
• Test samples were successfully extracted from the TPC-FMLs for mechanical testing without any debonding at the TPC-metal interface (except two laminates from last batch). Sample extraction was done via water jet cutting.
• Reference FRP and TPC-FMLs were characterised for their flexural and interlaminar shear strength properties. The measured properties were in comparable range with the published literatures.
• TPC-metal bond strength was measured with DCB test. Mode-I Interlaminar fracture toughness of the thermoplastic FML (Elium® resin/glass fibre and alkali treated metal interlayer) was found to be (~170%) higher than the reported value of epoxy based thermoset FML [8].

Evidence
Society: Once successfully validated and commercialised, the thermopalstic FML technology can bring significant positive impact on the society, bringing in more recyclable, repairable products. This work has only been initiated in this Feasibility study.
Economy: This Feasibility study clearly showed that such FMLs have potential to be explored in industrial application. The thermoplastic FML technology was close TRL 3-4. A follow-up project was required to investigate the mechanical properties of the FMLs and identify the key advantages, such as drop weight impact resistance and thermoformability, to take it to higher TRL, which could not be done. This could lead to various low-cost, real life FML products beyond aerospace. In future, a bigger proposal will be submitted to EPSRC seeking funding to take this technology forward.
People: Dr Dimitrios Mamalis, PDRA of this Feasibility Study project, has been trained on FML manufacturing and he is actively participating in new project proposals where he can take this novel FML technology forward. One M.Eng student is now working on this FML technology and will be investigating some key properties.
Knowledge: After our first paper was published in 'Materials and Design' journal, there has been several invitations from conferences and workshops from UK as well as from other parts of Europe for presenting our work on FML. This work has clearly generated interest in the scientific community.

Project 5: Multi-step thermoforming of multi-cavity multi-axial advanced thermoplastic composite parts

Key Findings
A multi-cavity, multi-axial carbon-nylon 'ripple' geometry was formed that was free of forming induced defects such as wrinkling or de-cohesion of plies. Results strongly suggest that the tin interlayer successfully achieved the twin goals of both heating and lubricating the forming thermoplastic laminate. The tin was successfully expelled from the composite part after forming using a novel multi-step forming tool.

Evidence
The two Research Assistants and PhD student were trained in composites manufacturing technologies
Knowledge: Discussions are currently underway regarding patenting the process

Project 6: Acceleration of monomer transfer moulding using microwaves

Findings
• Electromagnetic (EM) heating confirmed as being able to act as the sole heat source in an in-situ polymerisation reaction for a composite part
• Dielectric measurements indicate a 6 cm penetration depth in this material (meaing a ~12 cm thick part could be cured)
• Extremely rapid heating is achieved (< 3 mins to reach 180 °C) and this temperature maintained throughout
• Microwave assisted pre-drying of glass fibres is extremely effective, resulting in an improved part (higher final molecular weight)
• Process options limited by the behaviour of the monomer - e.g. poor fill under vacuum related to surface tension/viscosity. Positive pressure filling preferred
• Heat loss profile different from conventional heating and more affected by the presence of the fibre.Control of the EM field was limited and requires optimisation

Project 7:Simulation of Forming 3D Curved Sandwich Panel

Findings
At this early stage the FE model appears to be accurately capturing the key manufacturing performance criteria within a model which can be analysed within viable run times.

Evidence
The impact at this stage is engagement with industrial partner, Gordon Murray Design, an influential and innovative company within the UK automotive sector.

Project 8:Active control of the RTM process under uncertainty using fast algorithms

Findings
The project achieved its two main goals. First, the feasibility study demonstrated, in virtual and lab experiments, that a novel Bayesian Inversion algorithm (BIA) can successfully estimate local permeability and porosity of a preform using in-process information. In particular, the algorithm was able to determine locations and shapes of defects in fibre preforms. It can be used for novel NDE and control systems.
Second, the project demonstrated that it is feasible for an Active Control System (ACS) based on the BIA to ensure that the RTM process satisfies one of the key requirements of the composite industry: to have repeatable production cycles.

Project 9:Affordable Thermoplastic Matrix CFC / Metallic Framework Structures Manufacture

Findings
Many concept for thermoplastic matrix and metallic hybrid structures have been identified. Taking a sports car fully body structure geometry and carrying out a loading study, novel structures suitable for high rate manufacturing have been proposed. These utilise combinations of pultruded tubular sections and folded thermoplastic 'organosheets'. The tubular parts are proposed to be joined using low cost metallic connectors. The concepts do not therefore require dedicated mould tooling for shaping the parts.
The following concepts are considered to offer the most potential for structural application and further investigation:

a. Metallic joint wrapping
b. Composite tube swaging
c. Metal joint interlocking with composite sections

Having demonstrated the feasibility of the framework assembly techniques and identified the type of equipment, which will be required to enable structures manufacturing, partners are being sought for an industrial collaborative proposal to demonstrate manufacturing of an automotive framework structure.


Project 10: Novel strain-based NDE for online inspection and prognostics of composite sub-structures with manufacturing induced defects
Findings
Fully integrated DIC and TSA; the key challenge was in collecting the data simultaneously. This was done by using lock-in processing for the DIC. Although the the technique was developed at UoS previously, the key challenge was deploying this on a realistic component.
The strain measurements from the DIC and the thermoelastic response, which is dependent on the local fibre orientations and fibre volume fcations have provided strong indication of identification of stiffness distribution and resin-rich volumes.
Initial demonstration of vibration based technique on panels.
Exploitation Route The Future Composites Manufacturing Research Hub, which started in January 2017, aims to build upon on the foundations of CIMComp, the previously funded EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Composites. This forms a key element in the UK's composites manufacturing R&D strategy and will drive the development of automated manufacturing technologies to deliver components and structures for demanding applications, having identified five research priority areas from the outcomes of CIMComp:
1. High rate deposition and rapid processing technologies
2. Design for manufacture via validated simulation
3. Manufacturing for multifunctional composites and integrated structures
4. Inspection and in-process evaluation
5. Recycling and re-use

Over the seven year period, the Hub will underpin the growth potential of the composites sector, developing the underlying processing science and technology to enhance manufacturing robustness.

The National Composites Centre has developed a Technology Pull-Through scheme to take successful research at TRL1-3 and evaluate to transfer suitably mature technologies from CIMComp into the National Composites Centre (NCC), an advanced composites research hub based in Bristol. The NCC use their capabilities to industrialise lab-based technologies and increase their palatability to potential commercial users. The programme runs on an open call process, issued annually; proposals are assessed and selected through the input of NCC technical experts, supported by the Knowledge Exchange Committee of the CIMComp Hub.
The following CIMComp projects have been piloted during the first round:

Braid winding - University of Manchester: A technology that combines braiding and filament winding combining beneficial properties from both capabilities
DiSenC - Cranfield University: linear and woven dielectric sensors that can be used for flow and cure monitoring respectively in liquid moulding processing carbon fibre thermosetting composites.
SimpleCure2 - University of Bristol: feasibility study of using a portable device that scans a material's fingerprint, defines a robust cure cycle and automatically programs the production equipment controller
Braiding Simulation - University of Bristol: Validated modelling capability for mapping local permeability in braided preforms

The next steps for the TPT programme includes the dissemination of completed projects and the kick-off of the 2019/20 projects.
The dissemination process may include the exploitation of technologies into trademarked brands, showcasing demonstrators and processes at engineering shows (i.e. JEC) and integrating the technology into industrial applications through CR&D / privately funded projects. As part of this dissemination process, the successful projects are advertised to the NCC's Tier 1&2 members at the monthly Research Committee meetings. This creates a seamless communication channel across the 'valley of death' between the academic innovators and the industrial users.
Sectors Aerospace, Defence and Marine,Education,Manufacturing, including Industrial Biotechology,Transport

URL http://www.cimcomp.ac.uk
 
Description UK Composites Leadership Forum
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
 
Description 2-D forming of low cost steered fibre laminates.
Amount £28,492 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/P021379/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2017 
End 09/2020
 
Description Achieving a Predictive Design for Manufacture Capability in Composites by Integrating Manufacturing Knowledge and Design Intent
Amount £101,082 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/R021597/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2018 
End 07/2019
 
Description Advanced Continuous Tow Shearing in 3D (ACTS3D): Advanced fibre placement technology for manufacturing defect-free complex 3D composite structures
Amount £518,156 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/R023247/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2018 
End 01/2021
 
Description EP/S017038/1 Certification for Design - Reshaping the testing pyramid
Amount £6,900,000 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/S017038/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2019 
End 12/2025
 
Description EPSRC Impact Accelerator Grant - University of Manchester and Axon Automotive
Amount £210,000 (GBP)
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2018 
End 01/2020
 
Description HEFCE Composites Curriculum Development project
Amount £400,000 (GBP)
Organisation NIHR/HEFCE Higher Education Fund for England 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2018 
End 01/2019
 
Description High Performance Discontinuous Fibre Composites (HiPerDiF)
Amount £1,036,426 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/P027393/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 12/2017 
End 12/2020
 
Description Horizon 2020 Multiscale Analysis of Airframe Structures and Quantification of Uncertainties System (MARQUESS)
Amount £591,000 (GBP)
Funding ID Project ID: 754581 
Organisation Clean Sky 
Sector Public
Country Belgium
Start 06/2017 
End 05/2020
 
Description Investigation of fine-scale flows in composites processing
Amount £938,435 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/S016996/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 02/2019 
End 01/2022
 
Description Low emission vehicle systems Integrated Delivery Programme 13 (IDP13)
Amount £1,637,086 (GBP)
Funding ID 103362 
Organisation Innovate UK 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2018 
End 02/2021
 
Description Novel Tow termination technology for high-quality AFP production of composite structures with blended ply drop-offs
Amount £101,114 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/P027288/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2017 
End 06/2019
 
Description SIMulation of new manufacturing PROcesses for Composite Structures (SIMPROCS)
Amount £1,115,704 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/P027350/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 05/2017 
End 04/2022
 
Description Structures 2025
Amount £1,200,000 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/R008787/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 12/2017 
End 11/2020
 
Description Student internship: Estimation of permeability of composite materials using efficient Bayesian inversion algorithms
Amount £2,000 (GBP)
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 06/2018 
End 08/2018
 
Description Acceleration of Monomer Transfer Moulding using microwaves 
Organisation University of Nottingham
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to the University of Nottingham for the six-month funded project 'Acceleration of Monomer Transfer Moulding using microwaves'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'High rate deposition and rapid processing technologies'. The project will develop a manufacturing process that will facilitate and accelerate the production of thermoplastic composites through the use of microwave (volumetric) heating. 3 days use of Vötsch oven at AMRC Additional personnel time on microwave polymerisation testing of matrix materials Additional personnel time on developing higher viscosity infusion mixture University of Edinburgh included in technical meetings and are providing materials to the project
Impact The project investigated the feasibility of using microwave heating to accelerate in-situ polymerisation sufficiently that monomer solutions could be used directly to make composite articles. The project successfully achieved the objective of establishing benefits of using microwave heating for (a) glass fibre pre-preparation and (b) the resultant quality of matrix polymers produced when in contact with glass fibre. It also met the objective of defining benefits that are related to the preparation of composites from a monomer pre-solution rather than a polymer resin precursor system. The project partially achieved the objective of producing small scale flat panel via microwave polymerisation (Instrumented domestic microwave) The project was successful in delivering a mould designed and built to account for requirements/restrictions of both Monomer Transfer Moulding (MTM) and Microwave Heating/Processing, taking into consideration any manufacturing limitations due to materials choice. In addition, it successfully delivered manufacturing parameters determined for successful small-scale component.The project was considered to have achieved a Limited success overall
Start Year 2018
 
Description Acceleration of Monomer Transfer Moulding using microwaves 
Organisation University of Sheffield
Department Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre (AMRC)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to the University of Nottingham for the six-month funded project 'Acceleration of Monomer Transfer Moulding using microwaves'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'High rate deposition and rapid processing technologies'. The project will develop a manufacturing process that will facilitate and accelerate the production of thermoplastic composites through the use of microwave (volumetric) heating. 3 days use of Vötsch oven at AMRC Additional personnel time on microwave polymerisation testing of matrix materials Additional personnel time on developing higher viscosity infusion mixture University of Edinburgh included in technical meetings and are providing materials to the project
Impact The project investigated the feasibility of using microwave heating to accelerate in-situ polymerisation sufficiently that monomer solutions could be used directly to make composite articles. The project successfully achieved the objective of establishing benefits of using microwave heating for (a) glass fibre pre-preparation and (b) the resultant quality of matrix polymers produced when in contact with glass fibre. It also met the objective of defining benefits that are related to the preparation of composites from a monomer pre-solution rather than a polymer resin precursor system. The project partially achieved the objective of producing small scale flat panel via microwave polymerisation (Instrumented domestic microwave) The project was successful in delivering a mould designed and built to account for requirements/restrictions of both Monomer Transfer Moulding (MTM) and Microwave Heating/Processing, taking into consideration any manufacturing limitations due to materials choice. In addition, it successfully delivered manufacturing parameters determined for successful small-scale component.The project was considered to have achieved a Limited success overall
Start Year 2018
 
Description Active control of the RTM process under uncertainty using fast algorithms 
Organisation ESI Group
Country France 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to the University of Nottingham for the six-month funded project Active control of the RTM process under uncertainty using fast algorithms'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Design for manufacture via validated simulation'.
Impact The project achieved two main goals. First, the feasibility study demonstrated, in virtual and lab experiments, that a novel Bayesian Inversion algorithm (BIA) can successfully estimate local permeability and porosity of a preform using in-process information. In particular, the algorithm was able to determine locations and shapes of defects in fibre preforms. This outcome is important for making non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of composites faster and more robust, which in turn can deliver more reliable and cheaper manufacturing of composites. The project also demonstrated feasibility of an Active Control System (ACS) based on the BIA to ensure that the RTM process satisfies one of the key requirements of the composite industry: to have repeatable production cycles.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Active control of the RTM process under uncertainty using fast algorithms 
Organisation LMAT Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to the University of Nottingham for the six-month funded project Active control of the RTM process under uncertainty using fast algorithms'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Design for manufacture via validated simulation'.
Impact The project achieved two main goals. First, the feasibility study demonstrated, in virtual and lab experiments, that a novel Bayesian Inversion algorithm (BIA) can successfully estimate local permeability and porosity of a preform using in-process information. In particular, the algorithm was able to determine locations and shapes of defects in fibre preforms. This outcome is important for making non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of composites faster and more robust, which in turn can deliver more reliable and cheaper manufacturing of composites. The project also demonstrated feasibility of an Active Control System (ACS) based on the BIA to ensure that the RTM process satisfies one of the key requirements of the composite industry: to have repeatable production cycles.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Active control of the RTM process under uncertainty using fast algorithms 
Organisation National Composites Centre (NCC)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to the University of Nottingham for the six-month funded project Active control of the RTM process under uncertainty using fast algorithms'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Design for manufacture via validated simulation'.
Impact The project achieved two main goals. First, the feasibility study demonstrated, in virtual and lab experiments, that a novel Bayesian Inversion algorithm (BIA) can successfully estimate local permeability and porosity of a preform using in-process information. In particular, the algorithm was able to determine locations and shapes of defects in fibre preforms. This outcome is important for making non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of composites faster and more robust, which in turn can deliver more reliable and cheaper manufacturing of composites. The project also demonstrated feasibility of an Active Control System (ACS) based on the BIA to ensure that the RTM process satisfies one of the key requirements of the composite industry: to have repeatable production cycles.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Active control of the RTM process under uncertainty using fast algorithms 
Organisation University of Nottingham
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to the University of Nottingham for the six-month funded project Active control of the RTM process under uncertainty using fast algorithms'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Design for manufacture via validated simulation'.
Impact The project achieved two main goals. First, the feasibility study demonstrated, in virtual and lab experiments, that a novel Bayesian Inversion algorithm (BIA) can successfully estimate local permeability and porosity of a preform using in-process information. In particular, the algorithm was able to determine locations and shapes of defects in fibre preforms. This outcome is important for making non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of composites faster and more robust, which in turn can deliver more reliable and cheaper manufacturing of composites. The project also demonstrated feasibility of an Active Control System (ACS) based on the BIA to ensure that the RTM process satisfies one of the key requirements of the composite industry: to have repeatable production cycles.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Can a composite forming limit diagram be constructed? 
Organisation Dassault Systemes UK Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to the University of Cambridge for the six-month funded project 'Can a composite forming limit diagram be constructed?'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Design for manufacture via validated simulation'. The aim of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility of developing a forming limit diagram for textile composites, capturing the limits imposed by defects such as macro-wrinkling, tow level buckling and yarn sliding. March 2018 - Hexcel supplied £2000 worth of material February 2019 - Hexcel supplied £3000 worth of material 2018-2019 - Hexcel and Dassault Systèmes provided £3000 worth of advice each
Impact A successful output has been that we have been able to develop a technique to measure wrinkle formation effectively while forming, which will form the basis of a tool to understand how to avoid these defects. The feasibility study has demonstrated that an experimental set-up using digital image correlation is able to provide data correlating fabric deformation with wrinkling. The strain measurements can be manipulated to find strains in critical directions, for example along the tows or in the direction of maximum compressive strain. For the NCF fabric considered, there does not appear to be a simple correlation between the observed strains and the onset of wrinkling. While the experimental work provides the tools to explore wrinkle development, meso-scale architecture-based FE modelling will be needed to guide a wrinkling criterion which can be used in conjunction with these measurements. .In summary the proposed hybrid approach, of using experimental characterisation in conjunction with a simple FE model, shows considerable promise as a way of defining the forming limits for composite fabrics. Further work is needed, particularly on extending the range of deformation processes and understanding better the link between changes in tow architecture and wrinkling. The key objectives of the project were to: 1. Use existing measurements of wrinkle formation in woven and NCF fabrics to develop a preliminary forming limit diagram; The project has successfully developed measurement techniques in order to allow development of a preliminary forming limit diagram. Difficulties in identifying appropriate failure criteria highlight the need for a better micromechanical model of wrinkling to inform the forming limit diagram development. A process-specific forming limit diagram has been produced, which can form the basis for a proposed hybrid experimental and modelling approach to FLD development. 2. Extend the range of test configurations to explore the generality of the derived forming limit diagrams; Only preliminary work has been done in this area, due to the challenges of developing the forming limit diagram. However the FE model has successfully been applied to other test configurations, albeit without validation. 3. Examine the feasibility of using a range of canonical finite element calculations to interpolate and extrapolate the forming limit diagram from a limited set of tests; This objective has not been met, with the focus of research remaining on the first objective 4. Use the results to inform a full-scale proposal which will develop the concept of forming limit diagrams to include a wider range of materials and forming situations. The feasibility study has successfully identified an experimental route to forming limit diagram measurements, highlighting deficiencies in our understanding of wrinkling which need to be tackled to develop the concept further. Hence this key objective, of informing a full-scale proposal, has been met. Dr Zhou and Mr Viisainen have benefited from training in research methods associated with experimental and modelling of composites.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Can a composite forming limit diagram be constructed? 
Organisation Hexcel Composites Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to the University of Cambridge for the six-month funded project 'Can a composite forming limit diagram be constructed?'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Design for manufacture via validated simulation'. The aim of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility of developing a forming limit diagram for textile composites, capturing the limits imposed by defects such as macro-wrinkling, tow level buckling and yarn sliding. March 2018 - Hexcel supplied £2000 worth of material February 2019 - Hexcel supplied £3000 worth of material 2018-2019 - Hexcel and Dassault Systèmes provided £3000 worth of advice each
Impact A successful output has been that we have been able to develop a technique to measure wrinkle formation effectively while forming, which will form the basis of a tool to understand how to avoid these defects. The feasibility study has demonstrated that an experimental set-up using digital image correlation is able to provide data correlating fabric deformation with wrinkling. The strain measurements can be manipulated to find strains in critical directions, for example along the tows or in the direction of maximum compressive strain. For the NCF fabric considered, there does not appear to be a simple correlation between the observed strains and the onset of wrinkling. While the experimental work provides the tools to explore wrinkle development, meso-scale architecture-based FE modelling will be needed to guide a wrinkling criterion which can be used in conjunction with these measurements. .In summary the proposed hybrid approach, of using experimental characterisation in conjunction with a simple FE model, shows considerable promise as a way of defining the forming limits for composite fabrics. Further work is needed, particularly on extending the range of deformation processes and understanding better the link between changes in tow architecture and wrinkling. The key objectives of the project were to: 1. Use existing measurements of wrinkle formation in woven and NCF fabrics to develop a preliminary forming limit diagram; The project has successfully developed measurement techniques in order to allow development of a preliminary forming limit diagram. Difficulties in identifying appropriate failure criteria highlight the need for a better micromechanical model of wrinkling to inform the forming limit diagram development. A process-specific forming limit diagram has been produced, which can form the basis for a proposed hybrid experimental and modelling approach to FLD development. 2. Extend the range of test configurations to explore the generality of the derived forming limit diagrams; Only preliminary work has been done in this area, due to the challenges of developing the forming limit diagram. However the FE model has successfully been applied to other test configurations, albeit without validation. 3. Examine the feasibility of using a range of canonical finite element calculations to interpolate and extrapolate the forming limit diagram from a limited set of tests; This objective has not been met, with the focus of research remaining on the first objective 4. Use the results to inform a full-scale proposal which will develop the concept of forming limit diagrams to include a wider range of materials and forming situations. The feasibility study has successfully identified an experimental route to forming limit diagram measurements, highlighting deficiencies in our understanding of wrinkling which need to be tackled to develop the concept further. Hence this key objective, of informing a full-scale proposal, has been met. Dr Zhou and Mr Viisainen have benefited from training in research methods associated with experimental and modelling of composites.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Can a composite forming limit diagram be constructed? 
Organisation University of Cambridge
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to the University of Cambridge for the six-month funded project 'Can a composite forming limit diagram be constructed?'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Design for manufacture via validated simulation'. The aim of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility of developing a forming limit diagram for textile composites, capturing the limits imposed by defects such as macro-wrinkling, tow level buckling and yarn sliding. March 2018 - Hexcel supplied £2000 worth of material February 2019 - Hexcel supplied £3000 worth of material 2018-2019 - Hexcel and Dassault Systèmes provided £3000 worth of advice each
Impact A successful output has been that we have been able to develop a technique to measure wrinkle formation effectively while forming, which will form the basis of a tool to understand how to avoid these defects. The feasibility study has demonstrated that an experimental set-up using digital image correlation is able to provide data correlating fabric deformation with wrinkling. The strain measurements can be manipulated to find strains in critical directions, for example along the tows or in the direction of maximum compressive strain. For the NCF fabric considered, there does not appear to be a simple correlation between the observed strains and the onset of wrinkling. While the experimental work provides the tools to explore wrinkle development, meso-scale architecture-based FE modelling will be needed to guide a wrinkling criterion which can be used in conjunction with these measurements. .In summary the proposed hybrid approach, of using experimental characterisation in conjunction with a simple FE model, shows considerable promise as a way of defining the forming limits for composite fabrics. Further work is needed, particularly on extending the range of deformation processes and understanding better the link between changes in tow architecture and wrinkling. The key objectives of the project were to: 1. Use existing measurements of wrinkle formation in woven and NCF fabrics to develop a preliminary forming limit diagram; The project has successfully developed measurement techniques in order to allow development of a preliminary forming limit diagram. Difficulties in identifying appropriate failure criteria highlight the need for a better micromechanical model of wrinkling to inform the forming limit diagram development. A process-specific forming limit diagram has been produced, which can form the basis for a proposed hybrid experimental and modelling approach to FLD development. 2. Extend the range of test configurations to explore the generality of the derived forming limit diagrams; Only preliminary work has been done in this area, due to the challenges of developing the forming limit diagram. However the FE model has successfully been applied to other test configurations, albeit without validation. 3. Examine the feasibility of using a range of canonical finite element calculations to interpolate and extrapolate the forming limit diagram from a limited set of tests; This objective has not been met, with the focus of research remaining on the first objective 4. Use the results to inform a full-scale proposal which will develop the concept of forming limit diagrams to include a wider range of materials and forming situations. The feasibility study has successfully identified an experimental route to forming limit diagram measurements, highlighting deficiencies in our understanding of wrinkling which need to be tackled to develop the concept further. Hence this key objective, of informing a full-scale proposal, has been met. Dr Zhou and Mr Viisainen have benefited from training in research methods associated with experimental and modelling of composites.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Can a composite forming limit diagram be constructed? 
Organisation University of Nottingham
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to the University of Cambridge for the six-month funded project 'Can a composite forming limit diagram be constructed?'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Design for manufacture via validated simulation'. The aim of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility of developing a forming limit diagram for textile composites, capturing the limits imposed by defects such as macro-wrinkling, tow level buckling and yarn sliding. March 2018 - Hexcel supplied £2000 worth of material February 2019 - Hexcel supplied £3000 worth of material 2018-2019 - Hexcel and Dassault Systèmes provided £3000 worth of advice each
Impact A successful output has been that we have been able to develop a technique to measure wrinkle formation effectively while forming, which will form the basis of a tool to understand how to avoid these defects. The feasibility study has demonstrated that an experimental set-up using digital image correlation is able to provide data correlating fabric deformation with wrinkling. The strain measurements can be manipulated to find strains in critical directions, for example along the tows or in the direction of maximum compressive strain. For the NCF fabric considered, there does not appear to be a simple correlation between the observed strains and the onset of wrinkling. While the experimental work provides the tools to explore wrinkle development, meso-scale architecture-based FE modelling will be needed to guide a wrinkling criterion which can be used in conjunction with these measurements. .In summary the proposed hybrid approach, of using experimental characterisation in conjunction with a simple FE model, shows considerable promise as a way of defining the forming limits for composite fabrics. Further work is needed, particularly on extending the range of deformation processes and understanding better the link between changes in tow architecture and wrinkling. The key objectives of the project were to: 1. Use existing measurements of wrinkle formation in woven and NCF fabrics to develop a preliminary forming limit diagram; The project has successfully developed measurement techniques in order to allow development of a preliminary forming limit diagram. Difficulties in identifying appropriate failure criteria highlight the need for a better micromechanical model of wrinkling to inform the forming limit diagram development. A process-specific forming limit diagram has been produced, which can form the basis for a proposed hybrid experimental and modelling approach to FLD development. 2. Extend the range of test configurations to explore the generality of the derived forming limit diagrams; Only preliminary work has been done in this area, due to the challenges of developing the forming limit diagram. However the FE model has successfully been applied to other test configurations, albeit without validation. 3. Examine the feasibility of using a range of canonical finite element calculations to interpolate and extrapolate the forming limit diagram from a limited set of tests; This objective has not been met, with the focus of research remaining on the first objective 4. Use the results to inform a full-scale proposal which will develop the concept of forming limit diagrams to include a wider range of materials and forming situations. The feasibility study has successfully identified an experimental route to forming limit diagram measurements, highlighting deficiencies in our understanding of wrinkling which need to be tackled to develop the concept further. Hence this key objective, of informing a full-scale proposal, has been met. Dr Zhou and Mr Viisainen have benefited from training in research methods associated with experimental and modelling of composites.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Layer by layer curing 
Organisation Airbus Group
Country France 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution ?
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'High rate deposition and rapid processing technologies'. The project aim is to establish the capability of producing composites by processing in a single layer by layer (LbL) step.
Impact This work has demonstrated that it is possible to manufacturing composite laminates by placing and partially curing sublaminates sequentially. This allows the manufacturing of thick structures to be carried out significantly faster compared to current processes. The main challenge addressed was to find an optimal compromise between accelerating the process and preserving the adherence of adjacent layers. This was achieved through LbL curing study by the development and application of a dedicated simulation methodology for the process and the characterisation of interfacial behaviour as a function of processing parameters and was demonstrated at lab level through process trials. Simulation and experimental demonstration showed that the new process proposed is feasible. ?
Start Year 2017
 
Description Layer by layer curing 
Organisation Coriolis Composites
Country France 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution ?
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'High rate deposition and rapid processing technologies'. The project aim is to establish the capability of producing composites by processing in a single layer by layer (LbL) step.
Impact This work has demonstrated that it is possible to manufacturing composite laminates by placing and partially curing sublaminates sequentially. This allows the manufacturing of thick structures to be carried out significantly faster compared to current processes. The main challenge addressed was to find an optimal compromise between accelerating the process and preserving the adherence of adjacent layers. This was achieved through LbL curing study by the development and application of a dedicated simulation methodology for the process and the characterisation of interfacial behaviour as a function of processing parameters and was demonstrated at lab level through process trials. Simulation and experimental demonstration showed that the new process proposed is feasible. ?
Start Year 2017
 
Description Layer by layer curing 
Organisation Cranfield University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution ?
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'High rate deposition and rapid processing technologies'. The project aim is to establish the capability of producing composites by processing in a single layer by layer (LbL) step.
Impact This work has demonstrated that it is possible to manufacturing composite laminates by placing and partially curing sublaminates sequentially. This allows the manufacturing of thick structures to be carried out significantly faster compared to current processes. The main challenge addressed was to find an optimal compromise between accelerating the process and preserving the adherence of adjacent layers. This was achieved through LbL curing study by the development and application of a dedicated simulation methodology for the process and the characterisation of interfacial behaviour as a function of processing parameters and was demonstrated at lab level through process trials. Simulation and experimental demonstration showed that the new process proposed is feasible. ?
Start Year 2017
 
Description Layer by layer curing 
Organisation Heraeus
Department Heraeus Noblelight Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution ?
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'High rate deposition and rapid processing technologies'. The project aim is to establish the capability of producing composites by processing in a single layer by layer (LbL) step.
Impact This work has demonstrated that it is possible to manufacturing composite laminates by placing and partially curing sublaminates sequentially. This allows the manufacturing of thick structures to be carried out significantly faster compared to current processes. The main challenge addressed was to find an optimal compromise between accelerating the process and preserving the adherence of adjacent layers. This was achieved through LbL curing study by the development and application of a dedicated simulation methodology for the process and the characterisation of interfacial behaviour as a function of processing parameters and was demonstrated at lab level through process trials. Simulation and experimental demonstration showed that the new process proposed is feasible. ?
Start Year 2017
 
Description Layer by layer curing 
Organisation National Composites Centre (NCC)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution ?
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'High rate deposition and rapid processing technologies'. The project aim is to establish the capability of producing composites by processing in a single layer by layer (LbL) step.
Impact This work has demonstrated that it is possible to manufacturing composite laminates by placing and partially curing sublaminates sequentially. This allows the manufacturing of thick structures to be carried out significantly faster compared to current processes. The main challenge addressed was to find an optimal compromise between accelerating the process and preserving the adherence of adjacent layers. This was achieved through LbL curing study by the development and application of a dedicated simulation methodology for the process and the characterisation of interfacial behaviour as a function of processing parameters and was demonstrated at lab level through process trials. Simulation and experimental demonstration showed that the new process proposed is feasible. ?
Start Year 2017
 
Description Layer by layer curing 
Organisation University of Bristol
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution ?
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'High rate deposition and rapid processing technologies'. The project aim is to establish the capability of producing composites by processing in a single layer by layer (LbL) step.
Impact This work has demonstrated that it is possible to manufacturing composite laminates by placing and partially curing sublaminates sequentially. This allows the manufacturing of thick structures to be carried out significantly faster compared to current processes. The main challenge addressed was to find an optimal compromise between accelerating the process and preserving the adherence of adjacent layers. This was achieved through LbL curing study by the development and application of a dedicated simulation methodology for the process and the characterisation of interfacial behaviour as a function of processing parameters and was demonstrated at lab level through process trials. Simulation and experimental demonstration showed that the new process proposed is feasible. ?
Start Year 2017
 
Description Manufacturing for structural applications of multifunctional composites 
Organisation Airbus Group
Country France 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £884,532 core project grant to the University of Bristol and Imperial College London for the three-year funded project 'Manufacturing for structural applications of multifunctional composites'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Manufacturing for multifunctional composites and integrated structures'. The overarching aim of the project is to investigate and address the design and manufacturing issues associated with multifunctional composites, addressing specifically the transport phenomena of heat and electrical conduction. • Support from Airbus on demonstrator: Airbus have provided electrical and mechanical requirements and will provide tooling for the frame. • Support from NCC on tufting of microbraids to create test samples for Caroline O'Keeffe; gift of materials. • Assistance from Stanelco on induction heating. • Supply of Textreme spread tow fabric to Imperial College London • Supply of Chomarat fabric to Imperial College London. • Supply of Isola Group spread glass fabric to Imperial College London Support from Airbus on demonstrator. Support from NCC on tufting of microbraids to create test samples for Caroline O'Keeffe; gift of materials. Assistance from Stanelco on induction heating.
Impact No outputs reported yet.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Manufacturing for structural applications of multifunctional composites 
Organisation BAE Systems
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £884,532 core project grant to the University of Bristol and Imperial College London for the three-year funded project 'Manufacturing for structural applications of multifunctional composites'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Manufacturing for multifunctional composites and integrated structures'. The overarching aim of the project is to investigate and address the design and manufacturing issues associated with multifunctional composites, addressing specifically the transport phenomena of heat and electrical conduction. • Support from Airbus on demonstrator: Airbus have provided electrical and mechanical requirements and will provide tooling for the frame. • Support from NCC on tufting of microbraids to create test samples for Caroline O'Keeffe; gift of materials. • Assistance from Stanelco on induction heating. • Supply of Textreme spread tow fabric to Imperial College London • Supply of Chomarat fabric to Imperial College London. • Supply of Isola Group spread glass fabric to Imperial College London Support from Airbus on demonstrator. Support from NCC on tufting of microbraids to create test samples for Caroline O'Keeffe; gift of materials. Assistance from Stanelco on induction heating.
Impact No outputs reported yet.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Manufacturing for structural applications of multifunctional composites 
Organisation Chomarat Group
Country France 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £884,532 core project grant to the University of Bristol and Imperial College London for the three-year funded project 'Manufacturing for structural applications of multifunctional composites'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Manufacturing for multifunctional composites and integrated structures'. The overarching aim of the project is to investigate and address the design and manufacturing issues associated with multifunctional composites, addressing specifically the transport phenomena of heat and electrical conduction. • Support from Airbus on demonstrator: Airbus have provided electrical and mechanical requirements and will provide tooling for the frame. • Support from NCC on tufting of microbraids to create test samples for Caroline O'Keeffe; gift of materials. • Assistance from Stanelco on induction heating. • Supply of Textreme spread tow fabric to Imperial College London • Supply of Chomarat fabric to Imperial College London. • Supply of Isola Group spread glass fabric to Imperial College London Support from Airbus on demonstrator. Support from NCC on tufting of microbraids to create test samples for Caroline O'Keeffe; gift of materials. Assistance from Stanelco on induction heating.
Impact No outputs reported yet.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Manufacturing for structural applications of multifunctional composites 
Organisation Hexcel Composites Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £884,532 core project grant to the University of Bristol and Imperial College London for the three-year funded project 'Manufacturing for structural applications of multifunctional composites'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Manufacturing for multifunctional composites and integrated structures'. The overarching aim of the project is to investigate and address the design and manufacturing issues associated with multifunctional composites, addressing specifically the transport phenomena of heat and electrical conduction. • Support from Airbus on demonstrator: Airbus have provided electrical and mechanical requirements and will provide tooling for the frame. • Support from NCC on tufting of microbraids to create test samples for Caroline O'Keeffe; gift of materials. • Assistance from Stanelco on induction heating. • Supply of Textreme spread tow fabric to Imperial College London • Supply of Chomarat fabric to Imperial College London. • Supply of Isola Group spread glass fabric to Imperial College London Support from Airbus on demonstrator. Support from NCC on tufting of microbraids to create test samples for Caroline O'Keeffe; gift of materials. Assistance from Stanelco on induction heating.
Impact No outputs reported yet.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Manufacturing for structural applications of multifunctional composites 
Organisation Imperial College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £884,532 core project grant to the University of Bristol and Imperial College London for the three-year funded project 'Manufacturing for structural applications of multifunctional composites'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Manufacturing for multifunctional composites and integrated structures'. The overarching aim of the project is to investigate and address the design and manufacturing issues associated with multifunctional composites, addressing specifically the transport phenomena of heat and electrical conduction. • Support from Airbus on demonstrator: Airbus have provided electrical and mechanical requirements and will provide tooling for the frame. • Support from NCC on tufting of microbraids to create test samples for Caroline O'Keeffe; gift of materials. • Assistance from Stanelco on induction heating. • Supply of Textreme spread tow fabric to Imperial College London • Supply of Chomarat fabric to Imperial College London. • Supply of Isola Group spread glass fabric to Imperial College London Support from Airbus on demonstrator. Support from NCC on tufting of microbraids to create test samples for Caroline O'Keeffe; gift of materials. Assistance from Stanelco on induction heating.
Impact No outputs reported yet.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Manufacturing for structural applications of multifunctional composites 
Organisation National Composites Centre (NCC)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £884,532 core project grant to the University of Bristol and Imperial College London for the three-year funded project 'Manufacturing for structural applications of multifunctional composites'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Manufacturing for multifunctional composites and integrated structures'. The overarching aim of the project is to investigate and address the design and manufacturing issues associated with multifunctional composites, addressing specifically the transport phenomena of heat and electrical conduction. • Support from Airbus on demonstrator: Airbus have provided electrical and mechanical requirements and will provide tooling for the frame. • Support from NCC on tufting of microbraids to create test samples for Caroline O'Keeffe; gift of materials. • Assistance from Stanelco on induction heating. • Supply of Textreme spread tow fabric to Imperial College London • Supply of Chomarat fabric to Imperial College London. • Supply of Isola Group spread glass fabric to Imperial College London Support from Airbus on demonstrator. Support from NCC on tufting of microbraids to create test samples for Caroline O'Keeffe; gift of materials. Assistance from Stanelco on induction heating.
Impact No outputs reported yet.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Manufacturing for structural applications of multifunctional composites 
Organisation Qinetiq
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £884,532 core project grant to the University of Bristol and Imperial College London for the three-year funded project 'Manufacturing for structural applications of multifunctional composites'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Manufacturing for multifunctional composites and integrated structures'. The overarching aim of the project is to investigate and address the design and manufacturing issues associated with multifunctional composites, addressing specifically the transport phenomena of heat and electrical conduction. • Support from Airbus on demonstrator: Airbus have provided electrical and mechanical requirements and will provide tooling for the frame. • Support from NCC on tufting of microbraids to create test samples for Caroline O'Keeffe; gift of materials. • Assistance from Stanelco on induction heating. • Supply of Textreme spread tow fabric to Imperial College London • Supply of Chomarat fabric to Imperial College London. • Supply of Isola Group spread glass fabric to Imperial College London Support from Airbus on demonstrator. Support from NCC on tufting of microbraids to create test samples for Caroline O'Keeffe; gift of materials. Assistance from Stanelco on induction heating.
Impact No outputs reported yet.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Manufacturing for structural applications of multifunctional composites 
Organisation University of Bristol
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £884,532 core project grant to the University of Bristol and Imperial College London for the three-year funded project 'Manufacturing for structural applications of multifunctional composites'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Manufacturing for multifunctional composites and integrated structures'. The overarching aim of the project is to investigate and address the design and manufacturing issues associated with multifunctional composites, addressing specifically the transport phenomena of heat and electrical conduction. • Support from Airbus on demonstrator: Airbus have provided electrical and mechanical requirements and will provide tooling for the frame. • Support from NCC on tufting of microbraids to create test samples for Caroline O'Keeffe; gift of materials. • Assistance from Stanelco on induction heating. • Supply of Textreme spread tow fabric to Imperial College London • Supply of Chomarat fabric to Imperial College London. • Supply of Isola Group spread glass fabric to Imperial College London Support from Airbus on demonstrator. Support from NCC on tufting of microbraids to create test samples for Caroline O'Keeffe; gift of materials. Assistance from Stanelco on induction heating.
Impact No outputs reported yet.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Manufacturing for structural applications of multifunctional composites 
Organisation University of Sheffield
Department Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre (AMRC)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £884,532 core project grant to the University of Bristol and Imperial College London for the three-year funded project 'Manufacturing for structural applications of multifunctional composites'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Manufacturing for multifunctional composites and integrated structures'. The overarching aim of the project is to investigate and address the design and manufacturing issues associated with multifunctional composites, addressing specifically the transport phenomena of heat and electrical conduction. • Support from Airbus on demonstrator: Airbus have provided electrical and mechanical requirements and will provide tooling for the frame. • Support from NCC on tufting of microbraids to create test samples for Caroline O'Keeffe; gift of materials. • Assistance from Stanelco on induction heating. • Supply of Textreme spread tow fabric to Imperial College London • Supply of Chomarat fabric to Imperial College London. • Supply of Isola Group spread glass fabric to Imperial College London Support from Airbus on demonstrator. Support from NCC on tufting of microbraids to create test samples for Caroline O'Keeffe; gift of materials. Assistance from Stanelco on induction heating.
Impact No outputs reported yet.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Manufacturing thermoplastic fibre metal laminates by the in situ polymerisation route 
Organisation Arkema
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to the University of Edinburgh for the six-month funded project 'Manufacturing thermoplastic fibre metal laminates by the in situ polymerisation route'.
Collaborator Contribution Arkema has supplied free chemicals (Epoxy Acrylate of two grades) for this project. They also supplied 20 Kg Elium® resin free of cost. Technical Manager, Arkema, visited to discuss this project with. • XPS data collection was performed at the EPSRC National Facility for XPS ('HarwellXPS'), operated by Cardiff University and UCL (United Kingdom), under contract No. PR16195. • A series of optical surface measurements was performed at the Manufacturing Metrology Team, at the University of Nottingham (United Kingdom). • Al alloy sheets were electrochemically etched using anodising technique in a sulphuric acid (H2SO4) bath, provided by NPI-SOLUTIONS (United Kingdom). • Test coupons from manufactured FML laminates were extracted from Wilkie Engineering Ltd (United Kingdom) using water-jet cutting facility.
Impact Society: Once successfully validated and commercialised, the thermopalstic FML technology can bring significant positive impact on the society, bringing in more recyclable, repairable products. This work has only been initiated in this Feasibility study, not fully explored. Economy: This Feasibility study clearly showed that such FMLs have potential to be explored in industrial application. The thermoplastic FML technology was close TRL 3-4. A follow-up project was required to investigate the mechanical properties of the FMLs and identify the key advantages, such as drop weight impact resistance and thermoformability, to take it to higher TRL, which could not be done. This could lead to various low-cost, real life FML products beyond aerospace. In future, a bigger proposal will be submitted to EPSRC seeking funding to take this technology forward. People: Dr Dimitrios Mamalis, PDRA of this Feasibility Study project, has been trained on FML manufacturing and he is actively participating in new project proposals where he can take this novel FML technology forward. One M.Eng student is now working on this FML technology and will be investigating some key properties. Knowledge: After our first paper was published in 'Materials and Design' journal, there has been several invitations from conferences and workshops from UK as well as from other parts of Europe for presenting our work on FML. This work has clearly generated interest in the scientific community. A follow-on project after the Feasibility project could establish the key properties and advantages/disadvantages of FMLs in comparison to general FRPs. A set of mechanical property data generated through testing could be of interest to the industrial partners. Unfortunately, that could not be done within that short tenure. The six months Feasibility Project was more focussed on achieving a strong interfacial bonding between the two dissimilar materials which was done successfully. There was no time to investigate mechanical properties and bring that to the attention of the industrial partners.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Manufacturing thermoplastic fibre metal laminates by the in situ polymerisation route 
Organisation BeemCar Ltd
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to the University of Edinburgh for the six-month funded project 'Manufacturing thermoplastic fibre metal laminates by the in situ polymerisation route'.
Collaborator Contribution Arkema has supplied free chemicals (Epoxy Acrylate of two grades) for this project. They also supplied 20 Kg Elium® resin free of cost. Technical Manager, Arkema, visited to discuss this project with. • XPS data collection was performed at the EPSRC National Facility for XPS ('HarwellXPS'), operated by Cardiff University and UCL (United Kingdom), under contract No. PR16195. • A series of optical surface measurements was performed at the Manufacturing Metrology Team, at the University of Nottingham (United Kingdom). • Al alloy sheets were electrochemically etched using anodising technique in a sulphuric acid (H2SO4) bath, provided by NPI-SOLUTIONS (United Kingdom). • Test coupons from manufactured FML laminates were extracted from Wilkie Engineering Ltd (United Kingdom) using water-jet cutting facility.
Impact Society: Once successfully validated and commercialised, the thermopalstic FML technology can bring significant positive impact on the society, bringing in more recyclable, repairable products. This work has only been initiated in this Feasibility study, not fully explored. Economy: This Feasibility study clearly showed that such FMLs have potential to be explored in industrial application. The thermoplastic FML technology was close TRL 3-4. A follow-up project was required to investigate the mechanical properties of the FMLs and identify the key advantages, such as drop weight impact resistance and thermoformability, to take it to higher TRL, which could not be done. This could lead to various low-cost, real life FML products beyond aerospace. In future, a bigger proposal will be submitted to EPSRC seeking funding to take this technology forward. People: Dr Dimitrios Mamalis, PDRA of this Feasibility Study project, has been trained on FML manufacturing and he is actively participating in new project proposals where he can take this novel FML technology forward. One M.Eng student is now working on this FML technology and will be investigating some key properties. Knowledge: After our first paper was published in 'Materials and Design' journal, there has been several invitations from conferences and workshops from UK as well as from other parts of Europe for presenting our work on FML. This work has clearly generated interest in the scientific community. A follow-on project after the Feasibility project could establish the key properties and advantages/disadvantages of FMLs in comparison to general FRPs. A set of mechanical property data generated through testing could be of interest to the industrial partners. Unfortunately, that could not be done within that short tenure. The six months Feasibility Project was more focussed on achieving a strong interfacial bonding between the two dissimilar materials which was done successfully. There was no time to investigate mechanical properties and bring that to the attention of the industrial partners.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Manufacturing thermoplastic fibre metal laminates by the in situ polymerisation route 
Organisation Composite Solutions UK Ltd
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to the University of Edinburgh for the six-month funded project 'Manufacturing thermoplastic fibre metal laminates by the in situ polymerisation route'.
Collaborator Contribution Arkema has supplied free chemicals (Epoxy Acrylate of two grades) for this project. They also supplied 20 Kg Elium® resin free of cost. Technical Manager, Arkema, visited to discuss this project with. • XPS data collection was performed at the EPSRC National Facility for XPS ('HarwellXPS'), operated by Cardiff University and UCL (United Kingdom), under contract No. PR16195. • A series of optical surface measurements was performed at the Manufacturing Metrology Team, at the University of Nottingham (United Kingdom). • Al alloy sheets were electrochemically etched using anodising technique in a sulphuric acid (H2SO4) bath, provided by NPI-SOLUTIONS (United Kingdom). • Test coupons from manufactured FML laminates were extracted from Wilkie Engineering Ltd (United Kingdom) using water-jet cutting facility.
Impact Society: Once successfully validated and commercialised, the thermopalstic FML technology can bring significant positive impact on the society, bringing in more recyclable, repairable products. This work has only been initiated in this Feasibility study, not fully explored. Economy: This Feasibility study clearly showed that such FMLs have potential to be explored in industrial application. The thermoplastic FML technology was close TRL 3-4. A follow-up project was required to investigate the mechanical properties of the FMLs and identify the key advantages, such as drop weight impact resistance and thermoformability, to take it to higher TRL, which could not be done. This could lead to various low-cost, real life FML products beyond aerospace. In future, a bigger proposal will be submitted to EPSRC seeking funding to take this technology forward. People: Dr Dimitrios Mamalis, PDRA of this Feasibility Study project, has been trained on FML manufacturing and he is actively participating in new project proposals where he can take this novel FML technology forward. One M.Eng student is now working on this FML technology and will be investigating some key properties. Knowledge: After our first paper was published in 'Materials and Design' journal, there has been several invitations from conferences and workshops from UK as well as from other parts of Europe for presenting our work on FML. This work has clearly generated interest in the scientific community. A follow-on project after the Feasibility project could establish the key properties and advantages/disadvantages of FMLs in comparison to general FRPs. A set of mechanical property data generated through testing could be of interest to the industrial partners. Unfortunately, that could not be done within that short tenure. The six months Feasibility Project was more focussed on achieving a strong interfacial bonding between the two dissimilar materials which was done successfully. There was no time to investigate mechanical properties and bring that to the attention of the industrial partners.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Manufacturing thermoplastic fibre metal laminates by the in situ polymerisation route 
Organisation EireComposites Teo
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to the University of Edinburgh for the six-month funded project 'Manufacturing thermoplastic fibre metal laminates by the in situ polymerisation route'.
Collaborator Contribution Arkema has supplied free chemicals (Epoxy Acrylate of two grades) for this project. They also supplied 20 Kg Elium® resin free of cost. Technical Manager, Arkema, visited to discuss this project with. • XPS data collection was performed at the EPSRC National Facility for XPS ('HarwellXPS'), operated by Cardiff University and UCL (United Kingdom), under contract No. PR16195. • A series of optical surface measurements was performed at the Manufacturing Metrology Team, at the University of Nottingham (United Kingdom). • Al alloy sheets were electrochemically etched using anodising technique in a sulphuric acid (H2SO4) bath, provided by NPI-SOLUTIONS (United Kingdom). • Test coupons from manufactured FML laminates were extracted from Wilkie Engineering Ltd (United Kingdom) using water-jet cutting facility.
Impact Society: Once successfully validated and commercialised, the thermopalstic FML technology can bring significant positive impact on the society, bringing in more recyclable, repairable products. This work has only been initiated in this Feasibility study, not fully explored. Economy: This Feasibility study clearly showed that such FMLs have potential to be explored in industrial application. The thermoplastic FML technology was close TRL 3-4. A follow-up project was required to investigate the mechanical properties of the FMLs and identify the key advantages, such as drop weight impact resistance and thermoformability, to take it to higher TRL, which could not be done. This could lead to various low-cost, real life FML products beyond aerospace. In future, a bigger proposal will be submitted to EPSRC seeking funding to take this technology forward. People: Dr Dimitrios Mamalis, PDRA of this Feasibility Study project, has been trained on FML manufacturing and he is actively participating in new project proposals where he can take this novel FML technology forward. One M.Eng student is now working on this FML technology and will be investigating some key properties. Knowledge: After our first paper was published in 'Materials and Design' journal, there has been several invitations from conferences and workshops from UK as well as from other parts of Europe for presenting our work on FML. This work has clearly generated interest in the scientific community. A follow-on project after the Feasibility project could establish the key properties and advantages/disadvantages of FMLs in comparison to general FRPs. A set of mechanical property data generated through testing could be of interest to the industrial partners. Unfortunately, that could not be done within that short tenure. The six months Feasibility Project was more focussed on achieving a strong interfacial bonding between the two dissimilar materials which was done successfully. There was no time to investigate mechanical properties and bring that to the attention of the industrial partners.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Manufacturing thermoplastic fibre metal laminates by the in situ polymerisation route 
Organisation FAR-UK Ltd
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to the University of Edinburgh for the six-month funded project 'Manufacturing thermoplastic fibre metal laminates by the in situ polymerisation route'.
Collaborator Contribution Arkema has supplied free chemicals (Epoxy Acrylate of two grades) for this project. They also supplied 20 Kg Elium® resin free of cost. Technical Manager, Arkema, visited to discuss this project with. • XPS data collection was performed at the EPSRC National Facility for XPS ('HarwellXPS'), operated by Cardiff University and UCL (United Kingdom), under contract No. PR16195. • A series of optical surface measurements was performed at the Manufacturing Metrology Team, at the University of Nottingham (United Kingdom). • Al alloy sheets were electrochemically etched using anodising technique in a sulphuric acid (H2SO4) bath, provided by NPI-SOLUTIONS (United Kingdom). • Test coupons from manufactured FML laminates were extracted from Wilkie Engineering Ltd (United Kingdom) using water-jet cutting facility.
Impact Society: Once successfully validated and commercialised, the thermopalstic FML technology can bring significant positive impact on the society, bringing in more recyclable, repairable products. This work has only been initiated in this Feasibility study, not fully explored. Economy: This Feasibility study clearly showed that such FMLs have potential to be explored in industrial application. The thermoplastic FML technology was close TRL 3-4. A follow-up project was required to investigate the mechanical properties of the FMLs and identify the key advantages, such as drop weight impact resistance and thermoformability, to take it to higher TRL, which could not be done. This could lead to various low-cost, real life FML products beyond aerospace. In future, a bigger proposal will be submitted to EPSRC seeking funding to take this technology forward. People: Dr Dimitrios Mamalis, PDRA of this Feasibility Study project, has been trained on FML manufacturing and he is actively participating in new project proposals where he can take this novel FML technology forward. One M.Eng student is now working on this FML technology and will be investigating some key properties. Knowledge: After our first paper was published in 'Materials and Design' journal, there has been several invitations from conferences and workshops from UK as well as from other parts of Europe for presenting our work on FML. This work has clearly generated interest in the scientific community. A follow-on project after the Feasibility project could establish the key properties and advantages/disadvantages of FMLs in comparison to general FRPs. A set of mechanical property data generated through testing could be of interest to the industrial partners. Unfortunately, that could not be done within that short tenure. The six months Feasibility Project was more focussed on achieving a strong interfacial bonding between the two dissimilar materials which was done successfully. There was no time to investigate mechanical properties and bring that to the attention of the industrial partners.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Manufacturing thermoplastic fibre metal laminates by the in situ polymerisation route 
Organisation National Physical Laboratory
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to the University of Edinburgh for the six-month funded project 'Manufacturing thermoplastic fibre metal laminates by the in situ polymerisation route'.
Collaborator Contribution Arkema has supplied free chemicals (Epoxy Acrylate of two grades) for this project. They also supplied 20 Kg Elium® resin free of cost. Technical Manager, Arkema, visited to discuss this project with. • XPS data collection was performed at the EPSRC National Facility for XPS ('HarwellXPS'), operated by Cardiff University and UCL (United Kingdom), under contract No. PR16195. • A series of optical surface measurements was performed at the Manufacturing Metrology Team, at the University of Nottingham (United Kingdom). • Al alloy sheets were electrochemically etched using anodising technique in a sulphuric acid (H2SO4) bath, provided by NPI-SOLUTIONS (United Kingdom). • Test coupons from manufactured FML laminates were extracted from Wilkie Engineering Ltd (United Kingdom) using water-jet cutting facility.
Impact Society: Once successfully validated and commercialised, the thermopalstic FML technology can bring significant positive impact on the society, bringing in more recyclable, repairable products. This work has only been initiated in this Feasibility study, not fully explored. Economy: This Feasibility study clearly showed that such FMLs have potential to be explored in industrial application. The thermoplastic FML technology was close TRL 3-4. A follow-up project was required to investigate the mechanical properties of the FMLs and identify the key advantages, such as drop weight impact resistance and thermoformability, to take it to higher TRL, which could not be done. This could lead to various low-cost, real life FML products beyond aerospace. In future, a bigger proposal will be submitted to EPSRC seeking funding to take this technology forward. People: Dr Dimitrios Mamalis, PDRA of this Feasibility Study project, has been trained on FML manufacturing and he is actively participating in new project proposals where he can take this novel FML technology forward. One M.Eng student is now working on this FML technology and will be investigating some key properties. Knowledge: After our first paper was published in 'Materials and Design' journal, there has been several invitations from conferences and workshops from UK as well as from other parts of Europe for presenting our work on FML. This work has clearly generated interest in the scientific community. A follow-on project after the Feasibility project could establish the key properties and advantages/disadvantages of FMLs in comparison to general FRPs. A set of mechanical property data generated through testing could be of interest to the industrial partners. Unfortunately, that could not be done within that short tenure. The six months Feasibility Project was more focussed on achieving a strong interfacial bonding between the two dissimilar materials which was done successfully. There was no time to investigate mechanical properties and bring that to the attention of the industrial partners.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Manufacturing thermoplastic fibre metal laminates by the in situ polymerisation route 
Organisation Ultrawise Innovation Ltd
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to the University of Edinburgh for the six-month funded project 'Manufacturing thermoplastic fibre metal laminates by the in situ polymerisation route'.
Collaborator Contribution Arkema has supplied free chemicals (Epoxy Acrylate of two grades) for this project. They also supplied 20 Kg Elium® resin free of cost. Technical Manager, Arkema, visited to discuss this project with. • XPS data collection was performed at the EPSRC National Facility for XPS ('HarwellXPS'), operated by Cardiff University and UCL (United Kingdom), under contract No. PR16195. • A series of optical surface measurements was performed at the Manufacturing Metrology Team, at the University of Nottingham (United Kingdom). • Al alloy sheets were electrochemically etched using anodising technique in a sulphuric acid (H2SO4) bath, provided by NPI-SOLUTIONS (United Kingdom). • Test coupons from manufactured FML laminates were extracted from Wilkie Engineering Ltd (United Kingdom) using water-jet cutting facility.
Impact Society: Once successfully validated and commercialised, the thermopalstic FML technology can bring significant positive impact on the society, bringing in more recyclable, repairable products. This work has only been initiated in this Feasibility study, not fully explored. Economy: This Feasibility study clearly showed that such FMLs have potential to be explored in industrial application. The thermoplastic FML technology was close TRL 3-4. A follow-up project was required to investigate the mechanical properties of the FMLs and identify the key advantages, such as drop weight impact resistance and thermoformability, to take it to higher TRL, which could not be done. This could lead to various low-cost, real life FML products beyond aerospace. In future, a bigger proposal will be submitted to EPSRC seeking funding to take this technology forward. People: Dr Dimitrios Mamalis, PDRA of this Feasibility Study project, has been trained on FML manufacturing and he is actively participating in new project proposals where he can take this novel FML technology forward. One M.Eng student is now working on this FML technology and will be investigating some key properties. Knowledge: After our first paper was published in 'Materials and Design' journal, there has been several invitations from conferences and workshops from UK as well as from other parts of Europe for presenting our work on FML. This work has clearly generated interest in the scientific community. A follow-on project after the Feasibility project could establish the key properties and advantages/disadvantages of FMLs in comparison to general FRPs. A set of mechanical property data generated through testing could be of interest to the industrial partners. Unfortunately, that could not be done within that short tenure. The six months Feasibility Project was more focussed on achieving a strong interfacial bonding between the two dissimilar materials which was done successfully. There was no time to investigate mechanical properties and bring that to the attention of the industrial partners.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Manufacturing thermoplastic fibre metal laminates by the in situ polymerisation route 
Organisation University of Edinburgh
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to the University of Edinburgh for the six-month funded project 'Manufacturing thermoplastic fibre metal laminates by the in situ polymerisation route'.
Collaborator Contribution Arkema has supplied free chemicals (Epoxy Acrylate of two grades) for this project. They also supplied 20 Kg Elium® resin free of cost. Technical Manager, Arkema, visited to discuss this project with. • XPS data collection was performed at the EPSRC National Facility for XPS ('HarwellXPS'), operated by Cardiff University and UCL (United Kingdom), under contract No. PR16195. • A series of optical surface measurements was performed at the Manufacturing Metrology Team, at the University of Nottingham (United Kingdom). • Al alloy sheets were electrochemically etched using anodising technique in a sulphuric acid (H2SO4) bath, provided by NPI-SOLUTIONS (United Kingdom). • Test coupons from manufactured FML laminates were extracted from Wilkie Engineering Ltd (United Kingdom) using water-jet cutting facility.
Impact Society: Once successfully validated and commercialised, the thermopalstic FML technology can bring significant positive impact on the society, bringing in more recyclable, repairable products. This work has only been initiated in this Feasibility study, not fully explored. Economy: This Feasibility study clearly showed that such FMLs have potential to be explored in industrial application. The thermoplastic FML technology was close TRL 3-4. A follow-up project was required to investigate the mechanical properties of the FMLs and identify the key advantages, such as drop weight impact resistance and thermoformability, to take it to higher TRL, which could not be done. This could lead to various low-cost, real life FML products beyond aerospace. In future, a bigger proposal will be submitted to EPSRC seeking funding to take this technology forward. People: Dr Dimitrios Mamalis, PDRA of this Feasibility Study project, has been trained on FML manufacturing and he is actively participating in new project proposals where he can take this novel FML technology forward. One M.Eng student is now working on this FML technology and will be investigating some key properties. Knowledge: After our first paper was published in 'Materials and Design' journal, there has been several invitations from conferences and workshops from UK as well as from other parts of Europe for presenting our work on FML. This work has clearly generated interest in the scientific community. A follow-on project after the Feasibility project could establish the key properties and advantages/disadvantages of FMLs in comparison to general FRPs. A set of mechanical property data generated through testing could be of interest to the industrial partners. Unfortunately, that could not be done within that short tenure. The six months Feasibility Project was more focussed on achieving a strong interfacial bonding between the two dissimilar materials which was done successfully. There was no time to investigate mechanical properties and bring that to the attention of the industrial partners.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Microwave heating through embedded slotted coaxial cables for composites manufacturing (M-Cable) 
Organisation Brunel University London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to Brunel University London for the six-month funded project 'Microwave heating through embedded slotted coaxial cables for composites manufacturing (M-Cable)'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'High rate deposition and rapid processing technologies'. The overall aim of the project is to test the feasibility of uniform MW heating of composites during manufacturing by using a number of slotted coaxial cables embedded in tools.
Impact The feasibility of utilising MW heating for composites manufacturing without the need of a dedicated MW Oven is the topic of this report. The initial concept of wires with slots that will act as MW applicators (waveguides) did not produce an acceptable thermal profile: local temperature variations were too high. The simple configurations tried in this study improved the local variations, but more work is needed to conclusively evaluate the idea and its practicality. A different approach was then tried: MW applicators that can be realised as printed circuit boards (PCBs). These boards can be slotted inside tooling. Their design can follow the heating requirement of the composite shape and size. The feasibility study showed that the PCB applicators fulfil two of the three concept feasibility criteria. The concept was validated by producing a number of composite laminates that were of similar quality to laminates produced in a convection oven.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Multi-step thermoforming of multi-cavity multi-axial advanced thermoplastic composite parts 
Organisation Institute of Science and Innovation in Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to the University of Glasgow for the six-month funded project 'Multi-step thermoforming of multi-cavity multi-axial advanced thermoplastic composite parts'.
Collaborator Contribution • INEGI provided carbon/nylon sheets • Induction Coil Solutions (supplied induction heater for 3-month rental)
Impact The benefits to INEGI were in contributing towards a novel manufacturing process that, if perfected could be used in their own research ande development projects. The benefit to Induction Coild solutions is a potential new application of their induction heaters. The benefit to Forrest Precision Engineering is potential new business in manufacturing alternative versions of the multi-step forming tool
Start Year 2018
 
Description Multi-step thermoforming of multi-cavity multi-axial advanced thermoplastic composite parts 
Organisation University of Glasgow
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to the University of Glasgow for the six-month funded project 'Multi-step thermoforming of multi-cavity multi-axial advanced thermoplastic composite parts'.
Collaborator Contribution • INEGI provided carbon/nylon sheets • Induction Coil Solutions (supplied induction heater for 3-month rental)
Impact The benefits to INEGI were in contributing towards a novel manufacturing process that, if perfected could be used in their own research ande development projects. The benefit to Induction Coild solutions is a potential new application of their induction heaters. The benefit to Forrest Precision Engineering is potential new business in manufacturing alternative versions of the multi-step forming tool
Start Year 2018
 
Description New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures 
Organisation Airbus Group
Country France 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £906,782 core project grant to the University of Nottingham and the University of Manchester for the three-year funded project 'New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Design for manufacture via validated simulation'. This project aims to discover new 3D textile preform architectures. This will result in a step change in performance, leading to significant weight reductions and lower cycle times through routine use of automated manufacturing technologies. Contributions received to date: £17k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (attendance of project meetings, help with development of demonstrators) £50k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (through provided tooling and CAD files for demonstrators) Subcontract funding of £110k from ATI Future Landing Gear Programme for complex 3D woven architectures RTM tooling for an automotive component provided to the University of Nottingham by AMRC Metal liners and carbon fibres for a pressure vessel provided to the University of Manchester by Luxfer Cylinders
Impact Potluri, P., Jetavat, D., Sharma S. (2017) Method and apparatus for weaving a three-dimensional fabric, US Patent 9,598,798 2 x Journal publications (2019) detailed in 'Publications' section.
Start Year 2017
 
Description New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures 
Organisation BAE Systems
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £906,782 core project grant to the University of Nottingham and the University of Manchester for the three-year funded project 'New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Design for manufacture via validated simulation'. This project aims to discover new 3D textile preform architectures. This will result in a step change in performance, leading to significant weight reductions and lower cycle times through routine use of automated manufacturing technologies. Contributions received to date: £17k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (attendance of project meetings, help with development of demonstrators) £50k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (through provided tooling and CAD files for demonstrators) Subcontract funding of £110k from ATI Future Landing Gear Programme for complex 3D woven architectures RTM tooling for an automotive component provided to the University of Nottingham by AMRC Metal liners and carbon fibres for a pressure vessel provided to the University of Manchester by Luxfer Cylinders
Impact Potluri, P., Jetavat, D., Sharma S. (2017) Method and apparatus for weaving a three-dimensional fabric, US Patent 9,598,798 2 x Journal publications (2019) detailed in 'Publications' section.
Start Year 2017
 
Description New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures 
Organisation ESI Group
Country France 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £906,782 core project grant to the University of Nottingham and the University of Manchester for the three-year funded project 'New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Design for manufacture via validated simulation'. This project aims to discover new 3D textile preform architectures. This will result in a step change in performance, leading to significant weight reductions and lower cycle times through routine use of automated manufacturing technologies. Contributions received to date: £17k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (attendance of project meetings, help with development of demonstrators) £50k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (through provided tooling and CAD files for demonstrators) Subcontract funding of £110k from ATI Future Landing Gear Programme for complex 3D woven architectures RTM tooling for an automotive component provided to the University of Nottingham by AMRC Metal liners and carbon fibres for a pressure vessel provided to the University of Manchester by Luxfer Cylinders
Impact Potluri, P., Jetavat, D., Sharma S. (2017) Method and apparatus for weaving a three-dimensional fabric, US Patent 9,598,798 2 x Journal publications (2019) detailed in 'Publications' section.
Start Year 2017
 
Description New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures 
Organisation GKN
Department GKN Aerospace
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £906,782 core project grant to the University of Nottingham and the University of Manchester for the three-year funded project 'New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Design for manufacture via validated simulation'. This project aims to discover new 3D textile preform architectures. This will result in a step change in performance, leading to significant weight reductions and lower cycle times through routine use of automated manufacturing technologies. Contributions received to date: £17k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (attendance of project meetings, help with development of demonstrators) £50k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (through provided tooling and CAD files for demonstrators) Subcontract funding of £110k from ATI Future Landing Gear Programme for complex 3D woven architectures RTM tooling for an automotive component provided to the University of Nottingham by AMRC Metal liners and carbon fibres for a pressure vessel provided to the University of Manchester by Luxfer Cylinders
Impact Potluri, P., Jetavat, D., Sharma S. (2017) Method and apparatus for weaving a three-dimensional fabric, US Patent 9,598,798 2 x Journal publications (2019) detailed in 'Publications' section.
Start Year 2017
 
Description New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures 
Organisation Hexcel Composites Ltd
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £906,782 core project grant to the University of Nottingham and the University of Manchester for the three-year funded project 'New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Design for manufacture via validated simulation'. This project aims to discover new 3D textile preform architectures. This will result in a step change in performance, leading to significant weight reductions and lower cycle times through routine use of automated manufacturing technologies. Contributions received to date: £17k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (attendance of project meetings, help with development of demonstrators) £50k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (through provided tooling and CAD files for demonstrators) Subcontract funding of £110k from ATI Future Landing Gear Programme for complex 3D woven architectures RTM tooling for an automotive component provided to the University of Nottingham by AMRC Metal liners and carbon fibres for a pressure vessel provided to the University of Manchester by Luxfer Cylinders
Impact Potluri, P., Jetavat, D., Sharma S. (2017) Method and apparatus for weaving a three-dimensional fabric, US Patent 9,598,798 2 x Journal publications (2019) detailed in 'Publications' section.
Start Year 2017
 
Description New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures 
Organisation Luxfer Gas Cylinders
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £906,782 core project grant to the University of Nottingham and the University of Manchester for the three-year funded project 'New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Design for manufacture via validated simulation'. This project aims to discover new 3D textile preform architectures. This will result in a step change in performance, leading to significant weight reductions and lower cycle times through routine use of automated manufacturing technologies. Contributions received to date: £17k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (attendance of project meetings, help with development of demonstrators) £50k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (through provided tooling and CAD files for demonstrators) Subcontract funding of £110k from ATI Future Landing Gear Programme for complex 3D woven architectures RTM tooling for an automotive component provided to the University of Nottingham by AMRC Metal liners and carbon fibres for a pressure vessel provided to the University of Manchester by Luxfer Cylinders
Impact Potluri, P., Jetavat, D., Sharma S. (2017) Method and apparatus for weaving a three-dimensional fabric, US Patent 9,598,798 2 x Journal publications (2019) detailed in 'Publications' section.
Start Year 2017
 
Description New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures 
Organisation M Wright & Sons Ltd
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £906,782 core project grant to the University of Nottingham and the University of Manchester for the three-year funded project 'New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Design for manufacture via validated simulation'. This project aims to discover new 3D textile preform architectures. This will result in a step change in performance, leading to significant weight reductions and lower cycle times through routine use of automated manufacturing technologies. Contributions received to date: £17k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (attendance of project meetings, help with development of demonstrators) £50k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (through provided tooling and CAD files for demonstrators) Subcontract funding of £110k from ATI Future Landing Gear Programme for complex 3D woven architectures RTM tooling for an automotive component provided to the University of Nottingham by AMRC Metal liners and carbon fibres for a pressure vessel provided to the University of Manchester by Luxfer Cylinders
Impact Potluri, P., Jetavat, D., Sharma S. (2017) Method and apparatus for weaving a three-dimensional fabric, US Patent 9,598,798 2 x Journal publications (2019) detailed in 'Publications' section.
Start Year 2017
 
Description New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures 
Organisation National Composites Centre (NCC)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £906,782 core project grant to the University of Nottingham and the University of Manchester for the three-year funded project 'New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Design for manufacture via validated simulation'. This project aims to discover new 3D textile preform architectures. This will result in a step change in performance, leading to significant weight reductions and lower cycle times through routine use of automated manufacturing technologies. Contributions received to date: £17k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (attendance of project meetings, help with development of demonstrators) £50k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (through provided tooling and CAD files for demonstrators) Subcontract funding of £110k from ATI Future Landing Gear Programme for complex 3D woven architectures RTM tooling for an automotive component provided to the University of Nottingham by AMRC Metal liners and carbon fibres for a pressure vessel provided to the University of Manchester by Luxfer Cylinders
Impact Potluri, P., Jetavat, D., Sharma S. (2017) Method and apparatus for weaving a three-dimensional fabric, US Patent 9,598,798 2 x Journal publications (2019) detailed in 'Publications' section.
Start Year 2017
 
Description New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures 
Organisation Rolls Royce Group Plc
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £906,782 core project grant to the University of Nottingham and the University of Manchester for the three-year funded project 'New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Design for manufacture via validated simulation'. This project aims to discover new 3D textile preform architectures. This will result in a step change in performance, leading to significant weight reductions and lower cycle times through routine use of automated manufacturing technologies. Contributions received to date: £17k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (attendance of project meetings, help with development of demonstrators) £50k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (through provided tooling and CAD files for demonstrators) Subcontract funding of £110k from ATI Future Landing Gear Programme for complex 3D woven architectures RTM tooling for an automotive component provided to the University of Nottingham by AMRC Metal liners and carbon fibres for a pressure vessel provided to the University of Manchester by Luxfer Cylinders
Impact Potluri, P., Jetavat, D., Sharma S. (2017) Method and apparatus for weaving a three-dimensional fabric, US Patent 9,598,798 2 x Journal publications (2019) detailed in 'Publications' section.
Start Year 2017
 
Description New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures 
Organisation Sigmatex
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £906,782 core project grant to the University of Nottingham and the University of Manchester for the three-year funded project 'New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Design for manufacture via validated simulation'. This project aims to discover new 3D textile preform architectures. This will result in a step change in performance, leading to significant weight reductions and lower cycle times through routine use of automated manufacturing technologies. Contributions received to date: £17k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (attendance of project meetings, help with development of demonstrators) £50k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (through provided tooling and CAD files for demonstrators) Subcontract funding of £110k from ATI Future Landing Gear Programme for complex 3D woven architectures RTM tooling for an automotive component provided to the University of Nottingham by AMRC Metal liners and carbon fibres for a pressure vessel provided to the University of Manchester by Luxfer Cylinders
Impact Potluri, P., Jetavat, D., Sharma S. (2017) Method and apparatus for weaving a three-dimensional fabric, US Patent 9,598,798 2 x Journal publications (2019) detailed in 'Publications' section.
Start Year 2017
 
Description New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures 
Organisation University of Manchester
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £906,782 core project grant to the University of Nottingham and the University of Manchester for the three-year funded project 'New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Design for manufacture via validated simulation'. This project aims to discover new 3D textile preform architectures. This will result in a step change in performance, leading to significant weight reductions and lower cycle times through routine use of automated manufacturing technologies. Contributions received to date: £17k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (attendance of project meetings, help with development of demonstrators) £50k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (through provided tooling and CAD files for demonstrators) Subcontract funding of £110k from ATI Future Landing Gear Programme for complex 3D woven architectures RTM tooling for an automotive component provided to the University of Nottingham by AMRC Metal liners and carbon fibres for a pressure vessel provided to the University of Manchester by Luxfer Cylinders
Impact Potluri, P., Jetavat, D., Sharma S. (2017) Method and apparatus for weaving a three-dimensional fabric, US Patent 9,598,798 2 x Journal publications (2019) detailed in 'Publications' section.
Start Year 2017
 
Description New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures 
Organisation University of Nottingham
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £906,782 core project grant to the University of Nottingham and the University of Manchester for the three-year funded project 'New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Design for manufacture via validated simulation'. This project aims to discover new 3D textile preform architectures. This will result in a step change in performance, leading to significant weight reductions and lower cycle times through routine use of automated manufacturing technologies. Contributions received to date: £17k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (attendance of project meetings, help with development of demonstrators) £50k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (through provided tooling and CAD files for demonstrators) Subcontract funding of £110k from ATI Future Landing Gear Programme for complex 3D woven architectures RTM tooling for an automotive component provided to the University of Nottingham by AMRC Metal liners and carbon fibres for a pressure vessel provided to the University of Manchester by Luxfer Cylinders
Impact Potluri, P., Jetavat, D., Sharma S. (2017) Method and apparatus for weaving a three-dimensional fabric, US Patent 9,598,798 2 x Journal publications (2019) detailed in 'Publications' section.
Start Year 2017
 
Description New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures 
Organisation University of Sheffield
Department Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre (AMRC)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £906,782 core project grant to the University of Nottingham and the University of Manchester for the three-year funded project 'New manufacturing techniques for optimised fibre architectures'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'Design for manufacture via validated simulation'. This project aims to discover new 3D textile preform architectures. This will result in a step change in performance, leading to significant weight reductions and lower cycle times through routine use of automated manufacturing technologies. Contributions received to date: £17k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (attendance of project meetings, help with development of demonstrators) £50k of in-kind contribution from industrial partners (through provided tooling and CAD files for demonstrators) Subcontract funding of £110k from ATI Future Landing Gear Programme for complex 3D woven architectures RTM tooling for an automotive component provided to the University of Nottingham by AMRC Metal liners and carbon fibres for a pressure vessel provided to the University of Manchester by Luxfer Cylinders
Impact Potluri, P., Jetavat, D., Sharma S. (2017) Method and apparatus for weaving a three-dimensional fabric, US Patent 9,598,798 2 x Journal publications (2019) detailed in 'Publications' section.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Novel strain-based NDE for online inspection and prognostics of composite sub-structures with manufacturing induced defects 
Organisation University of Southampton
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to the University of Southampton for the project 'Novel strain-based NDE for online inspection and prognostics of composite sub-structures with manufacturing induced defects'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributed to the Hub priority research theme 'Inspection and in-process evaluation'. The overarching aim of the project is a system deployed alongside current inspection approaches in the production environment. When defects or subsurface artefacts including variability of fibre volume fraction and fibre orientation have been detected, the system would be deployed to determine if the component is fit for service, requires repair or is scrapped. The system would be flexible, portable, lightweight and robust.
Impact The feasibility study is completed. It has been fully demonstrated that DIC and TSA can be used simultaneously to collect data from composite components. The approach has been demonstrated on a high value carbon fibre aircraft component and shown that the results can be linked to the findings of high fidelity prognostic models, with defect geometry defined by X-ray CT. The work has been presented at ICCM 21 and in various other fora (see below), and a journal paper is in preparation. The approach has also been demonstrated on materials typical of those used in high volume manufacturing made from carbon fibre/epoxy discontinuous compression moulded preforms. The work has linked observations from X-ray CT to the mechanical response and that the combination of DIC and TSA for assessment of the material shows great promise. In particular it is possible to predict the localised stiffness variations, linked to local variability of fibre volume fraction and fibre orientation, throughout the preform. This indicates that the manufacturing control process could be directly informed/updated using the technique. It has also been demonstrated that the technique can be protable (i.e. no need for a test machine to load the components) by exciting the component briefly at its resonant frequency. The work on the discontinuous material will be presented at the Society for Experimental Mechanics conference in the US in June 2018, and a journal paper is also in preparation. The PhD study is focusing on developing a low cost infra-red camera for TSA. The work has revealed in the first 9 months what the scientificchallenges are in developing the technology further, and provided the first steps in developing signal processing routines that will address the challenges.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Simulation of forming 3D curved sandwich panel 
Organisation Gordon Murray Design Ltd
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to the University of Nottingham for the six-month funded project 'Simulation of forming 3D curved sandwich panel'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research themes 'High rate deposition and rapid processing technologies' and 'Design for manufacture via validated simulation'. The process aims to form a 3D curved panel with varying thickness from a 2D sandwich format based on a matched tool forming set, offering an affordable high volume technology for carbon fibre chassis and other demanding structural applications. Gordon Murray Design contributed supervision time, materials and provided access to their laboratory for moulding trials. Their financial contribution to the project was £9000
Impact A journal paper is in preparation. A conference paper was presented at ICMAC 2018 and at ICCM22 in August 2019.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Simulation of forming 3D curved sandwich panel 
Organisation University of Nottingham
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to the University of Nottingham for the six-month funded project 'Simulation of forming 3D curved sandwich panel'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research themes 'High rate deposition and rapid processing technologies' and 'Design for manufacture via validated simulation'. The process aims to form a 3D curved panel with varying thickness from a 2D sandwich format based on a matched tool forming set, offering an affordable high volume technology for carbon fibre chassis and other demanding structural applications. Gordon Murray Design contributed supervision time, materials and provided access to their laboratory for moulding trials. Their financial contribution to the project was £9000
Impact A journal paper is in preparation. A conference paper was presented at ICMAC 2018 and at ICCM22 in August 2019.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Technologies framework for Automated Dry Fibre Placement (ADFP) 
Organisation ESI Group
Country France 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £811,585 core project grant to the University of Nottingham and the University of Bristol for the three-year funded project 'Technologies framework for Automated Dry Fibre Placement (ADFP)'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'High rate deposition and rapid processing technologies'. The overall aims of the project are to understand the rate and quality limiting effects in the ADFP process and develop models to increase understanding of the critical factors.
Impact No outputs reported yet.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Technologies framework for Automated Dry Fibre Placement (ADFP) 
Organisation National Composites Centre (NCC)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £811,585 core project grant to the University of Nottingham and the University of Bristol for the three-year funded project 'Technologies framework for Automated Dry Fibre Placement (ADFP)'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'High rate deposition and rapid processing technologies'. The overall aims of the project are to understand the rate and quality limiting effects in the ADFP process and develop models to increase understanding of the critical factors.
Impact No outputs reported yet.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Technologies framework for Automated Dry Fibre Placement (ADFP) 
Organisation University of Bristol
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £811,585 core project grant to the University of Nottingham and the University of Bristol for the three-year funded project 'Technologies framework for Automated Dry Fibre Placement (ADFP)'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'High rate deposition and rapid processing technologies'. The overall aims of the project are to understand the rate and quality limiting effects in the ADFP process and develop models to increase understanding of the critical factors.
Impact No outputs reported yet.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Technologies framework for Automated Dry Fibre Placement (ADFP) 
Organisation University of Nottingham
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £811,585 core project grant to the University of Nottingham and the University of Bristol for the three-year funded project 'Technologies framework for Automated Dry Fibre Placement (ADFP)'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributes to the Hub priority research theme 'High rate deposition and rapid processing technologies'. The overall aims of the project are to understand the rate and quality limiting effects in the ADFP process and develop models to increase understanding of the critical factors.
Impact No outputs reported yet.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Thermoplastic Matrix CFC / Metallic Joint Framework Structure Manufacture 
Organisation Cranfield University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to Cranfield University for the six-month project 'Thermoplastic Matrix CFC / Metallic Joint Framework Structure Manufacture'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributed to the Hub priority research theme 'High rate deposition and rapid processing technologies'. The project investigated novel design and manufacturing techniques, which show the potential for manufacturing lightweight structural frameworks at high manufacturing rate using carbon fibre reinforced polyamide matrix laminate or tubing and metallic joints. Novel joining techniques have been developed to provide connection by interlocking so as to eliminate mechanical fasteners and adhesive bonding. The project aimed to establish the feasibility and potential affordability of the conceptual process in terms of frame section and joining piece manufacture and frame and joint attachment technique, and to propose framework designs based on the proposed approach for structural applications. Materials supply - from Tencate, Netherlands £5000 Braided carbon PA6 tubing manufacture by Dresden University - £4500 Discussions with Expert - 3 engineer days - £1800 Discussions with AMRC - 4 engineer days - £2400
Impact The project investigated novel design and manufacturing techniques, which show the potential for manufacturing lightweight structural frameworks at high manufacturing rate using carbon fibre reinforced polyamide matrix laminate or tubing and metallic joints. Novel joining techniques have been developed to provide connection by interlocking so as to eliminate mechanical fasteners and adhesive bonding. the project results are being utilised with the CIMComp project team involvement in a BAE systems led Innovate UK project. HITEA for fighter aircraft primary structure joints. The result of a successful partnership on the project is evidenced; By the research fellow on the project joining one of the project's industrial partners (Bighead) to develop new fastener types and application techniques initially investigated during the project. Envisaged market sectors for these are worldwide automotive bodies, lorry structures and wind turbine generators.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Thermoplastic Matrix CFC / Metallic Joint Framework Structure Manufacture 
Organisation Technical University of Dresden
Country Germany 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to Cranfield University for the six-month project 'Thermoplastic Matrix CFC / Metallic Joint Framework Structure Manufacture'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributed to the Hub priority research theme 'High rate deposition and rapid processing technologies'. The project investigated novel design and manufacturing techniques, which show the potential for manufacturing lightweight structural frameworks at high manufacturing rate using carbon fibre reinforced polyamide matrix laminate or tubing and metallic joints. Novel joining techniques have been developed to provide connection by interlocking so as to eliminate mechanical fasteners and adhesive bonding. The project aimed to establish the feasibility and potential affordability of the conceptual process in terms of frame section and joining piece manufacture and frame and joint attachment technique, and to propose framework designs based on the proposed approach for structural applications. Materials supply - from Tencate, Netherlands £5000 Braided carbon PA6 tubing manufacture by Dresden University - £4500 Discussions with Expert - 3 engineer days - £1800 Discussions with AMRC - 4 engineer days - £2400
Impact The project investigated novel design and manufacturing techniques, which show the potential for manufacturing lightweight structural frameworks at high manufacturing rate using carbon fibre reinforced polyamide matrix laminate or tubing and metallic joints. Novel joining techniques have been developed to provide connection by interlocking so as to eliminate mechanical fasteners and adhesive bonding. the project results are being utilised with the CIMComp project team involvement in a BAE systems led Innovate UK project. HITEA for fighter aircraft primary structure joints. The result of a successful partnership on the project is evidenced; By the research fellow on the project joining one of the project's industrial partners (Bighead) to develop new fastener types and application techniques initially investigated during the project. Envisaged market sectors for these are worldwide automotive bodies, lorry structures and wind turbine generators.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Thermoplastic Matrix CFC / Metallic Joint Framework Structure Manufacture 
Organisation Tencate
Country Netherlands 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to Cranfield University for the six-month project 'Thermoplastic Matrix CFC / Metallic Joint Framework Structure Manufacture'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributed to the Hub priority research theme 'High rate deposition and rapid processing technologies'. The project investigated novel design and manufacturing techniques, which show the potential for manufacturing lightweight structural frameworks at high manufacturing rate using carbon fibre reinforced polyamide matrix laminate or tubing and metallic joints. Novel joining techniques have been developed to provide connection by interlocking so as to eliminate mechanical fasteners and adhesive bonding. The project aimed to establish the feasibility and potential affordability of the conceptual process in terms of frame section and joining piece manufacture and frame and joint attachment technique, and to propose framework designs based on the proposed approach for structural applications. Materials supply - from Tencate, Netherlands £5000 Braided carbon PA6 tubing manufacture by Dresden University - £4500 Discussions with Expert - 3 engineer days - £1800 Discussions with AMRC - 4 engineer days - £2400
Impact The project investigated novel design and manufacturing techniques, which show the potential for manufacturing lightweight structural frameworks at high manufacturing rate using carbon fibre reinforced polyamide matrix laminate or tubing and metallic joints. Novel joining techniques have been developed to provide connection by interlocking so as to eliminate mechanical fasteners and adhesive bonding. the project results are being utilised with the CIMComp project team involvement in a BAE systems led Innovate UK project. HITEA for fighter aircraft primary structure joints. The result of a successful partnership on the project is evidenced; By the research fellow on the project joining one of the project's industrial partners (Bighead) to develop new fastener types and application techniques initially investigated during the project. Envisaged market sectors for these are worldwide automotive bodies, lorry structures and wind turbine generators.
Start Year 2017
 
Description Thermoplastic Matrix CFC / Metallic Joint Framework Structure Manufacture 
Organisation University of Sheffield
Department Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre (AMRC)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The Hub awarded a £50,000 feasibility study grant to Cranfield University for the six-month project 'Thermoplastic Matrix CFC / Metallic Joint Framework Structure Manufacture'.
Collaborator Contribution The project contributed to the Hub priority research theme 'High rate deposition and rapid processing technologies'. The project investigated novel design and manufacturing techniques, which show the potential for manufacturing lightweight structural frameworks at high manufacturing rate using carbon fibre reinforced polyamide matrix laminate or tubing and metallic joints. Novel joining techniques have been developed to provide connection by interlocking so as to eliminate mechanical fasteners and adhesive bonding. The project aimed to establish the feasibility and potential affordability of the conceptual process in terms of frame section and joining piece manufacture and frame and joint attachment technique, and to propose framework designs based on the proposed approach for structural applications. Materials supply - from Tencate, Netherlands £5000 Braided carbon PA6 tubing manufacture by Dresden University - £4500 Discussions with Expert - 3 engineer days - £1800 Discussions with AMRC - 4 engineer days - £2400
Impact The project investigated novel design and manufacturing techniques, which show the potential for manufacturing lightweight structural frameworks at high manufacturing rate using carbon fibre reinforced polyamide matrix laminate or tubing and metallic joints. Novel joining techniques have been developed to provide connection by interlocking so as to eliminate mechanical fasteners and adhesive bonding. the project results are being utilised with the CIMComp project team involvement in a BAE systems led Innovate UK project. HITEA for fighter aircraft primary structure joints. The result of a successful partnership on the project is evidenced; By the research fellow on the project joining one of the project's industrial partners (Bighead) to develop new fastener types and application techniques initially investigated during the project. Envisaged market sectors for these are worldwide automotive bodies, lorry structures and wind turbine generators.
Start Year 2017
 
Title Method and apparatus for weaving a three-dimensional fabric 
Description Potluri, P., Jetavat, D., Sharma S. (2017) Method and apparatus for weaving a three-dimensional fabric, US Patent 9,598,798. 
IP Reference US9598798 
Protection Patent application published
Year Protection Granted 2017
Licensed No
Impact Knowledge.
 
Description 11th International Conference on Manufacturing of Advanced Composites (ICMAC 2018) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact It was with great honour that the EPSRC Future Composites Manufacturing Research Hub hosted the 11th International Conference on Manufacturing of Advanced Composites (ICMAC11) on 11th-12th July 2018. The conference was organised on behalf of the British Composites Society (a division of the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining) and was held in the brand new Advanced Manufacturing Building at the University of Nottingham. ICMAC11 brought together composite manufacturing scientists, engineers and end users from academia and industry to hear about the latest developments from pioneers and emerging leaders in the composites field. The extensive programme was attended by over 120 delegates and featured 40 oral presentations across two parallel sessions, with a further 12 papers presented in a dedicated poster session. There was a truly international feel to the conference, with delegates travelling from as far as New Zealand, Japan and USA to present papers. Stimulating keynote presentations were delivered at the beginning of each day, inspiring and captivating attendees. The first was from Prof Remko Akkerman, University of Twente, who shared new thermoplastic processing developments at TPRC in the Netherlands. The second was from Prof Simon Bickerton, University of Auckland, who presented his work on preform quality assessment conducted during his 3 years at BMW, Munich. A full programme followed, with sessions focusing on areas such as Advanced Fibre Placement, Sensing and Inspection and Emerging Processes. Interactive workshops were held in the afternoon sessions, including training on TexGen, the University of Nottingham's Textile modelling software led by Dr Louise Brown, and a round-robin discussion on resin shrinkage measurement led by Dr Nicholas Boyard (Nantes). Networking opportunities were abundant and were formally recognised as a key motivating factor for conference attendance from the feedback received. The conference included an evening dinner reception at the Nottingham Council House, one of the region's most iconic buildings - which offered an opportunity for further networking, surpassed by the opportunity to watch England lose their World Cup Semi-final match against Croatia.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description 18 European Conference on Composite Materials- 25th June 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Multifunctional project were invited to present a conference paper at the ECCM conference paper from multifuncitonal project
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description 2nd International Symposium on Multiscale Experimental Mechanics (ISMEM 2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Dulieu-Barton and Thomsen O.T conducted a key note presentation on "Towards a new paradigm for high-fidelity testing and integrated multi-scale modelling of composite substructures and components".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description AMPERE Report publication invitation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Mihalis Kazilas, Feasibility project 'Microwave Heating through embedded slotted coaxial cables for composites manufacturing' were invited to write a small report on the project results and future prospects for the AMPERE (Association for Microwave Power in Europe for Research and Education)
newsletter http://www.twi-innovation-network.com/news-events/bcc-successfully-delivers-its-first-epsrc-funded-project/#.XEshRnYw50Q.linkedin
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.twi-innovation-network.com/news-events/bcc-successfully-delivers-its-first-epsrc-funded-p...
 
Description Advanced Engineering Show 2017 and 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact The Leadership Team attended the Advanced Engineering Show 1st-2nd November at the NEC, Birmingham (UK). Advanced Engineering is the UK's largest meeting place for advanced engineers, and the flagship exhibition for the Hub. The event attracted over 16,000 visitors across two days, and the Hub exhibited alongside some of the industry's biggest names. The Hub hosted a drinks reception on the afternoon for partners across the supply chain, from a range of composite engineering specialisms including automation, design and test engineering, process control, and machining. The Hub also hosted an Open Forum event where Hub investigators presented their current research, outputs, and future direction to attendees. Dr Rob Backhouse, Engineering Specialist and Global Process Owner (Polymer Composites), at Rolls Royce Plc gave an industry viewpoint on the Future Composites Manufacturing Research Hub. New for 2017, the 3D backlit stand provided a talking point to attract visitors, who could view exhibits and samples, pick up a Hub brochure, watch video presentations, and network with the Hub team.
The Hub's Management Group and a selection of researchers attended the Advanced Engineering Show 2018, held on 31st October - 1st November at the NEC, Birmingham. This event is the UK's largest annual engineering and manufacturing event that connects OEMS, Tier 1 manufacturers and supply chain partners. It is also the primary networking and showcasing opportunity for CIMComp to engage with the industrial community within the UK.
With an attendance of 15,000 visitors over the two days, the Hub was pleased to exhibit the most recent developments during the one-hour open forum session, where project leads, researchers and postgraduates delivered their research to a full auditorium. The Hub was delighted to welcome Guy Atkins, Managing Director of Jo Bird & Co Ltd, who discussed their collaboration with the University of Bristol's Industrial Doctorate Centre (IDC). Jo Bird and Co currently sponsor Laxman Sivanathan, an EngD student who has been instrumental in helping them to win their second Queen's Award for Enterprise in 5 years.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018
URL https://cimcomp.ac.uk/hub-news/advanced-engineering-show-2018-hub-to-showcase-outputs-and-future-vis...
 
Description CAMX 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact In October 2018, the Hub Director, Prof Nick Warrior, was invited to participate in an international expert mission to the USA to understand and benchmark the US composites materials landscape, as part of the NCMC addition to the NCC and UK High Value Manufacturing Catapult. Nick represented the UK academic community alongside UK industry experts, members of the HVMC, Innovate UK and BEIS. The group spent two days in Dallas at the CAMX exhibition before travelling to the Oakridge National Laboratory and the Institute for Advanced Composites Manufacturing Innovation (IACMI ). The trip was an excellent way to get an overview of the composite materials capabilities in the US in a short space of time.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Composites UK Conference - May 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Thomas Turner was asked to be a keynote Composite Leadership Forum Skills event
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description FPCM14 - June 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Mikhail Matveev was asked to conduct a presentation at FPCM14 - June 2018
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Farnborough Air show 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact In conjunction with colleagues at the University of Nottingham's Centre for Aerospace Manufacturing and Institute for Aerospace Technology, CIMComp was 1 of 1500 exhibitors that were invited to showcase at the Farnborough International Airshow 2018. With over 70,000 trade and public visitors over 7 days, Farnborough is the most significant aerospace event in the world, with impressive flight demonstrations and exhibits from Tier 1 suppliers and OEMs, as well as live STEM related activities, it provides an excellent opportunity to promote CIMComp and the work of our member institutions and partners
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description FrontUQ18 and Italian InterPore Chapter meeting (Pavia, Italy, 5-7 September 2018) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Marco Iglesias gave a talk as an invited speaker at FrontUQ18 and Italian InterPore Chapter meeting (Pavia, Italy, 5-7 September 2018)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Great Composites challenge 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact An event, which included elements of lab training and solving composite manufacturing challenges, was organised for Hub researchers at the University of Nottingham in July 2018. Over 30 people took part in a resin infusion challenge, dubbed the 'Great Composites Bake Off', in which researchers had to work in teams to layup and infuse a complex composite component within two hours. The panel with the least visible defects was selected by members of the Researcher Network and the winning team (including researchers from Bristol, Cranfield and Nottingham) was awarded a prize. The event received very positive feedback from all participants and more competitions of this kind will follow in the future.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Hub Launch Event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact In May, the Hub held its launch event in Nottingham to introduce current funded research and explain how the wider composites community can engage with the Hub. Half of the 135 registered delegates at the event represented the aerospace, automotive, defence, energy and rail sectors, from all aspects of the composites supply chain.
Andy Long opened the proceedings on 4th May with an introduction to the Hub, outlining the objectives over the next seven years and how they fit within the broader UK composites strategy. Enrique Garcia, Chief Technology Officer at the National Composites Centre (NCC) and member of the industrial Advisory Board, explained the importance of the Hub from an industrial perspective and talked about the role the NCC will play in pulling through promising technologies, in order to advance them through the Technology Readiness Levels in preparation for industrial adoption. Ivana Partridge discussed recent success stories from the Industrial Doctoral Training Centre in Composites Manufacturing and explained how the IDC will deliver the next generation of skilled composite engineers to support these fundamental developments in composites manufacturing. This event has provided us with the perfect platform to introduce the Hub to new potential stakeholders, in our effort to become the national centre of excellence in fundamental research for composites manufacturing.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://netcomposites.com/news/2017/may/09/future-composites-manufacturing-research-hub-launched/
 
Description Hub Media video 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact The hub launched its state of the art animated video showcasing its Core projects and Feasibility studies. The aim of the activity is to attract interest and promote the Hub, It was a great opportunity to hold the video launch at the Advanced Engineering event 2018 as was it watched by many of the 15,000 delegates that passed by the Hub stand. Many delegates stopped and held discussions with the hub stand representatives about the content.
The videos's promotion through Twitter also has attracted people to select it and view it.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019
URL https://cimcomp.ac.uk/
 
Description Hub Open Day 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The Hub hosted it's first Open Day in July 2018, which was a great opportunity to celebrate the first year and showcase achievements to both academia and industry. The celebrations were well received by an attendance of over 120 delegates from UK and international academic institutions and companies. The Hub was delighted to welcome two keynote speakers to the event: Dr Turlough McMahon from Airbus UK who presented the manufacturing challenges for future composite aerostructures; and Andy Smith from Gordon Murray Design who spoke about sandwich panel composites in volume automotive applications. The event also recognised the work of 35 Hub-affiliated PhD and EngD students as they conducted poster presentations and delivered two minute summaries of their research, conveying that the future really is bright for composites and manufacturing. The posters were judged by attendees and prizes were awarded to the top three during a drinks reception following the event.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/epsrc-future-composites-manufacturing-research-hubidc-open-day-regist...
 
Description Hub newsletter 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Our quarterly newsletter reaches out to industrial partners and disseminates Hub news and activities. The newsletter currently has over 250 subscribers with over a quarter of readers outside the UK and nearly 20% of those outside Europe.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018
 
Description JEC World 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact In March 2018, Hexcel Reinforcements exhibited the results of a collaboration with the University of Nottingham at JEC World in Paris. This automotive demonstrator component was the result of a Feasibility Study funded by CIMComp in 2013, which aimed to develop a forming simulation tool for complex 3D preforms manufactured from multiple plies of non-crimp fabric. The simulation tool was used to assist in the development of more drapeable fabrics suitable for use in the low pressure Double Diaphragm Forming process. The demonstrator component and the simulation output was shown to over 40,000 visitors at the JEC event, the largest composites trade show in the world.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.jeccomposites.com/knowledge/international-composites-agenda/jec-world-2018
 
Description MARINCOMP International Symposium - Novel Composite Materials & Processes for Offshore Renewable Energy 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Invited to present at the conference - Dulieu-Barton and Thomsen O.T., "Towards a new paradigm for high-fidelity testing and integrated multi-scale modelling of composite substructures and components".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Media partnership 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Working with the Hub's media partner, NetComposites, the Hub reaches nearly 800 unique users per quarter via press releases disseminated to the wider commercial community. Press releases this year have announced the successful Feasibility Studies, advertised the Hub's involvement at the Advanced Engineering Show and strategic partnership with ICMAC 2018, and publicised our first annual free-to-attend Hub-IDC Open Day. 13.03.18 https://netcomposites.com/news/2018/march/13/future-composites-manufacturing-research-hub-publishes-conference-programme/ 06.03.16 https://netcomposites.com/news/2018/march/06/call-for-abstracts-extended-for-icmac-2018/ 28.11.17 https://netcomposites.com/news/2017/november/28/future-composites-manufacturing-research-hub-partners-with-icmac-2018/ 21.11.17 https://netcomposites.com/news/2017/november/21/future-composites-manufacturing-research-hub-second-call-for-feasibility-studies/ 24.10.17 https://netcomposites.com/news/2017/october/24/advanced-engineering-2017-future-composites-manufacturing-research-hub-showcases-outputs-and-future-direction/ 3.10.17 https://netcomposites.com/news/2017/october/03/future-composites-manufacturing-hub-issues-funding-for-six-feasibility-studies/ 26.09.17 https://netcomposites.com/news/2017/september/26/motorcycle-footrest-bracket-created-with-hexcel-carbon-technologies/ 09.05.17 https://netcomposites.com/news/2017/may/09/future-composites-manufacturing-research-hub-launched/ 11.04.17 https://netcomposites.com/news/2017/april/11/programme-for-epsrc-future-composites-manufacturing-hub-launch-event-announced/ 06.12.16 https://netcomposites.com/news/2016/december/06/nottingham-to-lead-new-103m-composite-manufacturing-research-hub/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Multicomp 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Two-day conference involving a mix of academic and industry partners, providing an opportunity for awareness raising of the Hub initiative, dissemination of research, and networking with the intended purpose to generate new industrial and academic partner engagement.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Organisation and chair of the IMechE PostGrad Researcher Conference, Glasgow (6th/ 7th December 2018) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact Dr Daniel Mulvihill organised and chaired the IMechE PostGrad Researcher Conference in Glasgow on the 6th and 7th December 2018.
International awareness-raising of Hub research and initiative
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Outreach to school students 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Michael Elkington at the University of Bristol has led an outreach activity designed to promote engineering and higher education to secondary school students. A full one day program was developed, enabling students to gain hands-on experience with a mini project to design and build a rocket. Alongside the practical work, students were introduced to engineering and pathways to higher education. The event has been running for 3 years with a range of state schools across the Bristol area, involved 11 Hub PhD and EngD students to date.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016,2017,2018
 
Description Researcher Network event 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact The Researchers' Network (RN) aims promote research collaborations by organising regular social and professional events. The RN is steered by a dedicated committee with members from several Hub universities (Bristol, Manchester, Nottingham and Southampton) and is open to organising new exciting events and activities.

Hub researchers visited the Imperial War Museum, Duxford, to see inspiring examples of composite materials used on iconic aircraft such as Concord. The event was organised by the Researchers' Network in February 2019, gathering together almost 30 researchers from Bristol, Cambridge, Cranfield, Manchester, Nottingham and Southampton, including the new cohort of Hub PhD and EngD students. The researchers were shown how the aerospace industry adopted materials such as plywood and hardened fabrics for the WW1 Airco DH.9, filament winding for the Polaris missile in the 1960s, through to extensive use of carbon fibre composites on the Eurofighter Typhoon. The event concluded with dinner, providing an excellent opportunity for the group to network and reflect on their visit to the museum.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description SAMPE Europe presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Prof Andy Long invited as a keynote speaker to present at SAMPE Europe
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.sampe-europe.org/
 
Description STEM - 88 Pianists 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact An EngD student from Nottingham has been involved in a high profile STEM initiative to fuse engineering and art together, in an attempt to encourage more school pupils to consider a career in engineering. Preetum Mistry has been working on the "88 Pianists" project to try and break the current world record for the greatest number of people to play a single piano. Led by the University of Cambridge, the project is a collaboration involving numerous academic institutions across the UK to design mechanical fingers to enable 88 people to play the piano at once. Preetum has been involved in co-ordinating four half-day outreach sessions to Year 5 and 6 students at local schools, focusing on design, engineering and music. The project involves 2000 pupils from 35 schools throughout the UK, all trying to design and mechanical methods to play the piano from 5 metres away. Preetum was a member of the selection panel and is currently working on building the winning designs into full-size mechanisms. The students will then be taught how to use them to a play a newly commissioned piece of music composed by Martin Riley, conducted by Julian Lloyd Webber. This will be performed at the opening ceremony of the 69th CIRP General Assembly (The International Academy for Production Engineering) on 19th August 2019 in Birmingham, in an attempt to break the world record and mark the celebration of the 500th anniversary of Leonardo Da Vinci. This is a great example of how young engineers in manufacturing can foster creativity within school students and excite them about engineering.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019
 
Description ScienceX 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact University of Manchester - School of Materials in the University of Manchester participated in a science festival (ScienceX on 14/4/2018) at Trafford centre introducing and promoting Textile Composites for advanced engineering applications.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description The Composites Centre Research Showcase, Imperial College London, 24th September 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an open day or visit at my research institution
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact The Composites Centre Research Showcase, Imperial College London displayed a wide range of oral and poster presentations which provided the opportunity to engage with industrial stakeholders and enhance awareness of the breadth and depth of Composites Research at the Composites Centre.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Twitter 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact We launched out twitter account @EPSRC_CIMComp in August. On the twitter story feed we disseminate news of Hub activity including promotion of event attendance, success stories, and Hub-related vacancies. These tweets are regularly seen by over 7,000 Twitter users, broadening our reach across both expert and general audiences.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018
URL https://twitter.com/
 
Description Website 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The Hub website - cimcomp.ac.uk - reaching over 5,500 unique users over the last year. Visitors to the site can find out more about the Hub's vision, team, and research, and get involved by learning about recruitment opportunities, studying with the IDC, or by signing up to our quarterly newsletter.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017,2018
URL https://cimcomp.ac.uk/about/