Food riots and food rights: the moral and political economy of accountability for hunger

Lead Research Organisation: Institute of Development Studies
Department Name: Research Department

Abstract

This research falls within the theme of Resource Scarcity, Growth and Poverty Reduction, addressing the question of how to mitigate the risk of social and political conflict around resource scarcity in poor and food insecure countries. The challenge of world hunger is not only about growing more food for more people with fewer resources: it is also about making sure people can access that food. This means ensuring that governments can be made to answer when they fail to protect people's access to the food they need. But how can governments be made more accountable for hunger? This research aims to answer this question.

Food prices began to rise and became more erratic after 2007; at the same time, people in developing countries have taken two different approaches to making their governments more accountable for food security. One is right-to-food movements - efforts by human rights and antipoverty activists to secure and realise a legal right to food which have taken off in 20 countries over the 2000s. The second is food riots, mostly unorganised protests over sharp rises in food prices, which were seen in 60 developing countries in 2008 and others in 2011. They led to several governments falling and others acting to protect people's access to food. Some people argue that the Arab Spring was triggered by fury over the cost of food.

European history shows that similar food riots have often succeeded in holding governments to a rough kind of account. But it has also shown that people rarely protest out of sheer hunger: they usually have ideas about their rights to adequate provisions, and hold government responsible for protecting them - a set of ideas known as the 'moral economy'. This research plans to look at whether and how these riots and right-to-food campaigns actually worked in this recent food crisis. By this we mean whether they triggered government action to protect people's rights to food, now and in the future.

The study will take place in developing countries with large problems of poverty and hunger - Bangladesh, India, Kenya and Mozambique - where there have also been efforts to get governments to respond to people's concerns about the cost of food. To answer whether and how these efforts work to make governments more accountable, the research will ask three questions: 1) do officials and policymakers fully understand how food price rises affect people? Specifically, do they understand how quality of life, stress and the work (mainly by women) needed to keep families fed is affected by food price rises? 2) Do people hold ideas about the 'moral economy' that mean they think governments should put people's access to affordable food first? If so, what can governments do when food prices rise because of international factors not in their control? And 3) under what conditions do riots and right-to-food campaigns actually work to make governments more accountable for hunger?

The research will work at two levels. First, it will study what motivates protests and other direct actions, by looking closely at such events over the food crisis (2007-12), and holding interviews and focus group discussions with activists, protestors and affected groups (particularly women on low incomes). Second it will study official statements and policy changes, and interview key officials and policymakers. It will combine findings from these two levels in an analysis of whether the protests or campaigns worked and the general conditions under which popular mobilisation is likely to increase accountability for hunger.

The research will help policymakers and donor agencies understand the full impact of food price rises so that they can do better at anticipating and monitoring their effects, and protecting people against them. It will also create opportunities for activists fighting for the right to food to meet and communicate more constructively with policymakers and government officials.

Planned Impact

The project aims for impact on policy and practice among civil society organisations and social movements focused on accountability and rights to food (e.g. the Indian Right to Food Campaign, Oxfam GB's Grow Campaign); officials and policymakers in Bangladesh, India, Kenya and Mozambique, specifically food security units and social protection agencies; and sections of bilateral donor and multilateral agencies (e.g. FAO and World Bank) responsible for food security and social protection. The project will also engage researchers interested in the politics of accountability for hunger.

The research aims to contribute to strengthening accountability for food security by i) improving understanding of the grievances people have for mobilising around food, to help activists and civil society groups link with popular concerns, provide officials and aid donors with more sensitive indicators of food crisis, and enable donors to promote 'politically-optimal' social protection responses; ii) generating knowledge of how governments respond to mobilisation, to enable more informed political risk analyses, set more realistic parameters for donor technical advice and policy conditions during crises, and inform food security accountability initiatives (e.g. the Hunger Reduction Commitment Index); and iii) amplifying voice for right-to-food activism, by creating new platforms and spaces for constructive policy engagement by activists.

Potential political sensitivity around food security suggests the need for close and sustained engagement with key actors rather than a more public engagement. The strategy will be delivered in two ways. First, by creating a Reference Group comprising representatives of the audience groups identified above, to be invited to engage at key stages: the inception stage workshop (Phase 2), findings workshop (Phase 5), and final international and/or national workshops (Phase 6). The Reference Group will create a receptive environment for the research findings and a space for open engagement between activists and policymakers. It aims to ensure the relevance of the research, provide feedback, and facilitate connections to aid data collection and policy influence.

The second element of the Impact Strategy involves communicating with a wider set of key stakeholders and opinion leaders on food security and economic crisis, rights, civil society and protest. A database will be constructed from the teams' in-country networks and the IDS contact management system. This group will be contacted through regular brief email updates on progress throughout the project, and policy briefing notes when results are available.

Research outputs will include individual country case studies, to be disseminated to a national audience, and a comparative synthesis report, to be disseminated at an international workshop in Phase 6. To ensure the research remains connected to the concerns of food insecure people, findings will also be disseminated through at least one local level workshop to which participants from the communities in which focus group discussions were undertaken will be invited.

The Impact Strategy will be managed by a dedicated team member with extensive international expertise in facilitation of multi-stakeholder engagement processes in policy and civil society networks. The costs will include staff time, travel and subsistence costs for five Reference Group members to participate in three stakeholder research workshops; and the costs of national and local research workshops.

The impact of the research will be monitored quantitatively by tracking communications and interactions with key stakeholder groups, and qualitatively, through discussions with the Reference Group members, feedback from community level workshops, scrutinising statements, documents, media coverage and public discourse, and evaluating changes in the policy space for civil society engagement over the right to food.
 
Description Our research confirms our hypothesis that popular protests around food -food riots - happen because for the precarious urban poor, these are the best means of getting governments to respond to food price rises or shortages. Popular protest usually elicits a response, but not always. The case of Kenya - where protests were ignored by the press and political elites - is instructive: elite groups gain little from policies to tackle food crises, and electoral success does not depend on whether the urban poor think the government is legitimate. The social contract has been eroded by years of food crisis that the government has been slow and uneven in addressing. In Bangladesh, despite international press statements to the contrary, there were no 'food riots' in 2007-12. This was because the moral and political economy worked sufficiently well that in general, people did not need to take to the streets - the government responded, reasonably effectively and in time. A difference between contemporary 'food riots' and historical protests is that 21st century people see elections as an incentive for governments to respond - people claim to be willing to vote against governments that fail to act. The willingness to at least attempt to protect people against food price rises or shortages is foundational for public authority and legitimacy.

The project produced four rich case studies of struggles over food at a time of concern about commodity price volatility, climate change, land grabbing, and population growth outstripping agricultural productivity. These provide in-depth analysis of issues typically excluded from research into food security issues, including the moral and political economy of food crises, which help to explain why governments respond in the ways that they do (for instance, by banning exports), even when doing so is so often counter-productive. The cases illustrate the importance of context, and comparatively, reveal the common factors underpinning popular and policy responses to food shocks.

Our political events catalogue has produced several methodological advances including in a) the use of online news media in developing countries and b) the construction of event catalogues for political analysis. Our use of in-depth qualitative work to enrich our quantitative case analysis has given us insights into the limitations of news reporting of protest. As most protest analysis depends on news reporting of events as data, our findings present a crucial challenge to the validity of much of this research beyond a very basic understanding of the politics behind protest.

A very exciting aspect of the research is that we have been able to build bridges across disciplines, in particular to bring together historians of food riots in Europe with a focus on contemporary societies through development studies, political science and sociology, and anthropology. This has been a most productive engagement, bringing social history to the heart of the analysis of food politics in contemporary development.
Exploitation Route Our research outcomes are being taken forward by researchers at country level participating in policy spaces and debates around food and popular politics. Insights from Indian and other experiences with mobilization around the right to food are being shared with activists, scholars, policymakers and practitioners in each country, and results used to plan and organise. At global level, researchers have been involved in the Committee on Food Security at the Food and Agricultural Organisation, been interviewed by the UK-US Taskforce on Agri-food System Resilience, and participated in an expert meeting on protest by the Fiedrich Ebert Stiftung/Carnegie Council, among others.

The project has been successful with mass media coverage. The Indian newspaper Down To Earth ran a special issue on the research. A leading Kenyan newspaper ran an op-ed and several Bangladeshi newspapers ran stories, including a full business page article in the leading English daily. One of the most influential development bloggers, Duncan Green, reviewed the research.

The next step is funding proposals for meetings to support preparation of a book manuscript. Other academic outputs are in process. A plan to follow up the research in Bangladesh with a study of the effects of the 1974 famine there has emerged from the project, and a meeting is being held this year to develop proposals.
Sectors Agriculture, Food and Drink,Communities and Social Services/Policy,Government, Democracy and Justice,Security and Diplomacy

URL http://foodriots.org
 
Description As the research was only completed in October 2014, and we are still working on our academic outputs from the project, it is early to identify any economic and social impacts of the grant. However, our project has made a demonstrable contribution, beyond that to scholarship, in two ways. The first has been in challenging the mass media to reflect on its reportage of protests. Part of our research involved compiling political events based on newspaper reports. Comparing national with international press and national coverage with local interpretations of events made it clear that coverage of so-called 'food riots' by the international mass media was distinctly unreliable, and that national press coverage was typically uneven and biased. In at least two countries, these findings have been considerable interest to members of the media. In Kenya, colleagues have engaged with journalists in a workshop to discuss the challenges of protest coverage. In Bangladesh, journalists have been involved in guiding the project itself, and coverage of the findings has reflected the media's interest in considering its own role in publicizing popular struggles, for instance, around the right to food. It is clear from the Indian case, that the mass media plays a major role in turning a food crisis situation into a political event. We will continue to engage with members of the media on the coverage of 'food riots', in particular when we publish our methodological paper on the issues uncovered in using newspaper reports to compile events catalogues. The second way in which our work has influenced 'the real world' has been through connecting different activists linked to issues of food in the global north and south. Through public events in London and Sussex as part of the project, we were able to bring prominent writers, activists and speakers like Raj Patel, Professor John Bohstedt, Salil Shetty of Amnesty International, members of the Indian Right to Food movement (who were part of our team) and of FIAN together to debate progress towards the right to food, challenges and the connections between struggles around food in north and south, situated, as they are, within an increasingly globalized food regime. In each of the countries, in addition, we were able to bring together activists, policymakers and practitioners in new spaces, to discuss the connections between human rights, protest and the politics of food in ways that had not been possible before. This has created the bases for new coalitions and started new conversations that we will continue to track. Since the completion of the project, 11 months ago, a number of interesting and significant spin-off activities have taken place in each of the countries. In Mozambique, a book about the food and fuel riots is being written based on the research conducted there. The research generated a great deal of critical interest and discussion among donors, civil society actors and academics, including around issues such as the causes of the riots, and the problem of the right to food. Presentations at the IESE Annual Conference in 2015 and in a smaller more specialist workshop sparked off a great deal of discussion and there have been written outputs in the annual report on Mozambique's development challenges. All of this has been helped by the Portuguese translation of the country study from the report. With additional funding from elsewhere, the team has also been preparing briefing papers on key findings from the research. In Bangladesh, the research has sparked interest among the younger researchers involved to produce an edited volume focusing on the right to food and subsistence protests. There has been considerable interest in the media, signalling that these are issues that people consider to be important and worthy of research, including two lengthy articles in the English and Bengali press. A book proposal has been prepared and a publisher has been preliminarily approached for the work. Given that there has recently been a major regional conference on the right to food in Bangladesh, it is clear that there is much interest in this area. A second research spin-off has been meetings among academics from history, the social sciences, and arts and culture as well as journalists to discuss the famine of 1974. Findings from the Bangladesh study encouraged the team to recognise that the famine had had significant and lasting impacts on the social contract in that country, and a major research proposal is now underway. In India, an article from the study is being prepared for Economic and Political Weekly. Additional research is being planned and a proposal developed by other researchers and involving the original team and its advisors is to look at the effects of conflicts among marginalised communities on food security in India. In Kenya, there has been a workshop and follow-up work is ongoing with the civil society organisation Bunge La Mwananchi, or the Ordinary People's Parliament, to build on the themes of the right to food. Our findings have also been sought out for publication on the openDemocracy website, where an article reached audiences in Arabic as well as in English, and was shared almost 500 times on social media. At the invitation of a major academic publisher, we are now finalising a proposal for an edited volume about the research findings, along with some other authors. Since the last submission, the findings from the research have also been used in a major high-level report on food and nutrition security in Bangladesh. A monograph that was stimulated by the research findings in Bangladesh has been published by Oxford University Press. And the manuscript for an edited book is to be submitted in March 2017. Since the last submission, the Routledge book has been published, and disseminated through podcasts and events in the different countries. Also since the last submission, the findings and methodologies in the food riots work have provided the basis for a further new body of work, this time on 'fuel riots' or energy price protests, a phenomenon which increasingly appears to parallel the form and impact of food riots. An initial £50,000 grant produced a working paper in 2018. This led to a proposal for a larger project on the issue, to start in April 2019. This project, with a budget of £430,000 funded through the Action for Empowerment and Accountability (A4EA) programme (a £5 million programme funded by UK Aid), will study energy politics in Pakistan, Nigeria and Mozambique, in addition to some multi-country cross-national analysis. THe project will complete in 2020.
First Year Of Impact 2019
Sector Agriculture, Food and Drink,Energy,Government, Democracy and Justice,Other
Impact Types Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description Action for Empowerment and Accountability (A4EA) research programme
Amount £5,000,000 (GBP)
Organisation Institute of Development Studies 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2019 
End 09/2020
 
Description Action for Empowerment and Accountability programme
Amount £5,000,000 (GBP)
Organisation Institute of Development Studies 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2017 
End 03/2018
 
Title Food Riots and Food Riots ReShare collection number 851921 
Description A set of research guidelines, event catalogues based on news media analysis, and textual and pictorial data from focus group discussions. Data are in English, Bengali, Hindi, Portuguese. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2015 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact This data provided the evidence for the analysis in a series of research outputs and uptake activities relating to the right to food and the management of food crises in Bangladesh, India, Kenya and Mozambique. The data from the political events catalogues are currently being used to produce analysis of the challenges and weaknesses of media-based analysis of contentious politics. 
 
Description Country Strategic Food and Nutritrion Security Review, Bangladesh 
Organisation European Commission
Department Seventh Framework Programme (FP7)
Country European Union (EU) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution The Food Riots project PI has been recruited as a member of a high level expert team to prepare a strategic review on food and nutrition security in Bangladesh. One of the specific areas on which Naomi Hossain has been asked to comment is on responses to food priceshocks, and how they can be better handled to protect food and nutrition security. This has made it possible for us to share some of our findings about how urban and rural people in Bangladesh experienced the global food crises of 2007-12, and the political implications of those experiences.
Collaborator Contribution Colleagues from Ulster University, the International Center for Diarrhoeal DIsease Research, Bangladesh, and the International Food Policy Research Institute are also part of the team, which is working closely with the World Food Programme in Bangladesh to prepare this Review. The Review is funded by the WFP.
Impact None so far.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Global Platform on Participation and Protest 
Organisation Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung:
Country Germany 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I am acting as an advisor to the ongoing project of compiling data about popular protests and political participation
Collaborator Contribution Indirectly, via myself.
Impact An online platform has been produced and will be regularly updated, and new projects being curated at the time.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Proposal on the impacts of conflict on food security for marginalised communities 
Organisation Coventry University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution A new research proposal is building on the work done under the Food Riots project between one of the Indian team members, one of our research advisory group, and colleagues in Coventry University
Collaborator Contribution This is an ongoing process, and the results of the proposal are not yet known
Impact A research proposal in the areas of food security and conflict is being developed.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Advisor to Global Platform on Participation and Protest 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Having presented research findings from the Food Riots and Food Rights research to the Freidrich Ebert Stiftung Foundation conference on participation and protest in 2014, we were invited to be part of a group setting up a Global Platform on Participation and Protest, to share our research findings and learning from that project.

The group has now set up the online platform with blog to measure and analyse protests. We will continue to be involved in the analysis, and hope to share our work on the platform also.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://worldprotests.org/#/about
 
Description Blog on fuel riots 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Blog on the phenomenon of fuel riots, comparing to our findings on food riots from the awarded project. The new project on fuel riots has stemmed directly from our ESRC project on food riots, and includes several of the same researchers and partners, and one of the same countries.

The blog was first published on our in-house IDS website https://blogs.oxfam.org/en/content/are-fuel-riots-food-riots-21st-century and then republished on the very popular and widely-read blog of Duncan Green
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://blogs.oxfam.org/en/content/are-fuel-riots-food-riots-21st-century
 
Description Book launch Maputo 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact IESE, the Mozambique team that were part of the Food Riots project, launched their Portuguese language book of the study in March 2018 to a well-attended half-day workshop in Maputo.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.iese.ac.mz/lancamento-do-livro-agora-eles-tem-medo-de-nos/
 
Description British Medical Journal blog 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact This was a blog as part of a larger series on the Right to Food, which drew on our ESRC project findings. The series has been widely read to my knowledge.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://blogs.bmj.com/bmj/2017/03/06/naomi-hossain-the-right-to-food-is-common-sense-in-bangladesh/
 
Description Down to Earth magazine special issue 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact The Indian environmental magazine Down To Earth published interviews and articles about the Food RIots project research, enabling us to reach a far wider section of the Indian audience than we could have conceived.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://www.downtoearth.org.in/interviews/-food-security-not-profit-from-trade-in-food-is-priority-fo...
 
Description Expert group food and nutrition security review Bangladesh 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Naomi Hossain was invited to be a member of an expert group reviewing the food and nutrition security situation in Bangladesh, with the aim of developing strategic recommendations on these issues. The Review team met with top-ranking bureaucratic and political elites, and was able to advance suggestions for policy and practice regarding protection of vulnerable and undernourished populations during periods of crisis. This included an opportunity to raise the matters of the human right to food as a constitutional and policy concern in Bangladesh; the challenge of protecting populations against food price volatility and other types of subsistence crisis, under conditions of increasing global economic and food system integration; and to highlight the particular needs of urban low income populations. All of these issues were uncovered in the process of researching the Food Riots and Food Rights Bangladesh case study.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
 
Description Global Hunger Index 2017 essay 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I was commissioned to write the 2017 essay for the Global Hunger Index Report, hosted by the International Food Policy Research Institute. Referencing our Food Riots, among other research, I was invited to reflect on power inequalities in relation to hunger and malnutrition, and to discuss efforts to distribute power in the food system more equitably. The report and its essay target key policymakers and practitioners in the areas of food security, hunger and malnutrition, and it was an excellent platform for sharing lessons from our Food Riots research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.globalhungerindex.org/issues-in-focus/2017.html
 
Description Kenyan newspaper article 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact The authors of the Kenyan study wrote a opinion piece for the Nation, a leading ENglish language newspaper, showcasing our research results
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://www.nation.co.ke/oped/Opinion/Kenya-is-ill-prepared-for-global-food-price-spikes/-/440808/248...
 
Description Maputo workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact The results of the workshop have fed into the preparation of a book in Portuguese on the Mozambique research study, to be launched in a more public workshop with ministry officials and other practitioners and policymakers. The book is in process and the workshop is being planned.

The meeting helped to clarify and refine findings from the study, with the help of other academics in the country.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Media and Civic Engagement: From Protests to Dialogue panel discussion at Center for International Media Assistance/National Endowment for Democracy, Washington DC 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited to participate in a panel discussion in Washington DC at the Center for International Media Assistance/National Endowment for Democracy. Hosted by former Food Riots project team member, Nick Benequista, invited to discuss our learning about the experience of the food riots of 2008 (in particular) and of media coverage of those events.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hjKPTx-uS-s
 
Description Online essay on Obama's Global Food Security Act 2016 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact This was a blog / essay for the Impact Initiative to publicize the Food Riots project.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.theimpactinitiative.net/blog/obama%E2%80%99s-global-food-security-act-new-global-politics...
 
Description Open Democracy article 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact The article was commissioned by openDemocracy, the website for debate about democracy and human rights. It was translated into Arabic and the editor told me that they had particularly strong traffic from the Arabic-speaking world. The article itself was shared almost 500 times on social media, and openDemocracy receives 750,000 unique visitors each month. So our research findings are likely to have reached several hundred individuals who are interested in human rights and democracy issues.

None noted to date
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.opendemocracy.net/openglobalrights/naomi-hossain/why-food-riots-work-in-21st-century
 
Description Parliamentary Meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The event was a panel discussion of prominent scholars and activitists and our research team hosted by the All Party Parliementary Group on Aid and Food for Development. The meeting was attended by 70 researchers, activitists, NGO workers, policymakers, consultants and practitioners. There was a lively debate afterwards.

The meeting resulted in new connections between participants, and a lively debate about the role of popular protest in shaping food policies in developing countries.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.ids.ac.uk/events/food-riots-or-food-rights
 
Description Podcast 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Invited to discuss the Food Riots and Food Rights project on the 'Permaculture for the People' podcast.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://permacultureforthepeople.org/2018/12/21/episode-6-food-crises-and-food-riots-with-naomi-hoss...
 
Description Podcast Food Riots book 
Form Of Engagement Activity A broadcast e.g. TV/radio/film/podcast (other than news/press)
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact A podcast of the two editors of the Food Riots edited volume (2017) talking about the book and its main findings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.ids.ac.uk/events/podcast-ep-02-food-rights-food-riots-and-the-politics-of-provisions-nao...
 
Description Presentation at Reading University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Around 30 students and scholars were present, including many international scholars from Asia and Africa. THere was a good discussion afterwards.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Presentations at Annual IESE Conference, Maputo, Mozambique's premier social science forum 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Two papers from the research project were presented by early and mid-career researchers involved in the Mozambique study. There was reportedly a great deal of interest in the project.

Colleagues have commented that since the presentations, donors and civil society activists have been discussing the issues raised by the research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.iese.ac.mz/?__target__=home
 
Description Price VOlatility and FInancial Markets 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact This was a presentation at the Stockholm School of EConomics in partnership wtih the Resilience Centre, described below.

Price volatility and financial markets - current debates and implications

Financial players such as investment banks, and financial instruments such as commodity indexes, seem to play a larger role in the global economy today than just a few decades ago. A number of international organizations and scholars have voiced concerns over the risks associated with this larger role, especially as financial capital and actors enter commodity markets such as those for food commodities. The debate peaked in the aftermaths of the 2009-2009 "food crises" which saw rapid increases in food prices globally, and food riots in Haiti, Egypt, Burkina-Faso, Malaysia and others.

But did financial actors really contribute to the last "food crises"? What is their role for price volatility in commodities in general? How do increased prices and price volatility affect food security around the world? And how do high and unpredictable food prices affect overall well-being and development in poor or vulnerable communities?

Invited speakers
We are very proud to present Professor Christopher L. Gilbert, from the SAIS Bologna Center, Johns Hopkins University (Italy), and Dr. Naomi Hossain, Institute of Development Studies (IDS) (United Kingdom) who will share their insights on the topic, and take part of a moderated discussion.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.changingplanet.se/price-volatility-and-financial-markets
 
Description Route to Food Initiative launch in Kenya 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Kenyan team members of the project, Celestine Nyamu-Musembi and Patta Scott-Villiers, were invited to write a piece about the research for the inaugural edition of the magazine Cha Kula, which is part of the Route to Food Initiative. The launch was very well-attended.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description SOuth Asian Dialogue on the right to food 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Dipa Sinha participated in the South Asian Right to Food Dialogue in 2015, where she discussed some of the findings from the food riots project in relation to the right to food movement in India.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.fao.org/right-to-food/news/news-detail/ar/c/1026006/
 
Description Seminar on economic and social rights 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact A panel discussion and debate about human rights in relation to the achievement of economic and social rights, including food. A panel of very prominent development thinkers and practitioners, including the head of Amnesty International, a prominent human rights lawyer, and lead research and communicator at OXfam GB, conducted a lively session that raised questions about how useful human rights approaches were for tackling inequities and crises of food etc.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Workshop with Kenyan journalists 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact In Kenya, a workshop was held with local journalists, to discuss the challenges of reporting on hunger issues in that context.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2012