Building community knowledge about learning and teaching through technology

Lead Research Organisation: Institute of Education
Department Name: Culture, Communication and Media

Abstract

Education is changing. In response to demand for more and better education - more people to higher levels of attainment - the institutions that offer vocational and higher education are having to find ways of doing this without commensurate increase in funding. The only way to improve quality and scale without higher cost is to deploy technology. So there is extensive activity across schools, FE and HE. Investment in all sectors has enabled education to develop a wide range of resources, skills, and teaching methods that make use of many different kinds of technology. However, the activity has not yet focused on achieving the greater productivity we need for all young people to achieve their learning potential. The new policy review of professionalism in the FE sector, in New Challenges, New Chances, makes it timely to investigate how teachers themselves can be supported in developing new models of teaching and learning, given the right tools.

A recent ESRC/EPSRC-funded project produced a new kind of research tool, the Learning Designer, to help the teaching community to innovate effectively and efficiently. The interactive tool elicits the characteristics of a teacher's good pedagogic idea in a structured form, similar to a lesson plan. The program assigns properties to the design: e.g. type of learning outcome, nature of the learning activity, amount of learner and teacher time needed, use of technology, aspects of differentiation. Therefore the program has some knowledge about the learning design, making the Learning Designer a unique and valuable design tool because it can
analyse the teacher's design and provide feedback on the nature of the learner experience, and teacher and learner workload;
use its known properties to find relevant technology-based learning designs that offer alternative ways of teaching to that learning outcome;
store and represent the pedagogy in a form that other teachers can find, adopt and adapt ideas for their own context.

The tool therefore helps teachers build on each others' best ideas for using technology, test them in their own context, improve them, and then use the same tool to contribute their improved versions to the community library. The evaluation with users demonstrated that teachers liked having feedback on their design, thought more about their students' activities, reflected more on workload, and appreciated seeing interesting new ideas for the use of technology.

Now we ask: does it scale up, improve the quality of the learning experience, and improve teacher productivity? We want to test the capacity of the Learning Designer to improve the professionalism of teachers as innovators. We will use three main strands of work to
1. co-develop with teachers a library of learning designs on which teachers can build
2. use community requirements to develop the tool and its links further
3. work with institutions to evaluate how the tool works in practice.
The project will run webinars, workshops, and online support to help teachers create collaboratively their own learning designs to focus on better use of technology. This will develop the community-generated peer-tested library of good pedagogic designs and specifications for software adaptations.

The Learning Designer itself helps to measure impact through student evaluation: designs specify the form of assessment, and the explicit online representation of pedagogy enables students to provide targeted feedback by annotating the same representation.

The tool tests productivity by comparing teacher workload for different designs. In doing so it demonstrates the value of reusing existing designs or resources, which in turn can promote the use of Open Educational Resources. The project work should help our partner colleges to use the data and information generated by their learning management systems to track teacher productivity in terms of enhanced student learning and improved teacher workload.

Planned Impact

The motivation for this project is the need to improve the learning experience and attainment of post-16 students, both for their personal benefit and to enable them to contribute to the knowledge economy. Educational institutions and the teaching community know the importance of deploying technology to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of teaching and learning - this is reflected in many policy documents - but have had little investment, in their time and personal development, for working out how to do this. The technology evolves rapidly, and investment has been targeted more at hardware and software than at R&D for optimising its use. Our research has shown that an interactive learning design tool can support teachers in focusing on the effectiveness and efficiency of their teaching, and in sharing their best ideas. Now we set out to develop this shared community knowledge of how to improve teaching and learning.

Our aim is to help teachers help learners.

The principal tangible output will be a public library of shared learning designs created by the teachers in our partner schools and colleges. To collect and organise these designs the project will use an interactive design tool developed by an earlier ESRC-EPSRC-funded project. The Learning Designer provides a unique methodology for building a public library of learning designs because it helps teachers design, analyse and organise them in terms of the pedagogies and technologies they wish to use. By adopting, improving and sharing their best ideas, teachers can more easily discover how best to use technology to give their students an efficient and effective learning experience.

To achieve this, the project team has planned activities on several fronts:
> dissemination of the idea behind the Learning Designer: i.e. that teachers can innovate with new technology more effectively if they build their knowledge collaboratively;
> co-development with central staff in colleges to integrate the tool and the developing library of learning designs into the normal teaching-learning process;
> collaboration with teaching staff to assist them in using the Learning Designer to generate, test, and share their best ideas, and to build on other teachers' ideas;
> co-development of the public library of learning designs, to ensure that alternative designs relevant to what they are working on in the Learning Designer can be found and presented to teachers at the point of need;
> updating of the advice and guidance in the tool to link teacher-designers to evidence and research relevant to their current pedagogic decisions at the point of need;
> upgrading of the Learning Designer in response to further user requirements, to ensure it blends easily into individual and institutional practice.

These activities aim to contribute four types of impact:
* Academic impact, in the form of a collection of learning designs structured according to theory-based concepts of pedagogy, providing a well-organised body of evidence about how teachers conceptualise their teaching, useful for further theory development in the under-theorised area of technology-based pedagogies.
* Professional impact, in the form of a new type of methodology to develop teachers' professionalism in the skill of optimising the use of digital technologies in teaching and learning in a way that is more likely to achieve greater efficiency and effectiveness of student learning and attainment.
* Economic impact, in the form of help for educational institutions to adapt to a challenging and changing environment by improving the efficiency and effectiveness of their use of technology for teaching and learning.
* Societal impact, in the form of graduates who have been schooled in the use of new technologies for effective independent learning, who are more likely to include this capability in their continuing use of technology for work and leisure.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description The significant contribution of this project is the creation of a new type of tool for helping teachers, in all sectors, to use digital technologies effectively for innovative teaching and learning. We have built and tested an online learning design app for teachers, in all sectors, called the 'Learning Designer'.

These are the main features that make this design tool an important innovation:
• It elicits specific properties of each stage in a sequence of teaching and learning activities, and can therefore provide the user with feedback on the overall nature of the student experience, and the duration of the design in comparison with the intended learning time.
• It prompts critical reflection on the user's pedagogy, their inclusion of a wider range of pedagogical approaches than they normally use, and promotes the use of digital learning analytics as a way of testing the efficacy of each design.
• Because the learning design is created as a digital object, it can then be shared locally or on the online directory of designs for other teachers to access, adopt or adapt to their context.
• The website enables users to submit, review, revise and categorise each other's designs, so that the teaching community gradually builds these designs as shared knowledge of effective designs for learning, with or without technology.

The principal discovery of the project is that members of the teaching community in all sectors, and from many countries, are enthusiastic users and contributors to the website. The tool inaugurates a new way of building teaching community knowledge of effective use of learning technologies. It provides the means for design research collaboration across groups of teachers within and between countries and disciplines.

Because of its nature, the design tool can also be used as a research tool to help in understanding how teachers theorise and articulate their pedagogy. From evaluation of workshops and courses for teachers using the tool, our further findings are that:
• teachers frequently underestimate the duration of the learning time needed for their design, until they use the Learning Designer, and they become much more careful about how long students need for different activities;
• the CRAM modelling process makes teachers more clearly aware of how they spend their own time, and the reality of the time needed for different types of course;
• teachers provide detailed pedagogic reviews, in the Online Challenges from which clear pedagogic principles are emerging;
• the Challenge events are important for eliciting reviews, without which they are rarely offered, just as in the journal review process;
• designs that begin in one subject area or sector or country can be adapted successfully for very different subjects, sectors, and countries;
• it is possible to use the tool, in conjunction with a large-scale online collaborative course, for aggregating teachers' evidence of learning outcomes and effectiveness of a particular learning design or teaching method that has been used in a wide range of implementation contexts;
• for many practising teachers the use of these tools makes them aware of how little time they have for innovation, experimentation or professional development with respect to their teaching - this is not valued by their institutions, and the teachers we have worked with in all sectors are acutely aware of the difficulty of being able to invest time initially even if it is expected to deliver returns on more students and higher attainment in the longer run
• managers are interested in the CRAM tool, although finance managers believe they already understand how to cost teaching, building on their knowledge of how it has always been costed, and on what they have to provide for HEFCE and HESA; there is very little appreciation at senior level of the reality of the cost of teaching.
Exploitation Route Already taken forward by others:
The learning design tool has been used as follows:
- three 'international learning design challenge' events, with >300 participants.
- teacher training and CPD courses run within UCL-IOE
- in a Couresera MOOC on 'ICT in Primary Education', 2013-17
- as the basis for a new VLE for schools developed by a company (ASTRI) in Hong Kong.

Collaborative uses:
The Learning Designer and the CRAM tool have been built into a project funded by Ufi Charitable Trust to develop online CPD courses for the FE and Skills sector on 'blended learning', which also attract teachers from the HE and Schools sectors. During the first 3 runs of the two courses (Nov 2015 - Oct 2016) the courses had > 20,000 active participants (with >40,000 registered), from > 150 countries. All the comments on these tools were highly favourable.

It should be developed professionally as an open source pedagogical design front-end for any VLE a teacher may be using. The current institutional project will assist this.

The Learning Designer tool has been embedded in several research proposals, for the EU Erasmus call, for an ESRC-DFID call, and for the current ESRC Centre for Global Higher Education at UCL-IOE, for which we will study the viability of collaborative learning MOOCs for CPD to teachers and lecturers.

There have been many invitations to join EU projects where the Learning Designer is used as a research tool, and for collaborations with other universities, or with schools. Unfortunately many of these small-scale collaborations are not viable as they do not provide sufficient opportunities for further development, and we can only work on large-scale impact to attract future funding. There is no funding for the development of a user community itself.

A new collaboration with Beijing Normal University has been funded by their Advanced Innovation Center for Future Education to develop a teacher development course on the use of blended learning for problem-solving, at school level. The Learning Designer is the basis for the design and peer review activities on the course.
Sectors Education

URL http://buildingcommunityknowledge.wordpress.com/
 
Description This is an update on the previous narrative submitted and includes only the impact changes from July 2018 to March 2019. The Learning Designer tool continues to attract users, now running at > 6,500 per month. It has had little promotion, due to lack of funding, but is used in a wide range of MOOCs, by mainly European universities, mainly for teacher professional development. Through the work of the DEPIT (Designing Pedagogic Innovation in Teaching) project, funded by Erasmus+ and led by the University of Macerata, Italy, the fundamental design and model within the Learning Designer has been incorporated into the DEPIT tool for teachers. A video of the theoretical framework developed within this ESRC project is therefore included as part of the training for teachers involved in the project in Spain and Italy. The tool is also being linked directly to the ABC workshop run by UCL staff for university teachers at UCL and other universities, as the digital follow-on to a f2f workshop on learning design. A new and updated version of the tool is being developed through internal funding from UCL by the Information Services Division. The Course Resource Appraisal Modeller continues to be used for costing blended learning projects.
First Year Of Impact 2014
Sector Education
Impact Types Policy & public services

 
Description Blended Learning CPD for Vocational Teachers
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact Reach in terms of enrolments Over 35,000 registrations for the two courses (Blended Learning Essentials,:Getting Started and Embedding Practice), run on FutureLearn Over 54% of participants were from the UK, 56% from the VET sector and almost 60% are teachers or trainers. With further promotion, and the influence of the early participants in these three initial runs, we can expect that in time the courses could reach a high proportion of the intended workforce. Impact on participants Participants enrol on MOOCs such as BLE with a range of personal criteria for success, but completion rates for the courses (17%) have performed well in comparison with similar FutureLearn courses (12%). Participants' attitudes to blended learning were positive from the outset and post-course surveys indicated that they grew even more enthusiastic as a result of the course. Course surveys reported a drop from 49% to 25% of participants who felt nervous about using blended learning, and an increase from 39% to 64% who felt confident about using it appropriately. Participant Engagement and Activity Active engagement achieved across all parts of the course, including over 40,000 comments. The majority of course steps have in excess of an 80% visit to completion conversion rate. Take-up of the accreditation pathways is also positive, 15% opted to buy a statement of participation and the CMALT pilot, run by ALT, was full. Impact on Teaching Practice Pre- and post-course surveys show that: almost 90% of survey respondents note awareness of tools and technologies to support blended learning after the course compared to 45% beforehand. BLE has helped improve participants' confidence and attitudes towards blended learning: only 12% of respondents in the post-course survey now view their 'limited knowledge' of blended learning as a 'serious barrier' to using it, a significant drop from 56% in the pre-course survey. The qualitative analysis of peer assessment, discursive activities and reflective questioning on the platform provides evidence of improving skills and confidence in blended learning. Over 80% of survey respondents felt that the course would improve their career prospects. The interviews with course participants and impact case studies show that BLE helps participants meet their CPD goals. They also demonstrate the positive impact of imparting knowledge acquired on BLE to others within participants' organisations. The interviews also demonstrate the potential for BLE to help teacher trainees improve their practice and meet their professional development goals in blended learning. Further funding The success of these courses led to the team being invited to create two more, outside of the competitive funding process.
URL https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/blended-learning-getting-started/
 
Description EUN Pedagogial Advisory Board
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact The Advisory Board is a group of international experts who advise the EUN Teacher Academy on the content and design of free online courses to be run on their platform for the benefit of teacher professional development across Europe. Courses include training on issues such as EFL, Diversity in the classroom, Online safety, Developing digital skills, Innovative Practices for Engaging STEM Teaching. The free, open, online courses are providing access to professional development for thousands of teachers who otherwise would have no up to date access to such courses.
URL http://www.europeanschoolnetacademy.eu
 
Description Invitation to a Roundtable policy discussion on online learning
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Invited to 'expert workshop' on 'Technologies for Learning', Council for Science and Technology. Cabinet Office, London
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
 
Description Scoping Report for an FE Online Academy
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Beijing Normal University internal project funding
Amount £100,000 (GBP)
Organisation Beijing Normal University 
Sector Academic/University
Country China
Start 02/2017 
End 03/2019
 
Description Erasmus+ Programme 2017 - KA2 Strategic partnership supporting innovation
Amount € 345,000 (EUR)
Funding ID 2017-1-IT02-KA201-036605 
Organisation erasmus + 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2017 
End 08/2020
 
Description Key Action 3 Erasmus +
Amount £2,000,000 (GBP)
Funding ID EU Grant Agreement number 2014 - 3537 / 001 - 001 
Organisation EUN Partnership AISBL 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country Belgium
Start 03/2015 
End 04/2018
 
Description National Research Foundation Science of Learning Initiative
Amount $2,500,000 (SGD)
Organisation National Institute of Education, Singapore 
Sector Academic/University
Country Singapore
Start 11/2017 
End 10/2020
 
Title Course Resource Appraisal Model 
Description This is an in-house redevelopment by UCL-ISD of the research prototype costing tool developed by the Building Community Knowledge project. The redevelopment took the online tool CRAM (see other tool in this list) and developed as an in-house enterprise tool for UCL, embracing also the current Finance tools used for costing courses. This tool enables academics and administrators to identify and plan for the unique types of activity involved in costing online and blended learning courses as well as conventional courses. It is available internally on https://cram-uat.ucl.ac.uk/cram/ 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The development of the tool has brought both Finance and ISD colleagues to a greater understanding of the impact of digital learning on academic, administrative and technical staff time, and the benefits for students. 
URL https://cram-uat.ucl.ac.uk/cram/
 
Title The Course Resource Appraisal Modeller 
Description This is a modelling tool to enable teachers and managers to assess the likely impact of a course design on both learning benefits and teaching costs. It is applicable to all forms of teaching and learning, but is especially useful for modelling new types of technology-based courses, which may be online and large-scale, as the cost structures and likely benefits are so different from conventional courses. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2014 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Please see narrative of impact 75 new users registered during Jan-Feb 2016 
URL http://web.lkldev.ioe.ac.uk/cram/index.html
 
Title The Learning Designer 
Description Improved, updated, more secure, and faster version of the Learning Designer tool (see other research tools), now hosted by UCL-ISD to cope with larger numbers and wider usage. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2013 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Over the last year the tool has received on average 1,400 page views per day, and an average daily return visits of 37% on 380 unique visits per day. It has been adopted in several international MOOCs on teacher professional development. It has also been used as a research tool via the peer-reviewed design activities in several of our MOOCs on blended learning and the development of digital skills. 
URL http://statcounter.com/p9418723/summary/daily-pur-labels-bar-20170204_20180204/
 
Title The Learning Designer 
Description Not sure why the type of tool could only be something medical, as in list above. This is for teachers, to improve the quality and accessibility of their pedagogic innovations with technology, and to develop a community of shared practice among the teaching population in all sectors (and countries). 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2013 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Please see narrative on impact 
URL http://learningdesigner.org/index.php
 
Description Building digital skills in the FE Sector 
Organisation Government of the UK
Department Government Office for Science
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Report to the Future of Skills & Lifelong Learning Foresight, Government Office for Science
Collaborator Contribution Funding. Specfication of requirements
Impact Interviewed by DfE staff about the DfE contribution to the Industry Strategy, with respect to the use of online courses
Start Year 2016
 
Description Building teacher community knowledge of blended learning 
Organisation Beijing Normal University
Country China 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Design and support for the development and evaluation methodology for a research-based online course teachers' professional development
Collaborator Contribution Co-development of the course, support for the promotion, translation and delivery of the course and data collection instruments, co-analysis of data and publications. Funding of travel and accommodation for visits to Beijing. Funding of my academic time for the project.
Impact A 5-week online course for teacher professional development, with an audience of Chinese schoolteachers. The academics involved are from Education and Education Technology
Start Year 2017
 
Description Mentoring Technology Enhanced Pedagogy (MENTEP) 
Organisation EUN Partnership AISBL
Country Belgium 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution Being a member of the Scientific Committee of MENTEP, which has the aim of reviewing and advising, collegially or individually depending on the issues at stake, the approach, components and outcomes of the policy experimentation before their implementation/finalisation, the Expert being in charge more particularly of all aspects related to the technology-enhanced teaching competence and develop model related to it (competence definition, implementation and development, etc.).
Collaborator Contribution Development, evaluation and delivery of the Technology Enhanced Teaching Self Assessment Tool, and its translation to the language of all 12 partner countries. Management of the project.
Impact Development of the TET-SAT tool, and related resource links Design and delivery of the MENTEP MOOC; Invitation to present a report on the outcomes of the course in relation to the evaluation of the tool and the project overall, at the final conference
Start Year 2015
 
Description Report on Learning@Scale: How digital technology enhances equity, quality and efficiency in the global south. 
Organisation Education University of Hong Kong
Department Hong Kong Institute of Education
Country Hong Kong 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Produced a 5000 word white paper on 'Learning@Scale in the Global South'. Led a symposium on 'Learning@Scale in the Global South' to the n mEducation Alliance Symposium, Washington DC, 06 October 2017
Collaborator Contribution Some support for literature survey Management of the project
Impact Produced a 5000 word white paper on 'Learning@Scale in the Global South'. Led a symposium on 'Learning@Scale in the Global South' to the n mEducation Alliance Symposium, Washington DC, 06 October 2017. This generated a Coalition of international organisations and agencies, including UNESCO, UNICEF, World Bank, Brookings Institution and ~30 others for a meeting on 'Teacher Professional Development at Scale' in Hong Kong, Jan 2018 to determine the forward policy.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Research International Advisory Panel 
Organisation Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR)
Department Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences
Country Singapore 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Expert advice on learning with digital technology in particular, and i. Provide inputs on the direction of Singapore¹s research strategy, in support of Singapore¹s overall strategy on workforce development and lifelong learning; ii. Review and evaluate the potential impact of Singapore¹s research on workforce development and lifelong learning; and iii. Provide advice on initiatives to build research capabilities in workforce development and lifelong learning in Singapore¹s context.
Collaborator Contribution Organisation of the meeting of experts, support to the meetings, write-up of reports to the Ministry.
Impact Revision of the Research Strategy 2016 - 2020, for the Singapore Workforce Development Agency
Start Year 2015
 
Description The School Education Gateway - Teacher Academy 
Organisation EUN Partnership AISBL
Country Belgium 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution To act as an expert on the Teacher Academy Pedagogical Advisory Board.
Collaborator Contribution Developing the course proposals, responding to guidance, running and evaluating the courses; managing the project
Impact Website above Courses developed, evaluated, promoted, delivered, updated.
Start Year 2015
 
Title Course Resource Appraisal Model (CRAM) 
Description The Course Resource Appraisal Model (CRAM) was developed to support lecturers who are innovating with technology in their courses. It is a downloadable interactive tool for modelling learning benefits and teaching costs for a conventional, blended, or online course. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2014 
Impact In the 9 months following its launch it has acquired more than 1200 users, of whom 500 are in the US, as the largest user. This was the result of a 'Move-it-online' webinar/course that provided walk-through videos, exemplars, activities, and discussion forums on the use of the tool. It has been featured in several keynote lectures at international conferences. We cannot track all usage, but we do know it is being used for (i) Singapore Institue of Management, in a workshop for their international online tutors. (ii) a UCL-IOE institutional project to understand teacher workload for online and blended learning courses (CRAM). This should enable us to give some time to developing the user community, which really needs further funding to maintain and expand it. (iii) the Skills Funding Agency, to advise colleges and providers on costing blended learning (CRAM). 
URL http://web.lkldev.ioe.ac.uk/cram/index.html
 
Title Learning Designer 
Description The Learning Designer is a new type of tool for helping teachers, in all sectors, to use digital technologies effectively for innovative teaching and learning. We have built and tested it as an online learning design app for teachers, in all sectors. 
Type Of Technology Webtool/Application 
Year Produced 2013 
Impact Use of the Learning Designer tool was established during the project, and has since increased. Since the end of the project (31 May 2014) the Learning Designer tool has increased its page views from 29,000 to 89,000 (31 May 2015), with steady growth in visitors over each previous quarter of 19%, 46%, 32%, 73% to 60,000 unique visitors over the year. By the end of the BCK project the Learning Design Directory had collected 117 publicly available designs, including 48 reviews for teachers to share. In the 12 months since the end of the project this has now risen to 258 designs. The Learning Designer was used as the basis of an activity within a Coursera-based MOOC on ICT in Primary Education (May-July 2014), which brought over 1000 users to the tool. It is being used again in the current re-run (May - July 2015). In 2014 there were 92 comments in the associated forum, all highly appreciative, in a context where few forums would receive more than 100 contributions. 
URL http://learningdesigner.org/
 
Description 'Blended and online learning: Changing the pedagogical landscape' Diana Laurillard at EADTU Conference, University of Aarhus 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact To demonstrate value and outcomes of the use of MOOCs in blended learning for professionals to use within their communities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description 'Digital Leadership in Higher Education' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Keynote as interview, via videoconference, for Shanghai Open University International Conference on Leadership and Innovation for the Future in ODL, November 2016, followed by synchronous discussion
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description 'Evaluating the current landscape of higher education' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited talk at the BETT Show, Excel Centre, Jan 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description 'How will teachers cultivate the core competences for a digital world?' Diana Laurillard at INEI Conference on Cultivating Core Competences in a Changing Technological Society, Beijing 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact To propose a new type of programme for TPD, on the large scale.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description 'Learning in a world with AI and digital technology', Diana Laurillard at Royal Society and Cambridge Centre for Science and Policy, Expert workshop, Royal Society, London 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact To influence policy on the use of digital technology for learning in the wider skills sector.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description 'New models for developing teachers' competence online', Diana Laurillard at EMINENT Conference, Lisbon 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact To demonstrate new model of TPD on the large scale.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description 'Professionalising teaching innovation in the digital age' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Keynote at the Association of Medical Education Conference, Barcelona, August 2016.
Audience of >3000
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://amee.org/getattachment/Conferences/AMEE-Past-Conferences/AMEE-2016/1-AMEE-2016-Printed-Progr...
 
Description 'Rethinking the profession of teaching as a design science' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Keynote presentation at the Int'l Conference on Teaching with Learning Technology, Singapore, March 2016
International audience of >2000
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description A Research Agenda for e-Learning 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited workshop for the League of European Research Universites workshop, UCL Knowledge Lab, Nov 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Building Pedagogic Knowledge of Blended Learning 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact This workshop was the foundation for the one-day conference '2020 Vision: the Future of Learning'. It introduced to HE sector practitioners to the evaluation studies of the courses and tools used for blended learning as a way of fostering pedagogical knowledge-building about digital learning in the HE community. Some participants reported they would register for the MOOCs and there was a surge in access to the tools presented. There are several urls linked to this activity (e.g. http://web.lkldev.ioe.ac.uk/cram/index.html and http://learningdesigner.org), but only one can be presented below.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/blended-learning-getting-started/
 
Description CGHE Seminar 102: A MOOC Value Creation Methodology 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Seminar given at UCL Institute of Education by:
Eileen Kennedy, UCL Institute of Education
Diana Laurillard, UCL Institute of Education

Seminar topic:
Initial excitement about MOOCs was largely based on their capacity to recruit 10s of 1000s of participants. The MOOC platforms enabled massive cohorts of participants from outside of the university to engage with university teaching and research and the engagement could be tracked by the platforms themselves. However, it quickly became clear that MOOC participants differed markedly from the profile and patterns of engagement that characterise typical undergraduate students, and measures such as course completion, which might be meaningful for the evaluation of undergraduate courses, were less so in the context of MOOCs. To evaluate the success of a MOOC we need a new way to track the value that participants gain from taking part. Existing evaluation methods tend to focus on quantitative analysis of analytics from the platform, but these measures tell us little about the perceived value to participants. Moreover, since many MOOC participants are professionals, such as teachers or healthcare workers, and are undertaking continual professional development in MOOCs, we also need to track how they use their learning to impact the lives of others, such as students or patients, or in their own professional development activities, which can present challenges for evaluation.

In this presentation Eileen Kennedy and Diana Laurillard will consider a mixed method approach that carefully examines different sources of evidence to show different types of value created on a MOOC. They present a MOOC value creation framework that can be used with the full range of professional development courses, to give a more rounded evaluation of the impact of MOOC initiatives.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://www.researchcghe.org/events/cghe-seminar/a-mooc-value-creation-methodology/
 
Description CGHE Seminar 85: Investigating the transformative potential of MOOCs for professional development on the large scale 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Seminar given by Eileen Kennedy, UCL Institute of Education and Diana Laurillard, UCL Institute of Education at UCL.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.researchcghe.org/events/cghe-seminar/investigating-the-transformative-potential-of-moocs...
 
Description Discussion of a new 'Office for Research in Education' -Diana Laurillard 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact To influence policy on the approach to digital technology in education in general, and in particular, to the use of MOOCs for open online collaboration for teachers and education researchers and professionals, in support of the potential new 'Office for Research in Education'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description EdTech for students, teachers and HE systems 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact The FutureEdTech Conference is for HE practitioners and EdTech industries to support their development of digital strategies and "hear from fellow experts on their experiences: what has worked, what hasn't and how they are moving ahead with their plans and changing higher education across the board". This presentation was on 'EdTech for students, teachers and HE systems', after which there was a series of short discussions with different audience groups, and some participants took details of the relevant urls (one selected below) for further follow-up with their colleagues.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/blended-learning-embedding-practice/
 
Description Expert advice on best practice for Distance Learning provision 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Event run by Pearson to introduce their local training groups to 'Distance Learning Best Practice', as part of their programme of updating their providers on the value and use of online learning methods. Part of the outcome was to change the requirements for local training providers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.pearson.com/us/higher-education/products-services-teaching/distance-learning-solutions.h...
 
Description Higher Education Academy conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The presentation demonstrated the results of new approaches to the conceptualisation of teaching in terms of 'Peer review of online and blended learning designs: Creating a culture of teacher-researchers'. There was standing-room only at the session and many discussions after, some of which resulted in email exchanges to obtain access to our online courses and design tools.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://learningdesigner.org
 
Description International Learning Design Challenge events 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact We engaged new users in the use of the Learning Designer tool, and with the latest event with the CRAM tool as well.

In the second half of the project (Nov 2013 - May 2014), there were 10,742 unique visits to the online tool, of which 71% were first time visits, with page views running at 9,000 per month.
Since the end of the project (June 2014 - Nov 2014) there have been 17,340 unique visits, of which 71% were first time visits, with page views running at 11,000 per month.
By the end of the project the Learning Design Directory had collected 117 publicly available designs, including 48 reviews for teachers to share. In the 6 months since the end of the project this has now risen to 186 designs, including 54 reviews of designs, showing that users are continuing to contribute to the community now established.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL https://www.coursesites.com/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp?url=%2Fwebapps%2Fblackboard%2Fexecute%2Flaun...
 
Description International presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presentation to international symposium of international aid agencies, NGOs, government representatives, think tanks, charitable foundations, academics and researchers. This talk led a symposium on Learning@Scale for the mEducation Alliance in Washington
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Learning in the 21st Century - Blending in digital technology', LERN Conference, New Orleans, Keynote 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Keynote, with discussion and questions, prompting follow-up emails
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Limitless Learning: Who owns the responsibility for it? 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Plenary presentation and panel debate for Online Educa, Berlin, Dec 2016
Audience >2000
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://oeb.global/conference#highlights
 
Description Massive Open Online Course on Blended Learning Essentials: Embedding Practice 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The online course aims to help participants see how they can use new technology to tackle some of the very difficult challenges facing the Vocational Education and Training sector. It covers topics such as how best to use the technology to evaluate what works for learners, and how to track their learning; how technology can help with some of the main challenges tp the sector, e.g. by offering more flexible learning, encouraging more independent learning skills, and by sharing and working together perhaps we can also reduce the costs of innovation. In the final week it looks at how the educational organisation embraces this kind of change, and how participants can work with colleagues to make blended learning work most effectively.
The course runs wholly online, providing 4 study hours per week for 3 weeks. Activities include short videos, quizzes, discussions, and design activities that link to the Learning Designer tools.
More than 10,000 participants were enrolled in the course during the three runs of the course in 2016.
During the period when the Learning Designer tools were being used, usage peaked at more than 2000 in one day, and there were more than 20,000 unique visits to the website over a 4-week period, with 15,000 return visits, showing that the software continued to be used. Comments in the discussion forums were very enthusiastic about the prospect of using the tools, and sharing them with colleagues.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/blended-learning-embedding-practice/1/steps/47766#fl-comments
 
Description No evidence to back idea of learning styles 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Letter to the Guardian, published in print and online with all 30 academic signatories.
The aim was to promote caution in the use of the idea of 'learning styles' in education, and present the argument that there is no educational, psychological or neuroscience research evidence that supports the efficacy of the term in practice.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL https://www.theguardian.com/education/2017/mar/12/no-evidence-to-back-idea-of-learning-styles
 
Description Participatory Approaches to MOOC Co-Design in Lebanon 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Schools
Results and Impact Paper presented at CEID annual conference Higher Education and International Development, UCL IOE, 19 June 2018 "Participatory Approaches to MOOC Co-Design in Lebanon" (with Diana Laurillard).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.ucl.ac.uk/ioe/events/2018/jun/ceid-annual-conference-2018-higher-education-and-internati...
 
Description Positioning your institution's global presence: Marketing 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited plenary talk at the Higher Education Show, Olympia, Oct 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://he-show.co.uk/
 
Description Public Teaching Academy Masterclass on The Future of Higher Education in the Digital World 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The National University of Singapore, on an occasional basis, invites an academic of international standing to run a 'Teaching Academy Masterclass' for one week. The lecture and related workshops I ran throughout the week made the case that there is a positive role for HE in the digital world, IF the global HE sector seeks to understand the threats, AND seizes the opportunities to steer digital impacts towards beneficial results for the many not the few. The workshop sessions worked through the different mechanisms and findings that contribute to our understanding of how digital technologies can support and enhance the productivity and reach of higher education, both nationally and internationally.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.nus.edu.sg/thought-leadership/future-of-higher-education-in-the-digital-world
 
Description Putting teachers at the forefront of innovation in virtual learning 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Keynote to the European Association for Practitioner Research on Improving Learning, Porto, Nov 2016.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://eaprilconference.org/
 
Description Research Issues in Digital Global HE 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact This workshop was part of the Centre for Global HE annual conference. It reported on the current research issues in the field, and orchestrated discussion group activities and plenary discussion of how these related to the other research themes in their own and the Centre's work.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
URL http://www.researchcghe.org/research/local-higher-education-engagement/project-3-4/
 
Description Scaling up global higher education - The viable option, Diana Laurillard and Eileen Kennedy in University World News, 20 April 2018 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Scaling up global higher education - The viable option, Diana Laurillard and Eileen Kennedy in University World News, 20 April 2018
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=2018041808412299
 
Description Teaching in the 21st century: Technology policy and practice in education' 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Invited presentation to the New York State Board of Regents, Dec 2015, followed by debate and discussion.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Technology solutions for our biggest educational ambitions 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This was a Google Hangout presentation to Google Education in US. The research team there was intrigued and enthusiastic because of the innovative nature of the approach. It does not especially make use of Google tools in any way, but could be linked to their on-the-ground strategy for improving local use of technology in schools, which is why they were interested.

The follow-up was a request for a further meeting to discuss collaboration. Promising avenues emered at the meeting, but progress on taking it further is intermittent, and seems to be derailed by other pressures. The connection remains, and will be used for promulgating further versions of the tool.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Use within a MOOC for Primary Teacher CPD 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Learning Designer tool was used as the basis of an activity within a Coursera-based MOOC for primary teachers, which brought more than 1000 first time users of the tool in the 2014 run, and has already brought an additional 800 first time users in the first week of the 2015 run.
In 2014 there were 92 comments in the associated forum, all highly appreciative.


ULIP and Coursera asked us to run the course again.
The course is one of the 50 teacher professional development courses being offered to US teachers, reported by Couresera as a Presidential announcement in Nov 2014.
Several invitations to the PI to do keynotes and to contribute to radio and online TV channels about the use of MOOCs in teacher education.
Many of the teachers reported they would use it for planning their teaching.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015
URL https://class.coursera.org/ictinprimary-004