External Champion to RCUK Global Uncertainties Programme

Lead Research Organisation: University of Cambridge
Department Name: Politics and International Studies

Abstract

Dr Tristram Riley-Smith will act as External Champion to the Global Uncertainties Programme. The key methods to be used in this work are: analysis, networking, advocacy, and the deployment of tools designed to develop and support collaborative partnerships: he will apply his strategic skills and knowledge of research needs to identify accredited research projects that are of potential interest to users; he will also seek to identify significant gaps; he will use his networking skills to develop and work with contacts in RCUK, research establishments and end-user communities; GU Leadership Fellows represent a particularly important community, here; he will employ his communications and leadership skills to look for - and create - opportunities to deliver consistent messages that promote impact-focused research and collaborative working; he will work to raise understanding among end-users about the open-ended and uncertain nature of cutting-edge research, while encouraging researchers to realise the need to turn blue-sky thinking into applied tools, techniques and insights; he will draw on the insights gained over recent years to promote different approaches to enhance engagement, to include: portals, "speed-dating", workshops, Ideas Factories/Sandpits, conferences, research calls, data-sharing initiatives, research institutes, accelerators and incubators. Quality Assurance will be built into his activities by ensuring that the outputs from his work are subject to a review process from relevant stakeholders . He will also develop a Risk and Mitigation Plan.

Planned Impact

Dr Riley-Smith believes there are opportunities to extract significant impact from the GU Programme, recognising that focussed effort is needed a) to identify existing projects most likely to deliver value to end-users; b) to highlight end-user requirements that are currently unfulfilled; and c) to break down barriers between researchers and end-users.

His top priority in the first year would be to review the existing research portfolio, running a triage process to highlight a small number of projects - perhaps half a dozen - where there is the opportunity to draw up an enhanced impact plan that would deliver substantive benefits. He believes the External Champion can add value through coaching and support, with an emphasis on building partnerships between researchers and end-users. It is too early to predict where these benefits will materialise from, and when, but Dr Riley-Smith would expect to find good prospects in the portfolios of all Research Councils.

His second priority will be to promote greater levels of engagement between end-users and researchers, ensuring challenges are better understood, with the opportunity for end-users (from different domains) and researchers (from different disciplines) to co-design projects. The picture is patchy, with some interest-groups insufficiently engaged (eg Law Enforcement Agencies, which should have a strong interest in the GU Programme given the Serious and Organised Crime theme), and with many others suffering from limited "band-width" to support collaborative research. Over the last year, Riley-Smith has identified a number of tools and techniques designed to enhance engagement; he has concluded that these need to be deployed within a connected "eco-system" rather than haphazardly. An early goal will be to review governance arrangements, in case a "Partnership Board" could help stakeholders to work together.

The benefits deriving from his work extend beyond researchers and end-users/stakeholders, to citizens of the United Kingdom and the wider world who benefit from better national and global security outcomes.
 
Description The role of External Champion was essentially laying the foundations for, and delivering, effective Knowledge Exchange between a broad community of researchers (in many different disciplines and over fifty different universities) and hundreds of non-academic stakeholders working in Government, Industry and the Third Sector. This was, in other words, not about generating new knowledge in its own right, but facilitating the generation of impacts - notably intellectual and instrumental - from research undertaken by others. We have demonstrated the power and effectiveness of networking and brokerage methods explored and developed in an earlier Global Uncertainties Fellowship at Cambridge's Centre for Science and Policy: speed-dating exercises that bring the two "sides" together, "surgeries" or "clinics" where researchers receive guidance and support in delivering impact, placements, policy workshops and briefings, etc. an extensive network was established by the Champion, and the Communications Strategy - with website and Twitter feeds - continues to flourish as a way of making connections. An "Academic Marketplace" created conditions to support researchers seeking the turn their Intellectual Property into wealth-generating products and services. The recruitment of doctoral students to spend three months working closely with governmental and non-governmental agencies resulted in some significant outcomes shaping policy thinking.
Exploitation Route There is evidence that individual initiatives and outputs from this project are resulting in enhanced outcomes, be that in policy-making (eg around attitudes to countering the narratives of violent extremists or working collaboratively with researchers) or the delivery of products and services (eg through the commercialisation of security-related research, exemplified by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport running programmes in 2017 and 2018 to support the commercialisation of cyber-security research in our universities). The most significant outcome from this project would, however, be if Research Councils and others embraced the use of "brokers" to support the delivery of impact from research, informed and inspired by what has been achieved here. I had the opportunity to reinforce this point in February 2018, when invited to brief the Head of Policy within the team working on UK Research and Innovation Strategy within the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy.
Sectors Aerospace, Defence and Marine,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Government, Democracy and Justice,Culture, Heritage, Museums and Collections,Security and Diplomacy,Transport

 
Description The Champion's role has been designed to help researchers working within the Global Uncertainties (now PaCCS) Programme deliver non-academic impact, through engagement with stakeholders in Government, Industry and the Third Sector. We have achieved this through supporting knowledge exchange. At the simplest level, this has involved linking people together: I made 152 introductions over 22 months (April 2014 - December 2015), and expect the aggregate effect of these over the next decade will be significant; for instance, I introduced the Oxford-based Infrastructure Transitions Research Consortium to the gaming company Improbable, with the latter contributing £750,000 to a £5m project awarded by EPSRC to develop new simulation tools; I also introduced the Centre for Secure IT (Queen's Belfast) to UKTI and this - we are told - could lead to an investment in the Northern Ireland Science Park of c £150m. Through a placement into the Home Office's Office of Security and Counter-Terrorism, we have - they tell us - transformed their understanding of what academic research can do to help them; a placement into the National Crime Agency has uncovered requirements for social and behavioural scientific research; and the Evidence Review that we commissioned into Communications and Media Strategies for Countering Violent Extremism; has enlightened policy-makers at home and abroad struggling to respond to the propaganda campaigns of so-called Islamic State; in November 2017, we heard that a consultant advising Oxfam on countering violence was interested in using the definition of violent extremism "which seems to offer something different/more holistic to definitions I'm coming across elsewhere within the development sector." We developed and implemented a successful Communications Strategy for PaCCS, with a flourishing website - paccsresearch.org.uk (receiving almost 8,000 visits from over 6,000 users in the last quarter of 2016, of which 73% were new visitors) and Twitter feed (@paccsresearch) with over 1,000 followers. This infrastructure continues, having been passed across - with the Communications Officer - to Prof David Galbreath at Bath University. Our Academic Marketplace has allowed some 40 researchers keen to commercialise their IP to set out their stall, attracting interest from around the world via our website; one member of the Marketplace (Cytora, spun out of Cambridge University) raised £2.5m at the end of 2016; and collaboration with a number of Government Departments (including Home Office and Department for Transport) has seen a number of research-teams gain traction in their efforts to turn science into technological products and services. We can claim to have helped the emergence of a number of new companies from Global Uncertainties Research: CyberOwl, SeeQuestor (which has raised over £5m from investors and won the Innovation Award at HMG's 2017 Security and Policing event) and XPCI Technology (which was awarded almost £100,000 from the Department for Transport, in its Future of Aviation Security Solutions call); and our collaboration with Crossword Cybersecurity led to the creation of the CLUE database, helping a global audience understand the contribution that cybersecurity research in the UK is making to the development of new solutions. Policy Workshops, backed up by the production of carefully-crafted Policy Briefings, have also proved to deliver valuable impact (especially in terms of illuminating and influencing the judgments of policy- and decision-makers). For instance, the Workshop held in November 2015 led to a Policy Briefing Note entitled "Innovation Challenges in Cybersecurity"; this was launched in London (the Digital Catapult), Brussels (at the invitation of the EC's Special Adviser on Innovation) and Boston, with evidence that it has shaped policy-making (for instance through DCMS's launch - at the end of 2016 - of a programme to support academic start-ups in cyber-security; and their call, made in December 2017, for a second such programme in 2018 and a third in 2019). The workshop was able to shape DCMS thinking about the use of funds to stimulate the formation of early-stage companies, and it led to a national initiative based on the ICURe model developed by the SETsquared Partnership. DCMS subsequently announced a new cyber security programme for Academia designed to progress cutting edge research ideas and support these towards commercial success. The new Cyber Security ICURe Innovation-to-Commercialisation programme, piloted by the SETsquared Partnership and Innovate UK, and funded by DCMS, offered university researchers with commercially-promising cyber security ideas up to £35k to 'get out of the lab' ideas to the marketplace. The 2017 call was over-subscribed, with twelve teams selected from eleven universities; the boot-camp to kick-start the process ran in mid-January 2017. The successful candidates - who have been offered the chance to join the Cybersecurity section of our PaCCS Academic Marketplace - are: Imperial College (GLFuzz: Securing Graphic Drivers); University of Southampton (Provenance for Digital Fabrication (3D Printing); University of Cambridge (Pico Authentication Ltd); Liverpool John Moores (InteraCtive CrYPtograpHic Protocol TEaching and LeaRning); Queen's University Belfast (IoT Security - central and distributed protection); University of Surrey (Password+); University of South Wales (Talbot: A SCADA/ICS Forensics Toolkit); Liverpool Hope University (Secret Sharing for Cloud and the Internet-of-things); Anglia Ruskin (Botprobe); Bournemouth University (Commercialisation of CAIRIS - Computer Aided Integration of Requirements and Information Security); University of Northampton (Commercialising the concept of a Corporate Cyber-Immune System); Liverpool John Moores University (Modelling Security Requirements for Businesses in 3D). There was a second programme in 2018 that ended in a Demo Day with thirteen successful teams: as set out here (https://admin.ktn-uk.co.uk/app/uploads/2019/02/Cyber-Security-Booklet-2019-Digital.pdf): City University of London (Find, classify, and analyse online extremist videos); Bournemouth University (Enabling agile teams to create digital products and services with security and privacy designed in); City University London (A searchable encryption enterprise solution for the Cloud); University of Oxford (Empowering home users for digital wellness and protection); University of West London Smart security for smart infrastructures); University of Warwick, in collaboration with Newcastle University & University of York (Verifiable electronic voting for real-world elections); University of Hertfordshire (TAME - Threat assessment model for information environments); University of Huddersfield (Autonomous identification and exploitation of security expertise from Security Information and Event Management data sources); London Metropolitan University (Easy use of voice controlled devices with guaranteed security); Liverpool John Moores University (Low-power and high-speed True Random Number Generator); University of Brighton (Privacy-by-Design toolkit); De Montfort University (Adaptive Cyber Threat Intelligence for Security Investment Optimisation); University of Wolverhampton (Cydon: An intelligent decentralised data management platform). We ran three workshops for the Ministry of Defence linked to the Science and Security programme within PaCCS, and this led to five Policy Briefings on topics as wide-ranging as UAVs, innovation in defence and security, responsible science, open source data and the use of social media in the Armed Services. Meanwhile there were unusual impacts arising from our Workshop and Briefing on religion and contemporary security challenges, ranging from the uplifting experience of working with the Brilliant Club to engage Sixth Formers from deprived schools in the issues, through to being invited to brief the former head of UKIP on the importance of religious literacy in political life. Our Policy Briefings have continued to be used in different contexts, for instance informing meetings in 2018 with Google UK's Public Policy Manager, UKRIs Head of Policy, and the Cabinet Office's Head of Incident Management. In January 2018, I participated in a three-day conference at Ditchley Park on the Future of Policing in the Digital Age, working with senior police and policy-makers from the UK, USA on this important topic; the products of a number of my Policy Workshops were shared with participants, including those on delivering innovation. Our 2016 Policy Briefing "The Governance of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in Defence and Security" called for HMG to develop a communications strategy to help people understand the dangers, opportunities and complexities of drones and launch a consultation process to identify potential regulatory blind spots for smaller UAVs and resolve these. In 2017, the Department for Trade launched such a consultation with related communications strategy. The results were announced in July 2017, including next steps to be taken by Government to: a) implement a registration scheme and mandatory competency tests for all users of drones weighing 250 grams and above; b) bring forward work to create an authoritative source of UK airspace data, which will facilitate the implementation of geo-fencing and build greater awareness of airspace restrictions amongst drone users; and c) explore further measures such as increasing penalties, creating new offences and reviewing the powers available to law enforcement agencies to enforce relevant law. This aligns well with our recommendations. On 27 November 2017, a written statement in parliament reported in plans for legislation being passed in Spring 2018. I have received, in the course of the last few years, a number of testimonials from academic and non-academic stakeholders. The latest (received on 13 March 2017 from Dstl) nicely captures the sentiment of many: "The Science & Security programme within the Partnership for Conflict, Crime and Security Research (PaCCS) was set up with the intent of creating enduring relationships between the social sciences research base and the Defence and Security communities pan-government. As an integrator of research output, and creator of routes to exploitation, Tristram has made highly valued contributions to the success of the programme. He has designed and delivered a series of well-attended events, bringing together academics, policy makers, and representatives of the third and industrial sectors to access research outputs and explore their impact. These exposed participants to a rich seam of knowledge, as well as to perspectives other than their own, informing and challenging thinking. His subsequent leadership of the creation of a number of briefs, distilling the themes emerging from these events into insights for policy makers, are helping ensure that policy development is cognisant of the research front line in areas as diverse as social media, autonomy and the ethics of emerging science and technology. Tristram has also very effectively, and with significant energy, facilitated the building of new relationships between academia and a diverse set of stakeholders, enabling linkages which would otherwise not have been made."
First Year Of Impact 2015
Sector Aerospace, Defence and Marine,Communities and Social Services/Policy,Digital/Communication/Information Technologies (including Software),Education,Government, Democracy and Justice,Manufacturing, including Industrial Biotechology,Security and Diplomacy,Transport
Impact Types Societal,Economic

 
Description Advice on Ebola Capabilities in academic community for Civil Contingencies Secretariat
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
 
Description Attending European Commission Cybersecurity Conference in Vilnius convened by High-Level Group of Scientific Advisers
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
URL https://ec.europa.eu/research/sam/index.cfm?pg=cybersecurity#vilnius
 
Description CSaP Workshop (July 2015) to support Cabinet Office's Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
 
Description Evidence Review into Countering Violent Extremism through Media and Communication Strategies
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Implementation circular/rapid advice/letter to e.g. Ministry of Health
 
Description G8+1 Non-Proliferation Directors Workshop
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Home Office Security and Resilience Growth Partnership Ministerial Steering Group
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guidance committee
 
Description Innovation Challenges in Cybersecurity
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
Impact In 2016, the Department of Culture, Media and Sports brought together a group to advise on plans to stimulate the emergence of commercial cyber-security solutions from university research. This initiative was shaped by the PaCCS Policy Briefing "Innovation Challenges in Cybersecurity" and my contribution in turn informed planning for a pilot commercialisation programme run in 2017 and a second event planned for 2018. The PaCCS website and Twitter feed was also used to promote this.
URL https://www.ktn-uk.co.uk/news/call-for-expression-of-interest-in-cyber-security-academic-startups-pr...
 
Description Invitation to brief senior European Commission officials working on cybersecurity policy (3 May 2016)
Geographic Reach Europe 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
 
Description Meeting with Director of Defence and Security Accelerator (DASA) in 2017
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Meeting with Head of Incident Management and a senior policy adviser in the Cabinet Office National Security Secretariat (2018)
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Meeting with Public Policy Manager, Google UK (discussing ethics and regulation of Open Source Data and countering online abuse inc terrorism and child-secual exploitation.
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description National Security Fellowship Scheme
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Our Evidence Review (entitled "Countering violent extremism through media and communication strategies"), commissioned from Dr Kate Ferguson, receives favourable citation in ICCT Research Paper: Glazzard, A. "Losing the Plot: Narrative, Counter-Narrative and Violent Extremism", The International Centre for Counter-Terrorism - The Hague 8, no. 8 (2017).
Geographic Reach Australia 
Policy Influence Type Citation in other policy documents
URL https://icct.nl/publication/losing-the-plot-narrative-counter-narrative-and-violent-extremism/
 
Description Participation in Ditchley Park Conference on The Future of Policing in the Digital Age (January 2018)
Geographic Reach Multiple continents/international 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Policy Workshop for Cooperation Ireland
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
Impact We initiated a Policy Workshop held at the University of Durham for the charity Cooperation Ireland, to explore opportunities to reduce risks of radicalisation in marginalised Republican communities; senior representatives of the charity came together with a cross-section of researchers to discuss the challenges and consider options. The Director of the charity, Peter Sheridan, has written: "A huge thank you for your efforts in pulling such an eminent field together - it's exactly what I have been trying to do for a number of years."
 
Description RISC Council
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guideline committee
 
Description Research Integrator for Dstl in support of PaCCS's Science and Security Programme
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Influenced training of practitioners or researchers
 
Description Strategic Hub on Organised Crime
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Membership of a guidance committee
 
Description Submission of PaCCS Policy Briefing on "The Governance of UAVs in Defence and Security" to HMG's "Drone Consultation" in 2017
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a national consultation
Impact Our 2016 Policy Briefing called for HMG to develop a communications strategy to help people understand the dangers, opportunities and complexities of drones and launch a consultation process to identify potential regulatory blind spots for smaller UAVs and resolve these. In 2017, the Department for Trade launched such a consultation with related communications strategy. The results were announced in July 2017, including next steps to be taken by Government to: a) implement a registration scheme and mandatory competency tests for all users of drones weighing 250 grams and above; b) bring forward work to create an authoritative source of UK airspace data, which will facilitate the implementation of geo-fencing and build greater awareness of airspace restrictions amongst drone users; and c) explore further measures such as increasing penalties, creating new offences and reviewing the powers available to law enforcement agencies to enforce relevant law. This aligns well with our recommendations. On 27 November 2017, a written statement in parliament reported in plans for legislation being passed in Spring 2018.
URL http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/policy-briefings/governance-of-unmanned-aerial-vehicles/
 
Description PaCCS Transnational Organised Crime Innovation Call
Amount £260,294 (GBP)
Funding ID ES/P00301X/1 
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 09/2016 
End 12/2021
 
Title Map of Research Teams working on Security 
Description In 2014, my team responded to a request from the Home Office to produce a map of research teams working on security issues. We conducted a survey of Impact Acceleration Account Directors (and others), and identified 54 teams (located in 24 universities) working on Terrorism, 38 on Transnational Organised Crime, 83 on Threats to Critical Infrastructure, 63 on Conflict, 64 on Cyber-Security, and 45 on CBRNE proliferation. In Q1 2015, we expanded our map of centres associated with security-related research through an analysis of the old portfolio of accredited Global Uncertainties projects. This more than doubled the number of universities in the database (from 24 to 57): we identified 67 teams working on terrorism, 55 working on TNOC, 95 on Threats to Critical Infrastructure, 99 on Conflict; 75 on Cyber, and 59 on CBRN proliferation. The universities are: Aberystwyth, Anglia Ruskin, Aston, Bath, Birkbeck, Birmingham, Birmingham City, Bournemouth, Bradford, Bristol, Brunel, Cambridge, Cardiff, City, Cranfield, Derby, Durham, Edinburgh, Exeter, Glasgow, Heriot-Watt, Hull, Imperial, John Hopkins, KCL, Kent, Lancaster, Liverpool, Loughborough, LSE, Manchester, Middlesex, Newcastle, Nottingham, Nottingham Trent, Open University, Oxford, Plymouth, Queen's Belfast, Reading, Royal Holloway, Sheffield, SOAS, Southampton, South Wales, St Andrews, Surrey, Sussex, Swansea, UAL, UCL, UEA, UWS, Warwick, Westminster, Wolverhampton, York. We subsequently published this as a Prezi map on the PaCCS website, to facilitate those seeking access to our research-base. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2015 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact We are not sure what impacts have derived from this, other than the map becoming a useful point-of-reference. It was originally requested by the Home Office, and in 2017 we learned that it was being consulted by the Joint Security and Resilience Centre. We have analysed visits to the site: in the 20 months between its creation on 15 June 2015 and 15 February 2017) our PaCCS' Research Map page has received a total of 385 visits and 301 unique pageviews. Most users spent an average time of 02:21 minutes on the page. The majority of visits were from the UK (90.65%), followed by the US (2,60%), Australia, Canada and Spain (0.78% each). The greatest proportion of visits were recorded during the first month (with 42 Page-Views on 15/06/15 and 68 on 22/06/2015). There were 12 views on 10/11/16(the day we presented PaCCS at a gathering of Parliamentary researchers. 
URL http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/research-map/
 
Title Map of Resources for SMEs 
Description Following discussion among research teams associated with PaCCS's Academic Marketplace, and informed by The Dowling Review of Business-University Reearch Collaborations (July 2015), we built and launched an interactive map of resources available to support the commercialisation of research. The map, appearing on the PaCCS website, highlights various initiatives designed to incentivise spin-outs and make it easier for SMEs to flourish both in the UK and in international markets. It focuses on initiatives that will be of most use to researchers working in the areas of conflict, crime and security, and is divided into 5 categories: Sources of Advice; Public Procurement; Funding; IP; and Networks. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Resources for SMEs - Stats (24 August 2015 - 15 February 2017) by Natalia In the eighteen months since its creation (on 24 August 2015), this page on PaCCS's website has received a total of 58 visits and 54 unique page-views. Most users spent an average time of 02:48 minutes on the page. The majority of page-views were from the UK (91.38%), followed by the US (6.90%) and Greece (1.72%). During this 18-month period, the page was evenly visited with daily pageviews consistently ranging from 0 to 4 (an average of 0.10 visits per day). This is a relatively low hit-rate (a similar map showing centres of research excellence of relevance to PaCCS has received almost 400 hits in a similar amount of time). This appears to be indicative of a certain disinterest among many academics in commercialising their Intellectual Property. 
URL http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/resources-smes/
 
Description Collaboration with Cooperation Ireland 
Organisation Co-operation Ireland
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution In 2014 and 2015 we arranged three PaCCS Policy Workshops for the charity Cooperation Ireland (two at Durham University's Global Security Institute, one in Belfast), developing ideas for an academic contribution to efforts to reduce risks of radicalisation in marginalised Loyalist and Republican communities. Key outputs were the formation of an academic advisory group to help the charity develop its plans, and the skeleton-plan for a research proposal that encompasses the need for both academic excellence and impact.
Collaborator Contribution Cooperation Ireland provided requirements from a non-academic stakeholder for researchers to consider. Cooperation Ireland also hosted a visit from researchers to its headquarters in Belfast. Durham GlobalSecurity Institute provided the venue for two meetings, and catering.
Impact The workshop developed the idea of a nested programme of research aimed at delivering both impact (with short- and medium-term benefit accruing to Cooperation Ireland - and the Loyalist and Republican communities more broadly - through advice on implementation of the project and through an evaluation of its effectiveness) and research excellence (through linking these activities to theoretical reflections on the application on leadership development in relation to disengagement and engagement literature). Cooperation Ireland also invited the academics concerned to act as an informal advisory group. In 2016, the Director of Cooperation Ireland wrote: ""A huge thank you for your efforts in pulling such an eminent field together - it's exactly what I have been trying to do for a number of years. We have submitted an application with Queens University so it may yet prove successful. However, had it not been for your persistence in pulling together the range of universities and experts we would not have been in a position to refine the bid with Queens. If you recall when we spoke at the beginning I had the basis of an idea your knowledge and network in the field was extremely important in bringing the idea to an application stage. Without that support and assistance we would not have been able to crystallise the idea to application stage."
Start Year 2014
 
Description Collaboration with Cooperation Ireland 
Organisation Durham University
Department Department of Chemistry
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In 2014 and 2015 we arranged three PaCCS Policy Workshops for the charity Cooperation Ireland (two at Durham University's Global Security Institute, one in Belfast), developing ideas for an academic contribution to efforts to reduce risks of radicalisation in marginalised Loyalist and Republican communities. Key outputs were the formation of an academic advisory group to help the charity develop its plans, and the skeleton-plan for a research proposal that encompasses the need for both academic excellence and impact.
Collaborator Contribution Cooperation Ireland provided requirements from a non-academic stakeholder for researchers to consider. Cooperation Ireland also hosted a visit from researchers to its headquarters in Belfast. Durham GlobalSecurity Institute provided the venue for two meetings, and catering.
Impact The workshop developed the idea of a nested programme of research aimed at delivering both impact (with short- and medium-term benefit accruing to Cooperation Ireland - and the Loyalist and Republican communities more broadly - through advice on implementation of the project and through an evaluation of its effectiveness) and research excellence (through linking these activities to theoretical reflections on the application on leadership development in relation to disengagement and engagement literature). Cooperation Ireland also invited the academics concerned to act as an informal advisory group. In 2016, the Director of Cooperation Ireland wrote: ""A huge thank you for your efforts in pulling such an eminent field together - it's exactly what I have been trying to do for a number of years. We have submitted an application with Queens University so it may yet prove successful. However, had it not been for your persistence in pulling together the range of universities and experts we would not have been in a position to refine the bid with Queens. If you recall when we spoke at the beginning I had the basis of an idea your knowledge and network in the field was extremely important in bringing the idea to an application stage. Without that support and assistance we would not have been able to crystallise the idea to application stage."
Start Year 2014
 
Description Collaboration with Crossword Cybersecurity re Database of Cybersecurity Research 
Organisation Crossword Cybersecurity
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We provided Crossword Cybersecurity with open source data relating to cybersecurity research within the Global Uncertainties portfolio. Crossword; we arranged for Dr Jat Singh of Cambridge University's Computer Labs to undertake some quality control of the work done by Crossword. Tom Ilube, Chief Executive of Crossword has written: ""PaCCS partnered with Crossword Cybersecurity plc to close the gap between university cyber security research and industry by co-launching CLUE, an open database of all major cyber security research projects conducted in UK universities over the past five years. The concept was inspired by Tristram Riley-Smith's desire to ensure that industry has a window into the cyber research world. The database was seeded with data provided by PaCCS to Crossword. Today CLUE covers over 500 cyber security research projects and has in the region of 400 users. As a direct result of Tristram's initiative partner with Crossword to establish CLUE, UK cyber research is being showcased widely across industry, increasing the chances of commercialisation."
Collaborator Contribution Crossword Cybersecurity tasked three staff members to analyse and present this in a publicly-available database.
Impact The CLUE database is available to the world for those interested in seeking impact from cybersecurity research in UK universities.
Start Year 2014
 
Description Collaboration with Ministry of Defence re Science and Security Programme 
Organisation Defence Science & Technology Laboratory (DSTL)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution I was invited to help the PaCCS programme of research entitled Science and Security (partly funded by the MoD) to deliver greater impact. I reviewed the nine projects within the programme and organised three Policy Workshops (one in the British Academy; two in the Royal Society) that brought the researchers together with policy-makers, practitioners, scientists and technicians from Government, Industry and the Third Sector. I subsequently took the findings of those three workshops and produced (in collaboration with researchers) five PaCCs Policy Briefings (see outputs, below).
Collaborator Contribution In addition to the financial contribution to support the running of these workshops and publication of these briefings, the MoD helped to identify and invite people to represent their department at the workshops.
Impact Five PaCCS Policy Briefings were produced, deriving from the Policy Workshops that I organised: Responsible Research and Development: The Ethics of Dangerous Science; Transforming Research into Technology: Innovation for Defence and Security; Open Source Data: Ethical & Regulatory Considerations; Social Media and the Armed Forces; The Governance of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in Defence and Security. The Briefings were produced in hard and soft copy, and distributed to relevant stakeholders, with follow-up action to drive home impact. In March 2017, Lou Martingale of Dstl wrote the following testimonial: The Science & Security programme within the Partnership for Conflict, Crime and Security Research (PaCCS) was set up with the intent of creating enduring relationships between the social sciences research base and the Defence and Security communities pan-government. As an integrator of research output, and creator of routes to exploitation, Tristram has made highly valued contributions to the success of the programme. He has designed and delivered a series of well-attended events, bringing together academics, policy makers, and representatives of the third and industrial sectors to access research outputs and explore their impact. These exposed participants to a rich seam of knowledge, as well as to perspectives other than their own, informing and challenging thinking. His subsequent leadership of the creation of a number of briefs, distilling the themes emerging from these events into insights for policy makers, are helping ensure that policy development is cognisant of the research front line in areas as diverse as social media, autonomy and the ethics of emerging science and technology. Tristram has also very effectively, and with significant energy, facilitated the building of new relationships between academia and a diverse set of stakeholders, enabling linkages which would otherwise not have been made.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Collaboration with Oxford's Mathematical Institute on a Networks and Criminality Workshop 
Organisation University of Oxford
Department Mathematical Institute Oxford
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In 2015 I was asked by Dr Mason Porter at Oxford's Mathematical Institute for help in bringing together non-academic stakeholders to participate in a workshop on Networks and Criminality convened in April 2015. I was able to nominate a number of contacts who were involved, including those from GCHQ and the Financial Conduct Authority as well as the Chief Executive of Create Intelligence.
Collaborator Contribution This event advanced my goal of finding opportunities to demonstrate to non-academic stakeholders the contribution that research can make to their work, and helped to encourage engagement and knowledge-exchange that could be of value to future research.
Impact Not known.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Collaboration with The Brilliant Club to arrange workshop on Religion and Security for Sixth-Formers 
Organisation Brilliant Club
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The wellspring for this event was the PaCCS workshop on "Religion and Contemporary Security Challenges", held in September 2015, and the Policy Briefing that followed. An introduction to The Brilliant Club provided access to pupils who could derive the greatest benefit from this initiative: the Brilliant Club is an award winning charity that exists to widen access to universities for pupils from under-represented groups. They recruit, train and place doctoral and postdoctoral researchers in non-selective state schools across the country. Five schools were involved: Bushey Academy (Bushey), Fortismere School (Muswell Hill), Greenshaw High School (Sutton), King Solomon Academy (Marylebone), and St James Catholic High School (Barnet). Each sent about a dozen 6th Formers to our workshop in Camden Town, with the venue generously provided by the Open University. The day was structured around two big questions - "How does religion become entangled with conflict and violence?" and "Is there anything we can do about it?". Through a series of parallel round-table discussions and plenary feedback sessions, we explored a number of sub-themes: identity and difference; trust & mistrust; insecurity and alienation; closed minds and stereotypes.
Collaborator Contribution The Brilliant Club helped recruit schools to participate in the event. The Open University provided the venue.
Impact c Fifty Sixth-Formers from disadvantaged schools (least likely to get students to university) had the opportunity to expand thinking and enrich university applications. They were all asked to include one or two paragraphs in their Personal Statement for university entry.
Start Year 2016
 
Description Collaboration with The Brilliant Club to arrange workshop on Religion and Security for Sixth-Formers 
Organisation Open University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The wellspring for this event was the PaCCS workshop on "Religion and Contemporary Security Challenges", held in September 2015, and the Policy Briefing that followed. An introduction to The Brilliant Club provided access to pupils who could derive the greatest benefit from this initiative: the Brilliant Club is an award winning charity that exists to widen access to universities for pupils from under-represented groups. They recruit, train and place doctoral and postdoctoral researchers in non-selective state schools across the country. Five schools were involved: Bushey Academy (Bushey), Fortismere School (Muswell Hill), Greenshaw High School (Sutton), King Solomon Academy (Marylebone), and St James Catholic High School (Barnet). Each sent about a dozen 6th Formers to our workshop in Camden Town, with the venue generously provided by the Open University. The day was structured around two big questions - "How does religion become entangled with conflict and violence?" and "Is there anything we can do about it?". Through a series of parallel round-table discussions and plenary feedback sessions, we explored a number of sub-themes: identity and difference; trust & mistrust; insecurity and alienation; closed minds and stereotypes.
Collaborator Contribution The Brilliant Club helped recruit schools to participate in the event. The Open University provided the venue.
Impact c Fifty Sixth-Formers from disadvantaged schools (least likely to get students to university) had the opportunity to expand thinking and enrich university applications. They were all asked to include one or two paragraphs in their Personal Statement for university entry.
Start Year 2016
 
Description G8+1 Non-Proliferation Directors Workshop 
Organisation Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution In October 2013, the FCO hosted a gathering of the G8+1 Non-Proliferation Directors' Group, with a workshop that I had been invited to put together, inviting leading academics to discuss future proliferation threats (beyond the horizon). The gathering was chaired by Sir Richard Dearlove (former Chief of SIS and Master of Pembroke College, Cambridge) and focused on three potential sources of novel weapons: Artificial Intelligence and Robotic Weapons (AIR), Geo-Engineering (GE), and Synthetic Biology & Genomics (SBG). The following researchers participated: • Professor Alan Winfield (Open University) on AIR: The Science • Tim Kruger (Oxford) on GE: The Science • Professor Chris Lowe (Cambridge) on SBG: The Science • Lord Martin Rees (Cambridge) on AIR: Why should the NPDG care? • Professor Steve Rayner (Oxford) on GE/SBG: Why should the NPDG care? • Professor Guglielmo Verdirame (KCL) on AIR/GE/SBG: Legal Frameworks This was the initiative of Sarah Macintosh, the FCO's FCO Director for Defence & International Security, who wrote a note of thanks for the event, clearly delighted with the way that it had gone, and impressed by the strength and quality of the academic talent on display.
Collaborator Contribution Provided the venue and brought together Non-Proliferation Directors from the G8+1 nations.
Impact The FCO was pleased with the event, achieving their goal of encouraging the Group to consider issues beyond the horizon.
Start Year 2013
 
Description Global Uncertainties Placement re Requirements of the National Crime Agency for Social and Behavioural Sciences 
Organisation National Crime Agency
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We arranged to place a doctoral student into the National Crime Agency. Following a national recruitment campaign, (now Dr) Anna Sergi from Essex University was selected, and was security-cleared by the NCA. Her task reflected growing interest in improved engagement between Law Enforcement Agencies and academics, in order to improve capabilities and decision-making in the face of threats from Transnational and Organised Crime; the FCO and Home Office share an interest in these issues and were interviewed, and the Director of Europol facilitated a visit to his headquarters in The Hague. Anna Sergi spent three months conducting interviews and writing up.
Collaborator Contribution The NCA security-cleared Ms Sergi, provided desk-space and a supervisor to support her work, organising interviews and providing feedback.
Impact 1. Report to NCA, subsequently published on the PaCCS website to coincide with the PaCCS "Transnational Organised Crime" Research Call. 2. The report was discussed at the initial steering group meeting for a Strategic Hub on Organised Crime being hosted at RUSI where key representatives of public sector (including Home Office, National Police Chief's Council and the College of Policing) met with prominent representatives of research bodies and academic institutions. 3. In January 2016, Steve Welsh, Head of Behavioural Science, Organised Crime Command at the National Crime Agency reported: "We have tendered Anna Sergi's report to numerous academic institutions and research consortia; consistently resulting in a clear and immediate understanding of NCA's research requirements and the practical context which they arise. Anna's work (aided by her security vetted status) provided not just the requirements in language that academic and research could immediately digest but also just as importantly the strategic and operational context in which the requirements arose. This clarity of requirement, context and prioritisation offers the best prospect of research yielding practical impact of mutually benefit to the customer and researcher. Without such documented requirements various less effective means of securing research or deriving benefit from research in progress inevitably result."
Start Year 2013
 
Description Innovation Challenges in Cybersecurity 
Organisation Digital Catapult
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We worked with the KTN to convene a workshop in Horwood House in November 2015, bringing together researchers, policy-makers, industry and investment people to discuss what obstacles stand in the way of achieving innovatio0n in cybersecurity and how can these be overcome. The results were turned into a PaCCS Policy Briefing Note launched at Digital Catapult in March 2016 (with the conference organised by the Digital Catapult for free). The Special Advisor for Innovation to the Head of the European Commission gave the keynote address to our Horwood House event and subsequently organised a working lunch (in May 2016) to launch our Policy Briefing Note in Europe.
Collaborator Contribution I worked with the Cybersecurity Lead who helped to plan the Horwood House event, invite participants and co-chair the event. We worked with the Digital Catapult which launched our Note at its HQ in London, with a conference organised by them. We worked with the Special Advisor for Innovation to arrange a working lunch in Brussels with policy-makers in May 2016.
Impact Publication of a Policy Briefing Note ("Innovation Challenges in Cybersecurity" and its promotion through a conference at the Digital Catapult and a Working Lunch for policy-makers in the European Commission.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Innovation Challenges in Cybersecurity 
Organisation European Commission
Country European Union (EU) 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We worked with the KTN to convene a workshop in Horwood House in November 2015, bringing together researchers, policy-makers, industry and investment people to discuss what obstacles stand in the way of achieving innovatio0n in cybersecurity and how can these be overcome. The results were turned into a PaCCS Policy Briefing Note launched at Digital Catapult in March 2016 (with the conference organised by the Digital Catapult for free). The Special Advisor for Innovation to the Head of the European Commission gave the keynote address to our Horwood House event and subsequently organised a working lunch (in May 2016) to launch our Policy Briefing Note in Europe.
Collaborator Contribution I worked with the Cybersecurity Lead who helped to plan the Horwood House event, invite participants and co-chair the event. We worked with the Digital Catapult which launched our Note at its HQ in London, with a conference organised by them. We worked with the Special Advisor for Innovation to arrange a working lunch in Brussels with policy-makers in May 2016.
Impact Publication of a Policy Briefing Note ("Innovation Challenges in Cybersecurity" and its promotion through a conference at the Digital Catapult and a Working Lunch for policy-makers in the European Commission.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Innovation Challenges in Cybersecurity 
Organisation Knowledge Transfer Network
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We worked with the KTN to convene a workshop in Horwood House in November 2015, bringing together researchers, policy-makers, industry and investment people to discuss what obstacles stand in the way of achieving innovatio0n in cybersecurity and how can these be overcome. The results were turned into a PaCCS Policy Briefing Note launched at Digital Catapult in March 2016 (with the conference organised by the Digital Catapult for free). The Special Advisor for Innovation to the Head of the European Commission gave the keynote address to our Horwood House event and subsequently organised a working lunch (in May 2016) to launch our Policy Briefing Note in Europe.
Collaborator Contribution I worked with the Cybersecurity Lead who helped to plan the Horwood House event, invite participants and co-chair the event. We worked with the Digital Catapult which launched our Note at its HQ in London, with a conference organised by them. We worked with the Special Advisor for Innovation to arrange a working lunch in Brussels with policy-makers in May 2016.
Impact Publication of a Policy Briefing Note ("Innovation Challenges in Cybersecurity" and its promotion through a conference at the Digital Catapult and a Working Lunch for policy-makers in the European Commission.
Start Year 2015
 
Description Inviting two animation companies to describe how they support research communication 
Organisation Kindea Labs
PI Contribution We reached out to two small companies -Scriberia & Kindea Labs- who specialise in supporting researchers communicate their research through the use of animation as a way to communicate their insights , reaching out to a wider audience. We invited them to publish a blog on our PaCCS website under the title The Art of Communicating Knowledge in the Digital Age.
Collaborator Contribution They contributed to the blog.
Impact Not known
Start Year 2016
 
Description Inviting two animation companies to describe how they support research communication 
Organisation Scriberia Limited
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution We reached out to two small companies -Scriberia & Kindea Labs- who specialise in supporting researchers communicate their research through the use of animation as a way to communicate their insights , reaching out to a wider audience. We invited them to publish a blog on our PaCCS website under the title The Art of Communicating Knowledge in the Digital Age.
Collaborator Contribution They contributed to the blog.
Impact Not known
Start Year 2016
 
Description Member of Expert Advisory Panel to Global Cyber Security Capacity Centre 
Organisation University of Oxford
Department Global Cyber Security Capacity Centre
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution I have participated in workshops in Oxford and through virtual consultation exercises to support the work of the Centre, for instance in the production and revision of the Cybersecurity Capacity Model for Nations (CMM): http://www.sbs.ox.ac.uk/cybersecurity-capacity/content/cybersecurity-capacity-maturity-model-cmm-nations-revised-edition and in discussions about the concept of Cyber Harm.
Collaborator Contribution The work of the Centre has enriched both theory and practice around measuring cyber security efficacy at home and abroad, providing a valuable reference point for the community of academic and non-academic stakeholders involved in this PaCCS theme. In the process, this has created a valuable network of experts, typified by the panel: http://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/cybersecurity/people/
Impact The CMM: http://www.sbs.ox.ac.uk/cybersecurity-capacity/content/cybersecurity-capacity-maturity-model-cmm-nations-revised-edition
Start Year 2014
 
Description Membership of the Advisory Group for the Gerda Henkel-funded project on criminal and nefarious uses of UAVs 
Organisation University of Birmingham
Department Institute for Conflict, Cooperation and Security
PI Contribution I have drawn on the expert knowledge acquired in running a Policy Workshop on drones, and subsequently publishing a PaCCS Policy Briefing entitled "The Governance of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in Defence and Security" to contribute to discussions (including a Red Teaming session). I have also drawn on networks established as PaCCS Champion to help the team at Birmingham build an Advisory Group (to include representatives that I knew in the Cabinet Office and Sellafield), and to identify suitable venues to launch their findings in 2018.
Collaborator Contribution The lead has been taken by researchers at the University of Birmingham, consulting a wide range of collaborators.
Impact A report will emerge in 2018.
Start Year 2016
 
Description PaCCS Placement with BBC Media Action re Communication/Media Strategies to Counter Violent Extremism 
Organisation British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Department BBC Media Action
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Following a competitive selection process, we Dr selected Kate Ferguson (University of East Anglia, UEA) to undertake a PaCCS placement working with BBC Media Action, to look at the role of strategic communication and media development in reducing conflict and countering violent extremism. Her work focused on the use of propaganda by a variety of state and non-state actors, and the evidence base behind current counter-propaganda strategies and efforts to combat violent extremism. in the course of a 3 month placement, Dr Ferguson reviewed the evidence of the effectiveness (or otherwise) of strategic communication and the media in countering violent extremism and information warfare.The key output of the placement was a report (published on the PaCCS website and launched in the Houses of Parliament at the All Party Parliamentary Group for Global Uncertainties on 1 March 2016). It was used by BBC Media Action and the Partnership to inform policy thinking and, if appropriate, future research calls in this area. The Government Office of Science has already expressed interest in the findings.
Collaborator Contribution BBC Media Action provided desk-space in their London headquarters, and access to expert knowledge to support the literature review.
Impact 1. Production of a report (published on the PaCCS website): Countering Violent Extremism Through Media and Communication Strategies: A Review of the Evidence. 2. Talk to All-Party Parliamentary Group on Global Uncertainties in Houses of Parliament on 1 March 2016. 3. Talks in Brussels and Stockholm (linked to European Parliament and UNDP respectively) in March/April 2016. 4. The Government's Chief Scientific Advisor was complimentary about the quality of the work at a meeting of senior Government Officials. There was a meeting on 11 March 2016 with the Government Office of Science: the meeting with Dr Ferguson lasted c three hours with a detailed review of the paper by individuals conducting a significant internal review of HMG strategic communications; it emerged that they weren't aware of much of the literature covered in our evidence review (having rooted much of their efforts to date on quantitative methods): the introduction of insights from Social Sciences and Humanities would appear to represent an early impact. 5. On 23 March, Dr Ferguson was invited to present her findings to a meeting in the FCO, with representatives of DfID, FCO, RICU, and the British Council present. 6. International interest was expressed in this work by organisations as varied as the US Department of Defense; USAID; the National Endowment for Democracy (Washington DC); the Norwegian Development Agency; the Swiss Agency for Development; the United Nations Counter-Terrorism Centre; and NGOs Search for Common Ground and Saferworld. 7. In June 2016, Dr Ferguson travelled to Washington DC, giving a lunchtime presentation to staff in the British Embassy then speaking to the CVE (Countering Violent Etremism) task-force in the Department of Homeland Security (who asked her how she would spend a budget of $100,000,000! She then attended the UN General Assembly interactive dialogue on the responsibility to protect. 8. In summer 2016, the Ministry of Defence's Director of Defence Strategy and the Office fir Counter-Extremism in the Home Office asked for copies of the report. 9. In October 2016, our report featured as the second citation in HMG's BRICS call for concepts on Countering Violent Extremism in East Africa: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/561253/BRICS_Calls_for_Concepts_-__OCT2016.pdf
Start Year 2015
 
Description PaCCS Placement with Home Office (Office of Security and Counter-Terrorism) 
Organisation Home Office
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We recruited Dr Andrew Glazzard to undertake a three month placement with the Office of Security & Counter-Terrorism (OSCT) to map their Science & Technology (S&T) requirements against the portfolio of PaCCS Research. Key aims of the project were to draw OSCT's attention to significant research that could deliver impact, and to highlight any significant gaps between supply and demand; Dr Glazzard identified and reviewed 191 relevant projects within the Global Uncertainties/PaCCS programme (with an further 20 found through Gateway to Research), linking them to six OSCT S&T research themes (Explosives; Radiological & Nuclear Threats; Biological & Chemical Threats; Emergency Service Response; Border & Aviation Security; "Pursue" (innovative approaches to identifying terrorist threats and activity). The response from the Home Office was remarkable: a letter from the relevant Deputy Director (Ian Gibson) noted that Dr Glazzard's efforts "to map the academic work being undertaken under PaCCS has opened our eyes to a significant volume of work of relevance to our work here. ... To take full advantage of these opportunities will require a change in the way we engage externally, and this piece of work has confirmed for us the benefits of taking an increasingly open approach."
Collaborator Contribution The Home Office security cleared Dr Glazzard and provided desk-space in their head-quarters for him to work. They also supplied access to Civil Servants who described their requirements and provided detailed background information.
Impact 1. A presentation on findings was made to the Home Office officials in December 2014. 2. A detailed report was submitted to the Home Office in January 2015.
Start Year 2014
 
Description RUSI-PaCCS Essay Competition (2015) 
Organisation Royal United Services Institute
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution To coincide with their annual Resilience Conference in October, RUSI held an essay competition (exploring how resilience can be sustained in the long term). We were invited (as PaCCS Champion) to support this, choosing a PaCCS theme (focusing on resilience in relation to our three core themes - conflict, transnational organised crime and cyber security). The winning essay in the PaCCS category would be published on our website and would join others to compete for the overall prize. We set the essay title, advertised the event on the PaCCS website and were ultimately included in the panel of judges making the selection.
Collaborator Contribution RUSI initiated the event, providing the forum - at their Annual Conference - for researchers to contribute and agreeing to publish the overall winner on their website.
Impact Two essays linked to PaCCS were published on-line: Ryan Meeks: Resilient Critical National Infrastructure (CNI) in the age of the "internet of things" - Stemming the 'Ripple Effect' of Insider Threat attacks on connected systems towards 2050 (http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/essay.pdf) Dr Liviu Muresan and Alexandru Georgescu : The Road to Resilience - Critical Space Infrastructures (https://rusi.org/publication/rusi-journal/road-resilience-2050-critical-space-infrastructure-and-space-security)
Start Year 2015
 
Company Name Cobalt Light Systems Acquired by Agilent for £40m (2017) and wins Security and Policing Innovation Award (2018) 
Description Cobalt Light Systems is a spinout (dating from 2008) of the Science and Technology Facilities Council's Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Harwell, Oxfordshire. Cobalt's innovative suite of bench-top and handheld/portable Raman spectroscopic instruments are based on proprietary technologies that enable through-barrier identification of chemicals and materials. Traditional solutions based on conventional spectroscopy have limited capacities for detection of materials through sealed, non-transparent containers and are constrained to near-surface identification of materials such as pharma tablet coatings and containers. 
Year Established 2017 
Impact In 2015, Cobalt Light Systems joined PaCCS's Academic Marketplace, expressly looking for industry partners. It was acquired in 2017 by Agilent. At the time it was recognised that by enabling measurement through opaque barriers and surfaces, Cobalt's solutions can analyze whole tablets or inside sealed containers reducing the need for quarantines and time-consuming sample processing and testing in pharmaceutical QC, hazardous chemical ID and security. The result is significant time, cost, and resource savings for customers as well as increased safety for certain market segments such as first responders or air passengers. Cobalt's customers include more than 20 of the largest 25 global pharmaceutical companies, and more than 75 airports across Europe and Asia-Pacific, including eight of the 10 largest European airports, with over 500 devices deployed at airport checkpoints. Recently, Cobalt has entered the hazardous substances markets with its handheld platform.
Website https://www.agilent.com/about/newsroom/presrel/2017/07jul-gp17014.html
 
Company Name Crossword Cybersecurity 
Description Crossword Cybersecurity works with Universities doing Cyber Security research to bring their leading edge ideas into the commercial world. These include the Universities of Bristol, Warwick, Coventry, Surrey and City University London. I worked with them to develop the CLUE database of cybersecurity research, using open source data from the UK Research Councils: this database - available to all - enhances the opportunities for research to deliver impact through being turned into products and services. CyberOwl (qv) is an example. 
Year Established 2014 
Impact Crossword has bought two commercial products to market to date, Rizikon and Nixer. Rizikon's cyber risk assessment tool developed from research at the Centre for Cyber and Security Sciences at City University, London. In April 2016, Crossword announced the creation of CyberOwl Limited, a spin out from Coventry University with Mercia Fund Management providing the seed funding: CyberOwl is commercialising Coventry's patent pending research into early warning of cyber attacks in extremely large scale environments such as the Internet of Things and Smart Cities. In May, Crossword and the University of Warwick won a Ministry of Defence contract for a proof of concept for blockchain enabled smart documents.
Website http://www.crosswordcybersecurity.com
 
Company Name CyberOwl 
Description CyberOwl is a cybersecurity company commercialising Coventry's patent pending research into early warning of cyber attacks in extremely large scale environments such as the Internet of Things and Smart Cities. It is based on the research of Dr Siraj Shaikh (Coventry University) and was founded by Dr Shaikh and Tom Ilube (of Crossword Cybersecurity) both of whom collaborated with the External Champion (including in the November 2015 workshop on Innovation Challenges in Cybersecurity). 
Year Established 2016 
Impact Mercia Fund Management provided the seed funding. In May, Crossword and the University of Warwick won a Ministry of Defence contract for a proof of concept for blockchain enabled smart documents.In January 2017 CyberOwl was selected to join the first cohort in GCHQ's Cyber Accelerator Programme.
Website http://www.cyberowl.io
 
Company Name SeeQuestor Ltd 
Description I founded the company in 2014 and am the Executive Chairman. SeeQuestor has raised c £5m to take the research of Professor Sean Gong of Queen Mary University (a world leader in re-identification of people in video) and incorporate it into a platform delivering radically faster video intelligence in support of Law Enforcement Agencies investigating serious crimes. It launched its product in October 2016 and has seen it used in Australia, the UK and USA. This research had previously benefited from EPSRC funding (in c 2009) and had been accredited to the Global Uncertainties Programme. 
Year Established 2014 
Impact The first users of the platform (investigating a $32m fraud in Phoenix Arizona and the murder of a 12-year old girl in Queensland Australia) praised the speed with which they were able to find critical intelligence in months / years of video-data - something that would have been previously impossible. In March 2017, the company won the Innovation Award at Security and Policing 2017, organised by the Home Office, stimulating interest from delegations invited to the event by HMG from around the world. There were four criteria considered by the judges: a) innovation, b) uniqueness in the market; c) market demand; and d) making a clear impact on the operational ability and effectiveness of end-users. https://www.adsgroup.org.uk/policy-and-media/newsroom
Website http://www.seequestor.com
 
Company Name Cytora 
Description The business, which spun out of the University of Cambridge, has developed tools to monitor the web to discover real-time political risks. It is a member of the PaCCS Academic Marketplace. It is now focused on capturing hidden economic insights that exist in online data, giving clients a comprehensive overview of what is changing in the world and an unparalleled ability to unearth leading indicators and opportunities. 
Year Established 2012 
Impact When we launched the PaCCS Academic Marketplace in March 2015, Cytora won the mock "Dragon's Den" that we ran (giving our members the opportunity to pitch for funds from experienced fund-managers). In January 2017, Cytora secured £2.4m of real investment, in a Series A funding round led by Parkwalk with participation from Cambridge Enterprise, iLexIR and a high-profile group of angels.
Website http://www.cytora.com/
 
Company Name XPCI Technology 
Description XPCI Technology aims to work with university research, including the work of Professor Sandro Olivo at UCL into X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging (which has been funded by Global Uncertainties in the past) in X-Ray to develop improved applications in the security sectors. An early goal is to transform the effectiveness of security scanners in airports and elsewhere. The company was formed in January 2017 to bid into the Department for Transport's FASS (Future of Aviation Security Solutions) call: it has formed a partnership with Prof Olivo and Nikon Metrology (which has licenced the IPR); Prof Roberto Cipolla of Cambridge University is also involved in the bid, overseeing use of Deep Neural Networking methods applied to the x-ray images. 
Year Established 2017 
Impact Early days! But in February 2017 the company was successful in being awarded a grant of almost £100,000 from HMG under the FASS call. The grant number is ACC101705.
 
Description (2014) Meeting with John Glen MP (chair of All-Party Parliamentary Group for Global Uncertainties) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I visited the Houses of Parliament to brief John Glen MP (chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Global Uncertainties) on a range of options for using PCCS research to shape the Group's programme in 2014/15.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015
 
Description (2014) Stakeholder Engagement: Improbable 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact I met the senior team at Improbable, a London-based gaming company interested in working with researchers in simulating security scenarios. I briefed them on the PaCCS Programme and they expressed interest in engaging with researchers involved in security and resilience issues. One significant outcome, instigated by me through an introduction, was a collaboration between the Infrastructure Transitions Research Consortium (ITRC) and Improbable, with Improbable making a contribution in resources to the order of £750,000 in the £5m EPSRC funded project MISTRAL ( 2016-2020) awarded to the consortium: the aim is to develop the next generation of highly scalable infrastructure simulation models using Improbable's revolutionary SpatialOS for the design of smarter, more efficient and resilient cities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015,2016
 
Description 2013. AHRC Town meeting: Ethics & Rights in Security Context 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards.

After the Town Meeting several academics applied to the call, of which 7 were successful.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://www.ahrc.ac.uk/Funding-Opportunities/Pages/Ethics-and-Rights-in-a-Security-Context-Call.aspx
 
Description 2014. Academic Marketplace on RISC UK 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Since launching the Academic Market-Place 40 projects from 20 or more universities have been uploaded to the site. Those who have submitted projects are seeking industry partners and/or investors to turn their security-focused IP into products. In the first month the site had over 170 page views, with 477 visits in January-March 2015. In 2015 and 2016, members of the marketplace were involved in Home Office events designed to promote security research, and in 2017, one member of the Marketplace (Cytora) succeeded in raising £2.5m in funding from investors.

Too soon to say, but it has generated very positive responses from both the RISC Council and the Home Office's Security & Resilience Growth Partnership Ministerial Steering Group.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015,2016,2017
URL http://www.riscuk.org/academia/academic-marketplace/
 
Description 2014. Workshop for Government scientists on Inverse Problems and detection of IEDs and explosives 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I collaborated with UCL's Centre for Inverse Problems, following up a Fellowship Scheme that I had organised in 2013 to support Government scientists looking to improve the detection of Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) and Home-Made Explosives. UCL's Centre brought together mathematicians from six different universities to meet non-academic stakeholders from the Home Office, the MoD and the Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure), to consider the contribution that Inverse Problem Theory could make to the challenge.

In 2017, Prof Dick Lacey of the Home Office's Centre for Applied Science and Technology reported that these discussions informed follow-up action, with the Inverse Problems Group at Leeds University working with the UK's leading manufacturer to solve the challenges.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Advice sought by Home Office re JSARC Academic Engagement 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact In December 2016, the Home Office consulted me and Prof Chris Hankin (representing Academic RiSC) about developing academic engagement with JSaRC (the Joint Security & Resilience Centre which brings Government, Industry and Academic together to respond to the identification of innovative solutions to security challenges). Subsequently, the University of Kent has attached Dr Neil Hipps to JSaRC to consider the issues and both Prof Hankin and I have provided follow-up advice. I have also introduced Dr Hipps to Natalia Rodriguez Dominguez (PaCCS's Communications Coordinator) to provide an important channel of communication to researchers involved in this sector.

We had earlier given prominence to the call to build partnerships around JSARC.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/event/jsarc-partnership-briefing/
 
Description Appointment of PaCCS Communications Coordinator (establishing website, twitter etc) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact In 2014 we ran a selection process (working with the ESRC Communications team) to appoint a Communications Officer for GU/PaCCS. Our choice, Alex Benham, produced a Communications Strategy, selected web designers and subsequently launched the PaCCS website and Twitter account. Thousands of viewers have visited the website (almost 8,000 between October and December 2016, for instance, of which 75% were new visitors), and in December 2016 our Twitter followers reached more than 1,000 for the first time. The website became an active site for news, blogs and information about relevant research calls and projects, resources etc. This infrastructure, together with Communications Officer, is continuing for the foreseeable future with ESRC finding the funds to support its continuation (based, now, at the University of Bath).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015,2016,2017
URL http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk
 
Description Appointment to Executive Committee of RUSI's Strategic Hub on Organised Crime 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The Strategic Hub has been created to improve engagement between academic research into the subject and policy-makers and practitioners. I have supported the team with guidance on communications and engagement activities, making introductions to relevant practitioners (eg PSNI) and researchers (eg the 11 P.I,s who received grants under PaCCS's Trananational Organised Crime call.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016,2017
URL https://rusi.org/projects/organised-crime
 
Description Blog on PaCCS Website entitled Crossing the Valley of Death: Delivering Innovative Solutions to Security Needs 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I wrote a blog for the PaCCS website having sat on a panel at RUSI's launch of its report on R&D to support the intelligence and security sectors, and having read RAND Europe's report on innovation for the MOD. The purpose was to highlight the scale of the challenge in helping start-ups cross the valley of death but also to urge stakeholders to look for opportunities to take small steps, which could help -among other things - researchers aspiring to commercialise their work. I am not aware of any direct impact from this blog, but hope it adds to the debate. Certainly I have found myself referring interested parties to it.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/blog/crossing-valley-death-delivering-innovative-solutions-security-...
 
Description Blog on PaCCS's Brilliant Club Day 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Following the success of our workshop for Sixth Formers on Religion and Conflict, I wrote a blog on 28 September 2016 on the PaCCS website describing the event and urging researchers to look for opportunities to do something similar. I don't have evidence this made a difference (yet).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/blog/paccss-brilliant-club-day/
 
Description Blog to help researchers break into SBRI calls 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Following our engagement with the Science and Technology Briefing Day organised the the Office of Security and Counter-Terrorism (OSCT) in the Home Office .... we had the opportunity to work closely with both OSCT and Innovate UK to ensure that SBRI (Small Business Research Initiative) calls are suitable and appealing for researchers. We collectively identified potential obstacles to academia engaging effectively with these calls and are working together to improve the ecosystem for research to deliver impact. This was encapsulated in a blog (Helping researchers break into SBRI calls) that featured on the PaCCS website. This will have contributed to awareness-raising.

we have some evidence of the impact this achieved from a meeting with the Home Office on17 February 2016. Tim Cook in the Office of Security and Counter Terrorism made a point of thanking us for the contribution made in 2015, noting - in his words - a remarkable jump in quality and quantity of bids for their research funds. He specifically highlighted Digital Forensics - the focus of our blog - where there were 65 responses (far larger than usual) with 11 proposals being funded.
.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/blog/helping-researchers-break-sbri-calls/
 
Description Briefing Director HMGCC 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact A meeting to brief the Director of HMGCC on the PaCCS Programme, seeking to identify opportunities for research to deliver greater impact.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Chairing a session on Art and Memory: Conflict and Conflict Resolution at CSaP's annual conference in 2015 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact In April 2015, Cambridge University's Centre for Science and Policy (CSaP) held its annual conference, focusing on the question of how government can make better use of expertise and evidence from the humanities?

Conflict represents one intractable problem that policy-makers have to tackle. This session explored the complex role that art plays in relation to conflict, suggesting that images loaded with aesthetic and symbolic freight carry a force to be reckoned with here. I put together a PaCCS-relevant session, recruiting contributions from a panel of artists, art historians and curators. I chaired the panel which comprised Kathleen Palmer (Head of Art, Imperial War Museum), Dr Glenn Sujo (Senior Faculty, Royal Drawing School) and the artist Šejla Kameric.

The event was powerfully described in a blog on the PaCCS website by CSaP intern Leanne Melbourne: http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/blog/art-conflict/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://4humanities.org/2015/05/5487/
 
Description Chairing part of SHOC (Strategic Hub on Organised Crime Research) at RUSI (23-24 October 2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact A gathering of people from different spheres interested in Organised Crime research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Co-chairing Oxford Conference on Responsible Quantum IT in Defence and Security 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Following our PaCCS Workshop (and subsequent Policy Briefing) on Responsible Research and Development: The Ethics of Dangerous Science , I was invited to contribute to a conference at Oxford on "Responsible Quantum IT in Defence & Security", chairing one of the sessions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Contributing to DCMS/InnovateUK Workshop to set policy for Cybersecurity Academic Startups 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact In November 2016, I was invited to participate in a workshop exploring options for encouraging academic start-ups in cybersecurity, organised by InnovateUK's Knowledge Transfer Network and Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS). The workshop was informed by the PaCCS Policy Briefing Innovation Challenges in Cybersecurity that I had co-authored with Dr Siraj Shaikh (from the KTN), and both Dr Shaikh and I had the opportunity to refer to the Briefing's findings in the course of discussion.

The workshop was able to shape DCMS thinking about the use of funds to stimulate the formation of early-stage companies, and it led to a national initiative based on the ICURe model developed by the SETsquared Partnership. DCMS subsequently announced a new cyber security programme for Academia designed to progress cutting edge research ideas and support these towards commercial success. The new Cyber Security ICURe Innovation-to-Commercialisation programme, piloted by the SETsquared Partnership and Innovate UK, and funded by DCMS, offered university researchers with commercially-promising cyber security ideas up to £35k to 'get out of the lab' ideas to the marketplace.

The call was over-subscribed, with twelve teams selected from eleven universities; the boot-camp to kick-start the process ran in mid-January 2017. The successful candidates - who have been offered the chance to join the Cybersecurity section of our PaCCS Academic Marketplace - are: Imperial College (GLFuzz: Securing Graphic Drivers); University of Southampton (Provenance for Digital Fabrication (3D Printing); University of Cambridge (Pico Authentication Ltd); Liverpool John Moores (InteraCtive CrYPtograpHic Protocol TEaching and LeaRning); Queen's University Belfast (IoT Security - central and distributed protection); University of Surrey (Password+); University of South Wales (Talbot: A SCADA/ICS Forensics Toolkit); Liverpool Hope University (Secret Sharing for Cloud and the Internet-of-things); Anglia Ruskin (Botprobe); Bournemouth University (Commercialisation of CAIRIS - Computer Aided Integration of Requirements and Information Security); University of Northampton (Commercialising the concept of a Corporate Cyber-Immune System); Liverpool John Moores University (Modelling Security Requirements for Businesses in 3D).

There was a second programme in 2018 that ended in a Demo Day with thirteen successful teams: as set out here (https://admin.ktn-uk.co.uk/app/uploads/2019/02/Cyber-Security-Booklet-2019-Digital.pdf): City University of London (Find, classify, and analyse online extremist videos); Bournemouth University (Enabling agile teams to create digital products and services with security and privacy designed in); City University London (A searchable encryption enterprise solution for the Cloud); University of Oxford (Empowering home users for digital wellness and protection); University of West London Smart security for smart infrastructures); University of Warwick, in collaboration with Newcastle University & University of York (Verifiable electronic voting for real-world elections); University of Hertfordshire (TAME - Threat assessment model for information environments); University of Huddersfield (Autonomous identification and exploitation of security expertise from Security Information and Event Management data sources); London Metropolitan University (Easy use of voice controlled devices with guaranteed security); Liverpool John Moores University (Low-power and high-speed True Random Number Generator); University of Brighton (Privacy-by-Design toolkit); De Montfort University (Adaptive Cyber Threat Intelligence for Security Investment Optimisation); University of Wolverhampton (Cydon: An intelligent decentralised data management platform).

In 2019, a third programme was launched: https://apply-for-innovation-funding.service.gov.uk/competition/319/overview.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.setsquared.co.uk/research-commercialisation/cyber-security-icure-programme;
 
Description Corsham Institute Conference (of Thought-Leaders) on Digital Trust and Ethics 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact In June 2016 I was invited to attend a thought leadership conference on Digital Ethics and Trust held at Windsor Castle. The purpose of the conference was to discuss important issues relating to trust, consent, ethics, and privacy in the digital society we now live in. This was part of a wider conference series hosted by the Corsham Institute in partnership with RAND and St. George's House. Fellow participants included policy-makers from the Home Office,NHS and DCLG, and seniors from Third Sector organisations such as the Electoral Reform Society and Demos. I subsequently had the opportunity to feed in relevant PaCCS Policy Briefings (on Open Source Data: Ethical and Regulatory Considerations; and on the Use of Social Media in the Armed Forces), and to review the report that was launched at the House of Lords later in the year.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://corshaminstitute.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Ci-Trust-and-ethics-2016.pdf
 
Description Ditchley Park Conference on The Future of Policing in the Digital Age (January 2018) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Ditchley Foundation brought together senior police officers from the UK, the USA and elsewhere (Europol, Pakistan, Singapore) to meet with thought-leaders in a three day closed conference to discuss the future of policing. The event was chaired by Cressida Dick, Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police, and included her members of her senior team, the Chief Constable leading the National Police Chiefs Council, the Deputy Director of the National Crime Agency, and the Deputy Mayor of London responsible for Policing; the head and deputy of New York Police Department and the Director of the International Association of Chiefs of Police were also present. There was extensive discussion about the challenges facing Law Enforcement Agencies in tackling terrorism, cybercrime and traditional "physical" crimes and as an active participant in these discussions I drew on my two PaCCS projects (as Eternal Champion and TNOC Research Integrator) to inform debate: I made three PaCCS Policy Papers available to discussants: "Transforming Research into Technology: Innovation for Defence and Security", http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/policy-briefings/innovation-defence-security/#; "NCA Requirements for Social and Behavioural Science", http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/REPORT_NCA-Requirements-Social-and-Behavioural-Sciences_FINAL-V2.0.pdf; and "Countering Violent Extremism through Media and Communication Strategies". An immediate outcome was passing questions that arose in relation to cyber-crime into the PaCCS team at RCUK to inform thinking about a new call on Transnational Organised Crime Research. My interventions around innovation also struck a chord with senior police officers (including the chair, Cressida Dick).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Engagement and collaboration with CENSIS (Scotland's Innovation Centre for Sensors and Imaging System) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact I received a visit from Ian Reid, the Director of CENSIS, in 2014, when we discussed opportunities for engagement between his Centre and researchers involved in security themes. this led me to introduce the Forensics team at Dundee University to CENSIS leading to a successful workshop in Glasgow in November 2014 and an InnovateUK project between an SME (Amethyst) and Dundee University. In 2015 I visited CENSIS and presented on PaCCS.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015
 
Description Engagement with ESRC and EPSRC Impact Acceleration Account Directors etc 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact With the help and support of the Research Councils, we have established links to over 50 ESRC and EPSRC Impact Acceleration Account (IAA) Directors, as well as to recipients of grants from recent "Global Uncertainties" calls (EMOTICON, Ethics and Rights in a Security Context, and Science and Security). This delivered early benefits when we elicited responses from 15 research institutions within 24 hours to an urgent request from the Civil Contingencies Secretariat to identify capabilities the security sector could contribute to the current Ebola crisis. We have used this network subsequently disseminate calls, eg those linked to the Security Innovation Demonstration Centre and the Office of Security and Counter-Terrorism. We alsosought help from the IAAs to build a map of academic centres researching security and resilience issues.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015,2016
 
Description Engagement with Joint Public Issues Team for the Baptist, Methodist and United Reformed Churches 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact I introduced myself to Steve Hucklesby, Policy Adviser to the Joint Policy Issues Team. I visited his offices in the Marylebone Road, briefed him on PaCCS in order to encourage opportunities for engagement with our researchers. I made a number of introductions. He, in turn, provided me with briefing on their work-plan which included topics (under Conflict and Peace) of direct relevance to PaCCS, including Syria/Iraq, Refugees, comprehensive approaches to Nuclear Disarmament, and accountability over the use of armed drones.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015
 
Description Engagement with Lloyds Register Foundation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact In March 2015, through an invitation from John Baird of EPSRC, I met with Ruth Boumphrey, Head of Research Grants at Lloyds Register Foundation - a large charitable organisation with an interest in engineering-related research, training and education and a strong emphasis on safety and security (including of the critical infrastructure). I briefed her on PaCCS and we agreed to look for opportunities for synergies and to extract more impact from PaCCS research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
 
Description Engagement with Somalia Artisanal Fisheries Training, Infrastructure & Development (SAFTID) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Following a meeting with a British philanthropist (William Oswald) working with SAFTID (Somalia Artisanal Fisheries Training, Infrastructure & Development), where I briefed him on the work of PaCCS, I made an introduction to Dr Eric Herring (from Bristol's Global Insecurities Centre). I am aware that there were constructive discussions between the two, with Dr Herring being put in touch with the wider team at SAFTID.

[This can be seen to be a useful spin-off impact from the engagement with Bristol's Global Insecurities Centre in 2013].
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Engagement with World Vision and the Peace and Conflict Hub of the JLI on Faith and Local Communities 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact In February 2015 I visited Sarah Pickwick, Senior Conflict Adviser with World Vision UK, briefing her on the PaCCS Programme and exploring opportunities to improve engagement. This led to regular contact.

This meeting was instigated by Lucy Moore (from Islamic Relief), following my meeting in 2014 with that charity. The two individuals (Lucy and Sarah) were instrumental in setting up a Faith and Conflict hub under the Joint Learning Initiative on Faith and Local Communities, which subsequently became engaged in PaCCS research in a variety of different ways, including publishing a blog about the hub's work: http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/blog/new-learning-hub-experts-working-peace-conflict-faith/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
URL http://peace-and-conflict.jliflc.com/
 
Description Enhanced Impact Scheme 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Enhanced Impact Scheme is a scheme designed to help researchers deliver impact through making connections to stakeholders in government, industry and civil society, and through providing advice about delivery of messages that stand some chance of being heard and acted upon. In the first 15 months of my Championship scheme 33 researchers have applied to take part: initial surgeries have been conducted and action plans drawn up.

Subsequently, this has become an "open door", where researchers involved in security-related research can get in touch seeking help (and where stakeholders keen to connect with research can also receive advice). A key outcome is the introduction, where connections are made between researcher and stakeholder: I made 152 introductions over 22 months (April 2014 - December 2015), and expect the aggregate effect of these over the next decade will be significant. For instance, introducing the Centre for Secure IT (Queen's Belfast) to UKTI could lead to an investment in the Northern Ireland Science Park of c £150m; introducing the Infrastructure Transitions Research Consortium (based at Oxford) to Improbable (a gaming company) led to a £5m grant from EPSRC to develop simulation tools to model impacts on critical infrastructure, with Improbable contributing £750,000.



Over 50 introductions have been made between the researchers in the scheme and stakeholders, leading to many follow-up conversations.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015,2016
 
Description European Commission Cybersecurity Conference (Vilnius) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact In October, I attended an EC conference in Vilnius, convened by the High-Level Group of Scientific Advisors, to provide guidance to policymakers addressing cybersecurity issues. In making my contribution, I was able to draw on insights from the PaCCS Policy Briefing on Innovation Challenges in Cybersecurity which has been submitted as evidence for the review. This outputs from this conference will inform policy-making.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://ec.europa.eu/research/sam/index.cfm?pg=cybersecurity#vilnius
 
Description Exchanges with Prof Paul Taylor, Lancaster University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact In June 2015 I arranged a Skype call to Prof Paul Taylor (Lancaster University) to brief him on the PaCCS programme and to look for greater opportunities for engagement.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Framework for Responsible Research & Innovation in ICT Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards.

N/A
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2011,2014
 
Description G8 + 1 Non-Proliferation Directors Group: Horizon Scanning Seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Presentations from leading academics in various fields related to non-proliferation led to questions and discussion among policymakers.

N/A
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Global Uncertainties Impact Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact The conference sparked lively debate among the audience, and made connections between a number of academics and relevant policymakers.

Connections made at our conference led to me organsing a policy workshop with the Charity Co-operation Ireland on 'Holisitic approaches to reducing marginalisation - An Irish perspective'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Global Uncertainties Impact Conference (2014) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact In March 2014, I convened a conference at Chicheley Hall bringing together academic researchers from the Global Uncertainties Programme and non-academic stakeholders (principally from Government and Industry) to explore challenges and opportunities for researchers in delivering greater impact. The two-day event included presentations from policy-makers and industry representatives on what they were looking for from research, examples of effective impact emerging from research, and interactive breakout sessions where researchers presented their work to small teams of non-academics who helped them identify options for delivering impact. The proceedings and findings were published on the PaCCS website.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/RCUK-Global-Uncertainties-Conference-Repo...
 
Description Global Uncertainties Leadership Fellows Networking Event 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other academic audiences (collaborators, peers etc.)
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards. Led to lasting relationships being made.

Contact with the Leadership Fellows is ongoing, and we have worked with several of them to help bring their work to the attention of relevant stakeholders in Government, Industry and Civil Society.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Guest Speaker at SOAS's first Impact Lunch 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact in March 2015, I was invited to be the guest speaker at the first "Impact Lunch" organised by the School of Oriental and African Studies, providing a briefing - mainly to researchers - on the PaCCS programme and opportunities and techniques for delivering impact.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL https://www.soas.ac.uk/researchoffice/events/impact-lunches/18mar2015-impact-lunch-with-dr-tristram-...
 
Description Hosting CSaP Policy Workshop for Dstl on "Future threats and challenges of quantum technologies" 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I was invited to open and participate in this event, arranged by Cambridge's Centre for Science and Policy for the Defence Science and Technology Labs. It was chaired by Sir Richard Mottram and explored the threats posted to defence and security by emerging quantum technologies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Innovation Challenges in Cybersecurity 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact We worked together with the KTN to hold a residential workshop in Horwood House (lunch-time to lunch-time) bringing together c six researchers, six policy-makers, six industry and six investment people to discuss the challenges to delivering a innovative cybersecurity solutions. There was a keynote address from Robert Madelin, the EC's Special Advisor on Innovation and input from the White House's cybersecurity strategist. The results were written up in a PaCCS Policy Brief launched at the Digital Catapult on 14 March (followed with launched in Brussels on 3 May and - it is expected - Boston USA on 13 May).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
 
Description Instigating dialogue between Forensic Scientists at Dundee University and UKTI's Innovation Gateway 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Following an approach from the Department of Trade and Industry, I proposed the creation of a world-class Forensic Science Innovation Centre at Dundee University, with funds of c £50m channelled from overseas sponsors through UKTI's Innovation Gateway. I introduced UKTI's Innovation Gateway to Professors Sue Black and Niamh Nic Daeid at Dundee, and subsequently introduced the university to PilotLite Ventures (which specialise in advising the public sector on innovation hubs).

This initiative ultimately ran into the sand, but Professor Dame Sue Black has written that this initiative led ultimately to success with the Leverhulme Research Centre for Forensic Science being created at Dundee in 2016. "You were instrumental," Professor Black has writtenm "in allowing us our flights of fancy in the early days when we were searching for a vehicle for our idea and much of the Leverhulme success could comfortably sit on your doorstep."
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015
URL http://www.dundee.ac.uk/leverhulme/
 
Description Interview with "Research Fortnight" 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact I was interviewed about the PaCCS Programme by "Research Fortnight", with the article published in November 2014. The journal claims to have a circulation of more than 25,000.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Interview with Professional Security Magazine 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact I was interviewed in November 2014 by Professional Security Magazine (circulation 10,000) about the PaCCS Academic Marketplace.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Invitation to address senior EC officials on innovation challenges cybersecurity 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Supporters
Results and Impact Following the production of the PaCCS Policy Briefing on Innovation Challenges in Cybersecurity, I was invited with my co-author (Dr Siraj Shaikh of Coventry University and the KTN) to meet senior officials who are formulating innovation and cybersecurity strategy.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Invitation to brief senior European Commission officials in Brussels at a Cybersecurity Lunch 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact On 3 May 2016, I was invited (with Dr Siraj Shaikh, the co-author of our PaCCS Policy Briefing on Innovation Challenges in Cybersecurity, to brief a cross-section of senior EC officials on insights from our Briefing. Our audience was: Robert Madelin (Senior Innovation Adviser, EPSC); Michal Boni MEP (European Parliament);
Heli Tiirmaa-Klaar (Cyber Security Policy Advisor, EEAS); Andreas Mitrakas, Head of Quality and Data Management, ENISA); Steve Purser (Head of Core Operations, ENISA); Slawomir Tokarski (Director - Innovation and Advanced Manufacturing, DG GROW); Jorge Novais Gonçalves (Policy Officer, Intellectual Property and Fight Against Counterfeiting, DG GROW); Paul Timmers (Director, Digital Society, Trust and Security, DG CNECT); Jakub Boratynski (Head of Unit, Trust and Security, DG CNECT); Florent Frederix (Programme Officer, Trust and Security, DG CNECT); Cathrin Bauer-Bulst (Team Leader, Organised Crime Unit, DG HOME); Iphigenia POTTAKI (Scientific Advice Mechanism, DG RTD); Rogier Holla (Deputy Head of Unit, CERT-EU); Ann Mettler (Head of EPSC, European Political Strategy Centre); Leonardo Quattrucci (Policy Assistant to the Head of EPSC); Sylvia Hartleif (Foreign Affairs Team, European Political Strategy Centre); David Galloway (Deputy Director-General, Security, Safety and Communication and Information Systems, European Council); Gilles Dekerchove (EU Counter-Terrorism Coordinator, European Council). There was an extensive discussion about the findings of our report, with clear indications that this was shaping policy planning within the EC.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Invitation to meet Director of Ditchley Park Foundation (20 July 2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact I was invited to explore with the Director issues that could inform the Ditchley Park Programme going forward, including opportunities to extract innovation from research. As a result of the discussion, I have been invited to attend a new event, taking place in January 2018, entitled "The Future of Policing and Technology Conference".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Involvement in Cyber-Y meetings 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact I have represented PaCCS at several meetings of Cyber-Y, a newly-established forum for cyber-security entrepreneurs, who come together to explore "the realities of the UK ecosystem for cyber security start-ups and SMEs". Cyber-Y contributed to shaping the UK Government vision for the cyber security innovation ecosystems that is currently being implemented.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
URL http://www.cybery.co.uk/
 
Description Joining USA Cybersecurity Mission to speak at Harvard Reception (12 May) and MIT (13 May) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact I was invited to join the UK's Cybersecurity Mission to the United States organised by Crossword Cybersecurity and the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS). At each location we were meeting with a) cyber security researchers from the institution b) technology transfer/commercialisation teams and c) industry / government / national security representatives. The aim was to run interactive, working sessions with one or two presentations from key individuals (myself included), but the majority of the time wasspent in dialogue, looking for opportunities to learn, collaborate and leverage the relationships. Each of the universities visited was keen to understand what concrete outcomes can be derived from this visit.

Fellow-members of the British delegation included a number of researchers who have received PaCCS funding and others who participated in the PaCCS Policy Workshop on Innovation Challenges in Cybersecurity that I organised in November 2015; indeed, it emerged that this mission was inspired by that workshop and the subsequent PaCCS Policy Briefing (that was distributed to the American hosts). The British delegation was: Prof Andrew Blyth, Head of Information Security Research Group, University of South Wales; Prof Carsten Maple, Professor of Cyber Systems Engineering, University of Warwick; Dr Siraj Shaikh, Reader in Cyber Security and KTN Cyber Security Lead, Coventry University; Prof Vladimiro Sassone, Director of Cyber Academy, Southampton University; Dr Frank Stajano, Head of Academic Centre of Excellence in Cyber Security Research, University of Cambridge; Prof Steve Schneider, Director of Surrey Centre for Cyber Security, University of Surrey; Prof Angela Sasse, Director, Research Institute in Science of Cyber Security, UCL; Prof Raj Muttukrishnan, Professor of Security Engineering, City University, London; Prof John McCanny, Director of the Institute of Electronics, Communications and Information Technology, Queens University Belfast; Prof Awais Rashid, Director, Security Lancaster Research Centre, University of Lancaster; Andy Williams, Cyber Envoy, UKTI Defence & Security Organisation, British Embassy, Washington; Mohib Rahman, Cabinet Office/OCSIA
Andrew Boyce, Assistant Director, Cyber Research & Innovation, DCMS; Tony Collins, DCMS; Tom Ilube, CEO of Crossword Cybersecurity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Launch of Policy Briefing on Innovation Challenges in Cybersecurity at Digital Catapult 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Following the PaCCs Policy Workshop in November 2015 on the subject of innovation challenges in cybersecurity, I co-authored a Policy Briefing on the subject. This was launched at the Digital Catapult. There were c 100 participants at a day-long event- drawn from academia, industry, the public sector and investment community -. The event opened with a briefing from the PaCCS Champion, featured a packed agenda, including sessions on:
• the complexity of cyber in Internet of Things devices;
• the investors' view on cyber priorities for startups;
• fixing the skills gap (including a talk from Maggie Philbin, CEO of TeenTech CIC; and
• a panel of SMEs discussing challenges for UK businesses.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Launch of the PaCCS Academic Marketplace 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact More than 70 people attended the launch of the Market-Place at the Royal Academy of Engineering on 16 March, in an event which included: a closed briefing from MI5 to members of the Marketplace on the threats from Economic Espionage; panels on the challenges and opportunities of commercialising research; and a mock Dragon's Den allowing members to practice pitching for investment from experienced fund-managers. Feedback forms show that participants gave the event an average score of 3.6 out of 4. The official launch has generated follow-up activity at both the micro- and macro-levels: a number of project-specific exchanges have taken place (with researchers and SMEs talking to mentors, investors and potential industry partners) and with three broader initiatives proposed: a) members of the Academic Market-Place have been invited to join Lockheed Martin's Virtual Technology Cluster; b) the West of England Aerospace Forum (WEAF), is hosting its first forum for companies on 30 April at the Cyber Academy in Bristol; the forum aims to bridge the cybersecurity skills gap across the UK and we have been asked organise a "Dragon's Den" event focusing on the cyber-security teams in our Market-Place; we were given short notice, but believe we have some "takers"; c) the Home Office invited PaCCS to involve the Academic Market-Place in the launch of OSCT's Science & Technology Programme in July 2015.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/news/partnerships-success-human-security-research-impact-conference/
 
Description Meeting with Chief Scientific Advisor of the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact In 2015, I arranged to meet Professor Tim Dafforn, the new Chief Scientific Advisor at BI; he had previously been Entrepreneur-in-Residence at the Department. Our discussions inspired a new initiative to search for potential Chief Executive Officers from the nation's graduate cadre, to partner with the research teams and incipient SMEs in PaCCS's Academic Marketplace; I did not succeed in security RCUK funding to support this; however, this thinking informed the policy decision by the Department of Media, Culture and Sport (in 2016) to work with ICURe to recruit prospective usiness talent to work with academic start-ups in the cybersecurity sector.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Meeting with Director of Policy, Transparency International 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact In November 2016, I was invited to meet Duncan Hames, Director of Policy at Transparency International. I briefed him on PaCCS and we discussed opportunities for future engagement, including the charity becoming a non-academic stakeholder for PaCCS research projects (especially in the Transnational Organised Crime arena).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Meeting with Director of Urban Villages, Racial Equality & Communities in Transition at the Northern Ireland Executive. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I received a visit from Linsey Farrell, interested in gathering insights from researchers into methods that could be used to understand challenging marginalised communities in Northern Ireland. I shared a number of our outputs (notably the PaCCS Policy Briefing on Religion and Contemporary Security Challenges, and the Evidence Review on Countering Violent Extremism through Media and Communication Strategies). I also offered a number of introductions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Meeting with Full Spectrum Effects Coordination Cell (FSECC) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact In March 2017, I was contacted by FSECC and invited to meet a representative to discuss ways in which the UK's research base could help to efforts of FSECC to deliver the strategic aims of the National Security Council. I briefed him on the work of PaCCS, and described the different ways in which I was able to promote knowledge exchange between academic and non-academic stakeholders in my capacity as External Champion. In the process, I described the contribution that RCUK can make to this work. There was great interest in follow-up action.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Meeting with Gordon Corera (BBC Security Correspondent) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact In summer 2015 I had lunch with BBC's Security Correspondent, to brief him on PaCCS and to look for opportunities for our researchers to deliver greater impact. He expressed particular interest in the Placement with BBC Media Action looking at countering violent extremism through media and communication strategies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Meeting with Head of Research at Home Office Counter-Extremism Unit 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Susannah Browne asked to meet to discuss challenges she is facing in developing an evidence base and Local Area Assessments. I have made a number of introductions to academics.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Meeting with Home Office's Communications Capability Development Programme 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I was invited to meet the Home Office's Communications Capability Development Programme to understand their research requirements and map these against the PaCCS portfolio. It was agreed we would help them reach out to potential sources of solutions.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015
 
Description Meeting with IISS to discuss their plans in Conflict Research 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Antonio Sampaio at IISS invited me to receive a briefing on their programme in their area of conflict research, and to seek my advice on how they could progress towards opportunities for funding.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Meeting with Lord Lindsay, Chairman of the UK Accreditation Service 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact In November 2016, I was invited to brief Lord Lindsay on the work of PaCCS, and to explore where there might be opportunities for knowledge exchange with the UK Accreditation Service (which is, for instance, actively involved in setting cybersecurity standards). There was a follow-up meeting with Malcolm Hynde (External Affairs Manager at UKAS), where I introduced him to the acting director of the Joint Security and Resilience Centre (JSARC).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Meeting with Lord Pearson and Alan Craig in House of Lords 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact In January 2017, I was invited to the House of Lords by UKIP supporter (and former leader) Lord Pearson, and a Newham Councillor (Alan Craig) who opposed the building of the London Markaz Mosque and led the Christian Peoples Alliance. They invited me (at the urging of a mutual acquantance) as someone who would present some challenge to their views about the threat from Islam and the challenges of integration.

In the process, I handed them hard copies of the PaCCS Policy Briefing (Religion and Contemporary Security Challenges) and followed up with a soft copy; I also sent them a link to Prof John Wolffe's Religion, Security and Global Uncertainties. I also offered to make introductions if they want to get access to expertise - I urged them to talk to Prof Rob Gleave as a reliable source on the extent to which Mohammed's teachings and Islamic texts promote violence; and I suggested they could learn from the work that Prof Peter Morey is doing to build relationships of trust between different faiths.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Meeting with Private Secretary to the Minister for Digital and the Creative Industries, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The Private Secretary to the Minister for DCMS came to my office at the Centre for Science and Policy (CSaP) as a CSaP Fellow exploring a number of strategic policy issues. The aim was to further his own thinking on key issues which could, in turn, be shared with the minister as well as officials in the department. He also wanted to build a much wider network in academia, aiming to share this network with officials in the department to make sure that government is abreast of the latest evidence and thinking and using this to guide policy making. He came with the following questions: 1.What is the correct role of the state (both individual states and organisations of multiple states) in the internet? 2.How can we change our democratic processes - particularly law making and voting - to keep up with the digital age? Should we? 3.How can central government encourage the growth of the video games and esports industries in the UK?

At the end of an open-ended, hour-long one-to-one conversation, I provided him with the following outputs from PaCCS:
• http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/policy-briefings/cyber-security/ - see ref to use of short stories, films and computer games to communicate the threat of cyber attack;
• http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/policy-briefings/religion-contemporary-security/ - see reference to the use of the performing arts to help cross boundaries;
• http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/policy-briefings/innovation-defence-security/ - exploring the challenge of overcoming barriers to innovation;
• http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Countering-Violent-Extremism-Through-Media-and-Communication-Strategies-.pdf - see page 3, "Alternative Approaches" 3: "There is a growing evidence base suggesting that radio and television drama addressing issues of identity, reconciliation, and tolerance has an impact on public attitudes and behaviour." Details exist inside the body of the paper.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Meeting with Public Policy Manager, Google UK 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact I received a visit in Cambridge from Katie O'Donovan (Public Policy Manager at Google UK). She wanted to discuss the challenge of countering criminal and extremist use of online social media and broader issues of regulation of social media. Our wide-ranging discussion was followed up by sending her two PaCCS outputs: the Policy Briefing on Open Source Data: Ethical and Regulatory Considerations (http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/policy-briefings/ethical-regulatory-considerations/) and the Evidence Review undertaken by Dr Kate Ferguson (on a placement into BBC Media Action from my External Champion work) into Countering Violent Extremism through Media and Communication Stategies (http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Countering-Violent-Extremism-Through-Media-and-Communication-Strategies-.pdf). She told me the former informed her thinking about her role, and she shared the latter with colleagues leading on an EMEA and global basis on tackling VE "as I think it's really important for us to see".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Meeting with Senior Official in Overseas Directorate ofthe Department for International Trade, focusing on security and economic prosperity policy. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact My visitor wanted to Introduce an academic perspective to the development of his policy areas. His questions included ones about how governments support firms to invest overseas; how does trade and investment support development; to what extent can trade and investment play a role in delivering against national security objectives?

We covered a number of issues linked to PaCCS including impact through commercialisation and exports
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Meeting with the FCO's Director of Science & Innovation for the LatAm Hub (Argentina, Brazil, Chile) (2018) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Dr Julia Knights is seeking guidance on developing a strategy for scientific engagement with these nations. I was able to brief her on the principles underpinning my work as Champion, and agreed to share with her a copy of the PaCCS Policy Briefing on Transforming Research into Technology (Innovation for Defence and Security).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Meeting with the Financial Conduct Authority 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Supporters
Results and Impact I was invited by the Intelligence team at the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) to brief them on PaCCS and to explore opportunities for knowledge exchange. [This arose through an earlier engagement in a workshop on money-laundering run by the Kings Policy Institute]. We identified a number of areas of mutual interest and we kept in touch; for instance, the FCA identified itself as a stakeholder willing to engage with academics when PaCCS launched its research call for Innovative Transnational Organised Crime research proposals.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
 
Description Meeting/Briefing Director of Science, Research and Evidence at Dept of Health 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact The Director of Science, Research and Evidence at Dept of Health visited me in the course of a visit to Cambridge as a Fellow at the Centre for Science and Policy. She leads the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) with Professor Chris Whitty, the Department's Chief Scientific Advisor, working across government and with other funding agencies. She also has responsibility for research to inform policy in the Department and science policy for genomics, rare diseases and emerging therapies. Questions to be explored during her Fellowship were: 1. How should the benefits of health and care research to individuals, the NHS and society be quantified? 2. What factors have been demonstrated to be key to enabling and sustaining successful cross-disciplinary research in fields outside health research? 3. What does research tell us about successful leadership of large distributed organisations and the effective transition from set-up to maturity? 4. What methodologies are being used successfully to promote equality, diversity and inclusivity in academia in the UK and internationally (excluding Athena SWAN)? 5. How is digital technology being used in the health and care sector to engage citizens in rural and semi-rural areas in the UK and what tools are being used to assess effectiveness and impact?

We had a wide-ranging discussion around interdisciplinary research and delivery of impact. Afterwards, I sent her the PaCCS Policy Briefing on innovation (http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/policy-briefings/innovation-defence-security/) and a paper on innovation written for HMG in 2011. I received the following feedback in an email: "I enjoyed our wide-ranging discussion and the observations you made about the culture of civil servants and academia, and how that could/should influence the way people in the sorts of roles we have engage with the parties to deliver. Thanks also for following up with the documents. Much appreciated."
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Meeting/Briefing Salma Shah, Special Adviser to the Home Secretary with responsibiity for strategy and communication across the department. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I received a visit from Salma Shah in December 2018, as part of her Fellowship at Cambridge's Centre for Science and Policy. Her objectives were to establish policy processes focused solely on data, and scientific evidence; to broaden the network of academics for the Home Office's senior staff; to create better functions of challenge in the department; and to find ways of making finite amounts of money go further. She had a range of questions about security, policing and crime reduction.

There was follow-up action to an open-ended and wide-ranging discussion: I sent her a copy of the "Venture Catalyst Report" that I wrote when in Government (which has informed the PaCCS Academic Marketplace); I sent her links to the newly-created National Security Strategic Investment Fund;I introduced her to Prof Anthony Finkelstein (the National Security Chief Scientific Advisor); and set in train a visit to SeeQuestor (a company that has spun-out from PaCCS-funded research).

I have subsequently sent her a copy of the PaCCS Policy Briefing "Understanding Transnational Organised Crime in the 21st Century", emerging from the TNOC Research Intregrator grant.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Meeting/Briefing the Senior Policy Adviser at The Royal Society, responsible for the Society's machine learning and artificial intelligence policy portfolio. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact My visitor was interested in developing a richer understanding about the challenges posed by AI and new digital technologies, by broadening the range of academic disciplines to which I have access in seeking to understand these questions. At the end of a wide-ranging discussion, I sent her the following PaCCS Policy Briefings: http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/policy-briefings/ethical-regulatory-considerations/; http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/policy-briefings/ethics-dangerous-science/; and http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/policy-briefings/innovation-defence-security/. I also sent her the output from the Ditchley Park Conference that I had attended on "The Future of Policing in the Digital Age".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Meeting/Briefing with Nuffield Foundation's Programme Head for Justice, Rights and Digital Society 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact My visitor's interests included exploring the approach of different disciplines to shared questions on a digital society (philosophy/ethics, data science, social sciences, law etc.), in order to ensure the institute considers and accommodates differing voices. Questions included: 1. What are the emerging ethical and social issues posed by the growth in power and use of data, algorithms and AI? 2. What is known about the distributional and cumulative impact of data/AI on society? 3. What are research priorities in this area to provide an empirical platform for debate? Do we need new methodologies or metrics? 4. How can those who design and use data and AI systems consider their impact on society; how can they be supported and incentivised to act ethically? 5. How can people be protected and empowered in a data-driven society: what technical, legal, practical, or policy measures could be adopted? Do we need to pursue new approaches to realise benefits and protect against harms in this global technology? 6. What are the best models for interdisciplinary research and deliberation at pace? What good models exist for bridging gaps between academia, technical practice, ethical deliberation and practical action?

Following our conversation, I provided her with links to a number of relevant PaCCS Policy Briefings. She responded: "Thank you for the reading list, and for your time and thoughts earlier. Both extremely helpful.Our discussed sparked some thoughts and lines of inquiry for finalising plans for the institute. In particular: a) On commitment, the question of how we should engage with industry (techUK is one of our steering partners) and what we should ask of industry who engage with us to ensure there can be in situ testing and impact; b) Models for quicker ad hoc research, I'll follow up with the Behavioural Health Research Institute on their models for interdisciplinary work, and how they manage their two-week, rapid question investigation. I've been looking over the notes from our conversation, and you mentioned Tom Sorrell in the context of ethics policy and privacy by design. He's not somewhere I have encountered, but seems like an excellent person to speak to in the context of Ada Lovelace. Would you mind if I contacted him, mentioning you?"

I followed up with an introduction to Prof Sorrell (a PaCCS Leadership Fellow).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Meeting/briefing Senior Public Policy Manager at Google who leads Google public policy work in Israel, including initiatives around safer internet, counter speech, digital growth and inclusion. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact My visitor (a Fellow at Cambridge's Centre for Science and Policy) wanted to widen her perspective on issues of controversial content and intermediary liability regarding controversial content, outside of Google and the outside of the Israeli context. Her aim was to engage on varied, comprehensive approaches to questions regarding the balance between freedom of expression and other constitutional rights, especially, in the context of controversial content. her questions were: 1. Legal liability and beyond: what are the arguments (and counter arguments) at the basis of calls for proactive involvement of intermediaries, in fighting controversial content online (especially regarding hate speech and incitement)? I'd like to explore legal, philosophical, technological and political arguments. 2. Can (and should) national states maintain their sovereignty regarding the types of content that will be accessible to their citizens, in a world of global digital platforms? 3. What are the potential risks of such potential practices (i.e. requiring global removals) and how can they be mitigated? 4. What are the expectations from intermediaries regarding transparency of their policies, tools and practices? 5. What could be realistic and effective ways to engage with civil society and academia regarding these policies, tools and practices?

At the end of our conversation, I sent her the PaCCS Policy Briefing on the regulation of Social Media (http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/policy-briefings/ethical-regulatory-considerations/) and the report that emerged from the "Thought Leaders" event iI attended, organised by the Corsham Institute: https://www.corshaminstitute.org/trust-and-ethics-report-2016/.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Meeting/briefing UK Research and Innovation's Strategy lead for Equality Diversity and Inclusion and Research Culture 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I received a visit from UKRI's Strategy Lead who was pursuing a Fellowship with Cambridge's Centre for Science and Policy (CSaP). Her goals were a) to engage with the leading experts to help me best shape UK Research and Innovation's policies for equality, diversity and inclusion and research culture (integrity, ethics, reproducibility); b) to engage with experts through the various fora offered by the fellowship to help me scope a UKRI strategy for knowledge exchange between academic experts and Whitehall policy makers; c) t establish a network of expert contacts and stakeholders to help me make excellent strategic decisions, and develop policy to deliver on UKRI's Strategic Prospectus. Key questions were: what should a UK research and innovation strategy look like; what are the equality, diversity and inclusion challenges in the UK research and innovation landscape, and how are these best addressed; how can we ensure that UK research and innovation is conducted with integrity and is ethically sound and thereby preserve and strengthen the UK's position as a global leader; how can research best feed into policy making; what is the role of place and international relations in UK S&T policy?


We had an hour-long discussion, and one specific action was to pass her a link to the "Dangerous Science" PaCCS Policy Briefing (http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/policy-briefings/ethics-dangerous-science/#).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Meeting/briefing the Head of Counter-Terrorism Performance at the Cabinet Office 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I received a visit to my office at the Centre for Science and Policy (CSaP) in April 2018 from the Head of Counter-Terrorism Performance at the Cabinet Office. She was lead the development of a cross-government monitoring and evaluation framework for counter-terrorism; both domestically and internationally. This wasthe first time that all the evidence from across government has been drawn together in a structured way to enable Ministers and senior officials to monitor progress against a shared set of strategic outcomes and objectives. The framework will be used by NSC and senior officials to make better informed decisions about how to allocate and prioritise resource to meet strategic CT objectives. Her visit to Cambridge as a CSaP Fellow was driven by the following objectives: a) to gather some practical examples of techniques and data that could be used to develop the framework further - particularly to build it from a monitoring framework into an evaluation framework; b) to start to explore the evidence base that is available in academia against the new monitoring/evidence framework; c) to seek guidance on the methods and data we could use to better understand the impact of the whole of the counter-terrorism response on reducing the risk from terrorism. In addition, she hopes to develop long-term working relationships with researchers that we can draw on in the future, including in disciplines that are not traditionally related to security.

Following an hour-long one-to-one meeting, I provided her with my own Fellowship Report from an earlier project funded by the Global Uncertainties Programme (www.csap.cam.ac.uk/links/13/435/); b) Kate Ferguson's Evidence Review on counter-narratives: http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Countering-Violent-Extremism-Through-Media-and-Communication-Strategies-.pdf; c) the PaCCS Policy Briefing on responsible research: http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/policy-briefings/ethics-dangerous-science/; and d) an introduction to Cambridge's Centre for Urban Conflict (run by PaCCS Fellow Wendy Pullen)..
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Meetings with Head of Defence Strategy and Priorities (DSP), Ministry of Defence (MOD) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact In September 2016, I was invited to MoD Main Building to meet the head of DSP. This followed efforts over more than two years to encourage the MoD to engage with PaCCS - for instance in the lead-up to the Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR). I had first visited DSP in July 2014, and visited a second time in February 2015, with a number of follow-up emails. This latest visit represents something of a watershed, on the basis of the message received from the MoD after the meeting: "We are very enthused about the prospect of building a longer-term strategic partnership with the UK research base. We will be stepping up a gear with our internal work-planning in the next few weeks, and our approach to academic engagement is a key work-strand within that. I hope to be back in touch with you very soon to build on our early discussion."

In December 2016 I handed this contact over to Prof David Galbreath (as the Leadership Fellow for PaCCS's Conflict Theme) and ESRC.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015,2016
 
Description Member of Eight Roads Cybersecurity Panel (5 June 2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Eight Roads Ventures (also known as Fidelity Growth Partners) is a Venture Capital Fund with offices in China, India, Japan and the UK. I was invited to join one of their periodic gatherings of researchers from around the world, to participate in panel discussion about opportunities to invest in innovative cyber-security opportunities. I was able to talk about the UK's thriving cyber-security research base, but also to discuss the insights from the PaCCS Policy Workshop which led to the Policy Briefing "Innovation Challenges in Cybersecurity".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description PaCCS Policy Seminar: Religion and Contemporary Security Challenges 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact 55 participants from Government, Faith Groups, Civil Society and Academia came together in the Work Foundation to discuss the research of four Global Uncertainties Leadership Fellows - Professors Kim Knott (Lancaster University), Rob Gleave (Exeter University), Peter Morey (University of East London) and John Wolffe (Open University) all of whom have explored questions around religion and contemporary security challenges. We held round-table discussions which helped to ground the research in everyday experience of people working with and thinking about security challenges. Very positive feedback was received, with participants scoring the event 3.7 out of 4. The results were written up in a PaCCS Policy Briefing, published in 2016; the event also informed the publication of an article in The Conversation UK.

Ripples from this conference continue to spread out. In January 2017, I was invited to the House of Lords to brief Lord Pearson (former UKIP leader) and Alan Craig (leader of the Christian Peoples Alliance), both of whom are developing somewhat anti-Muslim rhetoric. As I sought to address and counter their views, I relied heavily on the outputs from this seminar.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/policy-briefings/religion-contemporary-security/
 
Description PaCCS Workshop on Business Skills for Academic Marketplace 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Following their presentation at the launch of the Market-Place, NuAge Vision trialled a coaching workshop for members of the Academic Marketplace (from UCL and Sheffield University) to explore the knowledge, tools and skills needed to transform research into successful products and services.
There were a number of outputs: a) we have published a blog on the workshop, together with workshop resources, on the website; b) one idea to emerge from the workshop was a request that we create a "map" of the opportunities (including grants and schemes) designed to support academic researchers interested in commercializing their work; this is in hand; c) the content of the workshop was found to be very useful, but we identified a challenge in making this available to busy researchers from across the UK; in order to make this coaching more accessible to our community, we explored the option of running a webinar (eg on recognising business opportunities, understanding markets and developing business models).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
URL http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/blog/commercialisation-process-workshop-nuage-vision/
 
Description PaCCS/Brilliant Club 6th Formers Workshop - Religion and Conflict 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact This event, held on 22 September 2016, built on the Policy Workshop in 2015 (when we brought policy-makers, NGOs and faith groups together with PaCCS researchers), and the Policy Briefing (Religion and Contemporary Security Challenges) published in the Spring of 2016. Now, our researchers had the chance to engage with 6th Form pupils, with the emphasis on creating the conditions for the schoolchildren themselves to discuss the issues.

Alex Benham, our first Communications Coordinator, had already proposed the idea of PaCCS conferences for schoolchildren in her Communications Strategy, and an introduction to The Brilliant Club provided access to pupils who could derive the greatest benefit from this initiative. The Brilliant Club is an award winning charity that exists to widen access to universities for pupils from under-represented groups. They recruit, train and place doctoral and postdoctoral researchers in non-selective state schools across the country.

Five schools were involved: Bushey Academy (Bushey), Fortismere School (Muswell Hill), Greenshaw High School (Sutton), King Solomon Academy (Marylebone), and St James Catholic High School (Barnet). Each sent about a dozen 6th Formers to our workshop in Camden Town, with the venue generously provided by the Open University. The day was structured around two big questions - "How does religion become entangled with conflict and violence?" and "Is there anything we can do about it?" Through parallel round-table discussions and plenary feedback sessions, we explored a number of sub-themes: identity and difference; trust & mistrust; insecurity and alienation; closed minds and stereotypes.

Discussion groups were led by: Prof Kate Cooper (Manchester), Zehra Jaffer (Vice-Principal of Skinner's Academy), Dr Tayyeb Mimouni (Exeter), Prof Rob Gleave (Exeter), Prof Peter Mory (UEL), Prof Quassim Cassan (Warwick) and Prof John Wolffe (Open University).

We placed one serious obligation on all the pupils. When they get back to their classrooms, each is to compose one or two paragraphs - to be used in the Personal Statement accompanying university applications - describing what they did and what they gained from the day.That way, the day delivers an enduring legacy.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/blog/paccss-brilliant-club-day/
 
Description Participation in DCMS/KTN "Academic Cyber Start-Up Selection Panel" 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact In June 2018, I took up the invitation from the Cyber Security Knowledge Transfer Network to participate in the panel assessing participants in the cyber-security acadamic start-ups programme (https://apply-for-innovation-funding.service.gov.uk/competition/100/overview) - an initiative in its second year, influenced by the PaCCS Policy Briefing "Innovation Challenges in Cybersecurity".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://apply-for-innovation-funding.service.gov.uk/competition/100/overview
 
Description Participation in Kings Policy Institute Workshop on Money-Laundering 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I was invited to contribute to a workshop convened by a former member of the Serious Organised Crime Agency, hosted by the Kings Policy Institute, to discuss opportunities to advance engagement between academic and non-academic stakeholders with interest in understanding and countering money-laundering. This included representatives from Law Enforcement (including the National Crime Agency), HMRC, the Financial Conduct Authority as well as banks and the Charity Commission.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Participation in MoD Global Strategic Trends 6 workshop: "Future of corruption & organised crime" (29 June '17) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Academics, policy-makers and military came together to contribute to a discussion facilitated by the "Futures, Strategic Trends Programme" of the Development, Concepts and Doctrine Centre at Shrivenham, The focus was on crime.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Participation in RAND Europe's Expert Workshop on Defence and Security Implications of Brexit 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Following Britain's historic vote to leave the European Union, this workshop (on 16 September 2016) was convened by RAND Europe to explore the possible implications for defence and security. It outlined and developed RAND's analysis and aimed to encourage thought-provoking discussion with a broad spectrum of senior experts from defence, security and other backgrounds. Our thoughts informed the report that appeared in RAND Europe's Spotlight on 2016: http://www.rand.org/pubs/corporate_pubs/CP531-2016.html

There was a spin-off benefit for PaCCS, in that the expert panel included representatives from MoD's Strategic Policy team who confirmed their interest (at the meeting) in closer engagement with PaCCS.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.rand.org/pubs/corporate_pubs/CP531-2016.html
 
Description Participation in RUSI's Annual Resilience Conference 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Not only did I give a talk to the conference about PaCCS programme (entitled The Academic Contribution to Resilience) but I also participated in the Essay Prize, setting a PaCCS question about future resilience at a time of cybersecurity threats in the Internet of Things. Two of the three short-listed winners (including the main winner) had applied for our question.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Participation in conference in Parliament discussion impact of Brexit on policy areas 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact On 10 November, I participated in an initiative to promote engagement between academics and Parliament, with the focus on building relationships and discussing the impact of Brexit on key policy areas. The conference was open to researchers from the House of Commons and House of Lords Libraries; the Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology; Select Committee staff (from both Houses); the Inter-Parliamentary Research and Information Network (IPRIN); and Members' staff. I manned a "stall" promoting PaCCS, and Dr Anna Sergi (who previously worked as a PaCCS placement inside the National Crime Agency) was a speaker at a panel on foreign and security policy.

A number of the parliamentary researchers who I spoke to expressed interest in the work of PaCCS and committed to following us on Twitter and monitoring our website.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL http://www.parliament.uk/brexit-conference-2016/
 
Description Participation in panel at launch of RUSI's paper on the Future of R&D in the Security and Intelligence Sector 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I was invited to join the panel of experts speaking at RUSI at the launch of the paper commissioned by RUSI on The Future of R&D in the Security and Intelligence Sector. There was a constructive engagement in Q&A afterwards, and I published a blog on the PaCCS website subsequently: http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/blog/crossing-valley-death-delivering-innovative-solutions-security-needs/
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Participation in workshop run by ESRC + their Nordic / Netherlands counterparts on Human Dimension of Cybersecurity 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact I participated in a two-day workshop organised by ESRC, in collaboration with their Nordic and Netherlands counterparts, on "The Human Dimension of Cyber-Security". This ultimately led to a call that featured on the PaCCS website and was supported by an interactive database.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015,2016
URL http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/hdocs-funding-call-register-yourself/
 
Description Policy Seminar on Identity Management 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards.

In conjunction with RUSI we published a report of the seminar: 'Identity Management (IM) Future Threats and Opportunities Policy Seminar'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.csap.cam.ac.uk/media/uploads/files/1/identity-management-policy-seminar.pdf
 
Description Policy Seminar on Identity Management (Future Threats and Opportunities) 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I organised this Policy Seminar on Identity Management (supporting the IMPRINTS project led by Professor Liesbet Van Zoonen of Loughborough University). 60 people attended - a mix of policy-makers, industry specialists, NGOs and academics; attendees came from afar afield as France, Sweden and Jordan (where - the Government analyst from Amman told us - identity management challenges arising from the influx of refugees from Syria and Iraq is immense). A report containing findings from the seminar was subsequently published on the PaCCS website.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/news/policy-seminar-explores-public-responses-to-identity-management...
 
Description Policy Workshop: Holisitic approaches to reducing marginalisation - An Irish perspective 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Sparked an exploration of alternative ways to support conflict resolution, including exploring the benefits of providing marginalised groups with access to traditional and emerging media.

After the workshop plans were made for a follow-up workshop in preparation for a funding application for new research in this area.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Religion and Security Roundtable 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? Yes
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards.

It led to the publication of the summary report 'Religion, Security and Global Uncertainties'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
URL http://www.open.ac.uk/arts/research/religion-martyrdom-global-uncertainties/sites/www.open.ac.uk.art...
 
Description Response to HMG call for help re Ebola crisis 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact In September 2014 we demonstrated the power of our network by eliciting (in tandem with Academic RISC) responses from 15 research institutions within 24 hours to an urgent request from the Civil Contingencies Secretariat to identify capabilities the security sector could contribute to the current Ebola crisis; this was used in a paper on the subject submitted to the COBRA meeting on 17 September 2014. The 15 institutions produced 24 individual capabilities, including: novel modelling techniques for predicting and monitoring spread and transmission; new vaccinations; disease simulators to accelerate and de-risk therapeutic development and delivery of drugs into patients; decontamination and quarantine systems to contain outbreaks; sensors and detection technologies; communications systems to improve access to information.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Science and Security Workshop for MOD/Dstl (Governance, Ethics and the Law) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact We responded to a request from the MoD to put on a workshop designed to deliver impact from research undertaken in the Science and Security" Programme in PaCCS (co-funded by AHRC, ESRC and Dstl. We brought together some 75 people from academia, Government, Industry and Civil Society to discuss the ethical and legal implications of new technologies applied to the defence and security spheres, with specific focus on Data, Drones and Social Media. We included researchers from other PaCCS programmes in the event (notably EMOTICON) and five "Science and Security" researchers were joined in giving presentations by Professor Marina Jirotka (Oxford) on her work within the Ethics and Rights in a Security Context; programme.

Three different PaCCS Policy Briefings were produced, based on this event: The Governance of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in Defence and Security (http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/policy-briefings/governance-of-unmanned-aerial-vehicles/); Social Media and the Armed Services (http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/policy-briefings/social-media-armed-forces/); and Open Source Data: Ethical and Regulatory Issues (http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/policy-briefings/ethical-regulatory-considerations/). All of these were given wide dissemination.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Social Media Strategy 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Since the launch, tweets have been published daily and the follower base is growing at a rate of 5 - 10 followers a week, reaching over 620 by February 2016. By then, almost 1,000 tweets have been published and our tweets have been seen by more than 5,500 users.

Since launch, our Twitter feed has increased awareness of research findings, for example, the publication of the research report from Leadership Fellow John Wolffe. It has driven people to visit the new Academic Marketplace and has supported the promotion of other events, including the British Academy event Rethinking State Fragility.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015,2016
URL https://twitter.com/PaCCSResearch
 
Description Speak at Colloquium on Education, Security & Intelligence Studies, Oriel College, Oxford (21 September 2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact My talk, entitled was "Men of the Professor Type" Revisited: Building a Partnership between Academic Research and National Security. I offered reflections on the challenges and opportunities for establishing stronger and more productive relationships between the UK's research-base and its security and intelligence community.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Speaking at Society for Educational Studies Seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I was invited to speak at a seminar organised by the Society for Educational Studies. The seminar, organised by Prof John Preston of UEL, aimed "to consider the fragility of the relationsip between universities and national security. My talk focused on "building a partnership between academic research and national security practitioners.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Speaking on panel at Security and Policing 2018 (Home Office event) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact I was invited to talk about the challenges faced by Small and Medium-Sized Companies (SMEs) in penetrating markets at home and abroad. In doing so I drew on experience with the Academic Marketplace and the PaCCS Policy Briefing entitled Transforming Research into Technology: Innovation for Defence and Security.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Stakeholder Enagement (BT) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact I was able to brief the Director for Security at BT about the Global Uncertainties Programme and to explore with him opportunities to improve engagement between BT and research. This has led to regular engagement, including an annual invitation to brief BT and Government officials on our Programme..
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014,2015,2016
 
Description Stakeholder Enagement (Northrop Grumman) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact I secured an invitation from the Chief Executive of Northrop Grumman (Europe) to brief him on the Global Uncertainties Programme and to explore with him opportunities to improve engagement. Despite declared interest in greater engagement, nothing significant came of this.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014
 
Description Stakeholder Engagement (BBC Media Action) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact I initiated a dialogue with the charity BBC Media Action, initially meeting those overseeing research to brief them on the Global Uncertainties Programme and to explore with him opportunities to improve engagement.This led to an ongoing engagement, with the charity ultimately being invited to sit on PaCCS's Strategic Advisory Group and with a PaCCS placement resulting in the production of an important evidence review: Countering Violent Extremism through Communications and Media Strategies.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014,2015,2016
 
Description Stakeholder Engagement (CPNI) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I established a link to CPNI's Chief Scientific Advisor (Prof Nick Jennings, and subsequently Prof Anthony Finkelstein), to brief them and their team on the Global Uncertainties/PaCCS Programme and to explore with them opportunities to improve engagement between CPNI and research. This has led to an ongoing engagement, with opportunities to build better links between CPNI and research..
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014,2015,2016
 
Description Stakeholder Engagement (Cassidian) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact I secured an invitation from a senior team at Cassidian interested in cybersecurity to brief them on the Global Uncertainties Programme and to explore opportunities to improve.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014
 
Description Stakeholder Engagement (Cooperation Ireland) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact I secured a meeting with the Director of Cooperation Ireland (Peter Sheridan), briefing him on the Global Uncertainties Programme and exploring opportunities to improve engagement. This led to regular contact, including the establishment of a small working group of researchers to provide advice to the charity in its work to secure the Northern Ireland Peace Process in marginalised communities.

For instance, at a PaCCS workshop organised for Cooperation Ireland (CI) at the end of 2014, Dr Nick Lewer of Durham University provided a briefing on the "One Text" approach to peace-building, in order to help adversaries build trust and engage in political dialogue. The Director of Cooperation Ireland has taken these insights and employed them in engagement with a group who advocate as dissident republicans and who have been rejecting the Peace Process (and who also support the right to bear arms in support of Irish freedom). A dialogue has now been established, and CI is hopeful that this group will engage constructively in the charity's "islands" programme.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014,2015
 
Description Stakeholder Engagement (Department for Communities and Local Government) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I secured a meeting with a senior official within DCLG to brief him on the Global Uncertainties Programme and to explore with him opportunities to improve engagement. This led to a request for guidance from DCLG on researchers working on integration and communities, which I supplied. DCLG replied: This is very helpful. I must say the brokerage role you provide is a great help in pinpointing projects of most relevance from all the wider programme activity."
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Stakeholder Engagement (Department for Transport) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I secured an invitation from the head of security at DfT to brief her on the Global Uncertainties Programme and to explore with him opportunities to improve engagement between DfT and research. This has led to an ongoing engagement, with opportunities to connect researchers to concerns of those involved in transport security (eg the "Future of Aviation Security Solutions" launched in 2016..
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014,2015,2016
 
Description Stakeholder Engagement (National Crime Agency) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I established a long-running link to the Serious Organised Crime Agency (and subsequently the National Crime Agency) to ensure that the agency understood about the Global Uncertainties Programme and was well-placed to explore him opportunities to engage with research. This has led to an ongoing engagement, which included the PaCCS placement into the NCA to help them identify their needs for social and behavioural research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014,2015,2016,2017
 
Description Stakeholder Engagement (Office of Cybersecurity and Information Assurance, Cabinet Office) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I secured an invitation from the head of OCSIA to brief him on the Global Uncertainties Programme and to explore with him opportunities to improve engagement between OCSIA and research. This has led to an ongoing engagement, with an official appointed as my point-of-contact and with opportunities arising to connect researchers to the OCSIA on different issues. A key success was OCSIA involvement in the 2014 Horwood House seminar that I organised, exploring Innovation Challenges in Cybersecurity.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014,2015,2016
 
Description Stakeholder Engagement (RISC) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact I established links to RISC (the Security and Resilience Industry Suppliers Community), established by the Home Secretary in 2002 to improve links to suppliers of security and resilience solutions to customers in Government and elsewhere. Through links to ADS (the trade association providing the RISC Secretariat) I was able to communicate an understanding of the Global Uncertainties /PaCCS Programme and to promote opportunities for greater impact to derive from security-related research. This has led to an ongoing engagement, with my appointment to the RISC Council (representing the academic research-base) and with RISC providing the website for our Academic Marketplace. The Home Office is closely aligned to RISC, and this subsequently led to PaCCS contributing to events organised by the two (eg the launches of Home Office Research Plans).

In 2015, I supported the RISC Council in its production of reviews of Security Innovation & Demonstration Centre, SRGP, and SDSR. In doing so, worked closely with Professor Chris Hankin (Imperial), representing Academic RiSC, to ensure that proper recognition is given to the contribution that academia can make.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014,2015,2016,2017
URL http://www.riscuk.org/
 
Description Stakeholder Engagement (Selex Finmeccanica) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact I secured an invitation from a Board member of Selex to brief him on the Global Uncertainties Programme and to explore with him opportunities to improve engagement. Despite declared interest in greater engagement, nothing significant came of this.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Stakeholder Engagement: Counterpoint 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact I secured a meeting with Catherine Fieschi, the Director of Counterpoint, briefing her on the PaCCS Programme and exploring opportunities to improve engagement. This led to periodic engagement, where I could introduce PaCCS researchers to Dr Fieschi as a potential non-academic stakeholder.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015,2016
 
Description Stakeholder Engagement: Islamic Relief 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact I secured a meeting with the Head of Research at Islamic Relief, briefing him on the PaCCS Programme and exploring opportunities to improve engagement. This led to regular contact, with an invitation for me to become a Fellow of the Islamic Relief Academy (turned down to avoid conflict of interest).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014,2015,2016
 
Description Stakeholder Visit (ACPO) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact I secured an invitation from Sir Hugh Orde, President of the Association of Chief Police Officers, to brief him on the Global Uncertainties Programme and to explore with him opportunities to improve engagement between Law Enforcement Agencies and research. This has led to an ongoing engagement, with opportunities to connect researchers to relevant ACPO "leads" on different issues.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Stakeholder Visit (Civil Contingencies Secretariat) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I secured an invitation from the Civil Contingencies Secretariat, to brief themon the Global Uncertainties Programme and to explore with him opportunities to improve engagement with research. This has led to an ongoing engagement.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Stakeholder Visit (FCO) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I secured an invitation from a senior Director-General within the FCO to brief him on the Global Uncertainties Programme and to explore with him opportunities to improve engagement between the FCO and research. This has led to an ongoing engagement, with a senior official appointed as my point-of-contact and with numerous opportunities arising to connect researchers to the FCO on different issues.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014,2015,2016
 
Description Stakeholder Visits (Home Office) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I secured an invitation from a senior Civil Servants in the Home Office (including the Chief Scientific Advisor, the Director for Science and Technology, and managers within the Office for Security and Counter-Terrorism) to brief them on the Global Uncertainties Programme and to explore with him opportunities to improve engagement between the Home Office and the GU/PaCCS research programme. This has led to an ongoing engagement, with numerous opportunities arising to connect researchers to the Home Office on different issues.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014,2015,2016
 
Description Stakeholder Visits (Ministry of Defence) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I have established links to a range of different managers and policy-makers within the Ministry of Defence (including the Defence Science and Technology Lab) and have briefed them on the Global Uncertainties / PaCCS Programme in order to promote opportunities to improve engagement between the MoDand security-related research. This has led to an ongoing engagement (including support for PaCCS's Science and Security Programme and requests from MoD's strategy team to establish a stronger relationship)..
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014,2015,2016,2017
 
Description Support for HMG Cross-Departmental Science and Technology Briefing Day 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact We were invited by the Home Office and the Department for Transport to support their plans for Science and Technology research calls in 2016, at an event that took place on 23 May 2016. There was a particular focus this year on detection capabilities. We were allocated a dedicated PaCCS space in the BIS Conference Centre, and organised a programme of presentations to industry by the following university-based teams seeking to commercialise their research: Cardiff University (QMC Instruments Ltd) on terahertz cameras from astronomy used for high-sensitivity security screening and plasma diagnostics; Durham University (School of Engineering & Computing Sciences) on Automatic Object Recognition techniques for threat item detection in CT & X-ray baggage security; Manchester Metropolitan University (Sensing & Imaging Group) on Millimetric Wave and Microwave detection of weapons and explosives; Liverpool University (Nuclear Physics Group) on Portable Gamma Ray Imaging Spectrometer: detecting radioactive materials Newcastle University (Selective Antibodies) See it on the Stick tests to detect CBRNe agents very rapidly displayed as a positive line on a dipstick; Oxford University (Department of Materials) on Percolation Sensors for ultra-sensitive detection of vapour traces of explosives; UCL ((Dept of Medical Physics & Biomedical Engineering) ON Novel solutions for through-barrier material identification and radioactive material detection/mapping.

We were invited to stay on after the Briefing Day had finished, to allow these teams to present again to a cross-section of Government officials and technologists working in the National Security arena, giving individual teams a chance to receive feedback from HMG on the "market" for their technology within Government agencies. (This idea came from the Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure, after their participation in the launch of the PaCCS Academic Marketplace in March 2015).

There was positive feedback, including a letter of thanks (dated 15 June 2016) received from the Home Office's Director for Prepare, Protect, CT Science and CBRNE in the Office of Security and Counter-Terrorism who wrote: I'm hugely grateful for the effort that yourself and Natalia put in to making the engagement day a success. The sheer numbers that turned out for the event, and the excellent feedback that we have received, once again demonstrated to us the benefit of these pre-procurement dialogues with industry and academia. The role that organisations such as PaCCS have to play in helping us reach out to the security sector in crucial, and my team will continue to look to your support, advice and assistance in facilitating this engagement as we look to deliver a challenging range of innovation calls this year."

Recently, I have heard from Prof Martin Castell at Oxford that the CEO of Cell Metric, came to visit Oxford after the talk, to discuss commercial collaboration; discussions remain at an early stage. And Dr Toby Breckon (Durham) has reported on a couple of new research contracts and a collaboration with two new manufacturers - developments which he partly ascribes to the exposure gained at this event. We have also heard from Ken Wood of Cardiff's WMC Ltd, who reports that in addition to meeting up with a couple of contacts (made at the event) to discuss general aspects of airport security hardware, they have recently been offered Phase 1 funding for HMG's Future of Aviation Security Solutions call.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Support for Home Office / Office of Security and Counter-Terrorism (OSCT) Science and Technology Briefing Day 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact (OSCT) held a Briefing & Networking day in July to provide academia & industry with information on three SBRI calls under their Science and Technology Programme. At the event, we delivered an address to participants on the research landscape in the UK, the benefits of collaborative research projects and the role of the Partnership in helping to facilitate these. We also sourced four academic researchers to present their work to participants, highlighting examples of innovative research. We received feedback from all four researchers that these presentations led to follow-up discussions with representatives from government and industry. Following the event, we have been working closely with both OSCT and Innovate UK to ensure the SBRI calls are suitable and appealing for researchers. We have collectively identified potential obstacles to academia engaging effectively with these calls and we are working together to improve the ecosystem for research to deliver impact. (See the blog "Helping researchers break into SBRI calls": http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/blog/helping-researchers-break-sbri-calls/).

On 17 February 2016 we were invited into the Home Office, as it prepared for its 2016 S and T programme. Tim Cook in OSCT made a point of thanking us for the contribution made in 2015, noting - in his words - a remarkable jump in quality and quantity of bids for their research funds. There were, for instance, 65 responses to the Digital Forensics; call, with 11 proposals being funded.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Talk on "Delivering Impact from Academic Scholarship" to Scholar from Jiangsu Province attending "The Rivers Project Leadership and Global Knowledge Programme" at Cambridge 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact I was invited to draw on understanding (as an Impact Champion for PaCCS) of the challenges and solutions for scholars in engaging with Government (in particular) in a three-hour session with professors from universities in Jiangsu Province, China who are interested in advancing the value of "think-tanks" in China. This included a talk and then I facilitated discussion. Afterwards, I received the following letter of appreciation:

"This is Hong Wang , representative at the Jiangsu Provincial International Exchange Center London branch. I am very grateful for your fantastic lecture last Wednesday in Cambridge. The students really appreciate it. They all believe your lectures gave them the most vivid memory during their stay in the UK. Thank you for coming, I really look forward to hearing your lectures again in the foreseeable future. Warmest wishes, Hong Wang, UK Representative, Jiangsu Provincial International Exchange Center, 12 John Princes Street London W1G 0JR"
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Talk on Delivering Innovation to the Palmerston Society (2018) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact I was invited to address the Annual Dinner of the Palmerston Society, with the audience mainly comprising undergraduates studying Politics, International Studies, Anthropology etc. My theme was innovation, exploring the contribution that Government can make to this.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Talk to ADS's Covert Tech Suppliers Forum (28 June 2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact This group, comprising c35 companies working across the four pillars of covert surveillance, covert interception, covert detection, and counter-measures, is interested in engaging better with academia. I was by Prof Chris Hankin of Imperial to talk about the contribution that research can make, including Academic RiSC.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Talk to Association of Security Consultants: Science, Security and Resilience 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards.

After my talk some members of the audience have been in touch to explore potential opportunities for engagement.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Talk to Conference: Society, Science and the Future of Terrorism 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards.

N/A
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Talk to Coventry University 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Undergraduate students
Results and Impact I was invited by Prof Richard Aldrich to speak to students involved in intelligence studies and engineering to talk about delivering science impact in the security sector. The students were invited to select from a menu of themes (security threats, delivering impact, knowledge exchange, intellectual impact, instrumental impact) and I then started a discussion by presenting on these themes. This included talking about delivering insight from Transnational Organised Crime Research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Talk to Imperial War Museum staff 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards.

I have been able to connect senior staff at the Imperial War Museum relevant members of my network to support the IWM's effort in developing their collection relating to warfare in the second half of the 20th Century.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Talk to PaCCs Policy Session on Organised Crime in Conflict Zones (14 July 2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact I was asked to explore the issue of Organised Crime's association with instability, uncertainty and breakdown.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Talk to University of Surrey 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact I was invited to the University of Surrey to brief a cross-section of administrators and researchers on PaCCS: I gave two talks and then ran "surgeries" for a number of research teams.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Talking to, and participating in, FINAC workshop at Teesside University (September 2017) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact I was invited by Professor Georgios Antonopoulos of Teesside University to speak to the workshop that was concluding his research into the Financial Aspects of Trade in Counterfeit Goods (FINAC), attended by a number of professionals involved in countering counterfeit. My theme was "Building a partnership between researchers and non-academic stakeholders".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description UEL Workshop on Critical Infrastructure Protection 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions and discussion afterwards.

After my talk I was invited by a member of the audience to visit the Emergency Planning College and give a talk to them.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description University Visit (Anglia Ruskin) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact I was invited to present to a cross-section of researchers from the university on the Global Uncertainties Programme, in order to raise awareness of the opportunities and explain my role as Champion in supporting delivery of research impacts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description University Visit (Bournemouth) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact I was invited to visit the Software Systems Research Centre (with its interest in cybersecurity issues) to give a presentation on the Global Uncertainties Programme in order to help identify opportunities for research and the delivery of research impacts,
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description University Visit (Bristol) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact I was invited to present to a cross-section of researchers from the university on the Global Uncertainties Programme, in order to raise awareness of the opportunities and explain my role as Champion in supporting delivery of research impacts. This included a briefing from Bristol's Centre for Global Insecurities.

One example of a follow-up impact occurred in 2015. I had been briefed during my visit to Bristol by Dr Eric Herring about his work in Africa. In 2015, I introduced Dr Herring to SAFTID (Somalia Artisanal Fisheries Training, Infrastructure & Development), with indications that they were identifying opportunities for collaboration.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014,2015,2016
 
Description University Visit (Brunel) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact I was invited to present to a cross-section of researchers from the university on the Global Uncertainties Programme, in order to raise awareness of the opportunities and explain my role as Champion in supporting delivery of research impacts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description University Visit (Cambridge) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact I was invited to present to a cross-section of researchers from the university on the Global Uncertainties Programme, in order to raise awareness of the opportunities and explain my role as Champion in supporting delivery of research impacts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description University Visit (Edinburgh) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact I was invited to give a talk to a cross-section of researchers interested in what they could learn about the Global Uncertainties Programme, and the role of the External Champion in promoting research impacts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description University Visit (Imperial) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact I was invited to present to a cross-section of researchers from the university on the Global Uncertainties Programme, in order to raise awareness of the opportunities and explain my role as Champion in supporting delivery of research impacts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description University Visit (Kent) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact I was invited to present to a cross-section of researchers from the university on the Global Uncertainties Programme, in order to raise awareness of the opportunities and explain my role as Champion in supporting delivery of research impacts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description University Visit (Newcastle) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact I was invited to present to a cross-section of researchers from the university on the PaCCS Programme, in order to raise awareness of the opportunities and explain my role as Champion in supporting delivery of research impacts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description University Visit (Oxford) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact I was invited by Oxford's Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Research to present to research administrators from every school/department from the university on the Global Uncertainties Programme, in order to raise awareness of the opportunities and explain my role as Champion in supporting delivery of research impacts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description University Visit (Queens Belfast) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact I was invited to meet a cross-section of researchers at the Centre for Secure IT on the Global Uncertainties Programme, in order to raise awareness of the opportunities and explain my role as Champion in supporting delivery of research impacts.

In 2015 I made a presentation to a wider audience at the university about PaCCS, and was consulted by a number of researchers about how to develop and deliver effective research in the areas of security and resilience.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014,2015,2016
 
Description University Visit (St Andrews) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact I was invited by Professor Louise Richardson, Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University, to meet her senior team (in the course of a separate visit to the Centre for the Study of Terrorism and Political Violence) to brief them on the Global Uncertainties Programme, in order to raise awareness of the opportunities and explain my role as Champion in supporting delivery of research impacts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description University Visit (UCL) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact I was invited to present to a cross-section of researchers from the university on the Global Uncertainties Programme, in order to raise awareness of the opportunities and explain my role as Champion in supporting delivery of research impacts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description University Visit: Loughborough 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact In May 2015 I was invited by Professor Mike Wilson to speak to a cross-section of researchers at Loughborough about the PaCCS programme, with the aim of raising awareness and looking for opportunities to deliver greater impact. Professor Wilson also briefed me on his approach to networking (with the EMOTICON network).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description UniversityVisit (Exeter) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact I was invited to give a talk about the Global Uncertainties Programme firstly to Exeter's Strategy and Security Institute followed by a talk to a cross-section of researchers working on AHRC and ESRC projects. These talks explored research and impact opportunities.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013
 
Description Visit to 20 universities re: Global Uncertainties / PaCCS Programme 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Each talk has sparked questions and discussion afterwards. This can include (as happened at Surrey University in February 2016) a clinic where researchers seek guidance on research plans (eg linked to the Transnational Organised Crime Call).

The talks have led to a significant expansion of my network of security researchers, some of whom I have connected with stakeholders in Government, Industry and Academia, to enhanced the impact of their research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2013,2014,2015,2016
 
Description Visit to Cellmetric to discuss opportunities for academic engagement 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Following the ADS Forum that I spoke to earlier in the year, I was invited by the CEO of Cellmetric to discuss how research could help his work.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Visit to the Defence Academy 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact On 27 October 2014, I visited the Defence Academy at Shrivenham to give a talk entitled Science, Security and Defence. It sparked questions and discussion afterwards, and there was follow-up engagement between members of the faculty and PaCCS's wider research network.

Since my talk members of the audience have approached me to discuss their research and how I can support it.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
 
Description Visit to the Emergency Planning College 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk sparked questions and discussion afterward.

After my talk I was asked to record an interview answering questions about the Partnership for Conflict, Crime and Security Research.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2014
URL http://www.epcollege.com/epc/news/in-the-chair-with-tristram-riley-smith/
 
Description Workshop (July 2015) convened for Cabinet Office with CSaP at Cambridge University re SDSR 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I supported CSaP in bringing together a range of researchers from different universities around the UK (including recipients of PaCCS grants) to form an expert panel to engage in dialogue with the Cabinet Office in preparing for the Strategic Defence and Security Review. The Cabinet Office acknowledged key messages received including on options for strategic focus; prioritising people vs. technology; cyber expertise and governance; how to make better use of wider expertise; and prospects for more systematic engagement between policy-makers and academic experts.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2015
 
Description Workshop with MOD/Dstl on Responsive Research and Development. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I was commissioned by the Research Councils and MOD/Dstl to support the delivery of impact from the PaCCS programme of research entitled Science and Security. Following a successful Policy Workshop on 1 March 2016 (on the subject of Governance, Ethics and the Law), I organised a second workshop on 20 May 2016 on the subject of Responsive Research and Development. This took place at the Royal Society and was chaired by Professor Theo Farrell, with keynote address by Mat Hunter (formerly Chief Design Officer at the Design Council) and presentations from Dr Michael Bourne (Queen's University of Belfast), Professor Mary Kaldor (London School of Economics & Political Science), Dr Andrew James (University of Manchester) and Mr David Crozier (Centre for Secure Information Technology, Queen's University Belfast). This workshop explored how we can best promote a responsive innovation ecosystem where scientists & engineers, end-users & policy-makers work together (with industry & the investment sector) to address capability gaps in defence and security (including humanitarian operations).

A PaCCS Policy Briefing was subsequently produced and given wide dissemination. It was entitled Transforming Research into Technology: Innovation for Defence and Security (http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/policy-briefings/innovation-defence-security/)
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
 
Description Workshop woth MOD/Dstl on responsible Research and Development 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact I was commissioned by the Research Councils and MOD/Dstl to support the delivery of impact from the PaCCS programme of research entitled Science and Security. Following a successful Policy Workshops on 1 March 2016 (on Governance, Ethics and the Law) and 20 May 2016 (responsive Research and Development) I organised a third workshop on Responsible Research and Development. This took place at the Royal Society and was chaired by Professor Tom Sorell (Warwick University), with keynote address by Lord Rees (former President of the Royal Society. Presentations were made by Professor Guglielmo Verdirame (Kings' College London), Professor David Galbreath (University of Bath), Professor Malcolm Dando and Dr Michael Crowley (University of Bradford), and Professor Marina Jirotka (University of Oxford).

This workshop explored how we can best promote a responsible ecosystem for dealing with potentially dangerous scientific outputs (such as weapons of mass destruction). Participants consisted of research scientists, engineers, end-users and policy makers as well as a cross-section of professionals from Industry and Civil Society (NGOs).
.
A PaCCS Policy Briefing was subsequently produced and given wide dissemination. It was entitled Responsible Research and Development: The Ethics of Dangerous Science (http://www.paccsresearch.org.uk/policy-briefings/ethics-dangerous-science/).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016