Fostering Resilient Recovery in Displaced Communities via School-based Hubs

Lead Research Organisation: University College London
Department Name: Division of PALS

Abstract

This project seeks to foster the resilient recovery of the poorest communities of Palu, Central Sulawesi, Indonesia, displaced by the 28th September 2018 earthquake and tsunami. During this disaster 184 000 pupils were affected by the damage or collapse of 12 000 schools in Palu and 164 000 people were displaced from their homes. These communities are highly vulnerable and marginalised from decisions made concerning their recovery and it is this marginalisation that this project seeks to address.

An interdisciplinary team of academics and NGO practitioners from the UK and Indonesia will co-develop an innovative intervention that targets psycho-social disaster support, hygiene and the safety of the physical environment, and which centres on schools as hubs for fostering community empowerment. Schools play a major part in shaping future generations and thus a community's future. Safer school can save the lives of children in future disasters; they can serve as a temporary shelters; and help to bring normalcy back to society in times of disaster, thus increasing community resilience.

This multi-pronged intervention will recreate not just the former status quo for these displaced communities but a more resilient future in which their needs and aspirations are put centre stage, and in which their wellbeing is fostered. The intervention will be created via three work packages: one targeting the psycho-social aspect, one for the water and sanitation hygiene aspect and one for structural infrastructure. The intervention involves four sets of stakeholders: pupils, their caregivers, their teachers and the contractors who build schools. It takes place over three sites in the poorest, most devastated parts of Palu. In order to devise a survivor-centred intervention an assessment phase will take place first. The goal will be to assess the aspirations and needs of these survivors - psycho-social, hygiene services-related and infrastructural - in order to devise and implement an intervention that will foster their recovery and simultaneously empower them to make decisions around their future disaster resilience.

Through this work we aim to establish a sound evidence-base for what works to improve the capacity of disaster-displaced people, and develop tools and education material to foster dialogue concerning disaster resilience and safer schools. The project builds the research capacity of two Indonesian Universities, and the collected evidence will enable them to further their mission of influencing the Indonesian Ministry of Education to implement an effective, compulsory disaster recovery and preparedness program in all Indonesian schools. No such program has been implemented yet, though our Indonesian team are at the forefront of devising this. The interdisciplinary evidence base that emerges from the proposed project will ensure that this disaster recovery and preparedness program, and others in different regions of the world that target similar contexts, are based on sound scientific evidence and knowledge of local contexts gleaned from survivors themselves. The research involves close collaboration with the Humanitarian sector, and so the proposed research will not only produce traditional academic output but also practice-based reports and guidelines, which will be developed with the aim of improving the efficiency of future disaster response and resilient recovery programs.

Planned Impact

The combination of internationally recognised expertise, gathered to tackle urgent and high-profile interdisciplinary research challenges, guarantees considerable opportunities for impact on:

Society: the project is highly relevant to Indonesia (and other ODA countries) in tackling the grand challenges of sustainability and resilience, undertaking adventurous interdisciplinary research and promoting dynamic and informed decision-making processes by the agencies in charge of Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) and recovery. The ultimate and major stakeholders in the project are the children from marginalised and displaced communities in Palu attending schools, their teachers and their families. The project will endeavour to empower them so that they have more control over their decision-making with increased strategies for dealing with future disasters. It will also look to influence school curricula to strengthen understanding and implementation of DRR. Other important stakeholders in the project are the Education Authority, both at provincial and district level, and the National Agency for Disaster Management (BNPB). The project will develop tools for school assessment that can support the existing program of building safety certification that has been started by the Indonesian Ministry of Public Works and Housing (PUPR). The project will also benefit the Ministry of Health (water) and Ministry of Public Works (sanitation) for building capacity on resilient and socio-culturally acceptable WASH solutions. All these agencies will be consulted as key-informants during both phases of the project and will be invited to the two in-country beneficiary workshops. By involving multiple stakeholders at international, national and local levels, output from the project will strengthen the adaptive capacity of local institutions, civil protection and communities to identify, assess and respond to present and potential shocks and stresses, with special focus on school facilities.

Economy: the project will provide several Indonesian and UK industries, such as local engineering consultancies and construction companies, with a characterised, practice-oriented framework (and related implementation tools) for assessing and increasing multi-hazard resilience of school facilities and for building-back better. UCL EPICentre's wide network of industrial collaborators will be used for the promotion of the project outputs to the insurance and re-insurance industry (e.g., Willis Re., Insurance Development Forum), NGOs (e.g., Save the Children, Build Change), and multidisciplinary consultancy firms (e.g., ARUP, Buro Happold). The ultimate goal is to create a vibrant core of activities in which research is driven by genuine user priorities, and industry in turn benefits from access to state-of-the-art techniques and innovation assembled by world-leading experts.

Knowledge and People: the project will address major intellectual challenges by bringing together the currently largely separate research disciplines of psychology, environmental and structural engineering. By so doing, and through strong community engagement, the project will advance knowledge on psycho-social and physical recovery, and on multi-hazard risk assessment. This work aims to inform the future design of culturally appropriate resilience-increasing solutions for marginalised disaster-displaced communities, through the strong involvement of NGOs, promoting more interdisciplinary, evidence-based approaches to the delivery of aid and recovery assistance. The project will directly build the research capacity of local partners TDMRC (Tsunami and Disaster Mitigation Research Centre) and TU (Tadulako University in Palu), through the creation of dynamic research collaborations amongst both the UK and Indonesian investigators, as well as between TDMRC and TU themselves. The latter will create south-south transfer of knowledge and capacity building.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Title Japanese Garden Kintsugi sculpture 
Description Have co-created an artwork - that is to be inaugurated in the Japanese Garden at UCL, partly as a nod to the five founders of modern Japan - who were UCL graduates. The artwork relates to earthquakes and the technique of mending broken pots with gold (called Kintsugi). The work is a sculpture of an ancient Soya Sauce jar with a map of Japan carved into it, with the carving having the shiny quality of the cracks repaired with gold leaf. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2021 
Impact It will be accompanied by a UCL exhibition to showcase all EPICentre has done over the years. 
 
Title Posters in schools 
Description During an intervention workshop teachers devised key principles to foster resilient recovery for themselves and their students. A local graphic designer then created posters inspired by the drafts made by participants in the intervention. These have been displayed in the schools participants work in. 
Type Of Art Artwork 
Year Produced 2023 
Impact The art work serves as a reminder of key principles to foster resilient recovery for teachers. 
 
Title Priti talks Poo 
Description Stand up comedy 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact To highlight the issues surround poor sanitation but using the medium of comedy to engage the audience and hopefully create interest in the topic 
URL https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0cpxnw7
 
Title Songs to foster resilience (YouTube) 
Description Students were audio recorded performing the songs they created during the intervention to foster resilient recovery. The songs were uploaded to YouTube account so that students could be reminded of their songs and perpetuate the song among their peers and family members. The account name was chosen by the students in order to maintain their ownership over the songs. 
Type Of Art Performance (Music, Dance, Drama, etc) 
Year Produced 2022 
Impact Students have reported engaging with the songs and sharing with their family members. Collectively the three videos have 236 views on YouTube. Students have also used the audio on the social media platform Instagram. This will have perpetuated the messaging of the song that aims to promote positive coping strategies and foster resilient recovery. 
URL https://www.youtube.com/@dademombinesquad9621
 
Description We completed our data collection for the assessment phase of the project and analyzed the data. We discovered what aids resilient recovery in this disaster setting and so devised interventions to endeavour to change resilience, targeting psycho-social, WASH (water and sanitation hygiene) and the infrastructure aspects related to schools. We have assessed whether the interventions have been effective. Regarding psycho-social aspects, the following significant changes were found in the teen girls two months after the intervention and underpinned their significantly greater sense of coping:
• Less attribution for the disaster to God
• Less use of meditation or prayer
• Less perceived social support from family
• More medication use
We concluded that:
• Intervening beyond the immediate aftermath of a disaster is important for young people's recovery
->Evidence of greater self-empowerment and peer support, as opposed to reliance on family and God for support
• Value of collective storytelling and mindfulness for supporting processing of disaster-related experiences
• Extend existing research on the benefits of group singing for well-being and disaster preparedness to the value of group song creation and singing for resilient disaster recovery
• A one year follow up will indicate whether and how intervention effects may change over time

Regarding the water and sanitation hygiene aspects intervention we found that WASH is a key barrier for bringing girls back to school post-disaster because of:
1. Issues with lack of water, including drinking water availability and water outages for toilets and handwashing stations, as well as bad quality water
2. A culture of littering (reported by girls and litter observed around schools) and waste issues
3. Most schools reported damaged toilets after disaster (earthquake cited as the most common cause), including some schools which have not managed to get repairs done and therefore have currently damaged infrastructure
4. Toilet conditions: no bins, inadequate lighting, paths with cracks and puddles, water pools (buckets with no lids), unmanaged toilets (dirty, used as storage)
5. Bullying and antisocial behaviour around toilets: long queues, opening doors, locking girls in cubicles, other forms of teasing
6. Shame and fear around menstruation, where girls leave school when menstruation begins while at school

Regarding the structural engineering aspects of the project:
• A regional database of 2536 school buildings from 454 elementary and high schools in the Palu, Sigi, and Donggala regions, susceptible to earthquake-induced ground shaking, tsunami, liquefaction, and landslides has been developed and made available to the public. This can be adopted for the development of hazard risk models and regional-level decision-making on school assets and related policies.
• Semi-structured interviews with school principals and other stakeholders involved in the recovery process were carried out to understand the effects of the 2018 event on schools, the preparedness level of schools, the post-event recovery trajectory, and the recovery impeding challenges faced by each stakeholder group. The stakeholder engagement highlighted poor preparedness levels of some schools and several challenges affecting reconstruction projects in the region.
• Focus group discussions were carried out with stakeholders to brainstorm practical solutions to issues of school preparedness and recovery. Based on the outcome of the stakeholder engagement, it was concluded that early-response funding mechanisms, true collaborations between stakeholders, and improved capacity for self-organisation are the critical elements for an inclusive, sustainable, safer and more resilient education system.

Regarding the inter-disciplinary discovery, working with stakeholders in all three domains allows one to get a strong sense of what specific challenges each face and involving them in workshops gives them ownership of their problems and solutions; this increases the resilience of people, WASH facilities and structures of schools.

Our findings are being written up into a White Paper, which the Department of Education will, we trust, use to augment its existing safeguarding programme. Our findings will also have an impact on the national disaster risk reduction programme in Indonesia and establish principles that will pertain to other settings too.
Exploitation Route Academically we have shed light on resilience post-disaster (tsunami/earthquake/landslide) in teenagers, their carers and their teachers. We have also shown that resilience levels can be changed via school-based interventions. Academic papers can be used by fellow academics to understand resilience and how to enhance it psycho-socially. Academics can also take forward findings regarding WASH and the specific way in which it acts as a barrier to girls returning to school post-disaster. The major database we formed on schools in the region can be used by modellers and other academics to develop hazard risk models.

Beyond academics, policy makers could use our database on schools' structures to make decisions on which to rebuild and which to retrofit. The low disaster preparedness levels found could be addressed, alongside psychosocial resilient recovery interventions, to increase the preparedness and recovery of those in schools across Indonesia and beyond.

We hope to be able to impact the Ministry of Education's safeguarding programmes for disaster recovery as we have a government figure affiliated to our project.
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Construction,Education,Government, Democracy and Justice

URL https://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/14/4/2471https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212420921004817
 
Description -We are writing a White Paper for the Ministry of Education, Indonesia, which documents the successful interventions used in this project and has links to the trainings for the successful interventions arising within the project, such that they can be used in the future -We have changed the water and sanitation hygiene facilities in a number of schools in the disaster affected area (Palu/Sigi, Indonesia) - we have changed locks on toilet doors and added bins to all toilet facilities in schools to prevent teenage girls from discomfort and school avoidance related to toilet facilities -We have done a teacher and a teen girl intervention involving three disaster affected schools and have many products: youTube songs/collages/posters all created by the teachers/teens themselves as part of the intervention, which continue to be used within the schools - occupying walls in schools and being perpetuated by peer and teacher role models and ongoing whatsapp groups
First Year Of Impact 2022
Sector Communities and Social Services/Policy,Construction,Education,Environment,Government, Democracy and Justice
Impact Types Cultural,Societal,Policy & public services

 
Description Advice to Cabinet Office about Covid-19 communications
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a guidance/advisory committee
 
Description Estimating population displacement following disasters
Amount £40,000 (GBP)
Organisation Willis, Towers, and Watson 
Sector Private
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description MEDiate - Multi-hazard and risk-informed system for Enhanced local and regional Disaster risk management
Amount € 5,000,000 (EUR)
Funding ID 101074075 
Organisation European Commission 
Sector Public
Country European Union (EU)
Start  
 
Description Multihazard vulnerability assessment for resilience enhancement
Amount £207,000 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/X023710/1 
Organisation Marie Curie 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Description REPLENISH - REimagining PLaces and ENgineering Infrastructure Systems for Health
Amount £50,406 (GBP)
Funding ID MR/T045353/1 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2020 
End 10/2020
 
Description Visiting Professorship
Amount £72,798 (GBP)
Organisation The Leverhulme Trust 
Sector Charity/Non Profit
Country United Kingdom
Start  
 
Title Intercoder reliability in qualitative research: debates and practical guidelines 
Description Paper with guidelines on how to do inter-coder reliability 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact obtained almost 90 citations within 6 months of publication 
 
Title Fostering Resilient Recovery in Displaced Communities via School-based Hubs 
Description The data from this project will be stored within the UCL Research Data Repository long-term. We have created a 'project' folder with the same name as the project, and have a series of subfolders to organise the storage of data. Shareable links can be created to share access to the data with researchers and colleagues by request. More information about the UCL Research Data Repository can be found here: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/library/open-science-research-support/research-data-management/ucl-research-data-repository-faqs. DOIs will be published and noted here by the end of the funding period (Oct 2023). 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2023 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The dataset currently comprises of the following: (1) qualitative free-association interviews with teen girls, teachers, and parents affected by natural hazard events, with a focus on (a) disaster recovery and notions of resilience, and (b) the role of teachers in disaster risk management; (2) quantitative risk assessment surveys with the three sample groups (teen girls, teachers, parents); (3) post-intervention evaluations for the teens at time 2 and time 3, and for teachers at time 2. We will continue to add the data collected from WP2 concerning their investigations focused on needs assessments of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene environments at our 3 participant sites (including quantitative observational surveys from transect walks, and interviews with principals of schools within the sites). We will continue to add the data collected from WP3 concerning their investigations focused on needs assessments of Infrastructure in the built environments at our 3 participant sites and beyond (including quantitative observational surveys and quantitative analyses of the environments using relevant softwares). These data files are all completely novel contributions in their fields, and offer expert insight into their respective work package focuses (i.e., psychosocial resilience, WASH resilience, infrastructural resilience). Once completely indexed, the DOIs to these datasets can be shared with colleagues and can be linked to publications. 
URL https://rdr.ucl.ac.uk/account/home#/projects/162202
 
Description Accessing Kobo Toolbox on your device - training session 
Organisation Syiah Kuala University
Country Indonesia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Training on how to access Kobo toolbox on personal devices delivered by Imaduddin Ahmed.
Collaborator Contribution They will gather, store and transmit all the data from the research surveys conducted in the field. They will work closely with their UK colleagues to ensure correct and precise methods of research gathering.
Impact The research assistants will be able to confidently utilise a data storing method such as Kobo toolbox. They will gather, store and transmit the data using this programme thus contributing to the RSH school hubs research project. This is capacity building: The partners' research assistants have gained the knowledge and skills researchers would need to have to ensure the fieldwork is carried out safely, both for researchers and the subjects. They were also provided with materials to assist with knowledge retention and further application. The other discipline involved was Civil and Structural Engineering.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Accessing Kobo Toolbox on your device - training session 
Organisation Tadulako University
Country Indonesia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Training on how to access Kobo toolbox on personal devices delivered by Imaduddin Ahmed.
Collaborator Contribution They will gather, store and transmit all the data from the research surveys conducted in the field. They will work closely with their UK colleagues to ensure correct and precise methods of research gathering.
Impact The research assistants will be able to confidently utilise a data storing method such as Kobo toolbox. They will gather, store and transmit the data using this programme thus contributing to the RSH school hubs research project. This is capacity building: The partners' research assistants have gained the knowledge and skills researchers would need to have to ensure the fieldwork is carried out safely, both for researchers and the subjects. They were also provided with materials to assist with knowledge retention and further application. The other discipline involved was Civil and Structural Engineering.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Collaborations have been set up with the International Research Institute of Disaster Science (IRIDeS), Tohoku University, Japan. 
Organisation Tohoku University
Country Japan 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Research discussions.
Collaborator Contribution Collaborations have been set up with the International Research Institute of Disaster Science (IRIDeS), Tohoku University, Japan. This collaboration sees IRIDeS providing the project with tsunami inundation simulations for the 2018 Palu earthquake and tsunami. They have used their proprietary numerical fluid mechanics software to simulate the tsunami.
Impact The tsunami inundation maps of Palu developed by IRIDeS present input to WP3 multi-hazard risk assessment of schools.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Focus Group Discussion FGD Training 
Organisation Syiah Kuala University
Country Indonesia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Training on how to conduct Focus Group Discussions as well as to introduce the data collection programme
Collaborator Contribution They will be working directly in the field using the FGD method from the training session
Impact The research assistants will be able to confidently conduct FGD in the field; and contribute to the RSH school hubs research project. This is capacity building: The partners' research assistants have gained the knowledge and skills researchers would need to have to ensure the fieldwork is carried out safely, both for researchers and the subjects. They were also provided with materials to assist with knowledge retention and further application. The other discipline involved was Civil and Structural Engineering.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Focus Group Discussion FGD Training 
Organisation Tadulako University
Country Indonesia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Training on how to conduct Focus Group Discussions as well as to introduce the data collection programme
Collaborator Contribution They will be working directly in the field using the FGD method from the training session
Impact The research assistants will be able to confidently conduct FGD in the field; and contribute to the RSH school hubs research project. This is capacity building: The partners' research assistants have gained the knowledge and skills researchers would need to have to ensure the fieldwork is carried out safely, both for researchers and the subjects. They were also provided with materials to assist with knowledge retention and further application. The other discipline involved was Civil and Structural Engineering.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Grid Elaboration Method (GEM) Training 
Organisation Syiah Kuala University
Country Indonesia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In-kind contribution from UCL: Professor Helene Joffe (PI) led an online workshop, which aimed to equip our colleagues at Tadulako University and the Tsunami and Disaster Mitigation Research Center (TDMRC) at Syiah Kuala University, with the knowledge and skills to understand, design and conduct high quality qualitative research using the GEM for free association interviews. The training session was recorded and shared with attendees for knowledge sharing and retention and re-use.
Collaborator Contribution The partners provided research assistants to collect data and conduct interviews. The restriction to travel from UCL caused by the pandemic required the partners to have full control of, and responsibility for, data handling.
Impact The partners' research assistants have gained the knowledge and skills researchers would need to have to ensure the research has integrity, and materials to assist with knowledge retention and further application of this method which was developed by the studies lead PI: Professor Joffe. This training is building capacity for our colleagues in Indonesia.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Grid Elaboration Method (GEM) Training 
Organisation Tadulako University
Country Indonesia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In-kind contribution from UCL: Professor Helene Joffe (PI) led an online workshop, which aimed to equip our colleagues at Tadulako University and the Tsunami and Disaster Mitigation Research Center (TDMRC) at Syiah Kuala University, with the knowledge and skills to understand, design and conduct high quality qualitative research using the GEM for free association interviews. The training session was recorded and shared with attendees for knowledge sharing and retention and re-use.
Collaborator Contribution The partners provided research assistants to collect data and conduct interviews. The restriction to travel from UCL caused by the pandemic required the partners to have full control of, and responsibility for, data handling.
Impact The partners' research assistants have gained the knowledge and skills researchers would need to have to ensure the research has integrity, and materials to assist with knowledge retention and further application of this method which was developed by the studies lead PI: Professor Joffe. This training is building capacity for our colleagues in Indonesia.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Health and Safety Training 
Organisation Syiah Kuala University
Country Indonesia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In-kind contribution from UCL: UCL-based researchers on each Work Package have met with their WP-colleagues from Tadulako University and the Tsunami and Disaster Mitigation Research Center (TDMRC) at Syiah Kuala University to provide guidance on procedures that should be in place to enable staff and participants to undertake fieldwork safely. Training materials are shared with all attendees for knowledge sharing and retention and re-use.
Collaborator Contribution The partners provided research assistants to collect data, survey buildings and conduct interviews. The restriction to travel from UCL caused by the pandemic required the partners to have full control of, and responsibility for, data handling.
Impact This is capacity building: The partners' research assistants have gained the knowledge and skills researchers would need to have to ensure the fieldwork is carried out safely, both for researchers and the subjects. They were also provided with materials to assist with knowledge retention and further application. The other disciplines involved were Civil and Structural Engineering and Sanitation & Public Hygiene
Start Year 2021
 
Description Health and Safety Training 
Organisation Tadulako University
Country Indonesia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In-kind contribution from UCL: UCL-based researchers on each Work Package have met with their WP-colleagues from Tadulako University and the Tsunami and Disaster Mitigation Research Center (TDMRC) at Syiah Kuala University to provide guidance on procedures that should be in place to enable staff and participants to undertake fieldwork safely. Training materials are shared with all attendees for knowledge sharing and retention and re-use.
Collaborator Contribution The partners provided research assistants to collect data, survey buildings and conduct interviews. The restriction to travel from UCL caused by the pandemic required the partners to have full control of, and responsibility for, data handling.
Impact This is capacity building: The partners' research assistants have gained the knowledge and skills researchers would need to have to ensure the fieldwork is carried out safely, both for researchers and the subjects. They were also provided with materials to assist with knowledge retention and further application. The other disciplines involved were Civil and Structural Engineering and Sanitation & Public Hygiene
Start Year 2021
 
Description Intervention Facilitators Training - for Psychological Resilience with Teachers 
Organisation Syiah Kuala University
Country Indonesia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In-kind contribution from UCL: Professor Helene Joffe (PI) and WP1 Research Team (Pacheco, Parrott) led an online workshop, which aimed to equip our colleagues at Tadulako University and the Tsunami, Disaster Mitigation Research Center (TDMRC) at Syiah Kuala University, and Sejenak Hening (local mental health NGO) with the knowledge and skills to facilitate the psychosocial, resilience-building interventions with Teachers who are survivors of, and/or employed by schools affected by, the 2012 multi-hazard events that impacted life in Palu, Indonesia. The training materials comprise a handbook of principals and instructions produced by the UK academic team, in partnership with local academics, researchers, youth, and mental health practitioners. The training session was recorded and shared with attendees for knowledge sharing and retention and re-use.
Collaborator Contribution Our partners facilitated the interventions locally. They also collected subsequent reflections from participants.
Impact The outcomes from these interventions are central to the progress of WP1's aims in this project. It was imperative that the facilitators of the interventions understand the framework driving the design of the activities, and had an understanding of appropriate facilitation practice in line with best standards for conducting such activities in research contexts (e.g., regarding ethical considerations, psychological aims, consideration for co-creation). The facilitators are now able to conduct such activities in future, and have been thoroughly trained on how to conduct psychological resilience-building interventions witheducators in a trauma-informed manner using co-creation methods.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Intervention Facilitators Training - for Psychological Resilience with Teachers 
Organisation Tadulako University
Country Indonesia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In-kind contribution from UCL: Professor Helene Joffe (PI) and WP1 Research Team (Pacheco, Parrott) led an online workshop, which aimed to equip our colleagues at Tadulako University and the Tsunami, Disaster Mitigation Research Center (TDMRC) at Syiah Kuala University, and Sejenak Hening (local mental health NGO) with the knowledge and skills to facilitate the psychosocial, resilience-building interventions with Teachers who are survivors of, and/or employed by schools affected by, the 2012 multi-hazard events that impacted life in Palu, Indonesia. The training materials comprise a handbook of principals and instructions produced by the UK academic team, in partnership with local academics, researchers, youth, and mental health practitioners. The training session was recorded and shared with attendees for knowledge sharing and retention and re-use.
Collaborator Contribution Our partners facilitated the interventions locally. They also collected subsequent reflections from participants.
Impact The outcomes from these interventions are central to the progress of WP1's aims in this project. It was imperative that the facilitators of the interventions understand the framework driving the design of the activities, and had an understanding of appropriate facilitation practice in line with best standards for conducting such activities in research contexts (e.g., regarding ethical considerations, psychological aims, consideration for co-creation). The facilitators are now able to conduct such activities in future, and have been thoroughly trained on how to conduct psychological resilience-building interventions witheducators in a trauma-informed manner using co-creation methods.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Intervention Facilitators Training - for Psychological Resilience with Teens 
Organisation Syiah Kuala University
Country Indonesia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In-kind contribution from UCL: Professor Helene Joffe (PI) and WP1 Research Team (Pacheco, Parrott) led an online workshop, which aimed to equip our colleagues at Tadulako University and the Tsunami, Disaster Mitigation Research Center (TDMRC) at Syiah Kuala University, and Sejenak Hening (local mental health NGO) with the knowledge and skills to facilitate the psychosocial, resilience-building interventions with Teen Girls who are survivors of the 2012 multi-hazard events that affected life in Palu, Indonesia. The training materials comprise a handbook of principals and instructions produced by the UK academic team, in partnership with local academics, researchers, youth, and mental health practitioners. The training session was recorded and shared with attendees for knowledge sharing and retention and re-use.
Collaborator Contribution Our partners facilitated the interventions locally. They also collected subsequent reflections from participants.
Impact The outcomes from these interventions are central to the progress of WP1's aims in this project. It was imperative that the facilitators of the interventions understand the framework driving the design of the activities, and had an understanding of appropriate facilitation practice in line with best standards for conducting such activities in research contexts (e.g., regarding ethical considerations, psychological aims, consideration for co-creation). The facilitators are now able to conduct such activities in future, and have been thoroughly trained on how to conduct psychological resilience-building interventions with teens in a trauma-informed manner using co-creation methods.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Intervention Facilitators Training - for Psychological Resilience with Teens 
Organisation Tadulako University
Country Indonesia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In-kind contribution from UCL: Professor Helene Joffe (PI) and WP1 Research Team (Pacheco, Parrott) led an online workshop, which aimed to equip our colleagues at Tadulako University and the Tsunami, Disaster Mitigation Research Center (TDMRC) at Syiah Kuala University, and Sejenak Hening (local mental health NGO) with the knowledge and skills to facilitate the psychosocial, resilience-building interventions with Teen Girls who are survivors of the 2012 multi-hazard events that affected life in Palu, Indonesia. The training materials comprise a handbook of principals and instructions produced by the UK academic team, in partnership with local academics, researchers, youth, and mental health practitioners. The training session was recorded and shared with attendees for knowledge sharing and retention and re-use.
Collaborator Contribution Our partners facilitated the interventions locally. They also collected subsequent reflections from participants.
Impact The outcomes from these interventions are central to the progress of WP1's aims in this project. It was imperative that the facilitators of the interventions understand the framework driving the design of the activities, and had an understanding of appropriate facilitation practice in line with best standards for conducting such activities in research contexts (e.g., regarding ethical considerations, psychological aims, consideration for co-creation). The facilitators are now able to conduct such activities in future, and have been thoroughly trained on how to conduct psychological resilience-building interventions with teens in a trauma-informed manner using co-creation methods.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Principal interviews Training session 
Organisation Syiah Kuala University
Country Indonesia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Training on how to conduct Principal interviews delivered by Imaduddin Ahmed.
Collaborator Contribution The research assistants will be in the field, using these skills to conduct vital interviews with Principals as part of the Schools surveys
Impact The research assistants will be able to confidently conduct interviews with school Principals in the field; and contribute to the RSH school hubs research project. This is capacity building: The partners' research assistants have gained the knowledge and skills researchers would need to have to ensure the fieldwork is carried out safely, both for researchers and the subjects. They were also provided with materials to assist with knowledge retention and further application. The other discipline involved was Civil and Structural Engineering.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Principal interviews Training session 
Organisation Tadulako University
Country Indonesia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Training on how to conduct Principal interviews delivered by Imaduddin Ahmed.
Collaborator Contribution The research assistants will be in the field, using these skills to conduct vital interviews with Principals as part of the Schools surveys
Impact The research assistants will be able to confidently conduct interviews with school Principals in the field; and contribute to the RSH school hubs research project. This is capacity building: The partners' research assistants have gained the knowledge and skills researchers would need to have to ensure the fieldwork is carried out safely, both for researchers and the subjects. They were also provided with materials to assist with knowledge retention and further application. The other discipline involved was Civil and Structural Engineering.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Research Integrity Training 
Organisation Syiah Kuala University
Country Indonesia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In-kind contribution from UCL: Training by UCL researchers. The session is based around what would be required for a research project to be said to have integrity, and therefore the knowledge and skills researchers would need to have to ensure the research has integrity (e.g. appropriate research methods, thorough research data management, consideration of ethical issues, etc.). A handbook was also composed and shared with attendees as part of this training; materials are shared with all attendees for knowledge retention and re-use. This handbook was translated into Bahasa, Indonesian for full comprehension.
Collaborator Contribution The partners provided research assistants to collect data, survey buildings and conduct interviews. The restriction to travel from UCL caused by the pandemic required the partners to have full control of, and responsibility for, data handling.
Impact The partners' research assistants have gained the knowledge and skills researchers would need to have to ensure the research has integrity, and materials to assist with knowledge retention and further application. This training is building capacity for these researchers and departments. The other disciplines involved were Civil and Structural Engineering and Sanitation & Public Hygiene Engineers.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Research Integrity Training 
Organisation Tadulako University
Country Indonesia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution In-kind contribution from UCL: Training by UCL researchers. The session is based around what would be required for a research project to be said to have integrity, and therefore the knowledge and skills researchers would need to have to ensure the research has integrity (e.g. appropriate research methods, thorough research data management, consideration of ethical issues, etc.). A handbook was also composed and shared with attendees as part of this training; materials are shared with all attendees for knowledge retention and re-use. This handbook was translated into Bahasa, Indonesian for full comprehension.
Collaborator Contribution The partners provided research assistants to collect data, survey buildings and conduct interviews. The restriction to travel from UCL caused by the pandemic required the partners to have full control of, and responsibility for, data handling.
Impact The partners' research assistants have gained the knowledge and skills researchers would need to have to ensure the research has integrity, and materials to assist with knowledge retention and further application. This training is building capacity for these researchers and departments. The other disciplines involved were Civil and Structural Engineering and Sanitation & Public Hygiene Engineers.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Transect Walks Training Session 
Organisation Syiah Kuala University
Country Indonesia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Training on how to conduct Transect walks delivered by Imaduddin Ahmed.
Collaborator Contribution The research assistants will be providing data and information vital to the research project, using the methodology taught to them in this training sessions.
Impact The research assistants will be able to confidently conduct transect walks using this method in the field; and contribute to the RSH school hubs research project. This is capacity building: The partners' research assistants have gained the knowledge and skills researchers would need to have to ensure the fieldwork is carried out safely, both for researchers and the subjects. They were also provided with materials to assist with knowledge retention and further application. The other discipline involved was Civil and Structural Engineering.
Start Year 2021
 
Description Transect Walks Training Session 
Organisation Tadulako University
Country Indonesia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Training on how to conduct Transect walks delivered by Imaduddin Ahmed.
Collaborator Contribution The research assistants will be providing data and information vital to the research project, using the methodology taught to them in this training sessions.
Impact The research assistants will be able to confidently conduct transect walks using this method in the field; and contribute to the RSH school hubs research project. This is capacity building: The partners' research assistants have gained the knowledge and skills researchers would need to have to ensure the fieldwork is carried out safely, both for researchers and the subjects. They were also provided with materials to assist with knowledge retention and further application. The other discipline involved was Civil and Structural Engineering.
Start Year 2021
 
Title Changing Children's Risk Perceptions and Behaviors: A Climate Change Risk Program for Schools 
Description Small climate change intervention conducted in schools with 10-11 year olds; cross cultural study - UK and Canada; funded by Society for Risk Analysis $20 000 
Type Therapeutic Intervention - Psychological/Behavioural
Year Development Stage Completed 2020
Development Status Closed
Impact A notable impact is that this will inform how the school-based intervention will be done in this grant. Since we discovered that a sense of control over their actions, social norms and incentives were more important for the children in terms of adopting more carbon neutral behaviours than the many of the decision making principles on which the intervention was based, we will conduct the intervention in Indonesia bearing in mind the more effective aspects of an intervention. Helene Joffe will also deliver a conference talk on this work. 
 
Title Intervention to foster resilient recovery in teachers after disaster 
Description The intervention was devised based on assessment data (both quantitative and qualitative) collected from the teachers and their students, insights from local experts and evidence-based intervention principles from similar cultural settings. Overall the intervention aimed to: 1) Foster post-disaster resilience for the teachers by promoting positive coping strategies to increase sense of control, reduce anxiety and improve well-being and 2) Support the teachers to help themselves and their students emotionally after disaster by co-creating a set of guidelines and practising implementing these. With the support of local psychologists, teachers that experienced a major disaster created an depiction of positive coping and sources of strength since the disaster in the form of a 'Tree of Life', that has been used to memorialise the 2018 disaster in three schools. Following this, teachers were supported to create and practice implementing guidance that aims to foster post-disaster psychological resilience both for themselves and their students, based on their own experience, knowledge and skills. It is also linked to empirical work concerning what works to foster resilient recovery. 
Type Therapeutic Intervention - Psychological/Behavioural
Current Stage Of Development Small-scale adoption
Year Development Stage Completed 2022
Development Status Under active development/distribution
Impact Initial feedback forms indicate a positive emotional response from teachers an increased sense of being able to cope with their own disaster-related stressors while also feeling better able support the disaster-affected students in their care. Three month follow up quantitative data is currently being collected to assess the impact of the intervention on variables related to resilience, coping and well-being. 
 
Title Intervention to foster resilient recovery in teenage girls after a major disaster 
Description A psychosocial intervention to foster resilient recovery in teenage girls (aged 14-16) across three schools sites in Palu, Central Sulawesi Indonesia. We used assessment phase data (qualitative and quantitative), insights from local researchers and intervention principles drawn from research in similar social-cultural settings in order to devise a culturally-appropriate, engaging and evidence-based intervention. The one day workshop used collective story telling, breathing exercise and song creation. Local researchers, local non-governmental organisation workers and musicians facilitated the workshop in the field. 
Type Therapeutic Intervention - Psychological/Behavioural
Current Stage Of Development Small-scale adoption
Year Development Stage Completed 2022
Development Status Under active development/distribution
Impact Initial findings indicate an overwhelmingly positive emotional response and increased sense of coping with disaster-related stressors. The results of a two month follow up reveals statistically significant changes in indicators of social support, well-being and coping style.We found that intervening beyond the immediate aftermath of a disaster is important for young people's recovery. We highlight the value of narrative storytelling for supporting processing of disaster-related experiences. Furthermore, we extend existing research on the benefits of group singing for well-being (e.g., Fancourt & Finn, 2019; Pearce et al., 2017) to the value of group song creation and singing for resilient disaster recovery. A longitudinal follow will indicate whether and how intervention effects may change over time. Currently we are working on scaling up the intervention to be used in other disaster sites in Indonesia. 
 
Description A special session at an international workshop and expo 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Third sector organisations
Results and Impact Keynote delivered by Prof. Helene Joffee at the 13th Aceh International Workshop and Expo on Sustainable Tsunami Disaster Recovery. Keynote entitled: Public responses to COVID-19: Psychosocial Aspects
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL http://aiwest-dr.unsyiah.ac.id/2021/schedule/
 
Description A special session at an international workshop and expo 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The UK team spoke at special session which was chaired by our Indonesian colleague. The session was titled - "School-based Disaster Resilience From Social and Engineering Perspectives".
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL http://aiwest-dr.unsyiah.ac.id/2021/
 
Description BSSC Research seminar 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Presentation of project at UCL BSSC Research Seminar by Dr Margarita Garfias Royo
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
 
Description Blog entry 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Blog entry for Engineers Against Poverty by Dr Margarita Garfias Royo and Prof Priti Parikh, with the support of Lauren Pemberton-Nelson entitled Infrastructure has a vital role to play in gender equality
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2023
URL http://engineersagainstpoverty.org/2023/03/08/iwd-2023/
 
Description Blog entry 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact Blog entry for ICE Blogs by Prof Priti Parikh and Dr Margarita Garfias Royo entitled Climate change affects women more - what can we do about it?
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://www.ice.org.uk/news-insight/news-and-blogs/ice-blogs/ice-community-blog/climate-change-affec...
 
Description Disaster Resilience: A social scientific perspective virtual seminar series - Session 1 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact We launched a new seminar series in collaboration with all partners on the project, entitled Disaster Resilience: A Social Scientific Perspective virtual seminar series. It primarily run by UCL's Earthquake and People Interaction Centre (EPICentre). The seminar series takes place on the last Wednesday of each month, between September 2021 to 2022 from 15:00-16:00 London, UK Time.

Sessions comprise of a half hour talk by a leading expert in a relevant field on an aspect of your research/thinking within the area of disaster resilience, followed by half an hour of question and answer time. The audience consists mostly of academics and post-graduate students interested in disaster resilience.

Our goal for the seminar series is to engage in multidisciplinary discussion regarding fostering disaster resilience in a range of settings affected by hazards such as earthquakes, tsunami, flooding, and wildfires. Speakers talk about how they see and approach 'Resilience', particularly Disaster Resilience, with reference to their own work.

Talk 1 was delivered by Professor George Bonanno entitled "Trauma and the resilience paradox."

George A. Bonanno, Ph.D. is a Professor of Clinical Psychology at Columbia University's Teachers College. His interests centre on the question of how human beings cope with loss, trauma and other forms of extreme adversity, His empirical and theoretical work has for over 25 years centered on defining and documenting resilience in the face of loss or potential traumatic events, including disaster, loss, terrorist attack, bio-epidemic, traumatic injury, life-threatening injuries medical events, and military deployment, and on investigating the role of flexible responding in predicting psychopathological and resilient outcomes. He was honoured recently with the Cattell award from the Association for Psychological Science "for a lifetime of intellectual achievements in applied psychological research and their impact on a critical problem in society at large.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.ucl.ac.uk/epicentre/news/2021/sep/virtual-epicentre-seminar-series-disaster-resilience-s...
 
Description Disaster Resilience: A social scientific perspective virtual seminar series - Session 2 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact We launched a new seminar series in collaboration with all partners on the project, entitled Disaster Resilience: A Social Scientific Perspective virtual seminar series. It primarily run by UCL's Earthquake and People Interaction Centre (EPICentre). The seminar series takes place on the last Wednesday of each month, between September 2021 to 2022 from 15:00-16:00 London, UK Time.

Sessions comprise of a half hour talk by a leading expert in a relevant field on an aspect of your research/thinking within the area of disaster resilience, followed by half an hour of question and answer time. The audience consists mostly of academics and post-graduate students interested in disaster resilience.

Our goal for the seminar series is to engage in multidisciplinary discussion regarding fostering disaster resilience in a range of settings affected by hazards such as earthquakes, tsunami, flooding, and wildfires. Speakers talk about how they see and approach 'Resilience', particularly Disaster Resilience, with reference to their own work.

Talk 2 was delivered by Dr Julia Becker entitled "Challenges to Residential Resilience Following Earthquakes in Aotearoa, New Zealand'. This talk focused on the challenges to residential resilience in the wake of such earthquakes and some of the considerations in planning for future events to ensure thriving residential communities.

Dr Julia Becker is a Senior Lecturer at the Joint Centre for Disaster Research at Massey University, New Zealand. She undertakes social science research on a range natural hazard and disaster issues. Her areas of expertise include perceptions, preparedness, community resilience, emergency management and warnings. She has worked extensively in New Zealand on local events (e.g. the 2010-11 Canterbury and 2016 Kaik?ura earthquakes) and internationally (e.g. U.S.A, Australia, Japan).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.ucl.ac.uk/epicentre/news/2021/sep/virtual-epicentre-seminar-series-disaster-resilience-s...
 
Description Disaster Resilience: A social scientific perspective virtual seminar series - Session 3 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact We launched a new seminar series in collaboration with all partners on the project, entitled Disaster Resilience: A Social Scientific Perspective virtual seminar series. It primarily run by UCL's Earthquake and People Interaction Centre (EPICentre). The seminar series takes place on the last Wednesday of each month, between September 2021 to 2022 from 15:00-16:00 London, UK Time. Sessions comprise of a half hour talk by a leading expert in a relevant field on an aspect of your research/thinking within the area of disaster resilience, followed by half an hour of question and answer time. The audience consists mostly of academics and post-graduate students interested in disaster resilience. Our goal for the seminar series is to engage in multidisciplinary discussion regarding fostering disaster resilience in a range of settings affected by hazards such as earthquakes, tsunami, flooding, and wildfires. Speakers talk about how they see and approach 'Resilience', particularly Disaster Resilience, with reference to their own work. Talk 3 was delivered by Professor Michael Ungar entitled "Multisystemic Resilience and Disasters: Promoting Strong Individuals, Institutions and Communities." In this presentation, Dr. Ungar draws on examples from his research and work with communities around the world to show that resilience is much more than our personal capacity to overcome adversity. It is instead a reflection of how well multiple systems work together (from the physical setting where we live, to the social relationships and policy environment that shape our experience of our community) to create opportunities for people to navigate their way to the resources they need for well-being while making those resources available in ways that people experience as both culturally and contextually meaningful. This multisystemic model of resilience has implications for how communities respond to experiences of exceptional stress whether that stress is caused by natural disasters, political violence or economic disruption.Michael Ungar, Ph.D., is a Family Therapist and Professor of Social Work at Dalhousie University where he holds the Canada Research Chair in Child, Family and Community Resilience. His ground-breaking work is recognized around the world for its emphasis on how to use the theory of resilience to increase both individual and community agility during crises, with numerous communities, organizations and businesses adopting his concept of resilience as a negotiated process that enhances people's wellbeing when facing adversity. Dr. Ungar has published over 200 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters on the subject of resilience and is the author of 17 books for mental health professionals, researchers and caregivers. These include Change Your World: The Science of Resilience and the True Path to Success, a book for adults experiencing stress at work and at home, and Multisystemic Resilience: Adaptation and Transformation in Contexts of Change, an open access edited volume with contributors from a dozen diverse disciplines ranging from epigenetics and psychology to architecture and computing science.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.ucl.ac.uk/epicentre/news/2021/sep/virtual-epicentre-seminar-series-disaster-resilience-s...
 
Description Disaster Resilience: A social scientific perspective virtual seminar series - Session 4 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact In 2021, we launched a new seminar series in collaboration with all partners on the project, entitled Disaster Resilience: A Social Scientific Perspective virtual seminar series. It is primarily run by UCL's Earthquake and People Interaction Centre (EPICentre). The seminar series takes place on the last Wednesday of each month, between September 2021 to 2022 from 15:00-16:00 London, UK Time. Sessions comprise of a half hour talk by a leading expert in a relevant field on an aspect of your research/thinking within the area of disaster resilience, followed by half an hour of question and answer time. The audience consists mostly of academics and post-graduate students interested in disaster resilience. Our goal for the seminar series is to engage in multidisciplinary discussion regarding fostering disaster resilience in a range of settings affected by hazards such as earthquakes, tsunami, flooding, and wildfires. Speakers talk about how they see and approach 'Resilience', particularly Disaster Resilience, with reference to their own work.

Talk 4 was delivered by Prof Orit Nuttman-Shwartz entitled "Trauma and Resilience in Shared Traumatic Situations." The phenomenon variously termed "shared reality," "shared trauma," and "shared traumatic reality" - and the outcomes pertaining to this phenomenon, "shared growth" and "shared resilience" - refer to those situations in which trauma workers help survivors cope with the very traumas that they themselves have been exposed to, given the reality that they live and work in the same community as their clients.As such, the aims of the current session were to describe the development of the shared reality concept, and the terminology used to refer to it, which define the unique conceptual nature of dual direct and indirect, and dual negative and positive, responses such as shared trauma, shared growth, and shared resilience in such situations. In addition, via several vignettes that illustrate the experience of working in a shared reality, the speaker discussed relevant theoretical constructs, theoretical applications, and the innovative practice approaches and research tools employed in shared reality situations. The speaker discussed also about what remains to be explored, and will then offer several recommendations for educators, trauma workers, supervisors, and managers when providing help in these shared reality situations. Orit Nuttman-Shwartz, MSW, PhD, is a group analyst (GA), and full professor. She is the founder and first head of the School of Social Work at Sapir College in Israel and past chairperson of the Israel National Social Work Council (2011-2019). She is currently the interim dean of the School of Social Work at Sapir College (2021-present) and the Israeli representative at the International Association of Schools of Social Work (IASSW) and in the European Cooperation in Science & Technology project entitled, Transnational Collaboration on Bullying, Migration and Integration at School Level. Her academic activity derives from her experience as a social worker and therapist, and as an educator and researcher. Her research focuses on personal and social trauma, resilience and bereavement, and on international social work. Working near the Israeli border, she is also engaged in research dealing with the effects of continuous and shared threat exposure on individuals, communities, and organizations, and with the impact of a shared continuous trauma environment on clients, students, supervisors, and social workers. Her studies have yielded more than 85 academic publications in leading international and local journals, as well as book chapters, reflecting her professional contribution. She received funding from the IASSW and EASSW to develop social work curricula in the context of political conflict, international social work, and the global migration crisis and received, with others, an EU Tempus fund to develop an international academic curriculum for child and youth welfare. She teaches courses on trauma and loss theory and practice, and international trauma, and she offers research seminars on resilience and migration. In 2014 she was awarded the Katan Prize for Academic Scholarship in Social Work, in 2016 she received an Award of Distinction for her groundbreaking efforts to integrate academic work and work with needy communities, and in 2022 she received the annual research prize from Israel's IDF Widows and Orphans Organization for her co-research with remarried military widows.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://www.ucl.ac.uk/epicentre/news/2021/sep/virtual-epicentre-seminar-series-disaster-resilience-s...
 
Description Disaster Resilience: A social scientific perspective virtual seminar series - Session 5 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact We launched a new seminar series in collaboration with all partners on the project, entitled Disaster Resilience: A Social Scientific Perspective virtual seminar series. It primarily run by UCL's Earthquake and People Interaction Centre (EPICentre). The seminar series takes place on the last Wednesday of each month, between September 2021 to 2022 from 15:00-16:00 London, UK Time. Sessions comprise of a half hour talk by a leading expert in a relevant field on an aspect of your research/thinking within the area of disaster resilience, followed by half an hour of question and answer time. The audience consists mostly of academics and post-graduate students interested in disaster resilience. Our goal for the seminar series is to engage in multidisciplinary discussion regarding fostering disaster resilience in a range of settings affected by hazards such as earthquakes, tsunami, flooding, and wildfires. Speakers talk about how they see and approach 'Resilience', particularly Disaster Resilience, with reference to their own work. Talk 5 was delivered by Prof John Drury entitled "Collective psychosocial resilience in the Covid pandemic: Sustaining mutual aid groups over time". John Drury is Professor of Social Psychology at the University of Sussex. He has been studying the psychology of and behaviour in crowd events for nearly 30 years - including in emergencies and disasters, protests and social movements, religious festivals, music and sports events. He has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles on these and other topics. Some of the emergencies and disasters he has investigated include the July 2005 London bombings, the 2010 Maule earthquake, and the 2017 Manchester Arena attack. On the basis of his work on public responses to mass emergencies, he developed the Social Identity Model of Collective Psychosocial Resilience. He provides training on crowd psychology to the UK Fire and Rescue Service and to crowd safety managers around the world. His research on collective behaviour in crowd events and mass emergencies has informed the training of over 2000 stewards across the UK and European football clubs and informs the Civil Contingencies Secretariat's National Risk Assessments. As part of the response to the Covid-19 pandemic, he participated in the UK government SAGE behavioural science subgroup SPI-B. He is also a member of Independent SAGE and two British Psychological Society Covid task force groups. He heads the Crowds & Identities group at the University of Sussex, where he is also Director of Research and Knowledge Exchange in the School of Psychology. He is currently researching collective responses to perceived hostile threats (false alarm evacuations) and how Covid-19 mutual aid groups can be sustained over time.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://www.ucl.ac.uk/epicentre/news/2021/sep/virtual-epicentre-seminar-series-disaster-resilience-s...
 
Description Disaster Resilience: A social scientific perspective virtual seminar series - Session 6 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact We launched a new seminar series in collaboration with all partners on the project, entitled Disaster Resilience: A Social Scientific Perspective virtual seminar series. It primarily run by UCL's Earthquake and People Interaction Centre (EPICentre). The seminar series takes place on the last Wednesday of each month, between September 2021 to 2022 from 15:00-16:00 London, UK Time. Sessions comprise of a half hour talk by a leading expert in a relevant field on an aspect of your research/thinking within the area of disaster resilience, followed by half an hour of question and answer time. The audience consists mostly of academics and post-graduate students interested in disaster resilience. Our goal for the seminar series is to engage in multidisciplinary discussion regarding fostering disaster resilience in a range of settings affected by hazards such as earthquakes, tsunami, flooding, and wildfires. Speakers talk about how they see and approach 'Resilience', particularly Disaster Resilience, with reference to their own work. Talk 6 was delivered by Professor Mark Pelling entitled "Resilience: research on a dynamic object" Mark Pelling is Professor of Geography, King's College London. He researches on the social and institutional aspects of resilience and disaster risk reduction, predominantly in collaboration with colleagues in the global South and often in an urban context. He was a Coordinating Lead Author for the IPCC 5th and 6th Assessment Reports helping lead a chapter on Cities, Settlements and Key Infrastructure. He is co-director of the GCRF-UKRI Tomorrow's Cities Hub, a £20m, 5 year programme of work seeking to support urban stakeholders in bringing multi-hazard risk reduction into urban development decision processes. Between 2019 and 2021 he was seconded to the GCRF as a Challenge Lead in Resilience and Climate Change. The talk abstract was: Resilience is well recognised as a contested concept - what object it is attributed to, what users seek it to do and how it feels to be more or less resilient, all differ by viewpoint. This seminar draws together three different research projects to offer some thoughts on how the fluid qualities of resilience can be drawn out and perhaps made useful. First, the use of scenario exercises to imagine the future relationship between development and risk/resilience trajectories with examples from richer and poorer country contexts. Second, the importance of placing the powerless at the centre of research to reveal hidden pathways to risk and resilience. Third, the emerging consequences for COVID-19 and the Russian invasion of Ukraine in highlighting the cascading and compounding sites of risk and resilience.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://www.ucl.ac.uk/epicentre/news/2021/sep/virtual-epicentre-seminar-series-disaster-resilience-s...
 
Description Disaster Resilience: A social scientific perspective virtual seminar series - Session 7 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact In 2021, we launched a new seminar series in collaboration with all partners on the project, entitled Disaster Resilience: A Social Scientific Perspective virtual seminar series. It primarily run by UCL's Earthquake and People Interaction Centre (EPICentre). The seminar series continues to take place across 2023. Sessions comprise of a half hour talk by a leading expert in a relevant field on an aspect of your research/thinking within the area of disaster resilience, followed by half an hour of question and answer time. The audience consists mostly of academics and post-graduate students interested in disaster resilience. Our goal for the seminar series is to engage in multidisciplinary discussion regarding fostering disaster resilience in a range of settings affected by hazards such as earthquakes, tsunami, flooding, and wildfires. Speakers talk about how they see and approach 'Resilience', particularly Disaster Resilience, with reference to their own work. This was delivered by Professor Ann Masten entitled "Resilience in Disaster: Multisystem Perspectives". In this presentation, Dr. Masten highlights the emergence of multisystem models of resilience in developmental science, growing evidence of parallel psychosocial drivers of resilience at the level of individuals, families, schools, and communities, and implications of a multisystem perspective for preparation and response. Ann Masten, Ph.D., is a Regents Professor, Irving B. Harris Professor of Child Development and Distinguished McKnight University Professor at the Institute of Child Development in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Minnesota. Masten studies competence, risk, and resilience in development, with a focus on the processes leading to positive adaptation and outcomes in children and families whose lives are threatened by adversity. The goal of her work is to inform science, practice, and policy seeking to understand and promote human adaptation and resilience. Masten directs the Project Competence Research on Risk and Resilience (PCR3), which includes studies of normative populations and high-risk young people exposed to war, natural disasters, poverty, homelessness, and migration. Masten's research in Minnesota has focused on school success in homeless and other disadvantaged mobile children, with a focus on malleable protective processes, including parenting and self-regulation skills.At the national and international level, Masten works with colleagues in multiple disciplines to understand adaptation and development, particularly in relation to migration, disasters, and war.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2023
URL https://www.ucl.ac.uk/epicentre/news/2021/sep/virtual-epicentre-seminar-series-disaster-resilience-s...
 
Description Expert advice given on BBC News - 7 March 
Form Of Engagement Activity A press release, press conference or response to a media enquiry/interview
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Appeared on BBC News as expert on Covid-related fear and panic 7 March 2020
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description How DO the Media and Public Conceptualise Neuroscience? Public Understanding of Science meeting, LSE, 27 November 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Keynote talks series at LSE
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description How People Respond to Mass Risks/Crises LSE, 19 March 2020 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Keynote talks series at LSE
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Invited talk and panelist on Efficient risk data sharing: A dedicated disaster risk data library in the 2020 Understanding Risk Forum, organised by the Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR) at the World Bank, USA, December 1, 2020 (on-line). 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited talk and panelist on Efficient risk data sharing: A dedicated disaster risk data library in the 2020 Understanding Risk Forum, organised by the Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR) at the World Bank, USA, December 1, 2020 (on-line).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Invited talk on Safer Communities Through Safer Schools in the workshop on Post disaster infrastructures for long term social wellbeing: Dialogues with Ecuador at the University of Leeds, UK, September 23, 2020 (on-line). 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Invited talk on Safer Communities Through Safer Schools in the workshop on Post disaster infrastructures for long term social wellbeing: Dialogues with Ecuador at the University of Leeds, UK, September 23, 2020 (on-line).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Living with Risks - Sharing the Good Practice 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Invited keynote by the President of the Society for Risk Analysis - Europe (SRA-E) on behalf of the local organizers of the SRA-E Annual Conference to be held in June 12-15, 2022 at the University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Novi Sad, Serbia.
Prof. Helene Joffe has accepted a keynote invitation. Prof. Joffe was invited on the basis of their high expertise in the field of risk analysis, grounded on a psychosocial level of analysis, and the contributions their work has given to the development of good practices and policy making, which very much aligns with the global topic of the conference - "Living with Risks - Sharing the Good Practice" - and also with some of the specific topics to be covered.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
URL https://sra-e2022ns.ftn.uns.ac.rs/
 
Description Lunch hour lecture 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact The activity was a virtual seminar, available to all interested in the topic. It was a look at Gender and Climate Change, exploring why women are more at risk from global heating. Priti Parikh was discussing how women bear the burden of lack of infrastructure and how climate change further exacerbates this inequity. The aim was to discuss the use of science and the need to take action against climate change
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://www.ucl.ac.uk/events/events/2021/dec/gender-and-climate-change-why-are-women-more-risk-globa...
 
Description Lunch hour presentation 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Presentation of project at KTH SEED Lunchtime Seminar by Dr Margarita Garfias Royo
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2022
 
Description Podcast recording 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact A podcast recording on the topic of 'Resilience in Childhood and Adolescence' featuring an expert panel of practitioners and academics from an international range of universities, run by the UCL Resilience Research Group. The recording is hosted on Sound Cloud (part of the UCL Minds Podcast). The podcast has currently been listened to 1273 times.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL https://soundcloud.com/uclsound/resilience-research-group-resilience-in-childhood-and-adolescence-pa...
 
Description Re-thinking Human Behaviour: Critical Perspectives on the Psychology of Covid-19, LSE, 7 October 2020 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Postgraduate students
Results and Impact Keynote talk series at LSE
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2020
 
Description Resilient School Hubs Finding Dissemination Meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact The meeting aimed to disseminate the projects findings to a relevant expert audience. We invited key stakeholders in the field and attendees included the Indonesian and UK members of the research team, project advisors, other researchers from UK institutions, a representative from the Embassy of Indonesia in London, undergraduate students interested in the area and non-governmental organisation links. The meeting led to a discussion of the projects findings and implications for policy and practice. The meeting also led to discussions of future potential international, interdisciplinary collaborations in the same research area.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2023
 
Description Resilient School Hubs Inaugural Meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Study participants or study members
Results and Impact The launch event provided a platform to connect various stakeholders involved in the project, including those from the research institutions of UCL, Tadulaku University, Syiah Kuala University; local communities (e.g., heads of school) and government (e.g., ministries), and third-sector organisations. The launch event comprised of formal talks by the leads of the research institutions, including Rectors and Vice-Provost. All investigators gave presentations outlining the aims of each work package, including how the work serves to holistically address the issue of fostering resilient recovery for the displaced community of Palu from a multi-disciplinary, collaborative effort. We have re-enforced our ties with these groups, especially the third-sector e.g. Save the Children and Palu City's Regional Development Planning Office.
One of our aims of the project is also to increase the capacity of the Indonesian institutions and their researchers; we can argue this event contributed to that, even by raising their profile to an international audience. Presentations were also intended to showcase the Indonesian investigators and their work.
We also created various social media platforms in the lead up to the event, and promoted them at the event. This further serves to connect us with various stakeholders through an informal medium from the event onwards.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
 
Description SCHOOL-BASED DISASTER RESILIENCE FROM SOCIAL AND ENGINEERING PERSPECTIVES 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact This talk promoted and disseminated initial findings from the Resilient School-Hubs Project at a conference organised by the project partners in Indonesia. Benefits included communicating project findings back to local community stakeholders and collating perspectives from the audience regarding the gaps or opportunities based on their knowledge or experience, and what lies ahead of the post-disaster recovery in Central Sulawesi. For instance, in the context of the education infrastructure sector, and how the resilient school-hubs project can potentially fill those gaps and take opportunities to contribute to the recovery progress.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2021
URL http://aiwest-dr.unsyiah.ac.id/2021/school-based-disaster-resilience-from-social-and-engineering-per...
 
Description The Power of Song for Resilience Building after Disaster (In-Person Presentation) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact We will give a talk at the UNESCO Spring School in Glasgow 2023.

Abstract for the UNESCO Spring School 2023 talk:
This study explores the potential of songs as a tool for building resilience in young people affected by disasters in Indonesia. Resilience building interventions are crucial in helping individuals, especially young people, cope with the trauma and stress experienced after a natural hazard event. The study proposes that songs, specifically created to address the experiences and emotions of young people, can serve as an effective and culturally relevant means of building resilience when interventions are co-created and culturally informed. We draw upon existing literature on the use of music and songs in therapy and trauma recovery, as well as the unique cultural context of Indonesia, to support the argument for the potential of songs as a resilience building tool. Song has been used successfully by communities to increase wellbeing, and prepare for earthquakes, tsunami and other natural hazards.

We present findings based on in-person workshops with female teen survivors of the 2018 earthquake in Indonesia (n=48) conducted in 2022, where songs were co-created by local artists, researchers, and teenage survivors to promote resilience and recovery. The design of these workshops are a significant contribution to the field and the results of this study have important implications for the design and implementation of resilience building interventions for young people in disaster-affected communities in Indonesia and beyond.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2023
URL https://www.gla.ac.uk/research/az/unesco/events/springschool/springschool2023/