Cohorts as Platforms for Mental Health research (CaP:MH)

Lead Research Organisation: University of Bristol

Abstract

Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.

Technical Summary

We will enhance two of the UK’s premier population based birth cohorts to create an intergenerational, integrated resource for mental health research with an unparalleled capacity to consider the importance of the early life course. This resource will be readily discoverable and available through a proven secure informatics platform with the flexibility to incorporate
other cohorts as part of a larger resource. The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) and the Born in Bradford (BiB) cohorts together include over 40,000 participants across three generations. Both cohorts are deeply phenotyped through clinic and questionnaire assessments and further enhanced through multi-omic measures and linkage to routine health and social records. We will extend this linkage to a comparable level in both cohorts particularly
to primary care patient records ensuring this is higher than in any comparable study based on the multiple strategies we have developed and the strengths of our underlying ethical and technical infrastructure. To this resource we will add additional measures from internet based applications and social media feeds underpinned by our expertise in data science and our strengths in participant engagement. Indicative projects, both individually in each cohort and across the integrated cross-cohort resource, will demonstrate value in enabling mental health discovery. In these projects we will further develop and deploy innovative bioinformatic and biostatistical approaches to facilitate discovery and strengthen causal inference developed in our MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit to maximise the value that existing information can add to observational research. We will build on ALSPAC’s established, sustainable infrastructure for secure, cost-efficient data sharing based on our own instance of the UK Secure E-research Platform (UKSeRP), extending this to include BiB and providing the foundation of a Mental Health Data Platform to support discovery science and service evaluation at a scale that will underpin our ability to understand and effectively improve mental health in individuals and the population.

Publications

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Maciejewski G (2019) The cost of learning new meanings for familiar words in Language, Cognition and Neuroscience

 
Title Virtual reality visualisation of Born in Bradford dataset 
Description We commissioned two artists to create an interactive virtual reality experience that would help the community understand the power of data science and the usefulness of linking datasets. 
Type Of Art Artefact (including digital) 
Year Produced 2019 
Impact The display was featured within the UKRI's First Year anniversary event and highlighted in Sir Mark Walport's speech. The display was the highlight of a Festival that attracted over 500 people (attending to learn more about the Born in Bradford study) The display was shown at the Tanween arts festival at the King Abdulaziz Center for World Culture (Ithra). The Center for World Culture are now exploring the potential to use this approach to help children within the kingdom gain a better understand of the factors that influence health. 
URL https://reflexarc.co.uk/projects/born-in-bradford
 
Description Age Appropriate Design Code
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
URL https://ico.org.uk/about-the-ico/news-and-events/news-and-blogs/2020/01/ico-publishes-code-of-practi...
 
Description Leading joint academic-NHS review on methods to onward share linked NHS records
Geographic Reach Local/Municipal/Regional 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact A joint piece of work between CLOSER (led by Andy Boyd & Alison Park) and NHS Digital (led by Garry Coleman & Estelle Spence) through the NHS Digital Research Advisory Group. The work included conducting a stakeholder needs analysis amongst the longitudinal studies community (two workshops held) and a report generated. The findings are leading to a clearer and more efficient mechanisms to maximise the research value of the secondary use of routine health records in order to develop and more effective and efficient NHS.
URL https://digital.nhs.uk/services/research-advisory-group
 
Description Patients Know Best
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact Patients Know Best is being successfully implemented in the NHS, with the dual ambitions of improving treatment and improving patient compliance. Mon-Williams is providing advice on whether there is read-across, both in ideas and in technical approach, to DfE's interest in concerted plans and agency for children/their carers - including solutions for GDPR-compliant means to bring together patient records from disparate sources into an encrypted, interactive app for patients to use. The relevance for the award is that this work includes children with SEND, children with behavioural challenges, children in care, children in the care of the YJB, children in mainstream EY and subsequent education. The outcome is to give insights and agency, to encourage compliance, and to join up public services around the child.
URL https://patientsknowbest.com/
 
Description Submission to Commons Science and Technology Committee inquiry into the impact of social media and screen-use on young people's health inquiry Gave evidence to a government review
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Gave evidence to a government review
Impact This project was submitted as written evidence to the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee's inquiry into the impact of social media and screen-use on young people's health, as current work that is likely to produce evidence relevant to the inquiry.
URL https://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/science-and-technology-c...
 
Description UK Strategic Framework Security Pillar
Geographic Reach National 
Policy Influence Type Participation in a advisory committee
Impact The UK's Strategic Framework Security Pillar working group (chaired by DfE Director of Strategy) have developed a ~£9mn HMT Shared Outcomes Fund, titled 'Data Improvement across Government' providing essential resource for further data analysis and linkage projects in the vulnerable people space. Mon-Williams is providing advice on how the following questions: How can we help the policy and operational policy functions become more intelligent, strategic and proactive customers of data and analytics? What are the key policy questions that need to be answered in 2020?
 
Description ActEarly: a City Collaboratory approach to early promotion of good health and wellbeing
Amount £6,600,528 (GBP)
Funding ID MR/S037527/1 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2019 
End 08/2024
 
Description ActEarly: a City Collaboratory approach to early promotion of good health and wellbeing
Amount £49,970 (GBP)
Funding ID MC_PC_18002 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2018 
End 11/2018
 
Description Delivering Societal Impact through Place-Based Urban Analytics
Amount £195,396 (GBP)
Organisation Alan Turing Institute 
Sector Academic/University
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2020 
End 10/2021
 
Description LONGITUDINAL ADMINISTRATIVE DATA SPINE SCOPING PROJECT GRANT FOR THE SPF UK POPULATION LAB WAVE I
Amount £236,901 (GBP)
Funding ID ES/S016732/1 
Organisation Economic and Social Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 12/2018 
End 03/2019
 
Description Mapping Neurodevelopmental Trajectories for Adult Psychiatric Disorder: ALSPAC-MRI-II
Amount £1,791,731 (GBP)
Funding ID MR/S003436/1 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 12/2018 
End 11/2022
 
Description Mapping Neurodevelopmental Trajectories for Adult Psychiatric Disorder: ALSPAC-MRI-II
Amount £1,791,731 (GBP)
Funding ID MR/S003436/1 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 03/2019 
End 02/2023
 
Description The Alan Turing Institute
Amount £42,000,000 (GBP)
Funding ID EP/N510129/1 
Organisation Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2015 
End 03/2020
 
Description Using birth cohorts to understand the impact of urban green space on child health and wellbeing
Amount £79,929 (GBP)
Funding ID 2081026 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 10/2018 
End 03/2022
 
Title A Privacy-Preserving Data Management system for MRI and other Large Image Data 
Description ALSPAC are collecting large volumes of image data through scanning individuals at assessment clinics and also work underway as part of ALSPAC's MRC MH Pathfinder award, through linkage to images held in social media accounts. These images are individually relatively small size, but are being accessed in huge volumes - e.g. a single participants MRI scan can comprise ~12,000 separate image files. Furthermore, many images have embedded identifier values (e.g. NHS ID or name embedded in an MRI scan) or have inherently identifiable components (e.g. an individuals MRI head scan can be used to show a 3D topographic map of a persons face). This leaves study databanks with a challenge to archive large volumes of data, efficiently process them for reuse, and to de-identify them in complex ways. Through MRC MH Pathfinder, the ALSPAC Data Team and Data Linkage Team have developed an image management server with capabilities for archiving, processing and de-identification. This is built on a suite of 'open source' software packages and tuned to the needs of a longitudinal study. This new infrastructure is now operational and facilitating new research in ALSPAC. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2019 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The tool has enabled ALSPAC to lower the charges for the processing of data for reuse from £750 per project to £300 per project. The use of the tool is supporting multiple grant applications, both in the UK and USA. The tool reduces the cost of the grant compared to previous approaches as it impacts on collection and archiving as well as reuse. E.g. Elanor Hinton application to support assessment of the impact of parenthood on maternal and paternal neurobiology and subsequent child development (ALSPAC Reference: B3386, https://proposals.epi.bristol.ac.uk/?q=node/129988). The tool is supporting the MRC funded grant led by Professor Anthony David (UCL) (ALSPAC Reference: B3035, https://proposals.epi.bristol.ac.uk/?q=node/127353). 
 
Title Data Access Agreement (DAA) data sharing contract 
Description The data access agreement is a new data sharing contract which is compatible with contemporary legislative (e.g. General Data Protection Regulations) and research governance expectations. It aligns with ALSPAC's Online Proposal System for efficient generation of specified and controlled data requests. Importantly, the DAA enables the replication of third-party data owner requirements and the addition of particular governance controls for specific datasets (e.g. geo-spatial datasets), and as such is an important element in ALSPAC's process to allow onward sharing of linked health, geo-spatial and social records. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The DAA is a central component in ALSPAC's negotiations with NHS Digital to enable onward sharing of linked records. 
URL http://www.bristol.ac.uk/alspac/researchers/access/
 
Title Data Privacy Impact Assessment Process 
Description A new privacy assessment tool for ALSPAC which enables the assessment of data flows (i.e. new record linkages or new data sharing with research users) in line with EU General Data Protection Regulation requirements. The tool allows the assessment of diverse risks and particular research scenarios (e.g. the use of geocoded data in the research process, the additional sensitivities of using mental or sexual health records in research investigations. 
Type Of Material Improvements to research infrastructure 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Ensuring ALSPAC data sharing is legally compliant. 
 
Title ALSPAC 
Description This award funded the linking of social media data in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, with over 900 participants agreeing to share their Twitter data with the study. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact None so far, too early 
 
Title ALSPAC 'GP' dataset of linked primary care records (1991-2018) 
Description These data are the coded values - relating to participant symptoms, diagnoses, treatments, care - extracted from GP primary care records of ALSPAC participants receiving care in England. The records are linked from EMIS Ltd (a GP software system company) and are managed by the ALSPAC data linkage team. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2018 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The data are being used projects led by: 1) Professor Stan Zammit as part of the ALSPAC - Born in Bradford MRC MH Pathfinder Award (ALSPAC Reference: B3060, https://proposals.epi.bristol.ac.uk/?q=node/129688). 2) Dr Alison Teyhan as part of the ALSPAC - Born in Bradford MRC MH Pathfinder Award (ALSPAC Reference: B3060, https://proposals.epi.bristol.ac.uk/?q=node/129688). 3) Dr Rosie Cornish as part of the ALSPAC - Born in Bradford MRC MH Pathfinder Award (ALSPAC Reference: B3060, https://proposals.epi.bristol.ac.uk/?q=node/129688). 4) Professor Dheeraj Rai to study Adolescent and adult mental health outcomes of autism and autistic traits (ALSPAC Reference: B2622, https://proposals.epi.bristol.ac.uk/?q=node/127702) 5) Professor Hilary Pinnock for the derivation of a clinical prediction rule for the diagnosis of asthma (ALSPAC Reference: B2830, https://proposals.epi.bristol.ac.uk/?q=node/127536) 6) Professor Sinead Langan as part of a program to establish efficient methods to understand medical and social outcomes associated with eczema (ALSPAC Reference: B2606, https://proposals.epi.bristol.ac.uk/?q=node/127717). 
URL http://www.bristol.ac.uk/alspac/researchers/our-data/linkage/
 
Title ALSPAC 'HES' Hospital Episode Statistics records 
Description These are minimum returns of Hospital Episode Statistics secondary care records of ALSPAC participants receiving care in England. The records are linked from NHS Digital and accessed under a NHS Digital - University of Bristol Data Sharing Agreement (managed by the ALSPAC data linkage team). 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2019 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The data are being used projects led by: 1) Professor Stan Zammit as part of the ALSPAC - Born in Bradford MRC MH Pathfinder Award (ALSPAC Reference: B3060, https://proposals.epi.bristol.ac.uk/?q=node/129688). 2) Dr Alison Teyhan as part of the ALSPAC - Born in Bradford MRC MH Pathfinder Award (ALSPAC Reference: B3060, https://proposals.epi.bristol.ac.uk/?q=node/129688). 3) Dr Rosie Cornish as part of the ALSPAC - Born in Bradford MRC MH Pathfinder Award (ALSPAC Reference: B3060, https://proposals.epi.bristol.ac.uk/?q=node/129688). 
URL http://www.bristol.ac.uk/alspac/researchers/our-data/linkage/
 
Title ALSPAC 'Looked After' and 'Children In Need' linked social care records 
Description These are records of children taken into state care and children classifed as 'in Need'. The records are linked from Department for Education National Pupil Database and accessed under a DfE - University of Bristol Data Sharing Agreement (managed by the ALSPAC data linkage team). While access is currently restricted to the project team, we are exploring mechanisms to widen access using the new powers of the Digital Economy Act and in partnership with the Administrative Data Research-UK. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2019 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The data are being used in a project led by Professor John Macleod and Dr Alison Teyhan as part of the ALSPAC - Born in Bradford MRC MH Pathfinder Award (ALSPAC Reference: B3060, https://proposals.epi.bristol.ac.uk/?q=node/129688). This research has resulted in an academic paper: Teyhan A, Boyd A, Wijedasa D, Macleod J. Early life adversity, contact with children's social care services and educational outcomes at age 16 years: UK birth cohort study with linkage to national administrative records. BMJ open. 2019 Oct 1;9(10):e030213. We have also published a blog article emphasising the value of the novel methodologies in this research: https://www.closer.ac.uk/news-opinion/blog/filling-gaps-boosts-evidence-vulnerable-children/ 
URL http://www.bristol.ac.uk/alspac/researchers/our-data/linkage/
 
Title ALSPAC 'MHSDS' Data Set of Mental Health & Learning Difficulties Community Care Interactions 
Description These are minimum returns of Mental Health community care records of ALSPAC participants receiving care in England. The records are linked from NHS Digital and accessed under a NHS Digital - University of Bristol Data Sharing Agreement (managed by the ALSPAC data linkage team). 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2019 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The data are being used in a project led by Professor Stan Zammit as part of the ALSPAC - Born in Bradford MRC MH Pathfinder Award (ALSPAC Reference: B3060, https://proposals.epi.bristol.ac.uk/?q=node/129688). 
URL http://www.bristol.ac.uk/alspac/researchers/our-data/linkage/
 
Title ALSPAC 'STORK' dataset of linked maternity records (1990-1992) 
Description The ALSPAC Data Linkage team have recently (2019-2020) cleaned and documented the STORK dataset of midwifery and birth delivery records for those index participants born in either of the two main maternity hospitals in Bristol (approx. 85% of enrolled participants). These data are available for access to the bona-fide research community via the ALSPAC access mechanism. A 'Data Note' publication is being prepared to contribute documentation and to aid the discoverability of the new dataset. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2019 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The data are being used by Dr Katie Harron (UCL) as part of her Wellcome Trust LPS (Aim 2) Award (ALSPAC reference B3002, https://proposals.epi.bristol.ac.uk/?q=node/127384). The data are being used by Dr Alison Teyhan (University of Bristol) as part of the ALSPAC Born-in-Bradford MRC MH Pathfinder award (ALSPAC reference B3060, https://proposals.epi.bristol.ac.uk/?q=node/129688). 
URL http://www.bristol.ac.uk/alspac/researchers/our-data/linkage/
 
Title ALSPAC UK Secure eResearch Platform for the secure analysis of sensitive data 
Description The ALSPAC data linkage team have worked with the UK Secure eResearch Platform team (University of Swansea) to establish an 'ALSPAC UKSeRP' secure research server and for the secure analysis of sensitive data, particularly linked routine records accessed under contract. The ALSPAC UKSeRP has been embedded in ALSPAC's linkage ethics and data sharing agreements. It has also been embedded in the study's ISO27001 certified Information Security Management System (ISMS). This is now providing the infrastructure for sharing data with bona fide users, subject to ALSPAC's project approvals process. The management of the system is governed by Standard Operating Procedures and is subject to internal and external audit assessments. We are currently in a 'Beta User' phase, once the mechanisms are fully established the resource will be promoted more widely. 
Type Of Material Data handling & control 
Year Produced 2019 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact The ALSPAC UKSeRP 'Beta User' phase is currently being used for 6 research programmes, 4 based at the University of Bristol, 1 at the University of Edinburgh and 1 at LSHTM. It is the key infrastructure for enabling the ALSPAC Born In Bradford MRC MH Pathfinder deliverables. The infrastructure is being used projects led by: 1) Professor Stan Zammit as part of the ALSPAC - Born in Bradford MRC MH Pathfinder Award (ALSPAC Reference: B3060, https://proposals.epi.bristol.ac.uk/?q=node/129688). 2) Dr Alison Teyhan as part of the ALSPAC - Born in Bradford MRC MH Pathfinder Award (ALSPAC Reference: B3060, https://proposals.epi.bristol.ac.uk/?q=node/129688). 3) Dr Rosie Cornish as part of the ALSPAC - Born in Bradford MRC MH Pathfinder Award (ALSPAC Reference: B3060, https://proposals.epi.bristol.ac.uk/?q=node/129688). 4) Professor Dheeraj Rai to study Adolescent and adult mental health outcomes of autism and autistic traits (ALSPAC Reference: B2622, https://proposals.epi.bristol.ac.uk/?q=node/127702) 5) Professor Hilary Pinnock for the derivation of a clinical prediction rule for the diagnosis of asthma (ALSPAC Reference: B2830, https://proposals.epi.bristol.ac.uk/?q=node/127536) 6) Professor Sinead Langan as part of a program to establish efficient methods to understand medical and social outcomes associated with eczema (ALSPAC Reference: B2606, https://proposals.epi.bristol.ac.uk/?q=node/127717). 
URL http://www.bristol.ac.uk/alspac/researchers/our-data/linkage/
 
Title Connected Bradford 
Description We have used the award to push forward linkage of all the health and education records across Bradford. This has required a data extract from the National Pupil Database and discussions with the Department for Education (including meetings with the Director of Strategy at the DfE). We now have the permissions to undertake this linkage and this will provide one of the most comprehensive datasets linking health and education in the UK (if not the most comprehensive). 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact The database will be finalised over the next few months and will then be open access (via the same mechanisms used for accessing Born in Bradford data). 
 
Description ALSPAC (University of Bristol) - Twins UK (KCL) collaboration on developing linkage methodologies 
Organisation St Thomas' Hospital
Department Twins Research Cohorts from St Thomas' Hospital
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution ALSPAC are providing strategic support to develop the TwinsUK record linkage programme based on the established and generalisable approaches developed by the 'PEARL' record linkage team. ALSPAC are specifically 1) supporting the development of the TwinsUK governance approvals based on the precedents of ALSPAC approaches; 2) supporting the development of the TwinsUK data access requests based on the precedents of ALSPAC approaches; 3) will lead the programme to secure GP assent to release copies of patients primary care records to the studies & to develop the technical mechanisms by which this will occur with practice software companies. Further to this, ALSPAC and TwinsUK will collaborate on development of aligned data processing and infrastructure and documentation/discovery developments.
Collaborator Contribution Regular working meetings to develop policy and materials and to share insights.
Impact In December 2019 TwinsUK received a conditional approval from the HRA Confidentiality Advisory Group to access identifiable patient information without explicit patient consent. This was based on ALSPAC's existing approvals.
Start Year 2019
 
Description ALSPAC Linkage Team collaboration with Dr Dheeraj Rai and Mr Paul Madley-Dowd (ALSPAC Ref: B2622) 
Organisation University of Bristol
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution To provide expert contributions on data science and MH epidemiology to the project. To facilitate access to the linked health records through the MRC MH Pathfinder programme. To support Mr Paul Madley-Dowd in his PhD programme.
Collaborator Contribution Facilitated access to, governance approvals of and understanding of the linked MH records.
Impact Research still active.
Start Year 2019
 
Description ALSPAC linkage team collaboration with Dr Beng Choon-Ho, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. 
Organisation University of Iowa
Department Carver College of Medicine
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution The ALSPAC Data Linkage Team are collaborating with Dr Choon-Ho to develop funding applications to support research investigating the neurobiological mechanisms in Adolescent Marijuana Exposure and subsequent Schizophrenia Risk. This will reuse MRI data collected by ALSPAC and Collaborators Professor David and Professor Linden, it will also utilise new data management infrastructure developed by the ALSPAC MRC MH Pathfinder award.
Collaborator Contribution Contributing expertise to grant applications led by Dr Choo-Ho.
Impact 1) Grant application to NIHR (Not supported) "Adolescent Impulsivity, Reward Brain Networks & Schizophrenia Risk" 2) Grant application to NIHR (in progress) "Neurobiological Mechanisms in Adolescent Marijuana Exposure and Schizophrenia Risk"
Start Year 2019
 
Description Bristol Health Intelligence Partnership 
Organisation NHS South, Central and West Commissioning Support Unit
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution ALSPAC with NIHR Arc West are collaborating with the NHS South, Central West Commissioning Support Unit (NHS SCW CSU) to identify the governance and technical pathways to integrate ALSPAC data into regional health and social care data managed within the Bristol, North Somerset and South Gloucestershire Commissioning Support Unit. The objective is enable applied health research with feedback loops into local NHS care provisioning.
Collaborator Contribution NHS SCW CSU have provided governance and technical expertise to help inform the governance structure and methodologies needed to realise this objective.
Impact The insights from this have been distilled into a 'Blueprint' technical report.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Centre for Population Health Sciences Stanford University 
Organisation Stanford University
Department Center for Population Health Sciences
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have sent staff to the Centre (e.g. Dr Liam Hill spent three months in the Center learning new data analysis techniques), and we have made data available.
Collaborator Contribution The Center have sent staff across to the UK to share their learning (e.g. Dr Isabella Chu; Professor David Rehkopf; Dr Lesley Park).
Impact Armstrong Carter E, Trejo S, Hill L, Crossley K, Mason D, Domingue B. 2020. The Earliest Origins of Genetic Nurture: Prenatal Environment Mediates the Association Between Maternal Genetics and Child Development. Psychological Science Multi-disciplinary: Geneticists, data scientists, educationalists and psychologists
Start Year 2019
 
Description Collaboration between five large population based cohort studies 
Organisation East London Genes and Health
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have agreed to collaborate on a project that links our databases (ALSPAC and BiB - linked via this award) with other large population based cohorts in order to inform prediction and prevention strategies for children at genetic risk.
Collaborator Contribution Cardiff University are leading on the cross-cohort collaboration with the other partners providing access to their databases (thereby enabling investigation of the relationship between genetic risk factors and later life outcomes).
Impact We have submitted a grant to the MRC under the multimorbidity call.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Collaboration between five large population based cohort studies 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC)
Department MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have agreed to collaborate on a project that links our databases (ALSPAC and BiB - linked via this award) with other large population based cohorts in order to inform prediction and prevention strategies for children at genetic risk.
Collaborator Contribution Cardiff University are leading on the cross-cohort collaboration with the other partners providing access to their databases (thereby enabling investigation of the relationship between genetic risk factors and later life outcomes).
Impact We have submitted a grant to the MRC under the multimorbidity call.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Collaboration between five large population based cohort studies 
Organisation UK Biobank
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We have agreed to collaborate on a project that links our databases (ALSPAC and BiB - linked via this award) with other large population based cohorts in order to inform prediction and prevention strategies for children at genetic risk.
Collaborator Contribution Cardiff University are leading on the cross-cohort collaboration with the other partners providing access to their databases (thereby enabling investigation of the relationship between genetic risk factors and later life outcomes).
Impact We have submitted a grant to the MRC under the multimorbidity call.
Start Year 2020
 
Description Developing statistical and qualitative methods to examine agreement between GP records and cohort study data in assessment of depression and generalised mood disorders. 
Organisation Bradford Institute for Health Research (BIHR)
Department Born in Bradford
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Analysis of agreement between measures of maternal mood in ALSPAC data and linked GP data
Collaborator Contribution Qualitative research on influences of recording of maternal mood disorder in patient records
Impact No outputs yet
Start Year 2019
 
Description Egton Medical Informatics Systems (EMIS) - Development of a harmonised standard and extraction tool for primary care data into longitudinal studies. 
Organisation EMIS Group
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Private 
PI Contribution ALSPAC with Born In Bradford and UK Biobank have established a harmonised standard for primary care data extracts optimised for longitudinal studies. EMIS Ltd are working to develop this into a clinical software grade software standard and to operationalise it in the EMIS primary care system platform (>50% market share within English GP practices).
Collaborator Contribution EMIS are bringing their considerable experience of managing primary care records and developing software extraction processes and data transformations. This experience will bring technical and data quality insights to the proposed standard. EMIS will also facilitate the collection of GP assents for data collection and extraction by longitudinal studies.
Impact The extraction software standard and mechanism are currently in development.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Investigating five large population-based cohort studies to understand for the precursors of multimorbidity risk. A Wellcome Trust Consolidator Grant proposal 
Organisation Bradford Institute for Health Research (BIHR)
Department Born in Bradford
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We will study the development of young people with elevated risk of multimorbidity (MM) in an unprecedented resource of five large longitudinal cohorts, including three multigenerational child cohorts: Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) Born in Bradford Study (BiB) Integrative Psychiatric Research (iPSYCH) Study and two adult cohorts: Genes & Health (G&H) UK BioBank (UKBB) Our team will provide data from two child cohorts (ALSPAC and BiB) enhance with relevant outcome data from administrative sources through our Pathfinder award
Collaborator Contribution The partnership and the cohort resources it encompasses is described above Combined these comprise ~680,296 individuals including ~104,351 young people and ~575,945 adults (of whom ~25,945 are parents of the young people). All phenotypic data have been collected and all participants have been genotyped on compatible microarray platforms. The cohorts include a wealth of data, including electronic records (Table 1) and rich phenotypic and exposure data (e.g. cognition, SEP), obtained through direct assessments and (multi-informant) questionnaires and interviews (Table 2). The ethnic and SEP diversity of our cohorts together with their different developmental stages will allow us to study the patterns and development of MM across populations. We will characterise MM trajectories in our adult cohorts and subsequently evaluate the precursors and early developmental stages of these patterns in the child cohorts, allowing us to study the mechanisms driving MM development. We will identify MM patterns in UKBB and generate hypotheses that can be tested within the other cohorts, taking advantage of differences in non-genetic risk factors between the cohorts- factors measured continuously and longitudinally. Replication of findings across markedly different samples would provide a powerful means of validation11 . We will focus on precursors (e.g., obesity, sedentary lifestyle, neurodevelopmental disorder) to a wide spectrum of health outcomes, including (but not limited to) diabetes, respiratory and cardiovascular disease, cancer, anxiety, depressive and bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Neurodevelopmental conditions will include developmental delay, intellectual disability, ADHD, and Autism. We will study genetic high-risk populations. We will explore how ND-CNV influence MM development, focusing on 54 ND-CNVs we have found to be robustly linked to adverse cognitive, physical and mental health outcomes3;12-14. This will help address the dearth in population-based studies of health outcomes associated with ND-CNV. With an estimated population prevalence of ND-CNV of ~2%12 we will have available close to 14,000 individuals with ND-CNV across our cohorts. PRS for physical, neurodevelopmental and mental health disorders have been or will be calculated using synchronized methods (Table 1). CNVs have already been called for all participants in iPSYCH and UKBB and all young people in ALSPAC. We will call the CNVs for all participants in BiB (young people and parents), G&H and ALSPAC parents, benefitting from the expertise and pipeline established at Cardiff University with a MRC Mental Health Data Pathfinder grant (Co-PI Walters). We will investigate propagation of MM profiles in related parents (where data available). This would be exploratory and confirmatory but can provide compelling mechanistic insights. Importantly, we will directly evaluate the extent to which our findings can be translated to the general population, providing important insights into the generalisability and wider implications of our findings. Work Streams Van den Bree and Walters will lead the Research Collaborative (Co-PIs). Our programme will be structured around six closely interlinked Work Streams (Figure 1). WS1: Physical health disorder (van Heel, Finer & Barroso, Macleod, Timpson) WS2: Neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorder (van den Bree, Owen & Ingason, Kirov, Walters) WS3: Role of genetic factors on MM development - CNV calling, PRS calculation, cross-cohort quality control and synchronisation (Walters & Kirov, Barroso, Ingason, Finer, Owen, Timpson, van Heel, Werge). WS4: Role of non-genetic factors on MM development (Timpson, Macleod & Mon-Williams, van den Bree) WS5: Analysis and database - Cohort-specific analysis and cross-cohort harmonisation, legacy database preparation (Macleod, Holmans & Ingason, Northstone) WS6: Clinical and society implications: developmental of MM map, outreach (Owen & ALL). Aspects that require further development during a Consolidator grant The grant will allow us to develop our teams and refine our research strategy. A number of us have worked together previously but we will use the six months to identify how we can grow the network. We will develop our cross-cohort data catalogue, and refine our strategies for CNV calling and PRS calculation. We will agree on data analysis strategies and the processes we will follow for legacy database development The grant will allow us to develop our teams and refine our research strategy. A number of us have worked together previously but we will use the six months to identify how we can grow the network. We will develop our cross-cohort data catalogue, and refine our strategies for CNV calling and PRS calculation. We will agree on data analysis strategies and the processes we will follow for legacy database development (see section 3.
Impact We are awaiting the outcome of this grant proposal
Start Year 2019
 
Description Investigating five large population-based cohort studies to understand for the precursors of multimorbidity risk. A Wellcome Trust Consolidator Grant proposal 
Organisation Cardiff University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We will study the development of young people with elevated risk of multimorbidity (MM) in an unprecedented resource of five large longitudinal cohorts, including three multigenerational child cohorts: Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) Born in Bradford Study (BiB) Integrative Psychiatric Research (iPSYCH) Study and two adult cohorts: Genes & Health (G&H) UK BioBank (UKBB) Our team will provide data from two child cohorts (ALSPAC and BiB) enhance with relevant outcome data from administrative sources through our Pathfinder award
Collaborator Contribution The partnership and the cohort resources it encompasses is described above Combined these comprise ~680,296 individuals including ~104,351 young people and ~575,945 adults (of whom ~25,945 are parents of the young people). All phenotypic data have been collected and all participants have been genotyped on compatible microarray platforms. The cohorts include a wealth of data, including electronic records (Table 1) and rich phenotypic and exposure data (e.g. cognition, SEP), obtained through direct assessments and (multi-informant) questionnaires and interviews (Table 2). The ethnic and SEP diversity of our cohorts together with their different developmental stages will allow us to study the patterns and development of MM across populations. We will characterise MM trajectories in our adult cohorts and subsequently evaluate the precursors and early developmental stages of these patterns in the child cohorts, allowing us to study the mechanisms driving MM development. We will identify MM patterns in UKBB and generate hypotheses that can be tested within the other cohorts, taking advantage of differences in non-genetic risk factors between the cohorts- factors measured continuously and longitudinally. Replication of findings across markedly different samples would provide a powerful means of validation11 . We will focus on precursors (e.g., obesity, sedentary lifestyle, neurodevelopmental disorder) to a wide spectrum of health outcomes, including (but not limited to) diabetes, respiratory and cardiovascular disease, cancer, anxiety, depressive and bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Neurodevelopmental conditions will include developmental delay, intellectual disability, ADHD, and Autism. We will study genetic high-risk populations. We will explore how ND-CNV influence MM development, focusing on 54 ND-CNVs we have found to be robustly linked to adverse cognitive, physical and mental health outcomes3;12-14. This will help address the dearth in population-based studies of health outcomes associated with ND-CNV. With an estimated population prevalence of ND-CNV of ~2%12 we will have available close to 14,000 individuals with ND-CNV across our cohorts. PRS for physical, neurodevelopmental and mental health disorders have been or will be calculated using synchronized methods (Table 1). CNVs have already been called for all participants in iPSYCH and UKBB and all young people in ALSPAC. We will call the CNVs for all participants in BiB (young people and parents), G&H and ALSPAC parents, benefitting from the expertise and pipeline established at Cardiff University with a MRC Mental Health Data Pathfinder grant (Co-PI Walters). We will investigate propagation of MM profiles in related parents (where data available). This would be exploratory and confirmatory but can provide compelling mechanistic insights. Importantly, we will directly evaluate the extent to which our findings can be translated to the general population, providing important insights into the generalisability and wider implications of our findings. Work Streams Van den Bree and Walters will lead the Research Collaborative (Co-PIs). Our programme will be structured around six closely interlinked Work Streams (Figure 1). WS1: Physical health disorder (van Heel, Finer & Barroso, Macleod, Timpson) WS2: Neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorder (van den Bree, Owen & Ingason, Kirov, Walters) WS3: Role of genetic factors on MM development - CNV calling, PRS calculation, cross-cohort quality control and synchronisation (Walters & Kirov, Barroso, Ingason, Finer, Owen, Timpson, van Heel, Werge). WS4: Role of non-genetic factors on MM development (Timpson, Macleod & Mon-Williams, van den Bree) WS5: Analysis and database - Cohort-specific analysis and cross-cohort harmonisation, legacy database preparation (Macleod, Holmans & Ingason, Northstone) WS6: Clinical and society implications: developmental of MM map, outreach (Owen & ALL). Aspects that require further development during a Consolidator grant The grant will allow us to develop our teams and refine our research strategy. A number of us have worked together previously but we will use the six months to identify how we can grow the network. We will develop our cross-cohort data catalogue, and refine our strategies for CNV calling and PRS calculation. We will agree on data analysis strategies and the processes we will follow for legacy database development The grant will allow us to develop our teams and refine our research strategy. A number of us have worked together previously but we will use the six months to identify how we can grow the network. We will develop our cross-cohort data catalogue, and refine our strategies for CNV calling and PRS calculation. We will agree on data analysis strategies and the processes we will follow for legacy database development (see section 3.
Impact We are awaiting the outcome of this grant proposal
Start Year 2019
 
Description Investigating five large population-based cohort studies to understand for the precursors of multimorbidity risk. A Wellcome Trust Consolidator Grant proposal 
Organisation Queen Mary University of London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We will study the development of young people with elevated risk of multimorbidity (MM) in an unprecedented resource of five large longitudinal cohorts, including three multigenerational child cohorts: Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) Born in Bradford Study (BiB) Integrative Psychiatric Research (iPSYCH) Study and two adult cohorts: Genes & Health (G&H) UK BioBank (UKBB) Our team will provide data from two child cohorts (ALSPAC and BiB) enhance with relevant outcome data from administrative sources through our Pathfinder award
Collaborator Contribution The partnership and the cohort resources it encompasses is described above Combined these comprise ~680,296 individuals including ~104,351 young people and ~575,945 adults (of whom ~25,945 are parents of the young people). All phenotypic data have been collected and all participants have been genotyped on compatible microarray platforms. The cohorts include a wealth of data, including electronic records (Table 1) and rich phenotypic and exposure data (e.g. cognition, SEP), obtained through direct assessments and (multi-informant) questionnaires and interviews (Table 2). The ethnic and SEP diversity of our cohorts together with their different developmental stages will allow us to study the patterns and development of MM across populations. We will characterise MM trajectories in our adult cohorts and subsequently evaluate the precursors and early developmental stages of these patterns in the child cohorts, allowing us to study the mechanisms driving MM development. We will identify MM patterns in UKBB and generate hypotheses that can be tested within the other cohorts, taking advantage of differences in non-genetic risk factors between the cohorts- factors measured continuously and longitudinally. Replication of findings across markedly different samples would provide a powerful means of validation11 . We will focus on precursors (e.g., obesity, sedentary lifestyle, neurodevelopmental disorder) to a wide spectrum of health outcomes, including (but not limited to) diabetes, respiratory and cardiovascular disease, cancer, anxiety, depressive and bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Neurodevelopmental conditions will include developmental delay, intellectual disability, ADHD, and Autism. We will study genetic high-risk populations. We will explore how ND-CNV influence MM development, focusing on 54 ND-CNVs we have found to be robustly linked to adverse cognitive, physical and mental health outcomes3;12-14. This will help address the dearth in population-based studies of health outcomes associated with ND-CNV. With an estimated population prevalence of ND-CNV of ~2%12 we will have available close to 14,000 individuals with ND-CNV across our cohorts. PRS for physical, neurodevelopmental and mental health disorders have been or will be calculated using synchronized methods (Table 1). CNVs have already been called for all participants in iPSYCH and UKBB and all young people in ALSPAC. We will call the CNVs for all participants in BiB (young people and parents), G&H and ALSPAC parents, benefitting from the expertise and pipeline established at Cardiff University with a MRC Mental Health Data Pathfinder grant (Co-PI Walters). We will investigate propagation of MM profiles in related parents (where data available). This would be exploratory and confirmatory but can provide compelling mechanistic insights. Importantly, we will directly evaluate the extent to which our findings can be translated to the general population, providing important insights into the generalisability and wider implications of our findings. Work Streams Van den Bree and Walters will lead the Research Collaborative (Co-PIs). Our programme will be structured around six closely interlinked Work Streams (Figure 1). WS1: Physical health disorder (van Heel, Finer & Barroso, Macleod, Timpson) WS2: Neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorder (van den Bree, Owen & Ingason, Kirov, Walters) WS3: Role of genetic factors on MM development - CNV calling, PRS calculation, cross-cohort quality control and synchronisation (Walters & Kirov, Barroso, Ingason, Finer, Owen, Timpson, van Heel, Werge). WS4: Role of non-genetic factors on MM development (Timpson, Macleod & Mon-Williams, van den Bree) WS5: Analysis and database - Cohort-specific analysis and cross-cohort harmonisation, legacy database preparation (Macleod, Holmans & Ingason, Northstone) WS6: Clinical and society implications: developmental of MM map, outreach (Owen & ALL). Aspects that require further development during a Consolidator grant The grant will allow us to develop our teams and refine our research strategy. A number of us have worked together previously but we will use the six months to identify how we can grow the network. We will develop our cross-cohort data catalogue, and refine our strategies for CNV calling and PRS calculation. We will agree on data analysis strategies and the processes we will follow for legacy database development The grant will allow us to develop our teams and refine our research strategy. A number of us have worked together previously but we will use the six months to identify how we can grow the network. We will develop our cross-cohort data catalogue, and refine our strategies for CNV calling and PRS calculation. We will agree on data analysis strategies and the processes we will follow for legacy database development (see section 3.
Impact We are awaiting the outcome of this grant proposal
Start Year 2019
 
Description Investigating five large population-based cohort studies to understand for the precursors of multimorbidity risk. A Wellcome Trust Consolidator Grant proposal 
Organisation University of Bristol
Department Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We will study the development of young people with elevated risk of multimorbidity (MM) in an unprecedented resource of five large longitudinal cohorts, including three multigenerational child cohorts: Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) Born in Bradford Study (BiB) Integrative Psychiatric Research (iPSYCH) Study and two adult cohorts: Genes & Health (G&H) UK BioBank (UKBB) Our team will provide data from two child cohorts (ALSPAC and BiB) enhance with relevant outcome data from administrative sources through our Pathfinder award
Collaborator Contribution The partnership and the cohort resources it encompasses is described above Combined these comprise ~680,296 individuals including ~104,351 young people and ~575,945 adults (of whom ~25,945 are parents of the young people). All phenotypic data have been collected and all participants have been genotyped on compatible microarray platforms. The cohorts include a wealth of data, including electronic records (Table 1) and rich phenotypic and exposure data (e.g. cognition, SEP), obtained through direct assessments and (multi-informant) questionnaires and interviews (Table 2). The ethnic and SEP diversity of our cohorts together with their different developmental stages will allow us to study the patterns and development of MM across populations. We will characterise MM trajectories in our adult cohorts and subsequently evaluate the precursors and early developmental stages of these patterns in the child cohorts, allowing us to study the mechanisms driving MM development. We will identify MM patterns in UKBB and generate hypotheses that can be tested within the other cohorts, taking advantage of differences in non-genetic risk factors between the cohorts- factors measured continuously and longitudinally. Replication of findings across markedly different samples would provide a powerful means of validation11 . We will focus on precursors (e.g., obesity, sedentary lifestyle, neurodevelopmental disorder) to a wide spectrum of health outcomes, including (but not limited to) diabetes, respiratory and cardiovascular disease, cancer, anxiety, depressive and bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Neurodevelopmental conditions will include developmental delay, intellectual disability, ADHD, and Autism. We will study genetic high-risk populations. We will explore how ND-CNV influence MM development, focusing on 54 ND-CNVs we have found to be robustly linked to adverse cognitive, physical and mental health outcomes3;12-14. This will help address the dearth in population-based studies of health outcomes associated with ND-CNV. With an estimated population prevalence of ND-CNV of ~2%12 we will have available close to 14,000 individuals with ND-CNV across our cohorts. PRS for physical, neurodevelopmental and mental health disorders have been or will be calculated using synchronized methods (Table 1). CNVs have already been called for all participants in iPSYCH and UKBB and all young people in ALSPAC. We will call the CNVs for all participants in BiB (young people and parents), G&H and ALSPAC parents, benefitting from the expertise and pipeline established at Cardiff University with a MRC Mental Health Data Pathfinder grant (Co-PI Walters). We will investigate propagation of MM profiles in related parents (where data available). This would be exploratory and confirmatory but can provide compelling mechanistic insights. Importantly, we will directly evaluate the extent to which our findings can be translated to the general population, providing important insights into the generalisability and wider implications of our findings. Work Streams Van den Bree and Walters will lead the Research Collaborative (Co-PIs). Our programme will be structured around six closely interlinked Work Streams (Figure 1). WS1: Physical health disorder (van Heel, Finer & Barroso, Macleod, Timpson) WS2: Neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorder (van den Bree, Owen & Ingason, Kirov, Walters) WS3: Role of genetic factors on MM development - CNV calling, PRS calculation, cross-cohort quality control and synchronisation (Walters & Kirov, Barroso, Ingason, Finer, Owen, Timpson, van Heel, Werge). WS4: Role of non-genetic factors on MM development (Timpson, Macleod & Mon-Williams, van den Bree) WS5: Analysis and database - Cohort-specific analysis and cross-cohort harmonisation, legacy database preparation (Macleod, Holmans & Ingason, Northstone) WS6: Clinical and society implications: developmental of MM map, outreach (Owen & ALL). Aspects that require further development during a Consolidator grant The grant will allow us to develop our teams and refine our research strategy. A number of us have worked together previously but we will use the six months to identify how we can grow the network. We will develop our cross-cohort data catalogue, and refine our strategies for CNV calling and PRS calculation. We will agree on data analysis strategies and the processes we will follow for legacy database development The grant will allow us to develop our teams and refine our research strategy. A number of us have worked together previously but we will use the six months to identify how we can grow the network. We will develop our cross-cohort data catalogue, and refine our strategies for CNV calling and PRS calculation. We will agree on data analysis strategies and the processes we will follow for legacy database development (see section 3.
Impact We are awaiting the outcome of this grant proposal
Start Year 2019
 
Description Investigating five large population-based cohort studies to understand for the precursors of multimorbidity risk. A Wellcome Trust Consolidator Grant proposal 
Organisation University of Copenhagen
Country Denmark 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We will study the development of young people with elevated risk of multimorbidity (MM) in an unprecedented resource of five large longitudinal cohorts, including three multigenerational child cohorts: Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) Born in Bradford Study (BiB) Integrative Psychiatric Research (iPSYCH) Study and two adult cohorts: Genes & Health (G&H) UK BioBank (UKBB) Our team will provide data from two child cohorts (ALSPAC and BiB) enhance with relevant outcome data from administrative sources through our Pathfinder award
Collaborator Contribution The partnership and the cohort resources it encompasses is described above Combined these comprise ~680,296 individuals including ~104,351 young people and ~575,945 adults (of whom ~25,945 are parents of the young people). All phenotypic data have been collected and all participants have been genotyped on compatible microarray platforms. The cohorts include a wealth of data, including electronic records (Table 1) and rich phenotypic and exposure data (e.g. cognition, SEP), obtained through direct assessments and (multi-informant) questionnaires and interviews (Table 2). The ethnic and SEP diversity of our cohorts together with their different developmental stages will allow us to study the patterns and development of MM across populations. We will characterise MM trajectories in our adult cohorts and subsequently evaluate the precursors and early developmental stages of these patterns in the child cohorts, allowing us to study the mechanisms driving MM development. We will identify MM patterns in UKBB and generate hypotheses that can be tested within the other cohorts, taking advantage of differences in non-genetic risk factors between the cohorts- factors measured continuously and longitudinally. Replication of findings across markedly different samples would provide a powerful means of validation11 . We will focus on precursors (e.g., obesity, sedentary lifestyle, neurodevelopmental disorder) to a wide spectrum of health outcomes, including (but not limited to) diabetes, respiratory and cardiovascular disease, cancer, anxiety, depressive and bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Neurodevelopmental conditions will include developmental delay, intellectual disability, ADHD, and Autism. We will study genetic high-risk populations. We will explore how ND-CNV influence MM development, focusing on 54 ND-CNVs we have found to be robustly linked to adverse cognitive, physical and mental health outcomes3;12-14. This will help address the dearth in population-based studies of health outcomes associated with ND-CNV. With an estimated population prevalence of ND-CNV of ~2%12 we will have available close to 14,000 individuals with ND-CNV across our cohorts. PRS for physical, neurodevelopmental and mental health disorders have been or will be calculated using synchronized methods (Table 1). CNVs have already been called for all participants in iPSYCH and UKBB and all young people in ALSPAC. We will call the CNVs for all participants in BiB (young people and parents), G&H and ALSPAC parents, benefitting from the expertise and pipeline established at Cardiff University with a MRC Mental Health Data Pathfinder grant (Co-PI Walters). We will investigate propagation of MM profiles in related parents (where data available). This would be exploratory and confirmatory but can provide compelling mechanistic insights. Importantly, we will directly evaluate the extent to which our findings can be translated to the general population, providing important insights into the generalisability and wider implications of our findings. Work Streams Van den Bree and Walters will lead the Research Collaborative (Co-PIs). Our programme will be structured around six closely interlinked Work Streams (Figure 1). WS1: Physical health disorder (van Heel, Finer & Barroso, Macleod, Timpson) WS2: Neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorder (van den Bree, Owen & Ingason, Kirov, Walters) WS3: Role of genetic factors on MM development - CNV calling, PRS calculation, cross-cohort quality control and synchronisation (Walters & Kirov, Barroso, Ingason, Finer, Owen, Timpson, van Heel, Werge). WS4: Role of non-genetic factors on MM development (Timpson, Macleod & Mon-Williams, van den Bree) WS5: Analysis and database - Cohort-specific analysis and cross-cohort harmonisation, legacy database preparation (Macleod, Holmans & Ingason, Northstone) WS6: Clinical and society implications: developmental of MM map, outreach (Owen & ALL). Aspects that require further development during a Consolidator grant The grant will allow us to develop our teams and refine our research strategy. A number of us have worked together previously but we will use the six months to identify how we can grow the network. We will develop our cross-cohort data catalogue, and refine our strategies for CNV calling and PRS calculation. We will agree on data analysis strategies and the processes we will follow for legacy database development The grant will allow us to develop our teams and refine our research strategy. A number of us have worked together previously but we will use the six months to identify how we can grow the network. We will develop our cross-cohort data catalogue, and refine our strategies for CNV calling and PRS calculation. We will agree on data analysis strategies and the processes we will follow for legacy database development (see section 3.
Impact We are awaiting the outcome of this grant proposal
Start Year 2019
 
Description Investigating five large population-based cohort studies to understand for the precursors of multimorbidity risk. A Wellcome Trust Consolidator Grant proposal 
Organisation University of Exeter
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We will study the development of young people with elevated risk of multimorbidity (MM) in an unprecedented resource of five large longitudinal cohorts, including three multigenerational child cohorts: Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) Born in Bradford Study (BiB) Integrative Psychiatric Research (iPSYCH) Study and two adult cohorts: Genes & Health (G&H) UK BioBank (UKBB) Our team will provide data from two child cohorts (ALSPAC and BiB) enhance with relevant outcome data from administrative sources through our Pathfinder award
Collaborator Contribution The partnership and the cohort resources it encompasses is described above Combined these comprise ~680,296 individuals including ~104,351 young people and ~575,945 adults (of whom ~25,945 are parents of the young people). All phenotypic data have been collected and all participants have been genotyped on compatible microarray platforms. The cohorts include a wealth of data, including electronic records (Table 1) and rich phenotypic and exposure data (e.g. cognition, SEP), obtained through direct assessments and (multi-informant) questionnaires and interviews (Table 2). The ethnic and SEP diversity of our cohorts together with their different developmental stages will allow us to study the patterns and development of MM across populations. We will characterise MM trajectories in our adult cohorts and subsequently evaluate the precursors and early developmental stages of these patterns in the child cohorts, allowing us to study the mechanisms driving MM development. We will identify MM patterns in UKBB and generate hypotheses that can be tested within the other cohorts, taking advantage of differences in non-genetic risk factors between the cohorts- factors measured continuously and longitudinally. Replication of findings across markedly different samples would provide a powerful means of validation11 . We will focus on precursors (e.g., obesity, sedentary lifestyle, neurodevelopmental disorder) to a wide spectrum of health outcomes, including (but not limited to) diabetes, respiratory and cardiovascular disease, cancer, anxiety, depressive and bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Neurodevelopmental conditions will include developmental delay, intellectual disability, ADHD, and Autism. We will study genetic high-risk populations. We will explore how ND-CNV influence MM development, focusing on 54 ND-CNVs we have found to be robustly linked to adverse cognitive, physical and mental health outcomes3;12-14. This will help address the dearth in population-based studies of health outcomes associated with ND-CNV. With an estimated population prevalence of ND-CNV of ~2%12 we will have available close to 14,000 individuals with ND-CNV across our cohorts. PRS for physical, neurodevelopmental and mental health disorders have been or will be calculated using synchronized methods (Table 1). CNVs have already been called for all participants in iPSYCH and UKBB and all young people in ALSPAC. We will call the CNVs for all participants in BiB (young people and parents), G&H and ALSPAC parents, benefitting from the expertise and pipeline established at Cardiff University with a MRC Mental Health Data Pathfinder grant (Co-PI Walters). We will investigate propagation of MM profiles in related parents (where data available). This would be exploratory and confirmatory but can provide compelling mechanistic insights. Importantly, we will directly evaluate the extent to which our findings can be translated to the general population, providing important insights into the generalisability and wider implications of our findings. Work Streams Van den Bree and Walters will lead the Research Collaborative (Co-PIs). Our programme will be structured around six closely interlinked Work Streams (Figure 1). WS1: Physical health disorder (van Heel, Finer & Barroso, Macleod, Timpson) WS2: Neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorder (van den Bree, Owen & Ingason, Kirov, Walters) WS3: Role of genetic factors on MM development - CNV calling, PRS calculation, cross-cohort quality control and synchronisation (Walters & Kirov, Barroso, Ingason, Finer, Owen, Timpson, van Heel, Werge). WS4: Role of non-genetic factors on MM development (Timpson, Macleod & Mon-Williams, van den Bree) WS5: Analysis and database - Cohort-specific analysis and cross-cohort harmonisation, legacy database preparation (Macleod, Holmans & Ingason, Northstone) WS6: Clinical and society implications: developmental of MM map, outreach (Owen & ALL). Aspects that require further development during a Consolidator grant The grant will allow us to develop our teams and refine our research strategy. A number of us have worked together previously but we will use the six months to identify how we can grow the network. We will develop our cross-cohort data catalogue, and refine our strategies for CNV calling and PRS calculation. We will agree on data analysis strategies and the processes we will follow for legacy database development The grant will allow us to develop our teams and refine our research strategy. A number of us have worked together previously but we will use the six months to identify how we can grow the network. We will develop our cross-cohort data catalogue, and refine our strategies for CNV calling and PRS calculation. We will agree on data analysis strategies and the processes we will follow for legacy database development (see section 3.
Impact We are awaiting the outcome of this grant proposal
Start Year 2019
 
Description Partnership with UC Berkeley 
Organisation University of California, Berkeley
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Professor Mon-Williams held a meeting with Chancellor Christ to agree to a formal partnership between UC Berkeley and the Wolfson Centres of Applied Research (Directed by Professor John Wright - PI of BIB and co-applicant on this grant). The meeting was attended by Sir Alan Langlands (VC University of Leeds) and Professor Lisa Roberts (DVC University of Leeds).
Collaborator Contribution UC Berkeley have created a staff and student exchange (based around the work undertaken in Bradford on data linkage and using data science to improve life outcomes for children).
Impact A University Academic Fellow and PhD student from UC Berkeley are now working within the Wolfson Centres in Bradford.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Prediction modelling 
Organisation University College London
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Initiated collaboration to strengthen the science of project and to help identify relevant datasets for validation. Leading a grant application (S.Sullivan PI. D.Kounali co-I)
Collaborator Contribution Sharing expertise and will co-author publications. Co-applicants on grant.
Impact None as yet. Still too early
Start Year 2019
 
Description Prediction modelling 
Organisation University of Cambridge
Department Cambridge Neuroscience
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Initiated collaboration to strengthen the science of project and to help identify relevant datasets for validation.
Collaborator Contribution Sharing expertise and will co-author publications.
Impact None as yet. Still too early
Start Year 2019
 
Description Prediction modelling - RCSI 
Organisation Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
Country Ireland 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Initiated collaboration to strengthen the science of project. Co-investigator on grant application
Collaborator Contribution Sharing expertise and will co-author publications. Leading grant application
Impact None yet, too early
Start Year 2018
 
Description Prediction modelling - TRC 
Organisation National Institute for Health Research
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Initiated collaboration to help identify relevant datasets for validation.
Collaborator Contribution Sharing knowledge of existing datasets
Impact None yet, too early
Start Year 2019
 
Description The Reading Model (Thames Valley Police & Public Health England Data Intelligence Network) 
Organisation Public Health England
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Thames Valley Police (Superintendent Stan Gilmour: Head of Violence Reduction, Thames Valley Police) and Public Health England (Dr Éamonn O'Moore: National lead health and justice team, PHE) have established a national data intelligence network called 'The Reading Model'. ALSPAC have contributed in order to provide research and data resource insights; to promote the ALSPAC database as a resource for studying criminal justice outcomes; and the interaction between criminality and mental health; and to further our research program to collect criminal justice self-report and linked records.
Collaborator Contribution Attendance and contributions to workshops and working groups.
Impact 1) Thames Valley Police and PHE supported ALSPAC led application to ESRC for funding to support criminal justice (particularly violent crime) research programme (under review) 2) Thames Valley Police and PHE supported ALSPAC work to engage Avon & Somerset Constabulary to develop a data sharing agreement for linking cohort data to their police outcomes data (project underway) 3) We have developed a working relationship with the Edinburgh Study of Youth Transition and Crime considering how to develop prospectively harmonised data collection and cross-cohort analysis.
Start Year 2018
 
Description The Reading Model (Thames Valley Police & Public Health England Data Intelligence Network) 
Organisation Thames Valley Police
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Thames Valley Police (Superintendent Stan Gilmour: Head of Violence Reduction, Thames Valley Police) and Public Health England (Dr Éamonn O'Moore: National lead health and justice team, PHE) have established a national data intelligence network called 'The Reading Model'. ALSPAC have contributed in order to provide research and data resource insights; to promote the ALSPAC database as a resource for studying criminal justice outcomes; and the interaction between criminality and mental health; and to further our research program to collect criminal justice self-report and linked records.
Collaborator Contribution Attendance and contributions to workshops and working groups.
Impact 1) Thames Valley Police and PHE supported ALSPAC led application to ESRC for funding to support criminal justice (particularly violent crime) research programme (under review) 2) Thames Valley Police and PHE supported ALSPAC work to engage Avon & Somerset Constabulary to develop a data sharing agreement for linking cohort data to their police outcomes data (project underway) 3) We have developed a working relationship with the Edinburgh Study of Youth Transition and Crime considering how to develop prospectively harmonised data collection and cross-cohort analysis.
Start Year 2018
 
Description The Reading Model (Thames Valley Police & Public Health England Data Intelligence Network) 
Organisation University of Edinburgh
Department Edinburgh Study of Youth Transitions and Crime
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Thames Valley Police (Superintendent Stan Gilmour: Head of Violence Reduction, Thames Valley Police) and Public Health England (Dr Éamonn O'Moore: National lead health and justice team, PHE) have established a national data intelligence network called 'The Reading Model'. ALSPAC have contributed in order to provide research and data resource insights; to promote the ALSPAC database as a resource for studying criminal justice outcomes; and the interaction between criminality and mental health; and to further our research program to collect criminal justice self-report and linked records.
Collaborator Contribution Attendance and contributions to workshops and working groups.
Impact 1) Thames Valley Police and PHE supported ALSPAC led application to ESRC for funding to support criminal justice (particularly violent crime) research programme (under review) 2) Thames Valley Police and PHE supported ALSPAC work to engage Avon & Somerset Constabulary to develop a data sharing agreement for linking cohort data to their police outcomes data (project underway) 3) We have developed a working relationship with the Edinburgh Study of Youth Transition and Crime considering how to develop prospectively harmonised data collection and cross-cohort analysis.
Start Year 2018
 
Title A longitudinal extraction framework and standard for electronic primary care records 
Description Using CLOSER cohort consortium innovation funding Andy Boyd led a group of longitudinal studies (including Born in Bradford and UK Biobank) to develop a standardised framework for longitudinal extracts of electronic primary care records (being prepared for publication). Through 'Cohorts as Platforms for Mental Health research (CaP:MH) ALSPAC and Born in Bradford are working with EMIS Ltd (the English market leading software provider for General Practices') to use this framework to develop and extraction standard (which will be published as open source in the public domain). This standard will then be realised by EMIS Ltd as a proprietary software product (owned by EMIS Ltd) to link and extract longitudinal copies of participants records in an efficient, accurate, secure and transparent manner. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2018 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact It is intended that this product will provide an efficient and consistent extraction pipeline which will generate consistent outputs which will can be harmonised and used in cross-cohort studies. 
 
Title Social media linkage software 
Description This project funded the development of easy to use open source software to facilitate the secure linkage of social media data in UK birth cohorts. 
Type Of Technology Software 
Year Produced 2019 
Open Source License? Yes  
Impact This software will facilitate the secure linkage of social media data in UK birth cohorts, providing high-resolution time series data on participants' real-life social interactions that will be processed to provide anonymised datasets available to researchers. 
 
Description An Introduction to the ALSPAC resource: a multi-generation study spanning a quarter of a century (Invited Presentation) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Andy Boyd was invited to visit the CHILD birth cohort study (Manitoba, Canada) and present about the ALSPAC cohort in order to raise awareness of the study and foster cross-cohort links.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://childstudy.ca
 
Description Born in Bradford Science Festival 2019 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact We held a Festival to celebrate the achievements of Born in Bradford (Sir Jeremy Farrar, Director of Wellcome, was our keynote speaker). We had over 500 practitioners and participants coming together to discuss who we could create whole system change to improve mental health for children across the Region and then use this learning to drive National change.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://borninbradford.nhs.uk/news-events/events/bib-scientific-festival/
 
Description Bradford Science Festival 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Regional
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact We provided a number of stalls (with interactive experiences) and talks aimed at helping the public understand the importance of longitudinal research. We highlighted findings from ALSPAC and Born in Bradford and we promoted healthy living.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018,2019
URL https://www.scienceandmediamuseum.org.uk/what-was-on/bradford-science-festival-2019
 
Description Curiosity toolkit for Bristol's We The Curious science centre. 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Public/other audiences
Results and Impact This award funded the development of a public engagement activity that will form part of the programme of We The Curious over an initial period of three years. The activity has been developed in partnership with the Alan Turing Institute and Microsoft Research and explores the question "can machines understand emotion?". It introduces visitors to how artificial intelligence can inform our understanding of mental health.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019,2020
 
Description Designing a framework for extraction Primary Care electronic records for longitudinal population studies 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact With support from the CLOSER cohort consortium (Work Package 14) we have established an expert working group of data managers from longitudinal population studies. The exert working group is designing a framework primary care extraction protocol tuned to the needs of the longitudinal community. The expert group will use this framework to engage industry (GP software providers) and the NHS in order to realise an implemented software product.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://www.closer.ac.uk/research-fund-2/data-linkage/framework-linking-sharing-social-media-data-hi...
 
Description Discussion of psychosis prediction work and data linkage at Mental Health Translational Research Collaboration meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Discussion of psychosis prediction work, identifying areas of similar activity and potential collaborations across other UK academic institutions
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019,2020
 
Description Enhancing Environmental data Resources in Cohort Studies: ALSPAC exemplar (ERICA) (ISIS/ISEE Conference, Canada) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Andy Boyd gave a presentation to an international conference of environmental epidemiologists to promote the ALSPAC study as a resource for linking geospatial data with health data for the investigation of physical health, mental health and wellbeing outcomes.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://na.eventscloud.com/ehome/294696/638645/
 
Description Enhancing Environmental data Resources in Cohort Studies: ALSPAC exemplar (ERICA). (IPDLN Confererence, Canada) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Andy Boyd gave a presentation to an international conference of Data Scientists (International Population Data Linkage Network) to promote the ALSPAC study as a resource for linking geospatial data with health data for the investigation of physical health, mental health and wellbeing outcomes.

Boyd A. Enhancing Environmental data Resources in Cohort Studies: ALSPAC exemplar (ERICA). International Journal of Population Data Science. 2018 Sep 11;3(4).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://ijpds.org/article/view/1040
 
Description Enhancing Environmental data Resources in Cohort Studies: ALSPAC exemplar (ERICA). (Invited Presentation) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Andy Boyd was invited to give a talk to the Manitoba Health Data Centre - a regional whole population research databank - to give insights to record linkage, participant acceptability and the use of Secure Research Environments to support research in geospatial epidemiology and the use of sensitive health records relating to Mental Health.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
URL https://umanitoba.ca/faculties/health_sciences/medicine/units/chs/departmental_units/mchp/resources/...
 
Description MRC Pathfinder meeting 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Workshop organised by the MRC to give all Pathfinder projects opportunity to provide updates on their progress, network and discuss potential collaboration
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://mrc.ukri.org/funding/browse/mh-data-pathfinder/mental-health-data-pathfinder/
 
Description MhDEL Ethics and Governance in Data Linkage Workshop 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact This is a MRC MH Pathfinder activity led by University of Oxford. Bristol contributed ALSPAC's experience of using linked health records, and the governance and ethics surrounding this, to support researchers investigating hypotheses relating to Mental Health.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Record linkage in social research for policymaking: evidence, methods and issues arising within longitudinal population studies. 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Andy Boyd chaired a session at the British Academy's "Realising the promise of big data in social research for public policy making." event to inform policy makers about the potential for research using Big Data approaches within longitudinal research. I also took part in the event panel session. This promoted the ALSPAC resource (as an exemplar) and the CLOSER programme. It raised awareness about the potential for linkage informed cohorts, but also the barriers faced.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Record linkage in the ALSPAC / Born in Bradford MRC Mental Health Pathfinder 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Andy Boyd gave a presentation at the UK-CRIS annual conference to raise awareness of the ALSPAC / Born in Bradford cohorts to research users and the NHS community involved in the UK-CRIS programme. To build relationships with UK-CRIS data owners to facilitate ALSPAC's linkage to these data.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description The potential of linking cohort participants to official criminal records: a pilot study using the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) (ADRUK Conference, UK) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Other audiences
Results and Impact Alison Teyhan gave a presentation to the ADRUK conference on the feasibility of linking cohort studies to criminal justice outcomes held in Police administrative databases. Networks were established with the Home Office and criminal justice researchers.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
URL https://ijpds.org/adr2019