Neurodevelopmental disorders in LMIC settings

Lead Research Organisation: Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

Abstract

Many children in low and middle income settings have mental health disorders. A large percentage of these are
neurodevelopmental disorders - disorders where the brain has not grown in the right way. This includes disorders such as general developmental delay, autism, behavioural problems and motor difficulties such as cerebral palsy. We think these are more common in low and middle income settings because there are so many more infections, nutritional deficiencies or other injuries which are more likely to occur in these settings. These can occur in the womb, during the period of birth or
after birth in the first few years of life. At present we do not exactly know how common these disorders are or what causes them because we have no good tools which can definately say which children have a disorder and which do not. Most tools that are used in high income settings are culturally specific and expensive to use and are not always appropriate for workers at community level in low and middle income settings. Furthermore, up until now there have been very few
professionals in many low and middle income settings who can diagnose children with these disorders so that we have been unable to do research on what tools can identify the right children.
In this study we will create the first network of professionals and researchers who are specifically interested in identifying and creating better feasible and valid tools for use in identifying children in the early years with neurodevelopmental disorders. We already have a multicentre study going on with data from a tool created in Malawi which will provide some information on what may work and what doesn't. We will hold two network meetings with researchers and co-investigators
from these three sites as well as from our wider network. - one in the UK and one in Uganda. In the first one we will aim to identify already existing tools, cohorts and databases which have information about children who have been definitively diagnosed with a neurodevelopmental disorder. We will also decide on what we need to analyse the data we already have
and plan that analysis over the coming months. Our second meeting will feed back the results of this analysis and will provide an opportunity to co-write a more definitive collaborative grant to show the diagnostic utility of a tool which can be used to identify children with neurodevelopmental disorders at an early stage across countries.
Our second aim will be to conduct an analysis of data from a developmental tool - the Malawi Developmental Assessment Tool - which is currently being collected in three sites in children in the community with no know difficulties as well as those who have difficulties. This study will be extended through this grant and will enable a definitive diagnosis to be made on at
least 50 additional children in each of three sites in order to enable us to provide more information on the diagnostic utility of the tool across sites. We may be provided with additional databases to utilise during this analysis.
Our third aim will be to conduct a meeting with stakeholders (national networking) to gain information on what types of pathways there are at present for identifying and referring children and what stakeholders in each setting feel would be most helpful and feasible for the future. This will be fed back at our second networking meeting.
This international network, early data analysis and information on feasibility will allow us to move forward with this work and progress to creating a tool which can identify children with neurodevelopmental disorders better in the early years in order to provide better information on the causes, amount and spectrum of disorders in low and middle income settings.

Technical Summary

We estimate that many children in low and middle income (LMIC) settings have neurodevelopmental disorders (NDD) due to a multitude of causes (e.g.infections, nutritional deficiencies, trauma in antenatal, perinatal and postnatal period. At
present we have no definitive data due to the lack of tools which can screen and identify children. Most tools used in high income settings are culturally specific, proprietry and require training. With few specialists in LMIC settings we have been unable to do research to provide the evidence. In this study we will create the first network of professionals and researchers who are specifically interested in identifying and creating better feasible, diagnostically acurate, sensitive and
specific tools for early identification of NDD. An ongoing funded study (CHAIN NDD - Children with Acute Illness Network Neurodevelopmental Substudy) in Uganda, Malawi and Pakistan provides a network of sites, interest and expertise. Aim 1 will be to hold two network meetings (UK and Uganda). Meeting 1 will aim to identify already existing tools, cohorts and
databases with information on children who have been definitively diagnosed with NDD. The group will make a data analysis plan. Meeting 2 will feedback results and provide an opportunity to co-write a collaborative grant to demonstrate diagnostic utility of a tool to identify children with NDD at 0-3 years. Aim 2 will be to conduct a diagnostic utility study using GAMLSS statistics to look at performance of Malawi Developmental Assessment Tool (MDAT) Z-scores collected in 600 CHAIN NDD in children with a definitive diagnosis and those with no diagnosis (as provided by an expert neurodevelopmental paediatrician). This grant will enable definitive diagnosis to be made on at 50 additional children to provide this data. Aim 3 will enable a stakeholders meeting in each site to gain information on feasibility and pathways
presently available for identifying and referring children.

Publications

10 25 50
 
Description STREAM -
Amount £4,078,552 (GBP)
Funding ID S036423/1 
Organisation Medical Research Council (MRC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 08/2019 
End 07/2024
 
Title Creation of an MDAT database with children with or without disabilities 
Description We are working with Keele University to support the analysis of MDAT databases with information about children with disabilities so that we can compare scoring for children with disabilities to those without to understand how items in the tool work better. 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2019 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact None as yet as early days and only just creating the data base. We will in future aim to make this open access for other researchers. 
 
Description Collaboration with INDIGO team members across multiple settings looking at identifying children with disabilities in the community 
Organisation Aga Khan University
Country Pakistan 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have worked to create two collaborative meetings to discuss and plan the way forward in creating tools to identify children with disabilities in communities in low resource settings. We have conducted one meeting in Liverpool to create a plan of action to create a first version of a tool which is now presently being piloted in three countries. We have discussed plans for related qualitative and implementation science work to enable us to consider the best ways to embed a tool in the future. We have since had a second meeting in Uganda with participants from Ministry of Health and Education as well as all other participants in the group. This included training on the HINE (Hammersmith Infant Neurological Exam) and RITA-T (ASD detection tool) and further discussion about the way forward with papers and presentations for the future. We are planning to write up some papers and aim to submit some larger grants for further work in the same area soon.
Collaborator Contribution Kirsty Donald (UCT) has spent her time to come to these collaborative meetings, to work on creation of the tools for piloting and to consider the best ways to start writing up the work from the grant to date. She will be an active collaborator in future grants. Meta Van den Heuvel (University of Toronto) has spent time in coming to the collaborative meetings, also worked on creation of the tools for piloting and has supported training on the RITA-T. Amina Abubakar (Aga Khan University) has spent time travelling to present at meetings and worked on supporting tool development on INDIGO Gill Lancaster and Gareth McCray (Keele) have worked on data analysis of previous data and will support analysis of new data Paul Lynch (University of Birmingham) has supported qualitative work in all three sites and will support the write ups of the first papers from this work. Muneera Rasheed (Aga Khan University) has supported the field work for the piloting of the INDIGO tool in Karachi, Pakistan Harriet Babikako and Angelina Kakooza (Makerere University) have supported the field work as well as creation of the INDIGO tool in Uganda (Kampala) Emmie Mbale (College of Medicine Malawi) has supported field work for piloting of the INDIGO tool in Malawi
Impact No outcomes as yet. Study is not yet finished.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Collaboration with INDIGO team members across multiple settings looking at identifying children with disabilities in the community 
Organisation Aga Khan University Hospital, Nairobi
Country Kenya 
Sector Hospitals 
PI Contribution We have worked to create two collaborative meetings to discuss and plan the way forward in creating tools to identify children with disabilities in communities in low resource settings. We have conducted one meeting in Liverpool to create a plan of action to create a first version of a tool which is now presently being piloted in three countries. We have discussed plans for related qualitative and implementation science work to enable us to consider the best ways to embed a tool in the future. We have since had a second meeting in Uganda with participants from Ministry of Health and Education as well as all other participants in the group. This included training on the HINE (Hammersmith Infant Neurological Exam) and RITA-T (ASD detection tool) and further discussion about the way forward with papers and presentations for the future. We are planning to write up some papers and aim to submit some larger grants for further work in the same area soon.
Collaborator Contribution Kirsty Donald (UCT) has spent her time to come to these collaborative meetings, to work on creation of the tools for piloting and to consider the best ways to start writing up the work from the grant to date. She will be an active collaborator in future grants. Meta Van den Heuvel (University of Toronto) has spent time in coming to the collaborative meetings, also worked on creation of the tools for piloting and has supported training on the RITA-T. Amina Abubakar (Aga Khan University) has spent time travelling to present at meetings and worked on supporting tool development on INDIGO Gill Lancaster and Gareth McCray (Keele) have worked on data analysis of previous data and will support analysis of new data Paul Lynch (University of Birmingham) has supported qualitative work in all three sites and will support the write ups of the first papers from this work. Muneera Rasheed (Aga Khan University) has supported the field work for the piloting of the INDIGO tool in Karachi, Pakistan Harriet Babikako and Angelina Kakooza (Makerere University) have supported the field work as well as creation of the INDIGO tool in Uganda (Kampala) Emmie Mbale (College of Medicine Malawi) has supported field work for piloting of the INDIGO tool in Malawi
Impact No outcomes as yet. Study is not yet finished.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Collaboration with INDIGO team members across multiple settings looking at identifying children with disabilities in the community 
Organisation Keele University
Department Research Institute for Primary Care and Health Sciences
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have worked to create two collaborative meetings to discuss and plan the way forward in creating tools to identify children with disabilities in communities in low resource settings. We have conducted one meeting in Liverpool to create a plan of action to create a first version of a tool which is now presently being piloted in three countries. We have discussed plans for related qualitative and implementation science work to enable us to consider the best ways to embed a tool in the future. We have since had a second meeting in Uganda with participants from Ministry of Health and Education as well as all other participants in the group. This included training on the HINE (Hammersmith Infant Neurological Exam) and RITA-T (ASD detection tool) and further discussion about the way forward with papers and presentations for the future. We are planning to write up some papers and aim to submit some larger grants for further work in the same area soon.
Collaborator Contribution Kirsty Donald (UCT) has spent her time to come to these collaborative meetings, to work on creation of the tools for piloting and to consider the best ways to start writing up the work from the grant to date. She will be an active collaborator in future grants. Meta Van den Heuvel (University of Toronto) has spent time in coming to the collaborative meetings, also worked on creation of the tools for piloting and has supported training on the RITA-T. Amina Abubakar (Aga Khan University) has spent time travelling to present at meetings and worked on supporting tool development on INDIGO Gill Lancaster and Gareth McCray (Keele) have worked on data analysis of previous data and will support analysis of new data Paul Lynch (University of Birmingham) has supported qualitative work in all three sites and will support the write ups of the first papers from this work. Muneera Rasheed (Aga Khan University) has supported the field work for the piloting of the INDIGO tool in Karachi, Pakistan Harriet Babikako and Angelina Kakooza (Makerere University) have supported the field work as well as creation of the INDIGO tool in Uganda (Kampala) Emmie Mbale (College of Medicine Malawi) has supported field work for piloting of the INDIGO tool in Malawi
Impact No outcomes as yet. Study is not yet finished.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Collaboration with INDIGO team members across multiple settings looking at identifying children with disabilities in the community 
Organisation Makerere University
Department Child Health and Development Centre
Country Uganda 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have worked to create two collaborative meetings to discuss and plan the way forward in creating tools to identify children with disabilities in communities in low resource settings. We have conducted one meeting in Liverpool to create a plan of action to create a first version of a tool which is now presently being piloted in three countries. We have discussed plans for related qualitative and implementation science work to enable us to consider the best ways to embed a tool in the future. We have since had a second meeting in Uganda with participants from Ministry of Health and Education as well as all other participants in the group. This included training on the HINE (Hammersmith Infant Neurological Exam) and RITA-T (ASD detection tool) and further discussion about the way forward with papers and presentations for the future. We are planning to write up some papers and aim to submit some larger grants for further work in the same area soon.
Collaborator Contribution Kirsty Donald (UCT) has spent her time to come to these collaborative meetings, to work on creation of the tools for piloting and to consider the best ways to start writing up the work from the grant to date. She will be an active collaborator in future grants. Meta Van den Heuvel (University of Toronto) has spent time in coming to the collaborative meetings, also worked on creation of the tools for piloting and has supported training on the RITA-T. Amina Abubakar (Aga Khan University) has spent time travelling to present at meetings and worked on supporting tool development on INDIGO Gill Lancaster and Gareth McCray (Keele) have worked on data analysis of previous data and will support analysis of new data Paul Lynch (University of Birmingham) has supported qualitative work in all three sites and will support the write ups of the first papers from this work. Muneera Rasheed (Aga Khan University) has supported the field work for the piloting of the INDIGO tool in Karachi, Pakistan Harriet Babikako and Angelina Kakooza (Makerere University) have supported the field work as well as creation of the INDIGO tool in Uganda (Kampala) Emmie Mbale (College of Medicine Malawi) has supported field work for piloting of the INDIGO tool in Malawi
Impact No outcomes as yet. Study is not yet finished.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Collaboration with INDIGO team members across multiple settings looking at identifying children with disabilities in the community 
Organisation Sangath
Country India 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution We have worked to create two collaborative meetings to discuss and plan the way forward in creating tools to identify children with disabilities in communities in low resource settings. We have conducted one meeting in Liverpool to create a plan of action to create a first version of a tool which is now presently being piloted in three countries. We have discussed plans for related qualitative and implementation science work to enable us to consider the best ways to embed a tool in the future. We have since had a second meeting in Uganda with participants from Ministry of Health and Education as well as all other participants in the group. This included training on the HINE (Hammersmith Infant Neurological Exam) and RITA-T (ASD detection tool) and further discussion about the way forward with papers and presentations for the future. We are planning to write up some papers and aim to submit some larger grants for further work in the same area soon.
Collaborator Contribution Kirsty Donald (UCT) has spent her time to come to these collaborative meetings, to work on creation of the tools for piloting and to consider the best ways to start writing up the work from the grant to date. She will be an active collaborator in future grants. Meta Van den Heuvel (University of Toronto) has spent time in coming to the collaborative meetings, also worked on creation of the tools for piloting and has supported training on the RITA-T. Amina Abubakar (Aga Khan University) has spent time travelling to present at meetings and worked on supporting tool development on INDIGO Gill Lancaster and Gareth McCray (Keele) have worked on data analysis of previous data and will support analysis of new data Paul Lynch (University of Birmingham) has supported qualitative work in all three sites and will support the write ups of the first papers from this work. Muneera Rasheed (Aga Khan University) has supported the field work for the piloting of the INDIGO tool in Karachi, Pakistan Harriet Babikako and Angelina Kakooza (Makerere University) have supported the field work as well as creation of the INDIGO tool in Uganda (Kampala) Emmie Mbale (College of Medicine Malawi) has supported field work for piloting of the INDIGO tool in Malawi
Impact No outcomes as yet. Study is not yet finished.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Collaboration with INDIGO team members across multiple settings looking at identifying children with disabilities in the community 
Organisation University of Birmingham
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have worked to create two collaborative meetings to discuss and plan the way forward in creating tools to identify children with disabilities in communities in low resource settings. We have conducted one meeting in Liverpool to create a plan of action to create a first version of a tool which is now presently being piloted in three countries. We have discussed plans for related qualitative and implementation science work to enable us to consider the best ways to embed a tool in the future. We have since had a second meeting in Uganda with participants from Ministry of Health and Education as well as all other participants in the group. This included training on the HINE (Hammersmith Infant Neurological Exam) and RITA-T (ASD detection tool) and further discussion about the way forward with papers and presentations for the future. We are planning to write up some papers and aim to submit some larger grants for further work in the same area soon.
Collaborator Contribution Kirsty Donald (UCT) has spent her time to come to these collaborative meetings, to work on creation of the tools for piloting and to consider the best ways to start writing up the work from the grant to date. She will be an active collaborator in future grants. Meta Van den Heuvel (University of Toronto) has spent time in coming to the collaborative meetings, also worked on creation of the tools for piloting and has supported training on the RITA-T. Amina Abubakar (Aga Khan University) has spent time travelling to present at meetings and worked on supporting tool development on INDIGO Gill Lancaster and Gareth McCray (Keele) have worked on data analysis of previous data and will support analysis of new data Paul Lynch (University of Birmingham) has supported qualitative work in all three sites and will support the write ups of the first papers from this work. Muneera Rasheed (Aga Khan University) has supported the field work for the piloting of the INDIGO tool in Karachi, Pakistan Harriet Babikako and Angelina Kakooza (Makerere University) have supported the field work as well as creation of the INDIGO tool in Uganda (Kampala) Emmie Mbale (College of Medicine Malawi) has supported field work for piloting of the INDIGO tool in Malawi
Impact No outcomes as yet. Study is not yet finished.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Collaboration with INDIGO team members across multiple settings looking at identifying children with disabilities in the community 
Organisation University of Cape Town
Department Department of Medicine
Country South Africa 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have worked to create two collaborative meetings to discuss and plan the way forward in creating tools to identify children with disabilities in communities in low resource settings. We have conducted one meeting in Liverpool to create a plan of action to create a first version of a tool which is now presently being piloted in three countries. We have discussed plans for related qualitative and implementation science work to enable us to consider the best ways to embed a tool in the future. We have since had a second meeting in Uganda with participants from Ministry of Health and Education as well as all other participants in the group. This included training on the HINE (Hammersmith Infant Neurological Exam) and RITA-T (ASD detection tool) and further discussion about the way forward with papers and presentations for the future. We are planning to write up some papers and aim to submit some larger grants for further work in the same area soon.
Collaborator Contribution Kirsty Donald (UCT) has spent her time to come to these collaborative meetings, to work on creation of the tools for piloting and to consider the best ways to start writing up the work from the grant to date. She will be an active collaborator in future grants. Meta Van den Heuvel (University of Toronto) has spent time in coming to the collaborative meetings, also worked on creation of the tools for piloting and has supported training on the RITA-T. Amina Abubakar (Aga Khan University) has spent time travelling to present at meetings and worked on supporting tool development on INDIGO Gill Lancaster and Gareth McCray (Keele) have worked on data analysis of previous data and will support analysis of new data Paul Lynch (University of Birmingham) has supported qualitative work in all three sites and will support the write ups of the first papers from this work. Muneera Rasheed (Aga Khan University) has supported the field work for the piloting of the INDIGO tool in Karachi, Pakistan Harriet Babikako and Angelina Kakooza (Makerere University) have supported the field work as well as creation of the INDIGO tool in Uganda (Kampala) Emmie Mbale (College of Medicine Malawi) has supported field work for piloting of the INDIGO tool in Malawi
Impact No outcomes as yet. Study is not yet finished.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Collaboration with INDIGO team members across multiple settings looking at identifying children with disabilities in the community 
Organisation University of Malawi
Department College of Medicine
Country Malawi 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have worked to create two collaborative meetings to discuss and plan the way forward in creating tools to identify children with disabilities in communities in low resource settings. We have conducted one meeting in Liverpool to create a plan of action to create a first version of a tool which is now presently being piloted in three countries. We have discussed plans for related qualitative and implementation science work to enable us to consider the best ways to embed a tool in the future. We have since had a second meeting in Uganda with participants from Ministry of Health and Education as well as all other participants in the group. This included training on the HINE (Hammersmith Infant Neurological Exam) and RITA-T (ASD detection tool) and further discussion about the way forward with papers and presentations for the future. We are planning to write up some papers and aim to submit some larger grants for further work in the same area soon.
Collaborator Contribution Kirsty Donald (UCT) has spent her time to come to these collaborative meetings, to work on creation of the tools for piloting and to consider the best ways to start writing up the work from the grant to date. She will be an active collaborator in future grants. Meta Van den Heuvel (University of Toronto) has spent time in coming to the collaborative meetings, also worked on creation of the tools for piloting and has supported training on the RITA-T. Amina Abubakar (Aga Khan University) has spent time travelling to present at meetings and worked on supporting tool development on INDIGO Gill Lancaster and Gareth McCray (Keele) have worked on data analysis of previous data and will support analysis of new data Paul Lynch (University of Birmingham) has supported qualitative work in all three sites and will support the write ups of the first papers from this work. Muneera Rasheed (Aga Khan University) has supported the field work for the piloting of the INDIGO tool in Karachi, Pakistan Harriet Babikako and Angelina Kakooza (Makerere University) have supported the field work as well as creation of the INDIGO tool in Uganda (Kampala) Emmie Mbale (College of Medicine Malawi) has supported field work for piloting of the INDIGO tool in Malawi
Impact No outcomes as yet. Study is not yet finished.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Collaboration with INDIGO team members across multiple settings looking at identifying children with disabilities in the community 
Organisation University of Toronto
Country Canada 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have worked to create two collaborative meetings to discuss and plan the way forward in creating tools to identify children with disabilities in communities in low resource settings. We have conducted one meeting in Liverpool to create a plan of action to create a first version of a tool which is now presently being piloted in three countries. We have discussed plans for related qualitative and implementation science work to enable us to consider the best ways to embed a tool in the future. We have since had a second meeting in Uganda with participants from Ministry of Health and Education as well as all other participants in the group. This included training on the HINE (Hammersmith Infant Neurological Exam) and RITA-T (ASD detection tool) and further discussion about the way forward with papers and presentations for the future. We are planning to write up some papers and aim to submit some larger grants for further work in the same area soon.
Collaborator Contribution Kirsty Donald (UCT) has spent her time to come to these collaborative meetings, to work on creation of the tools for piloting and to consider the best ways to start writing up the work from the grant to date. She will be an active collaborator in future grants. Meta Van den Heuvel (University of Toronto) has spent time in coming to the collaborative meetings, also worked on creation of the tools for piloting and has supported training on the RITA-T. Amina Abubakar (Aga Khan University) has spent time travelling to present at meetings and worked on supporting tool development on INDIGO Gill Lancaster and Gareth McCray (Keele) have worked on data analysis of previous data and will support analysis of new data Paul Lynch (University of Birmingham) has supported qualitative work in all three sites and will support the write ups of the first papers from this work. Muneera Rasheed (Aga Khan University) has supported the field work for the piloting of the INDIGO tool in Karachi, Pakistan Harriet Babikako and Angelina Kakooza (Makerere University) have supported the field work as well as creation of the INDIGO tool in Uganda (Kampala) Emmie Mbale (College of Medicine Malawi) has supported field work for piloting of the INDIGO tool in Malawi
Impact No outcomes as yet. Study is not yet finished.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Collaboration with INDIGO team members across multiple settings looking at identifying children with disabilities in the community 
Organisation Wellcome Trust
Department Malawi-Liverpool Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme
Country Malawi 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have worked to create two collaborative meetings to discuss and plan the way forward in creating tools to identify children with disabilities in communities in low resource settings. We have conducted one meeting in Liverpool to create a plan of action to create a first version of a tool which is now presently being piloted in three countries. We have discussed plans for related qualitative and implementation science work to enable us to consider the best ways to embed a tool in the future. We have since had a second meeting in Uganda with participants from Ministry of Health and Education as well as all other participants in the group. This included training on the HINE (Hammersmith Infant Neurological Exam) and RITA-T (ASD detection tool) and further discussion about the way forward with papers and presentations for the future. We are planning to write up some papers and aim to submit some larger grants for further work in the same area soon.
Collaborator Contribution Kirsty Donald (UCT) has spent her time to come to these collaborative meetings, to work on creation of the tools for piloting and to consider the best ways to start writing up the work from the grant to date. She will be an active collaborator in future grants. Meta Van den Heuvel (University of Toronto) has spent time in coming to the collaborative meetings, also worked on creation of the tools for piloting and has supported training on the RITA-T. Amina Abubakar (Aga Khan University) has spent time travelling to present at meetings and worked on supporting tool development on INDIGO Gill Lancaster and Gareth McCray (Keele) have worked on data analysis of previous data and will support analysis of new data Paul Lynch (University of Birmingham) has supported qualitative work in all three sites and will support the write ups of the first papers from this work. Muneera Rasheed (Aga Khan University) has supported the field work for the piloting of the INDIGO tool in Karachi, Pakistan Harriet Babikako and Angelina Kakooza (Makerere University) have supported the field work as well as creation of the INDIGO tool in Uganda (Kampala) Emmie Mbale (College of Medicine Malawi) has supported field work for piloting of the INDIGO tool in Malawi
Impact No outcomes as yet. Study is not yet finished.
Start Year 2018
 
Description Collaborative open meeting in Uganda for Ministry and University colleages 
Form Of Engagement Activity A talk or presentation
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact We conducted an open meeting at the collaborative workshop in Uganda to enable members from the hospital, university and from the ministry of education and health to attend and discuss ways forward with research and practice looking at identifying children with disabilities earlier in Uganda as well as elsewhere in African settings.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Creation of the INDIGO website for providing information about 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Media (as a channel to the public)
Results and Impact We created a website with information about INDIGO so that those who are interested from the wider networks can log in and see what is happening with regards to the creation of the tools and the piloting work.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019