Land Ocean CArbon TransfEr (LOCATE)

Lead Research Organisation: National Oceanography Centre
Department Name: Science and Technology

Abstract

Our climate, and hence our lifestyle and economy, is profoundly influenced by the concentration of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere, which regulates the amount of heat which arrives on earth from the sun that returns to outer space. Human activities such as land clearance and the burning of fossil fuels have increased atmospheric carbon dioxide levels by about 40% in the last 250 years, with most of this increase occurring since the Second World War. This has caused a measurable increase in our temperature, with many of the warmest years on record occurring in the last decade. For this reason our interest is now firmly focused on other natural parts of the carbon cycle, in particular other reservoirs of carbon which are currently locked away from the atmosphere but which might enter the atmosphere as climate changes. One key pool is soil carbon - soils across the globe contain about 4 times as much carbon as the fossil fuel carbon which to date has entered the atmosphere via combustion, with this pool being largest at high latitudes such as northern Scotland. The British pool of soil carbon is a large element of our 'natural capital' - the value that the ecosystem represents to us. It is so large that restoring some damaged elements of it, such as upland peat bogs, would probably save us 570 million pounds over the next 40 years in carbon values alone. Each year some of this leaches into rivers and streams, with the concentration of carbon in rivers gradually increasing in Britain and Europe. As this material gets into estuaries and coastal waters some of it gets returned to the atmosphere when bacteria use it to grow or when it's destroyed by sunlight, some is buried and some enters the open ocean. We don't understand what controls these various processes, so aren't currently in a position to say how they will change into the future. For these reasons we plan to undertake a programme called LOCATE, which will establish the current status of our peatland stocks is (how much soil carbon is getting into our rivers and estuaries), and then determine what happens to this material in our estuaries (including measuring the key processes). Based on this we will do some accurate up to date carbon accounts for the GB landmass and also produce some simple mathematical equations describing what happens to soil organic matter in our rivers and estuaries. These equations will then be embedded into a much larger model of the Earth System so that we can begin to answer questions about the long term fate of the soil organic carbon pool over the next 50 or 100 years.

Planned Impact

We identify three key non - academic constituencies who we will liase with regarding LOCATE outcomes; 1) the IPCC process, 2) the general public, 3) Government departments and agencies, NGOs, charities and landowners who make decisions regarding land and river management across GB.

We will engage with these groups in the following ways

The IPCC process.
1) By delivering up to date estimates of carbon losses from GB soils and the consumption of this material in GB estuaries.
2) By informing the ongoing development of the NERC Met Office UK Earth System Model (ESM), the UK's platform for future IPCC assessments. Colin Jones (Head of the UKESM project) and policy makers from DECC have agreed to attend LOCATE annual meetings to gain early sight of our key results.
3) By publishing high profile papers. We target a publication in Nature or Science in 2018 describing the whole GB budget for organic carbon resulting from WP1 and a further high profile paper describing the future evolution of GB soil organic carbon stocks based on LOCATE modelling by 2020.

The general public We will communicate directly with the media via targeted release of information to our extensive network of media contacts. In addition we will use the established web portal alpha galileo to inform elements of the specialist science press with whom we do not have direct contact. Such interactions have most recently lead to short films shot by Reuters (for example http://reut.rs/1Wffryv which deals with our current large grant COMICS).

We will build a project website at NOC. It will include outward facing pages designed to engage the general public, including school children. We will also reach these constituencies via the annual NOC Open Day during 'Science Week' attended by 2000 -3000 young people and their parents.

We will establish a twitter account, to which individual scientists can contribute short updates about field work, interesting research findings etc. Blogs from research field trips will give more detailed information, with Twitter drawing attention to key blog entries. We will also attend the pint of science events (https://pintofscience.co.uk/) delivering talks such as the one shown here https://youtu.be/sW7TQpiPctQ.

3) Land Managers We will engage with this group at our annual meeting when we plan a whole day devoted to translating LOCATE outcomes into useful information from stakeholders. Stakeholders who have committed to attending LOCATE meetings include Department of Energy and Climate Change, Department of the Environment, Fisheries and Rural Affairs, Forestry Commission, International Union for the Conservation of Nature Peatland Programme, Natural Resources Wales, the Rivers Trust, Rothamsted research, the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, Scottish Natural Heritage, Scottish Water, the James Hutton Institute, the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency, the Environment Agency and the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquatic Science. In addition Sanders is the UK Stakeholder for the Integrated carbon observing system, an EU ESFRI project which includes terrestrial greenhouse gas research. As part of this he recently presented ICOS at the Marine Science Coordination Committee and has now been asked to assist DEFRA in liasing with UK Gov departments including DECC, BIS, DoT, and possibly the FCO and Met Office around greenhouse gas issues. LOCATE will clearly inform this process.

People

ORCID iD

Richard Sanders (Principal Investigator)
Barry Rawlins (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0585-3312
Alejandro Jose Souza (Co-Investigator)
Donald Monteith (Co-Investigator)
Bryan Spears (Co-Investigator)
Jason Holt (Co-Investigator)
Vassilis Kitidis (Co-Investigator)
Claire Evans (Co-Investigator)
Christopher Vane (Co-Investigator)
Edwin Christopher Rowe (Co-Investigator)
Daniel Joseph Lapworth (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7838-7960
Victoria Anne Bell (Co-Investigator)
Christopher Pearce (Co-Investigator)
Sinhue Torres-Valdes (Co-Investigator)
Yuri Artioli (Co-Investigator)
Nancy Dise (Co-Investigator)
Socratis Loucaides (Co-Investigator)
Ricardo Javier Torres (Co-Investigator)
Daniel J Mayor (Co-Investigator)
Rachael Beale (Co-Investigator)
Jeremy Blackford (Co-Investigator)
Laurent Olivier Amoudry (Co-Investigator)
Martin Arundell (Co-Investigator)
Philip David Nightingale (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7177-5469
Luca Polimene (Co-Investigator)
Thomas Robb Anderson (Co-Investigator)
Christopher David Evans (Co-Investigator)
Kerry Dinsmore (Co-Investigator)
Douglas Ballantine Clark (Co-Investigator)
Andrew Paul Rees (Co-Investigator)
Daren Clive Gooddy (Co-Investigator) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6015-1332
Gregory John Slavik (Researcher)
Gareth Farr (Researcher)
Christopher Alan Balfour (Researcher)
B P Marchant (Researcher)
Sarah Louise Wakelin (Researcher)
Christopher Leonard Cardwell (Researcher) orcid http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1305-4174
Anna Lichtschlag (Researcher)
Louise Maurice (Researcher)
James Duncan Harle (Researcher)
Nicole Antoinette Lucie Archer (Researcher)
Lei Wang (Researcher)
 
Description 1. Terrigenous Organic Matter (tOM) in the North Sea. We participated in a 4-week expedition on board the CEFAS research vessel Endeavour to determine the distribution of tOM throughout the North Sea. The highest concentrations occur in the low salinity coastal margins. The Baltic outflow in the eastern central North Sea had a weaker signature than the combination of the Rhine, Weser and Elbe in the southeast, despite it draining the Baltic Sea linked to high peatland landscapes in Fenno-Scandia as opposed to agricultural systems in central Europe. We hypothesise that this results from the much longer (multi year) residence time of water in the N Sea which permits loss via respiration, burial or photolysis to occur. Once tOM has entered coastal waters it is diluted rather than being degraded, implying a potential loss to the open N Atlantic.
2. Behaviour of tOM in ultra oligotrophic systems. We undertook a survey of four Falklands estuaries, measuring DOC and nutrients along the conductivity gradient, alongside estimates of organic matter degradation via respiration. All systems have very high levels of tDOC at the landward end which declined quasi conservatively with only a small loss (<2%) in the mid estuarine region diagnosed from the respiration data. In general terms we suggest that unperturbed southern hemisphere (and by extension preindustrial N hemisphere) systems display conservative transfer of organic matter from land to sea. Nutrient concentrations showed the opposite pattern with elevated values in the marine end member, declining to undetectable values in the freshwaters feeding the system. This leads us to propose a new paradigm; namely that the degradation of tOM is nutrient controlled and that in unperturbed systems marine nutrients are required to permit the degradation of the minor fraction of terrestrial material that is removed during transit.
3. Experimental Work. We have conducted experimental field campaigns in the catchments of the Halladale (N Scotland) and Tamar (SW England) rivers, quantifying the absolute and relative importance of microbial respiration, flocculation and photolysis for removing tOM along the land-ocean continuum. We have also conducted similar field campaigns overseas, in the Falklands (above), Bornean Malaysia, Belize, Sweden and Finland. These campaigns focussed more specifically on microbial respiration and were undertaken to help understand whether or not the insights derived from our UK-based observations could be applied elsewhere around the globe.
4. Development of a unified model for DOM cycling in freshwater and the ocean. We have developed a tOM model valid in all aquatic environments (see earlier discussion of Figure 2). We have embedded this in a simple model and evaluated the dominant sink terms for the various pools we identify (Figure 8). Overall we suggest minor losses within estuaries due to their short residence times with a significant fraction of each pool reaching the open ocean. Both photoxidation and microbial respiration are important sinks. Surprisingly flocculation appears rather unimportant.
5. Quantification of national-scale aquatic carbon fluxes. We have completed the UK's first internally consistent annual study to quantify the flux of tOM across the land-ocean aquatic continuum. This involved the collection of monthly samples at the tidal extent of 40 rivers draining 36% of the GB landmass, and quarterly sampling across the salinity gradient of 13 GB estuaries. Our riverine tOM data analysis demonstrates that rainfall, peat soil extent and within-catchment forest cover are the main drivers of tOM export. The latter driver is of particular importance given that many see afforestation as a tangible solution to lowering atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Our estuarine study has demonstrated that seasonal and spatial variation in DOC fluxes across the river-ocean interface is large. Nevertheless, it is apparent that estuaries receiving humic-like tOM conservatively transport this material into the ocean, whereas tOM from arable and urban catchments behaves non-conservatively across the salinity gradient. This is consistent with the understanding that arable-derived tOM is more labile than peatland-derived tOM. Drafted manuscripts of the riverine and estuarine data are currently in the final stages of preparation and are expected to be submitted within a few weeks.
Exploitation Route The quantification of GB tOM fluxes and our new understanding of their drivers represent major achievements of LOCATE. They help academics and environmental regulators better understand and appreciate how decisions on land influence both the carbon cycle and the coastal (and open) ocean. The UniDOM model is another major achievement of LOCATE. This new conceptual framework will transform our ability to mechanistically model land-ocean carbon fluxes and hence refine our understanding of the global carbon cycle. The findings of LOCATE are of immediate interest to other academics and environmental regulators, but in the mid- to long-term we anticipate it driving new policy-relevant information (particularly in the context of net zero 2050).
Sectors Communities and Social Services/Policy,Environment

 
Description (RINGO) - Readiness of ICOS for Necessities of integrated Global Observations
Amount € 4,719,680 (EUR)
Funding ID 730944 
Organisation European Commission 
Sector Public
Country European Union (EU)
Start 01/2017 
End 12/2020
 
Description Commonwealth Marine Economies (CME) Programme. Enabling Safe and Sustainable Marine Economies across Commonwealth Small Island Developing states
Amount £2,000,000 (GBP)
Organisation Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2018 
End 03/2021
 
Description How does land management influence FIre REsilience and carbon fate in BLANKET bogs? (FIRE BLANKET)
Amount £7,992 (GBP)
Funding ID NE/T006501/1 
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 07/2019 
End 06/2020
 
Description RCUK-SEA Identifying trade-offs of changing land use for aquatic environmental and socio-economic health and facilitating sustainable solutions
Amount £80,686 (GBP)
Funding ID NE/P020917/1 
Organisation Natural Environment Research Council 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 01/2017 
End 04/2019
 
Title Implementation of riverine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in FVCOM-ERSEM at the Conwy estuary 
Description The model was an implementation of a 3D coupled ocean-biogeochemical model (FVCOM-ERSEM) in the Conwy estuary, which simulated fate and transport of riverine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) based on the recent publication by Anderson et al., 2020. The model used a new LTLS dataset for the river forcing. 
Type Of Material Computer model/algorithm 
Year Produced 2019 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Fate and transport of riverine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) have been simulated for the first time in the Conwy estuary by the FVCOM-ERSEM model. Analyses of the model results will provide quantification of carbon transport from land to the marine system. 
 
Title L4 ADCP dataset 
Description 46 day deployment of a bottom moored ADCP at PML coastal station L4 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2019 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact Data has been used within the group to validate coupled hydrodynamic-biogeochemical models (FVCOM-ERSEM and GOTM-ERSEM) 
URL https://data.ecosystem-modelling.pml.ac.uk/thredds/catalog.html
 
Title NEMO-ERSEM with terrestrial DOC in the AMM7 domain 
Description NEMO-FABM-ERSEM simulation (1981-2015) for the AMM7 domain with the addition of terrestrial DOC (tDOC). Riverine inputs of of tDOC are taken from the LTLS Integrated Model (Great Britain) and published literature. A key feature of this model is that both photochemical and bacterial degradation rates of tDOC are age dependant. 
Type Of Material Computer model/algorithm 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact This work provides information on tDOC spatial and temporal variability across the north west European shelf. It will also provide a preliminary assessment of the impact of terrestrial DOC discharge on major ecosystem processes and services like CO2 air-sea fluxes, primary and bacterial production and nutrient remineralisation. 
 
Title Riverine and Estuarine measurements of dissolved N2O and CH4 
Description Samples collected from 13 sites in the River Tamar catchment taken monthly and at 5 sites in the Tamar estuary collected bi-monthly between April 2019 and March 2020 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact None yet 
 
Title Sampling activities in the Tamar River Catchment and Estuary 
Description Data collected on monthly basis from 13 sites in Tamar catchment - DOC, POC, nutrients, greenhouse gases, cations, CDOM/FDOM Same variables bi-monthly from Tamar estuary at 5 sites 
Type Of Material Database/Collection of data 
Year Produced 2020 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact None yet 
 
Title Tamar high resolution hydrodynamics model 2017 
Description A version of the Tamar estuary FVCOM model with extra outputs to study the small scale hydrodynamic features of estuary and sound area. 
Type Of Material Computer model/algorithm 
Year Produced 2019 
Provided To Others? No  
Impact Understanding of the features in the Plymouth sound relevant to mixing which will feed into work on pollution transport 
 
Title UniDOM model in ERSEM 
Description this is a module of ERSEM aimed at simulating processing of terrigenous DOM in the marine environment. it builds on the work of Anderson et al., 2019, but it uses multiple fixed age pool of DOM instead of a single aging DOM pool 
Type Of Material Computer model/algorithm 
Year Produced 2019 
Provided To Others? Yes  
Impact none yet 
URL https://gitlab.em.pml.ac.uk
 
Description Collaboration with West Country Rivers Trust 
Organisation Westcountry Rivers Trust
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Charity/Non Profit 
PI Contribution The Plymouth Marine Laboratory have provided sample analysis for three upland streams sampled by WRT on 7 occasions. These are added to monthly sampling and analysis from the Tamar catchment, carried out by the PML under the LOCATE project.
Collaborator Contribution The Westcountry Rivers Trust have sample 3 upland streams complementing the monthly Tamar-catchment samples collected by the Plymouth Marine Laboratory
Impact This collaboration has added value to both WRT and PML activities. For WRT it has provided additional measurement parameters (Dissolved Organic Carbon, Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter). For the PML, it has provided additional sampling, particularly in upland streams which complements the monthly sampling of the Tamar catchment.
Start Year 2019
 
Description Environmental Research Institute, Halladale Sampling (Gibb) 
Organisation University of the Highlands and Islands
Department Environmental Research Institute
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Halladale Sampling
Collaborator Contribution Support for Hinterland sampling at the Halladale, use for labs on site, support of intensive campaign at the Halladale
Impact See publications
Start Year 2016
 
Description Establishment of UK FVCOM interest group 
Organisation Lancaster University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have set up a UK FVCOM interest group that includes representatives from SAMS, NOCL and Marine Scotland. We held our first meeting at PML in September 2012. Since then, we have setup a wiki and SVN repository for sharing common tools related to FVCOM and model implementations to foster collaborations and enhance our understanding of the model's capabilities.
Collaborator Contribution The partners have contributed with intellectual inputs and shared experiences.
Impact The partnership is mostly focused on the use of FVCOM and associated models (wave, sediment and ecosystem models) and provides a platform for exchange of ideas and experiences. As such, this is a multidisciplinary collaboration involving physical oceanography, ecology and ecosystem modelling and numerical methods. We have produced a Wiki (web based how-to manual) where the partners exchange their experiences and solutions to common problems in detail. Improvements to the code and/or analysis tools are also documented here. We also host an SVN repository (version control software) of the FVCOM code together with each partner's updates to the code. The exchange of information has enabled a more robust and consistent approach to implementations of FVCOM in different regions of the UK.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Establishment of UK FVCOM interest group 
Organisation Marine Scotland Science (MSS)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution We have set up a UK FVCOM interest group that includes representatives from SAMS, NOCL and Marine Scotland. We held our first meeting at PML in September 2012. Since then, we have setup a wiki and SVN repository for sharing common tools related to FVCOM and model implementations to foster collaborations and enhance our understanding of the model's capabilities.
Collaborator Contribution The partners have contributed with intellectual inputs and shared experiences.
Impact The partnership is mostly focused on the use of FVCOM and associated models (wave, sediment and ecosystem models) and provides a platform for exchange of ideas and experiences. As such, this is a multidisciplinary collaboration involving physical oceanography, ecology and ecosystem modelling and numerical methods. We have produced a Wiki (web based how-to manual) where the partners exchange their experiences and solutions to common problems in detail. Improvements to the code and/or analysis tools are also documented here. We also host an SVN repository (version control software) of the FVCOM code together with each partner's updates to the code. The exchange of information has enabled a more robust and consistent approach to implementations of FVCOM in different regions of the UK.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Establishment of UK FVCOM interest group 
Organisation National Oceanography Centre
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have set up a UK FVCOM interest group that includes representatives from SAMS, NOCL and Marine Scotland. We held our first meeting at PML in September 2012. Since then, we have setup a wiki and SVN repository for sharing common tools related to FVCOM and model implementations to foster collaborations and enhance our understanding of the model's capabilities.
Collaborator Contribution The partners have contributed with intellectual inputs and shared experiences.
Impact The partnership is mostly focused on the use of FVCOM and associated models (wave, sediment and ecosystem models) and provides a platform for exchange of ideas and experiences. As such, this is a multidisciplinary collaboration involving physical oceanography, ecology and ecosystem modelling and numerical methods. We have produced a Wiki (web based how-to manual) where the partners exchange their experiences and solutions to common problems in detail. Improvements to the code and/or analysis tools are also documented here. We also host an SVN repository (version control software) of the FVCOM code together with each partner's updates to the code. The exchange of information has enabled a more robust and consistent approach to implementations of FVCOM in different regions of the UK.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Establishment of UK FVCOM interest group 
Organisation Scottish Association For Marine Science
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have set up a UK FVCOM interest group that includes representatives from SAMS, NOCL and Marine Scotland. We held our first meeting at PML in September 2012. Since then, we have setup a wiki and SVN repository for sharing common tools related to FVCOM and model implementations to foster collaborations and enhance our understanding of the model's capabilities.
Collaborator Contribution The partners have contributed with intellectual inputs and shared experiences.
Impact The partnership is mostly focused on the use of FVCOM and associated models (wave, sediment and ecosystem models) and provides a platform for exchange of ideas and experiences. As such, this is a multidisciplinary collaboration involving physical oceanography, ecology and ecosystem modelling and numerical methods. We have produced a Wiki (web based how-to manual) where the partners exchange their experiences and solutions to common problems in detail. Improvements to the code and/or analysis tools are also documented here. We also host an SVN repository (version control software) of the FVCOM code together with each partner's updates to the code. The exchange of information has enabled a more robust and consistent approach to implementations of FVCOM in different regions of the UK.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Establishment of UK FVCOM interest group 
Organisation University of Strathclyde
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution We have set up a UK FVCOM interest group that includes representatives from SAMS, NOCL and Marine Scotland. We held our first meeting at PML in September 2012. Since then, we have setup a wiki and SVN repository for sharing common tools related to FVCOM and model implementations to foster collaborations and enhance our understanding of the model's capabilities.
Collaborator Contribution The partners have contributed with intellectual inputs and shared experiences.
Impact The partnership is mostly focused on the use of FVCOM and associated models (wave, sediment and ecosystem models) and provides a platform for exchange of ideas and experiences. As such, this is a multidisciplinary collaboration involving physical oceanography, ecology and ecosystem modelling and numerical methods. We have produced a Wiki (web based how-to manual) where the partners exchange their experiences and solutions to common problems in detail. Improvements to the code and/or analysis tools are also documented here. We also host an SVN repository (version control software) of the FVCOM code together with each partner's updates to the code. The exchange of information has enabled a more robust and consistent approach to implementations of FVCOM in different regions of the UK.
Start Year 2012
 
Description Field Campaign - Falklands, South Atlantic Environmental Research Institute 
Organisation South Atlantic Environmental Research Institute
Country Falkland Islands (Malvinas) 
Sector Learned Society 
PI Contribution Field Campaign
Collaborator Contribution Support to Field campaign
Impact In progress
Start Year 2018
 
Description Field Campaigns - Belize University 
Organisation University of Belize
Country Belize 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Field Campaign
Collaborator Contribution Support for Field campaigns
Impact In progress
Start Year 2018
 
Description Field Campaigns -Malaysia University 
Organisation University of Malaysia
Country Malaysia 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Undertaking 2 major field campaigns in the Sarawak region of Malaysia (NOC + CEH), along with a variety of stakeholder engagement with the University of Malaysia and NTU.
Collaborator Contribution Supporting 2 field campagins
Impact In progress
Start Year 2018
 
Description LOCATE Collaboration Partners 
Organisation British Geological Survey
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Collaborative partnership across all Work Packages
Collaborator Contribution Collaborative partnership across all Work Packages
Impact See publications
Start Year 2016
 
Description LOCATE Collaboration Partners 
Organisation Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH)
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Collaborative partnership across all Work Packages
Collaborator Contribution Collaborative partnership across all Work Packages
Impact See publications
Start Year 2016
 
Description LOCATE Collaboration Partners 
Organisation Plymouth Marine Laboratory
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Collaborative partnership across all Work Packages
Collaborator Contribution Collaborative partnership across all Work Packages
Impact See publications
Start Year 2016
 
Description LOCATE Programme Advisory Group 
Organisation Bangor University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Initial engagement, first meeting May 2020
Collaborator Contribution Nothing yet
Impact Provide expertise and guidance on the Project PAG reports
Start Year 2019
 
Description LOCATE Programme Advisory Group 
Organisation Scottish Water
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Public 
PI Contribution Initial engagement, first meeting May 2020
Collaborator Contribution Nothing yet
Impact Provide expertise and guidance on the Project PAG reports
Start Year 2019
 
Description LOCATE Programme Advisory Group 
Organisation The Finnish Environment Institute
Country Finland 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Initial engagement, first meeting May 2020
Collaborator Contribution Nothing yet
Impact Provide expertise and guidance on the Project PAG reports
Start Year 2019
 
Description LOCATE Programme Advisory Group 
Organisation University of Essex
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Initial engagement, first meeting May 2020
Collaborator Contribution Nothing yet
Impact Provide expertise and guidance on the Project PAG reports
Start Year 2019
 
Description Lyell Research Fellow (Pereira) 
Organisation Heriot-Watt University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provided Samples
Collaborator Contribution Assessing the importance of invisible DOM in Scottish rivers
Impact Still in progress, via publications
Start Year 2019
 
Description NOC and Met Office Collaboration 
Organisation Meteorological Office UK
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Under the Joint Weather and Climate Research Programme (JWCRP) between NERC and the Met Office, we have forged a strong strategic partnership with the Met Office. This takes the form of the Joint Marine Modelling Project (JMMP; formerly JOMP; the Joint Ocean Modelling Programme and JCOMP; the Joint Coastal Ocean Modelling Programme). JMMP comprises staff from both NOC (from the Marine Systems Modelling group) and the Met Office and enables the best possible versions of the NEMO global and coastal-ocean models to be taken up into predictive systems at the Met Office (for ocean forecasting, coupled weather forecasting, seasonal prediction, decadal prediction, and climate and earth system modelling). Successive versions of NEMO are developed internationally on a regular cycle and have a number of new options. The benefit of these options are assessed both individually and in various combinations through undertaking decadal timescale simulations on MONSooN, a supercomputer facility shared between NERC and the Met Office, and identical in architecture to the main Met Office supercomputer. Once the optimal combination of options has been ascertained, the NEMO model can then be rapidly and easily taken up into the predictive systems at the Met Office. The cycle is repeated approximately every 1-2 years. The shelf seas activities, specifically support the models run operationally in the shelf sea forecasting and reanalysis system at the Met Office and delivered by the European Copernicus Marine Environmental Monitoring Service. Alongside JMMP, the National Partnership for Ocean Prediction (formally known as the National Centre for Ocean Forecasting) aims to develop and promote the application of world-leading marine products and services to stakeholders, with a focus on national and public benefit. This is achieved firstly through the integration of models, observations and scientific understanding to produce the best information and advice about the marine environment, with rigorous quality assurance and traceability; and secondly through engaging with stakeholders to understand their requirements and to maximise the beneficial use of marine products and services.
Collaborator Contribution Under the Joint Weather and Climate Research Programme (JWCRP) between NERC and the Met Office, we have forged a strong strategic partnership with the Met Office. This takes the form of the Joint Marine Modelling Project (JMMP; formerly JOMP; the Joint Ocean Modelling Programme and JCOMP; the Joint Coastal Ocean Modelling Programme). JMMP comprises staff from both NOC (from the Marine Systems Modelling group) and the Met Office and enables the best possible versions of the NEMO global and coastal-ocean models to be taken up into predictive systems at the Met Office (for ocean forecasting, coupled weather forecasting, seasonal prediction, decadal prediction, and climate and earth system modelling). Successive versions of NEMO are developed internationally on a regular cycle and have a number of new options. The benefit of these options are assessed both individually and in various combinations through undertaking decadal timescale simulations on MONSooN, a supercomputer facility shared between NERC and the Met Office, and identical in architecture to the main Met Office supercomputer. Once the optimal combination of options has been ascertained, the NEMO model can then be rapidly and easily taken up into the predictive systems at the Met Office. The cycle is repeated approximately every 1-2 years. The shelf seas activities, specifically support the models run operationally in the shelf sea forecasting and reanalysis system at the Met Office and delivered by the European Copernicus Marine Environmental Monitoring Service. Alongside JMMP, the National Partnership for Ocean Prediction (formally known as the National Centre for Ocean Forecasting) aims to develop and promote the application of world-leading marine products and services to stakeholders, with a focus on national and public benefit. This is achieved firstly through the integration of models, observations and scientific understanding to produce the best information and advice about the marine environment, with rigorous quality assurance and traceability; and secondly through engaging with stakeholders to understand their requirements and to maximise the beneficial use of marine products and services.
Impact NEMO model configurations. NW European Shelf Operational Copernicus service.
Start Year 2008
 
Description PHD Student Glasgow University (Brown) 
Organisation University of Glasgow
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Providing Sample data
Collaborator Contribution Measuring GHG fluxes on the Clyde
Impact In progress, will form publication
Start Year 2017
 
Description PHD Student Heriot Watt University (Lyell Centre) (Trojahn) 
Organisation Heriot-Watt University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provide Data
Collaborator Contribution Assessing the impacts of extreme rainfall on DOM losses from land to stream
Impact In progress, publication
Start Year 2019
 
Description PHD Student NOC (Felgate) 
Organisation Scottish Association For Marine Science
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution X
Collaborator Contribution To study the role of microbes in the removal and fate of terrigenous (land-derived) organic matter (ex-living stuff) as it moves along the land-ocean continuum (from land to the ocean, via lakes, streams, rivers and estuaries)
Impact In progress
Start Year 2016
 
Description PHD Student Northumbria University (Mann) 
Organisation Northumbria University
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provide sampling data
Collaborator Contribution D/H and O18 isotope ratios across WP1 rivers sampling programme
Impact In progress, output will be a publication
Start Year 2018
 
Description PHD Students University of East Anglia (Matthews, Cooper) 
Organisation University of East Anglia
Country United Kingdom 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Provide sampling data
Collaborator Contribution Analyse Data
Impact In progress, will be a publication
Start Year 2018
 
Description Engagement with Dartmoor National Park Authority 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Plymouth Marine Laboratory has engaged with stakeholders in the River Tamar catchment Area to introduce the LOCATE project and explore collaboration with the Dartmoor National Park Authority. We are looking to work in partnership to explore the impact of peatland restoration on organic Carbon export by rivers (Carbon-retention in peat).
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Engagement with Tamar Valley AONB 
Form Of Engagement Activity A formal working group, expert panel or dialogue
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact The Plymouth Marine Laboratory has engaged with stakeholders in the River Tamar catchment Area to introduce the LOCATE project and explore collaboration with the Tamar Valley AONB. We are looking to work in partnership to explore Carbon retention and greenhouse gas cycling in the Calstock managed realignment scheme.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description Flow Country Research Hub Newsletter 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact To let people know what LOCATE as a project will be delivering
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2016
URL https://www.theflowcountry.org.uk/learning-and-teaching/research/publications/
 
Description Forsinard Newsletter (RSPB) 
Form Of Engagement Activity A magazine, newsletter or online publication
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Article about Project LOCATE to go into the Forsinard Newsletter
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Scottish Government Briefing 
Form Of Engagement Activity Engagement focused website, blog or social media channel
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Policymakers/politicians
Results and Impact Briefing note to the Scottish Government on what the LOCATE project plans to deliver 'Tracking Scotland's carbon losses from soil to sea'
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Stakeholder Workshop September 2017 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Presentations to let people know what LOCATE are researching
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2017
 
Description Talk & Poster to stakeholders of Westcountry Rivers Trust 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach Local
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Talk and poster presentation at Tamar Catchment Partnership meeting to introduce research activities performed under LOCATE to a whole swathe of stakeholders (e.g. EA, Defra, Plymouth City Council, Farmers, Dartmoor Park, Anglers, Devon and Cornwall wildlife trusts ....). Meetings afterwards have led to direct involvement in future activities with dartmoor Parks, Tamar Valley AONB, Environment Agency.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2019
 
Description UK Water Industry output of project 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach National
Primary Audience Industry/Business
Results and Impact Informed UK Water Industry of outputs of the project, Summer 2018.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018
 
Description Workshop- DOC cycling in aquatic ecosystems 
Form Of Engagement Activity Participation in an activity, workshop or similar
Part Of Official Scheme? No
Geographic Reach International
Primary Audience Professional Practitioners
Results and Impact Hosting a workshop on DOC cycling in aquatic ecosystems with attendees from France, Germany, Sweden, and the USA.
Year(s) Of Engagement Activity 2018