Development of second generation 3D silicon detectors for future upgrades at the Large Hadron Collider.

Lead Research Organisation: University of Manchester
Department Name: Physics and Astronomy

Abstract

3D silicon detectors use the latest technology for applications in particle physics. The UK leads the world in the development of this technology. They are also being developed for medical and biological imaging as they can significantly improve currently available systems. They combine silicon micromachining with traditional Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) planar processing on high resistivity silicon to produce sensors with unique properties. These include the world record for survival in a radiation environment and very fast signals. They can also operate to within a hairs breadth of their edge, which allows one to tile them into a larger array with almost no loss of image quality. They have the potential for use in many areas of science and also in homeland security. This project will produce the second generation of this technology which will improve their characteristics and open up new areas of application.

Publications

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Albrow M. G. (2009) The FP420 R&D project: Higgs and New Physics with forward protons at the LHC in JOURNAL OF INSTRUMENTATION

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Da Via C (2008) Dual readout-strip/pixel systems in Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment

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Da Via C (2012) 3D silicon sensors: Design, large area production and quality assurance for the ATLAS IBL pixel detector upgrade in Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment

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Da Via Cinzia (2009) 3D Active Edge Silicon Detector Tests With 120 GeV Muons in IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE

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Da Vià C (2013) 3D active edge silicon sensors: Device processing, yield and QA for the ATLAS-IBL production in Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment

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Da Viá C (2008) Radiation hardness properties of full-3D active edge silicon sensors in Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment

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Da Viá C (2009) 3D active edge silicon sensors with different electrode configurations: Radiation hardness and noise performance in Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment

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Hansen Thor-Erik (2009) First fabrication of full 3D-detectors at SINTEF in JOURNAL OF INSTRUMENTATION

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La Rosa A (2012) Characterization of proton irradiated 3D-DDTC pixel sensor prototypes fabricated at FBK in Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment

 
Description The technology used to develop 3D sensors can be used for developing vertically integrated micro-structures useful for low mass, radiation hard detector systems. Such systems can find applications in high energy physics and other fields.
Exploitation Route microdosimetry for hadrontherapy. Microchannels for cooling management. aggressive vertically integrated systems for portable environmental detectors.
Sectors Environment,Healthcare

 
Description 3D pixel detectors have been used for the first time in the ATLAS experiment (Insertable B-layer). Their radiation hardness and geometrical properties are now being studied for medical and environmental dosimetry
First Year Of Impact 2012
Sector Environment,Healthcare,Other
Impact Types Societal

 
Description ATLAS UPGRADE
Amount £13,970,000 (GBP)
Organisation Science and Technologies Facilities Council (STFC) 
Sector Public
Country United Kingdom
Start 04/2010 
End 03/2013
 
Description 3DATLAS R&D Collaboration 
Organisation National Institute for Nuclear Physics
Department National Institute for Nuclear Physics - Trento
Country Italy 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Access to research material, contribution to data taking, analysis and simulations
Collaborator Contribution irradiation, test and analysis of devices
Impact qualification of research devices for LHC experiment upgrade
Start Year 2007
 
Description 3DATLAS R&D Collaboration 
Organisation Stanford University
Department Department of Physics
Country United States 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution Access to research material, contribution to data taking, analysis and simulations
Collaborator Contribution irradiation, test and analysis of devices
Impact qualification of research devices for LHC experiment upgrade
Start Year 2007
 
Description ATLAS INSERTABLE B-LAYER (IBL) 
Organisation National Institute for Nuclear Physics
Department National Institute for Nuclear Physics - Genova
Country Italy 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution design, fabrication and testing of 3D sensors compatible with the ATLAS pixel readout electronics.
Collaborator Contribution Bump-bonding, mounting and characterization of devices
Impact 3D is one of the sensors currently being evaluated for the IBL
Start Year 2009
 
Description ATLAS INSERTABLE B-LAYER (IBL) 
Organisation University of Oslo
Department Department of Physics
Country Norway 
Sector Academic/University 
PI Contribution design, fabrication and testing of 3D sensors compatible with the ATLAS pixel readout electronics.
Collaborator Contribution Bump-bonding, mounting and characterization of devices
Impact 3D is one of the sensors currently being evaluated for the IBL
Start Year 2009
 
Title 3D sensors 
Description Etched electrode are processed inside the silicon bulk rather than onthe wafer surface. Active edges are fabricated etching trenches around the sensor perimeter reducing the sensor dead area to few microns. This can be used to cover large sensing areas. Radiation hard detectors 
Type Of Technology Detection Devices 
Impact 3D technlogy was selected for the very first upgrade of the ATLAS experiment (IBL) to improve vertex reconstruction and b-tagging. It is the radiation hardest sensor ever fabricated and has potential spinoffs in medical, syncrotron and neutron imaging,